Dawrosmore

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Townland:                                  Dawrosmore

Civil Parish:                                Ballynakill

Barony:                                       Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                          Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Rinvyle

Area:                                           623.39 acres / 623 acres, 1 rood, 22 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Dawrosmore

Map

Galway Library for Dawrosmore

Logainm for Dawrosmore

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Dawrosmore

 

 

1911 Census for Dawrosmore

Overview of Dawrosmore in 1911.

There were 32 buildings in Dawrosmore in 1911 according to that year’s census. Houses 5, 11 and 13 were unoccupied. House 1 was a hotel, house 11 was the Letterfrack National School and the rest of the houses were listed as being private dwellings. All the buildings were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls. Houses 1, 6-10 and 12 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and the other houses in the townland had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 1, 4 and 7 were 1st class dwellings, houses 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 21-14, 30 and 32 were 2nd class dwellings and the rest of the houses were 3rd class. House 15 had 2 rooms and no windows, house 18 had 2 rooms and 1 window, houses 1, 3, 9, 14, 16, 17, 19, 20, 25-29 and 31 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front. Houses 6, 8, 21-14, 30 and 32 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 10 had 3 rooms and 3 windows in the front, house 34 had 3 rooms and 4 windows, house 12 had 3 rooms and 4 windows, house 7 had 4 rooms and 6 windows, house 4 had 5 rooms and 13 windows and house 1 had 6 rooms and 12 windows. According to the out-offices and farm-steadings return (form B2) there were a total of 64 out buildings in the townland of Dawrosmore and they consisted of 8 stables, 4 coach houses, 2 harness rooms, 23 cow houses, 9 piggeries, 5 fowl houses, 6 barns, 3 turf houses, a potato house, a shed, a store and a court house. The enumerator’s abstract return (form N) shows that there were a total of 173 people in the townland at that time, 87 male and 86 female. They were all Roman Catholic. The enumerator was Const. Thos Casey.

 

O’Grady                                  (additional surname: Lavelle)

The head of the O’Grady family in house 1 was the widow Brigid (62) who had been married for 35 years and had had 7 children of which 4 had survived. She living with her at that time were her daughter, Norah Lavelle (28), who had been married for 7 years and had 1 child, her granddaughter, Margie Lavelle (sic) (6) and her niece Rebecca (35). Margie was born in America and the others were born in Co. Mayo. All were Roman Catholic. Brigid, Norah and Rebecca all spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for Margie which could indicate that she spoke only English. They could all read and write. Brigid was a shopkeeper and Margie was a scholar. They shared a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling with 4stables, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house, a turf house, a potato house and a shed. Brigid O’Grady was the landholder.

 

Coyne

The head of the Coyne family was the widow Mary (62) who had been married for 38 years and had had 5 children of which 2 had survived. She lived with her son Peter (36). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter spoke both Irish and a English but nothing was entered for Mary so that may indicate that she only spoke English. Neither of them could read. Mary was a washerwoman and Peter was a farm servant. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Mary Coyne was the landholder.

 

Nee                              (additional surname: Peters)

The head of the Nee family was Bridget (33) who was married and had been for 15 years and had had 7 children of which 5 had survived. She lived with those 5 children Mary (14), Maggie (11), Bridget (8), Anne (7) and Kathleen (2) and also a visitor was in the house at that time, Jeremiah peters (5). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Bridget (33), Mary, Maggie and Bridget (8) all spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others so that could mean that they only spoke English. With the exception of Kathleen and Jeremiah, they could all read and write. Mary, Maggie, Bridget (8) and Anne were scholars, there were no occupations listed for the others. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house. Michael Nee was the landholder.

 

McDonnell                              (additional surname: Coyne)

Head of the family in house 4 was John Joseph McDonnell (56) who lived with a servant Patrick Coyne (17). John Joseph was born in Co. Roscommon and Patrick was born in Pittsburgh, US America and both were Roman Catholic. There was nothing recorded under Irish language so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Both of them could read and write. John Joseph’s occupation was recorded as dispensary Mcoll officer and generally practioner LRCP and S Edu and Patrick was a groom. The two of them lived in a 5 roomed, 1st class dwelling with stable, coach house, harness room, a cow house, a piggery and a shed. Dr. J.J. McDonnell was the landholder.

