Rusheenduff

An Roisín Dubh

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Townland:                                 Rusheenduff

Civil Parish:                               Ballynakill

Barony:                                       Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                          Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Rinvyle

Area:                                          291.29 acres / 291 acres, 1 rood, 6 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Rusheenduff (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Rusheenduff

Logainm for Rusheenduff

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Rusheenduff

 

1911 Census for Rusheenduff

Overview of Rusheenduff in 1911.

The 1911 census shows us that there were 10 houses in Rusheenduff at that time and house 9 was listed as a hotel while all the others were private dwellings. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and house 9 had a slate, iron or tiled roof, the others had only thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. House 9 was a 1st class dwelling, houses 1, 3, 4 and 10 were 2nd class and the rest were 3rd class dwellings. House 2 had 2 rooms and no windows, houses 6 and 8 had 2 rooms and 1 window in the front and houses 5 and 7 had 2 rooms and 2 windows. Houses 1, 3, 4 and 10 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 9 had 6 rooms and 16 windows. There were a total of 32 out buildings in the townland consisting of 5 stables, a coach house, a harness house, 8 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 5 piggeries, 4 fowl houses, a barn, 2 turf houses and 2 potato houses. The enumerator’s abstract return shows that there were a total of 60 people living in the area, 28 male and 32 female. The enumerator was Const. John Sadlier.

 

King 

The head of the family in house 1 was the widow Catharine (sic) (72) and she lived with 2 of her sons, Michl (sic) (40) and John (35). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and Michl and John could read and write. Michl was a farmer and John was an agricultural labourer. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was listed as Catherine King.

 

Kilcoyne 

The head of this family was Michael (70) who lived with his wife Mary (70). They had been married for 44 years and they had had 8 children but only 4 of those had survived. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for Mary so she may have only spoken English. Both were described as being illiterate. Michael was a farmer. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a barn and a potato house. Michael Kilcoyne was the landholder.

 

Heanue

The head of this Heanue family was John (31) and he shared the house with his sisters, Margaret (28) and Kate (18) and his brother Michl (sic) (21). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write. John was listed as being a farmer. They all shared a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. John Heanue was the landholder.

 

Conneely                                (additional surname: Kerrigan)

The head of this family was Pat (67) who was married to Catherine (65) and had been for 40 years and in that time they had had 12 children of which 11 had survived. They shared the hosue with 5 of those children and they were Thomas (28), Festy (21), Kate (19), Martain (sic) (17) and Michael (15) and also in the house at that time was a visitor Julia Kerrigan (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Pat and Catherine both spoke Irish and English, Thomas and Festy spoke only English and there was nothing entered for the other members of the family. Catherine and Julia could not read but the others could all read and write. Pat, Thomas, Festy and Martain (sic) were listed as being farmers and Michael was a scholar. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Pat Conneely (Pat) was the landholder.

 

Malley 

The head of the Malley family in house 5 was Phil (53) and he was married to Bridget (45) and had been for 19 years and in that time they had had 10 children and 9 of those had survived. Seven of those children lived with them at that time and they were Thos (15), Maria (13), Kate (10), Ellina (8), Bridget (7), Stephen (5) and Michael (3). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Phil, Bridget (45) and Thos all spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the rest of the family which could indicate that they only spoke English. Only Thos, Maria, Kate and Ellina could read and write. Phil was a farmer, Thos was a farmer’s son and Maria, Kate, Ellina and Bridget (7), were scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a turf house. The landholder was Phil Malley.

 

Faherty 

The head of this Faherty family in house 6 was Thomas (57) who had been married to Anne (44) for 24 years and they had had 7 children and 5 of those had survived. They shared their house with their 5 daughters and they were Mary (20), Anne (16), Bridget (14), Agnes (10) and Catherine (7). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, although there was no place of birth entered for Catherine. There was nothing entered under the Irish Language heading for Agnes or Catherine so that could indicate that they only spoke English but the rest of the family all spoke both Irish and English. Thomas and Anne (44) were listed as illiterate but the others could all read and write. Thomas was a farmer and Bridget Agnes and Catherine were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Thos Faherty was the landholder.