 

Conneely

House 6 was the home of the Conneely family and the head of the family was Michael (53) who lived with his wife, Jane (32) who he had been married to for 5 years and they’d had 3 children and all survived. Those 3 children lived with them in the house and they were Joseph (4) Sarah Anne (2) and Mary (7mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael and Jane spoke both Irish and English and they could read and write. Michael was a farmer. They shared a 5 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Michael Conneely was the landholder.

 

Vallely

Head of the family in house 7 was James (38) and he had been married to his wife Josephine (32) for 3 years and they had no children. Both were Roman Catholic and James was born in Co. Galway and Josephine in Kings Co.[i]. James spoke both Irish and English and Josephine spoke only English and both could read and write. James was a farmer and boot maker. They shared a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a cow house, piggery, fowl house and barn. James Vallily was the landholder.

 

Corbett                                    (additional surname: Coyne)

The head of the Corbett family in house 8 was Mathias (65) and his wife, Annie (49) and they had been married for 16 years and had 1 child. That child lived with them and was Michael R. (14) and there was also a visitor in the house at that time, Bridget Coyne (79). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mathias, Annie and Bridget all spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for Michael R. which could indicate that he only spoke English. Mathias and Michael R. Could read and write. Mathias was a local postman Michael R. Was a scholar. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and barn. Mathias Corbett was the landholder.

 

Joyce                           (additional surname: Lydon)

Head of this Joyce family was Peter (76) and he had been married to his wife Bessie (73) for 46 years and they had had 7 children and 6 had survived. They lived with their Daughter Annie (30), son-in-law John Lydon (29), Niece’s, Mary Ellen Lydon (6) and Elizabeth Lydon (2), Nephew Christopher Lydon (4) and peter’s brother, Patrick (75). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary Ellen, Christopher and Elizabeth spoke only English and the rest all spoke both Irish and English. Bessie, Christopher and Elizabeth could not read but the others could all read and write. Peter and John were both recorded as being farmers and Mary Ellen was a scholar. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, coach house and cow house. Peter Joyce was the landholder.

 

Ward

The head of the Ward family in house 10 was Michael (52) and his wife Margaret (43) who had been married for 22 years and had had 11 children of which 10 had survived. They lived with 8 of their children, Bridget (17), Patrick (15), Margaret Josephine (11) Hanah (9), Norah Teresa (8), Sarah Teresa (6), Martin Joseph (4) and Kathleen Agnes (2).Margaret spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the other members of the family so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Sarah Teresa, Martin Joseph and Kathleen Agnes could not read but the other members of the family could read and write. Michael was born in Co. Limerick, Margaret and Kathleen Agnes, were born in Co. Galway, Bridget, Patrick and Margaret Josephine were born in Co. Mayo and the others were born in Co. Roscommon. All the family were Roman Catholic. Michael was a R.I.C. pensioner and farmer, Patrick was a farmer’s son and Margaret Josephine, Hanah, Norah Teresa, Sarah Teresa and Martin Joseph, were scholars. They all lived in a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Michael ward was the landholder.

 

Hanly

Head of the Hanly family in house 12 was Patrick (50) who had been married to his wife, Louisa (47) for 21 years and had had 11 children of which 9 had survived. They lived with those children and they were, Mary Elizabeth (20), Patrick (19), Louisa Josephine (17), Bridget Teresa (14), James Francis (12), Timothy (10), Lilian (sic) (8), Christopher Mathew (7) and Ethel Mary (4). Patrick was born in Co. Roscommon, Louisa was born in Co. Sligo and the rest of the family were all were born in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholic. There was nothing recorded under Irish Language for any of the family so that may mean that they all only spoke English. Ethel Mary could read and the rest of the family could all read and write. Both Patrick and Louisa were national school teachers, Louisa Josephine was a national school monitress and all the others, with the exception of Mary Elizabeth, were scholars. They all lived in a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house, a fowl house and a turf house. Patrick Hanly was the landholder.

 

Conneely

House 14 was the home of the Conneely family. The head of this family was Thomas (68) and his wife Margaret (60) who had been married for 22 years and had had 8 children of which 7 had survived. They live with 5 of those children at that time, John (20), James (18), Mary Ann (16), Bridget (13) and Patrick (4). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English with the exception of young Patrick. Margaret and Patrick could not read but all the others could read and write. Thomas was listed as a farmer, John, James and Mary Ann were listed as farmer’s sons (sic)[ii] and Bridget was a scholar. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house. Thomas Conneely was the landholder.

 

Joyce                                       (additional surname: Burke)

The head of the Joyce family was Peter (34) and his wife Annie (34) who had been married for 7 years and had had 3 children, all of which had survived. They lived with a servant Miachel (sic) Burke (70), who was married, and their 3 children, John (5), William (4) and Alick (sic) (1). Annie was born in County Kildare but the rest of the family were born in Co Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter and Miachel (sic) spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the others so that could mean that they only spoke English. Peter, Annie and Miachel (sic) could read and write but the others could not read. Peter was a plummer (sic), Annie was a nurse, Miachel (sic), John and William were scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with 2 cow houses. Peter Joyce was the landholder.

 

Conway

Michael (40) was the head of the Conway family in house 16 and he had been married to his wife Anne (39) for 16 years and they’d had 7 children of which 6 had survived. They shared their house with those 6 children, Peter (15), Patrick (12), Mary Anne (10), Bridget (7), Maggie (4) and Catherine Anne (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael, Anne and peter spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the others so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Michael, Maggie and Catherine Anne could not read but the others could all read and write. Michael was a farmer, Peter was a farmer’s son and Patrick was a scholar. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Michael Conway was the landholder.

 

Davis

Head of the Davis family was Patrick (41) and his wife Bridget (41) who had been married for 18 years and had had 13 children of which 10 had survived. Those 10 children lived with them and they were, Michael (16), John (15), Bridget (14), Barbara (13), Mary (12), Thomas (11), martin (9), Paddy (7), Onnie (sic) (5) and Anthony (3). Onnie (sic) and Anthony had nothing recorded under birthplace but they were Roman Catholic but the rest were all were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. With the exception of Paddy, Onnie (sic) and Anthony all spoke both Irish and English. Patrick, Bridget (41) and Martin could read, Paddy, Onnie (sic) and Anthony could not read and the rest could all read and write. Patrick was a farmer, Michael and John were farmer’s sons and Bridget (14), Barbara, Mary, Thomas, Martin and Paddy were scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Patrick Davis was the landholder.

 

Conneely

The head of this Conneely family was the widow Mary (70) who had been married for 21 years. She lived with a daughter, Norah (20). Both spoke both Irish and English but only Norah could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. There was nothing listed under occupations. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a barn. Mary Conneely (Jas) was the landholder.

 

Joyce

The head of the family on house 19 was Tobias (71) and his wife Ellen (70). They had been married for 33 years and had had 6 children and all those ha survived. Also in the house at that time were 2 of their children, Kate (20) and Thomas (17). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Kate and Thomas could read and write. Tobias and Thomas were listed as being farmers. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a barn. Tobias Joyce was the landholder.

 

Conneely

House 20 was the home of the Conneely family with the head of the family being Pat (80) and he had been married to his wife Bridget (73) for 31 years and they had had 9 children of which only 5 had survived. They shared the house with their son John (28). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but none of the family could read. Pat was a farmer and John was a farmer’s son. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a barn. Pat Conneely was the landholder.

 

Joyce                           (additional surnames: Wallace and Duffy)

Head of this family was the widow Mary (70) who had been married for 40 years and had had 8 children and all of those had survived. She lived with her daughter Norah (27) who was married and had been for 3 years and she had had 2 children and both had survived. Also in the house were her son, James (20), Granddaughter Mary Wallace (2), grandson John Wallace (9mths) and 2 boarders, Patrick Duffy (71) who had been married to his wife Jean Duffy (70) for 27 years and they had had 4 children and they had all survived. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. There was no entry for Mary and John under Irish language but the rest of the household all spoke both Irish and English. Only Norah, James and Patrick could read and write. James was listed as being a farmer. They all shared a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with 2 cow houses. Mary Joyce was the landholder.