 

Salmon 

House 7 was the home of the Salmon family and the head of this family was Patrick (40) and he was married to Agnes (45) and had been for 14 years and they had had 6 children in that time and they had all survived. Those 6 children also lived with them and they were Patk James (sic) (13), Joseph (11), Mary (9), Bridget (7), Daniel (4) and John (10mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick (40) and Agnes spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the other members of the family so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Only Patrick, Agnes, Patk James and Joseph could read and write. Patrick was a farmer and Patk James, Joseph, Mary and Bridget were scholars. They all lived in 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Pat Salmon was the landholder.

 

Salmon

The head of this Salmon family was the widower Thady (90) who had had8 children but only 3 had survived. He lived with his son Michael (32) and Daughter[i] and she had been married to Michael for 3 years and they had had 1 child and that child was Thomas (1). All spoke both Irish and English except baby Thomas and Thady and Thomas could not read but the other 2 could both read and write. Both Thady and Michael were listed as being farmers. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a cow house. Thady Salmon was the landholder.

 

Blake                        (additional surnames: Connolly, Fitzpatrick and Kane)

The widow Caroline Johanna (76) was the head of this family. She lived with her daughter, Julia E. M. (42), her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth J (34), her grandson, Edgar Valentine M. (7), her granddaughter, Joan J. C. (8) and 4 servants, Elizabeth Lilly Connolly (28), Julia Fitzpatrick (17), Martin Kane (21) and Margaret Kane (15). Caroline Johanna, Julia E.M., Elizabeth J, Edgar Valentine and Joan J.C. were all members of the Irish Church, with Caroline Johanna being born in Co Tyrone, Julia E.M. being born in Co. Galway and Elizabeth J., Edgar Valentine M. and Joan J.C. were born in Dublin. All the rest of the household were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Elizabeth Lilly, Julia Fitzpatrick, Martin and Margaret all spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others so that could mean that they only spoke English. All could read and write. Caroline Johanna was a landowner and hotel keeper, Julia E.M.’s occupation was listed as ‘obed cork London’ (sic), Elizabeth J. was a landowner trustee, Elizabeth Lilly was a cook domestic servant, Julia was a kitchen maid, Martin was a waiter and Edgar Valentine and Joan J.C. were scholars. The house they lived in was a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling and they had a stable, a coach house, a harness house, cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a turf house. The landholder was Caroline J Blake.

 

Connolly 

The head of the last house in Rusheenduff was Michael (55) who had been married to Mary (54) for 36 years and they had had 8 children of which 7 had survived. They shared their house with 4 of those children, John (32), Michael (19), Margret (15) and Lucy (13). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic except Michael (55), who was born in America. Michael (55) and Mary both spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the other members of the family so they may have only spoken English. All could read and write. Michael (55) was a farmer, John and Michael (19) were farmer’s sons and Lucy was a scholar. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, a cow house, 2 calf houses, a piggery, a fowl house and a potato house. Michael Connolly was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Rusheenduff

Overview of Rushenduff in 1901.

The 1901 census shows us that there were 11 houses in Rushenduff at that time. House 1 was listed as a hotel and all the rest were private dwellings. All the houses were built with stone, brick or concrete walls and house 1 had a slate, iron or tiled roof but the rest all had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 1 was a 1st class dwelling, houses 5 and 9 were 2nd class dwellings and the rest of the houses were 3rd class. Houses 3, 6 and 11 had 2 rooms and 1 window in the front, Houses 2, 4, 7, 8 and 10 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 5 and 9 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 1 had 6 rooms and 16 windows. The out-offices and farm-steadings return (form B2) shows that there were a total of 30 out buildings consisting of 6 stables, a coach house, a harness room, 10 cow houses, 2 piggeries, a fowl house, 8 barns, a turf house and a laundry. According to the enumerator’s abstract return (form N) there were a total of 75 people in Rusheenduff at that time, 36 male and 39 female. 35 male and 35 female were Roman Catholic and 1 male and 4 female were Church of Ireland. The enumerator was Const. Peter Carre.

 

Blake                             (additional surnames: Loughlin, Hare, Ribbon, Connely (sic), De Morgan, Coyne, Flaherty and Rane)

The head of the first house was the widow Caroline J. (66) and she shared the house with 7 servants, Cathrine (sic) Loughlin (39), also a widow, Sarah Hare (18), Bridget Ribbon (14), Anne Connely (sic) (12), Thomas Coyne (22), Stephen Flaherty (16) and Mary Rane (19). Also in the house were 4 boarders, Walter De Morgan (49) and his wife, Georgina De Morgan (41), Gladys De Morgan (17), and Florence De Morgan (6). Caroline J. was born in Co. Tyrone and a member of the Irish Church. All the others were Roman Catholic with Cathrine (sic) Loughlin and Thomas Coyne being born in England, Walter and Georgina De Morgan being born in London, Gladys De Morgan was born in Berkshire and the others were all born in Co. Galway. Sarah, Bridget, Anne, Thomas, Stephen and Mary all spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others so that could indicate that they only spoke English. All of the household could read and write. Caroline J. was a land owner and hotel keeper, Cathrine (sic) was a Cook D S[ii], Sarah was a housemaid D S, Bridget Ribbon and Anne Connely (sic) were kitchen maids D S, Walter De Morgan was a civil engineer, Thomas Coyne was a coachman D S, Stephen Flaherty was a waiter D S and Mary Rane was a children maid D S. The house was a 6 roomed, 1st class hotel and had a stable, coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a turf house. The landholder was Caroline J. Blake.

 

Salmon 

The head of this Salmon family was Pat (30) and he was married to Agnes (20) and they lived with their 2 children, Patrick (3) and Joseph (1). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Pat and Agnes spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Pat was a farmer and Agnes was a housekeeper. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable, a cow house and a barn. The landholder was Pat Salmon.

 

Salmon

The head of this Salmon family was the widower Thady (60) and he lived with his daughter, Honor (24) and Michl (sic) (22). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Michl (sic) could read and write. Thady was a farmer, Honor was a farmer’s daughter and Michl (sic) was a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable, a cow house and a barn. The landholder was Thady Salmon.

 

Kilcoyne 

Michael (50) was the head of this family and he was married to Mary (50) and they shared their house with their 2 sons, John (15) and James (12). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only James could read and write. Michael was a farmer, Mary, a housekeeper and John and James were farmer’s sons. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class delling with a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Michael Kilcoyne was the landholder.

 

Heanue

The head of the family in house 5 was Joe (55) who was married to Mary (52) and they shared their house with 6 of their children, John (22), Margaret (20), Norah (18), Anne (16), Michl (sic) (10) and Kate (8). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and all the children could read and write. Joe was recorded as being a farmer, Mary was a housekeeper, John was a farmer’s son, Margaret and Norah were farmer’s daughters and Anne, Michl (sic) and Kate were scholars. The house they all lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and they had a stable, cow house and a barn. Joe Heanue was the landholder.

 

Conneely

The head of this Conneely family was Pat (60) who was married to Catherine (51) and they lived in the house with 9 of their children, Gregory (24), James (20), Tom (18), Peter (16), Anne (13), Festy (11), Kate (8), Martin (6) and Michael (4) and also in the house there was a boarder, Maraget (sic) (45). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. There was nothing entered under Irish Language for Kate, Martin or Michael, which could indicate that they only spoke English but the rest all spoke both Irish and English. With the exception of Catherine they could all read and write. Pat was listed as being a farmer, Catherine, a housekeeper, Gregory, James, Tome and Peter, farmer’s sons, Anne, Festy, Kate and Martin were scholars and Maraget (sic), a general servant. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and a barn. The landholder was Pat Conneely.

 

Faherty                                     (additional surname: Malley)

The head of the family in house 7 was Thos (30) and he was married to Anne (25) and they shared the house with their 4 children, Mary (9), Anne (7), Bridget (3) and Martin (1) and Anne’s (25) mother, Anne Malley (50). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English except baby Martin. Only Mary and Anne (7) could read and write. Thos was a farmer, Anne (25) was a housekeeper and Mary and Anne (7) were scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and a barn. Thos Faherty was the landholder.