 

Kane

The head of the Kane family in house 22 was Michael (40) who had been married to his wife, Bridget (38) for 13 years and they’d had 6 children of which 5 had survived. Also in the house at that time were 5 of their children, Mary (13), Joseph (7), Martin (4), Patrick (4) and Annie (1). Mary and Joseph were born in America and were Roman Catholic and the rest of the family all were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael and Bridget spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others so that could indicate that they only spoke English. With the exception of Michael, they could all read and write. Michael was listed as being a farmer and Mary and Joseph were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Michael Kane was the landholder.

 

Conroy                                    (additional surnames: M Guire (sic))

House 23 was the home of the Conroy family and the head of this family was John (35) who lived with a servant, Michael M Guire (sic) (19) and his sister, Ellie (20) All spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write. John and Ellie were born in Letterfrack Co. Galway and Michael was born in Co. Galway and all of them were Roman Catholic. John was a farmer, Michael was farmer’s servant and Ellie was a farmer’s daughter. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn. John Conroy was the landholder.

 

King                            (additional surname: Lydon)

The head of this King family was Martin (77) who had been married to his wife, Mary (73) for 50 years and they had had 12 children but only 6 of those had survived. Also in the house at that time were 2 of their sons, Peter (37) and Anthony (32) along with a nephew, Peter Lydon (16). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only the 2 Peters and Anthony could read and write. Martin was listed as a farmer, Peter (37), a farmer’s son, Anthony, a postman and Peter (16) was a farm servant. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Martin King was the landholder.

 

Mongan

Head of the Mongan family was John (63) who had been married to his wife, Mary (61) for 30 years and they’d had 6 children and all of those ha survived. Also in the house at that time were 3 of their sons, Michael, (29), Patrick (19) and John (16). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and Mary and Michael could read and the others could read and write. John (63) was a farmer, and Michael, Patrick and John (16) were farmer’s sons. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house and piggery. John Mongan was the landholder.

 

Joyce

John (77) was the head of this Joyce family. He was married to Mary (69) and had been for 52 years and in that time they had had 10 children and 7 of those had survived. Living with them in the house were their daughter-in-law, Mary (38) who had been married for 17 years and had had 8 children and 7 of those had survived. Those 7 children also lived in the house at that time and they were John (16), Thomas (14), Micheal (12), Peter (8), Ulick (5), Ambrose (3) and Joseph (1). John, Mary (69) and Mary (38) were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic while the rest of the family were all born in England and were Roman Catholic. John (77) and Mary (69) spoke both Irish and English while the rest only spoke English. All were listed as being able to read and write. John (77) was a farmer, John (17) was an apprentice plumber and Micheal and Peter were scholars. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house. John Joyce was the landholder.

 

Lyden                          (additional surname: Walsh)

There were 7 members of the Lydon household with Patrick (53) being the head of the family and he had been married to his wife, Catherine (54) for 30 years and they had had 11 children of which only 8 had survived. They lived with 4 of their children, Patrick (20), Peter (17), William (12) and Julia Agnes (11) and their granddaughter Johanna Walsh (2). Apart from Johanna, who had no place of birth recorded, all were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. There was nothing entered under language for Julia Agnes and Johanna so they may have only spoken English but all the others spoke both Irish and English. With the exception of Johanna they all were able to read and write. Patrick was a fisherman and farmer, Patrick and Peter were farmer’s sons and William and Julia Agnes were scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a store. Pat Lyden was the landholder.

 

Nee                              (additional surname: Kane)

Head of this Nee family in house 28 was Thomas (31) and his wife, Ellen (35) who had been married for 8 years and they had had 5 children all of which had survived. Those 5 children lived with them and they were Bridget (7), Thomas (6), Patrick (4), Mary (2) and Sarah (2mths) and also in the house at that time was Thomas’ mother-in-law, Bridget Kane (78), who was a widow who had been married for 50 years and had had 6 children and 4 of those had survived. Thomas (31), Ellen and Bridget (78) spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the other members of the family which may indicate that they only spoke English. Only Thomas (31) and Ellen could read and write. Thomas (31) was a farmer and Bridget and Thomas were scholars. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Thomas Nee was the landholder.