 

Malley

The head of the family in house 8 was Philip (35) and he was married to Bridget (30) and they lived in the house with 6 of their children and they were Mary (9), Anne (7), tom (5), Maria (3), Patrick (2) and Kate (6mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Philip and Bridget both spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others so that could mean that they only spoke English. Only Bridget, Mary and Anne could read and write. Philip was recorded as being a farmer, Bridget was a housekeeper and Mary and Anne were scholars. The all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house and a barn. The landholder was Philip Malley.

 

Connolly 

The head of this Connolly family was Michael (45) who was married to Mary (44). They lived in the house with 6 of their children, John (21), Eliza (18), Mary (16), Michael (9), Margaret (7) and Lucy (4). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (45) and Mary (44) both spoke Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the others so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Lucy could not read, Margaret could read only and the rest of the family could read and write. Michael was a farmer, Mary (44) was a farmer’s wife, John (21) was a farmer’s son, Eliza and Mary (16) were farmer’s daughters and Michael (9), Margaret and Lucy were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, a cow house and a barn. Michael Connolly was the landholder.

 

King 

The head of this King family was the widow Catherine (50) and she shared the house with her 2 sons, Michael (26) and John (23) and her daughter, Bridget (20). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and all, apart from Catherine, could read and write. Catherine was a housekeeper, Michael and John were farmer’s sons and Bridget was a farmer’s daughter. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Catherine King was the landholder.

 

Cannon                                                (additional surname: Connis)

The head of the last house in Rusheenduff was Martin (47), a widower. He lived with his step children who all had the surname of Connis and they were Edward (18), James (14), David (11) and Mary Anne (9). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin, Edward and James all spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for David and Mary Anne so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Mary Anne could not read but all the others could read and write. Martin was a hawker, Edward was a shoemaker and James and David were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Thos Faherty was the landholder.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Rusheenduff

The Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) shows that Henry Blake was the main immediate lessor in this townland. He leased 117acres, 2 roods and 28 perches of land to Messrs. Blake at an annual rate of £58. The Board of customs /Henry Blake had a coast guard boat house that had a annual half rent £2 5s that had a annual ratable valuation of £1. The following were all leased from Henry Blake if not mentioned separately. David Daly leased a house for 5s, the female industrial school leased a house for no rent but it had an annual valuation of £2 and Margaret McNabb leased a house for 15s. Daniel Salmon leased a house on 11 acres and 2 roods of land for which he paid £3 10s for the land and 10s fro the house, James Heany leased a house and office on 10 acres and 11 perches of land for which he paid £2 7s for the land and 8s for the buildings. Thomas Daly leased a house on 6 acres, 1 rood and 12 perches of land for £1 5s for the land and 5s for house, John Hope leased a house on 3 acres, 1 rood and 35 perches of land for 15s for the land and 5s for the house and Edward Flaherty leased an office on 9 acres and 33 perches of land for £1 17s for the land and 3s for the office. Michael Walsh leased a house on 11 acres, 2 roods and 21 perches of land for which he paid £2 10s for the land and 5s for the house, Michael Mullin leased a house on 3 acres, 2 roods and 30 perches of land for £1 for the land and 5s for the house. Henry Blake had land of an area 93 acres, 2 roods and 38 perches and houses and offices at an annual ratable valuation of £15 for the land and £30 for the buildings. Henry Blake and Daniel Salmon Leased a tenement from Stephen Daly for which Henry Blake paid 10s for land and Daniel Salmon paid 5s for a house. There were also 17 acres, 2 roods and 5 perches of water in the townland. Exemptions were applied to the Coast Guard boat house of the £1 and the female industrial school of the £2. There were 20 islands with an area of 8 acres and 38 perches that had no agricultural value belonging to Henry Blake and 4 islands with an area of 1 acre and 22 perches, again pof no agricultural value belonging to Herbert H. Blake.

 

1670 Down Survey for Rusheenduff

Other names for this area under the 1670 Down Survey were Keilemore, Glancarbdemore, Gortnefunshine, Rossynelee and Shanaharaghane. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Edmund O’Flaharty and in 1670 the owner was James Darcy, also a Catholic.

 

[i] Most likely daughter-in-law as it seems that she was married to Michael

[ii] D S would be a Domestic Servan

This page was added on 13/06/2018.

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