 

Burke                          (additional surname: Davis)

The head of this household was the widow Bridget (55), she had been married for 35 years and had given birth to 1 child. Living with her in the house at that time were her grandchildren, all with the surname Davis and they were Mary (16), Ellen (15), Julia (14), McDara (12), Patrick (7) and John (5). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Only Bridget spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the other members of the family so that could mean that they only spoke English. Bridget could read, John could not read and the others could read and write. Mary was listed as being a farmer’s son (sic)[iii], and Ellen, Julia, McDara, Patrick and John were scholars. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house. Bridget Burke was the landholder.

 

Wallace

Head of the Wallace family in house 30 was the widow Anne (70) who had been married for 50 years and had had 15 children and all of them had survived. Living with her at that time were 2 of her children, Maggie (24) and Philip (18) along with 2 relatives, Willie (6) and Stephen (7). They were all Roman Catholic and Willie and Stephen were born in America and the rest being born in Co. Galway. Willie and Stephen spoke only English and the rest spoke both Irish and English. Apart from Willie and Stephen they could all read and write. Philip was listed as a farmer and Willie and Stephen were listed as scolars (sic). They all lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, a coach house, 3 cow houses, and a piggery. Anne Wallace was the landholder.

 

Lavelle                                    (additional surname: Duffy)

The head of the Lavelle family in house 31 was Michael (65) who had been married to his wife, Mary (50) for 27 years but there were no children mentioned[iv]. Also in the house were Michael’s father-in-law, Stephen Duffy (80) and 2 of their grandchildren Mary (3) and Ellen (2). Mary (3) and Ellen were born in Scotland but the others were all were born in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholic. Apart from Mary (3) and Ellen all spoke both Irish and English and only Michael could read and write. Michael was a farmer and shepherd and Stephen was a farm servant. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Michael Lavelle was the landholder.

 

Connolly

The last house in Dawrosmore was that of the Connolly family and the head of that family was Michael (72) who had been married to his wife, Margaret (48) for 25 years and they had had 11 children of which only 7 had survived. They shared their house with 5 of those children, Patrick (21), Kate (19), Maggie (19), Janey (sic) (11) and Valentine (10). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Janey and Valentine had nothing entered under language so that could indicate that they only spoke English, but all the others spoke both Irish and English. Apart from Michael, all the family could read and write. Michael was listed as a farmer, Margaret was a laundress, Patrick was a labourer, Kate was a domestic servant, Maggie was listed as a farmer’s daughter and Janey and Valentine were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and they had a piggery. Michael Connolly was the landholder.

 

 

1901 Census for Dawrosmore

According to the 1901 census for Dawrosmore, there were 32 houses and apart from house 1, which was a hotel and public house, they were all listed as private. All the houses wre constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 1, 6 and 12 had slate, iron or tiled roofs while all the others had thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. Houses 1 and 12 were 1st class dwellings, house 6 was a 2nd class dwelling and all the other houses were 3rd class. House 1 had 6 rooms and 12 windows in the front, house 6 had 4 rooms and 2 windows, house 12 had 6 rooms and 6 windows in the front and all the other houses in the townland had 2 rooms and 2 windows. According to the enumerator’s abstract return there were a total of 201 people in Dawrosmore at that time, 96 male and 105 female and all were Roman Catholic. The enumerator for the area was Const. Thomas Burke.

 

O’Grady                                  (additional surname: Gallagher)

The head of the O’Grady family in house 1 was the widow Bridget (54), who lived with 3 of her children, Mary C. (23), William M. (19) and John T. (17) and her niece, Rebecca (28) and her nephew, Thomas Gallagher (26). All were born in Co. Mayo and were Roman Catholic. All could read and write but there was nothing entered under Irish Language so that could indicate that they all only spoke English. Bridget was listed as being a hotel propietter (sic), Mary C. and Rebecca were assistants, William M., was a student of medicine, John T. was a scholar and Thomas was a shop man. They lived in a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling and Bridget O’Grady was the landholder.

 

Coyne

The sole occupant of house 2 was the widow Mary (67) who was born in Co. Roscommon Ireland and was a Roman Catholic. She could not read and spoke both Irish and English. She was a housekeeper. The house that she lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Mitchel Henry was the landholder.

 

Coury (sic)

The sole occupant of house 3 was Mary (80), a widow. She spoke Irish but could not read. She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She was listed as a care taker. The house she lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Connelly

There were 8 members of the Connelly family in house 4 with the head of the family being Michael (50) who lived with his wife, Margaret (35) and 6 of their children, Anne M. (15), Patrick (10), Ellen (7), Kate (7), Margaret (7) and Jane (1). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English except baby Jane who spoke English. Michael and Jane could not read but the others could all read and write. Michael was a Famer, Margaret (35) and all the children except Jane were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Michael Connelly was the landholder.

 

Nee

The head of this Nee family was the widow Bridget (80) who lived with her son Michael (38), her daughter-in-law, Bridget (25) and her grandchildren, Mary (5) and Maggie (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael and Bridget (25) spoke both Irish and English, Bridget (80) only spoke Irish and Mary and Maggie spoke only English. Bridget (80) was a manager, Michael as a coachman and Bridget (25) was a farm superintendant. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Bridget Nee was the landholder.

 

Coyne

The head of this Coyne family was John (45) who lived with his wife, Mary (46) and their children Patrick (7) and Stephen ([v]). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John and Mary spoke both Irish and English, but nothing was entered for the other 2 so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Only John and Mary could read and write. John was a car driver, Mary was a house keeper and Patrick and Stephen were scholars. They lived in a 4 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was J.J. McDonnell.

 

Fitzpatrick

The head of this family was John (61) who lived with his wife, Kitty (65) and their grandson, John (17). John (61) and Kitty spoke both Irish and English and John (17) spoke only English. Kitty could read only and the 2 John’s could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John’s (61) occupation was listed as a cartpinter (sic)[vi] and John (17) was a farmer. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John Fitzpatrick was the landholder.

 

Vallely

Head of the family was the widow Bridget (63) and at that time she lived with 4 of her children, James J. (27), John (25), Margaret (23) and Patrick (33). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and they could all read and write. Bridget was listed as being a manager, James J., John and Patrick were boot makers and Margaret was a dressmaker. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Bridget Vallely was the landholder.

 

Corbett

The head of the Corbett family in house 9 was Mathias (52) who lived with his wife, Anne (37) and their son Michael R. (4). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mathias and Anne spoke both Irish and English and Michael R. spoke only English and only Mathias could read and write. Mathias was a small farmer, Anne was a small farmer’s wife and Michael R. was a scholar. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Mathias Corbett was the landholder.

 

Burke

The head of this Burke family in house 10 was Michael (56) and his wife, Catherine (53) and they lived with 2 of their daughters, Susan (17) and Bridget (14). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write. Michael was recorded as being a farmer, Catherine was a farmer’s wife and Susan and Bridget were farmer’s daughters. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Michael Burke.

 

Mullen

The head of this Mullen family was John (50) and his wife Mary (40) and they shared the house at that time with their children, John (14), Martin (10), Anne (6), Eliza (5) and Maggie (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and John (50) and Anne could read only, John (14) and Martin could read and write and the rest of the family could not read. John (50) was a farmer, John (14) was a labourer, Martin and Anne were scholars and Eliza and Maggie were recorded as infants. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John Mullen was the landholder.

 

Hanly                          (additional surname: Melia)

The head of the Hanly family in house 12 was Patrick Joseph (40) and his wife Louisa (35) and they lived with their children, May (10), Patrick Joseph (9), Louisa (6), Annie (5), Bridget Teresa (4), James Francis (3) and Timothy (3mths) and also a servant Mary Melia (17). Patrick Joseph (50) was born in Co. Roscommon but all the rest were born in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholic. Mary spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the other members of the family which could indicate that they only spoke English. They could all read and write. Patrick Joseph (50) and Louisa (35) were national school teachers, Timothy was recorded as an inf (sic)[vii], Mary was a general servant (domestic) and the rest of the children were scholars. They lived in a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Eastwood

The Eastwood family consisted of 12 members and the head of the family was Thomas (46) and his wife, Maryann (40). They shared the house with 10 of their children, Frank (20), George (18), Ambrose (16), Bernard (14), Katy (13), Lucy (11), Florence (3), Arther (sic) (10mths), William (9) and John (7). Mary was born in Co. Mayo but the rest were all were born in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholic. Thomas and Maryann spoke both Irish and English while the rest of the family only spoke English. Thomas was recorded as a farmer, Maryann was a farmer’s wife, Frank, George, Ambrose, Bernard and Arther (sic) were farmer’s sons. Florence was a farmer’s daughter, Katie and Lucy were farmer’s daughters and scholars and William and John were farmer’s sons and scholars. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Thomas Eastwood was the landholder.

 

Wallace                                   (additional surname: Heanue)

The head of the Wallace family in house 14 was Stephen (60) and Anne (50). They lived, at that time, with their children, William (22), Thomas (18), Philip (8), Annie (20), Bridget (17), Katie (15), Maggie (14) and Julia (12) and also in the house was a relative, Michael Heanue (61). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and apart from Stephen and Michael all the family could read and write. Stephen was a farmer, Anne was a farmer’s wife, William and Thomas were labourers, Philip, Katie, Maggie and Julia were scholars and Michael was a domestic servant. They all shared a a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling Stephen Wallace was the landholder.

 

Lavell (sic)

House 15 was the home of the Lavell (sic) family and the head of that family was Michael (50) and his wife Mary (45). They shared the house with 3 of their daughters, Bridget (14), Julia (12) and Mary (10). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael, Mary (45) and Bridget spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the other 2, so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Apart from Bridget (14), they could all read and write. Michael was a labourer, Bridget was a general servant and Julia and Mary (10) were scholars. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Michael Lavell (sic) was the landholder.

 

Conaway

The head of the Conaway family was Michael (27) who lived with his wife, Anne (24) and their children, Peter (4), Patrick (1) and Mary Ann (1mth). All were born in Co. Galway WK and were Roman Catholic. Michael and Anne could speak both Irish and English, and Peter spoke English. Only Anne could read and write. Michael was a farmer and Anne was a farmer’s wife. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Michael Conaway was the landholder.

 

Conroy

The head of the family in house 17 was Anthony (60) and his wife Bridget (40). They shared the house with 7 of their children, John (20), Mary (16), Patrick (14), Norah (12), Ellie (9), Festus (13) and Thomas (8). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Anthony and Bridget spoke both Irish and English while the other members of the family only spoke English. Anthony was a farmer, Bridget was a farmer’s wife and all the children were scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Anthony Conroy was the landholder.

 

Connolly

House 18 was that of the Connolly family. Head of this family was Margrett (sic) (30), who was married and she shared the house at that time with 5 of her children, Martin (11), John (9), James (7), Maryann (5) and Bridget (3). Only Margrett (sic) spoke both Irish and English and there was nothing recorded for the rest of the family so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Only Martin, John and James could read and write. Margrett (sic) was a general servant, Martin was a basket maker and the rest of the family members were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Margrett Connolly was the landholder.

 

Davis

Head of the Davis family was Patrick (32() and his wife, Bridget (32). They lived with 5 of their children, Michael (8), John (6), Bridget (4), Bat (sic) (2) and Mary (6). Patrick and Bridget (32) spoke both Irish and English but the rest only spoke English. Patrick, Bridget 932) and Michael could read and write, John could read and the rest of the family could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick was a farmer, and all the children were listed as scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Patrick Davis was the landholder.

 

Davis                           (additional surname: Burke)

The head of the family in house 20 was Joe (29) and his wife Catherine (26) and they lived with their children, Mary (6), Ellen (5), Julia (4) and John (2) and a lodger Bridget Burke (95). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English apart from John who only spoke English. Joe and Catherine could read and write, Mary could read and Bridget could not read. Joe was a farmer and Mary and Ellen were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Joe Davis was the landholder.

 

Joyce

Head of the Joyce family in house 21 was John (66) and his wife, Mary (55) and they lived with 3 of their children Peter (26), Lizzie (21) and Annie (21), John’s brother, Pat (60) and John’s mother, Mary (91). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English, except Mary (91), who only spoke Irish. Mary (55) could not read, Mary (71) could read only and the rest of the family could all read and write. John was recorded as being a farmer, Mary (55), a farmer’s wife, Peter, a plumber, Lizzie was doing housework, Pat was a labourer and Annie was a dressmaker. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John Joyce was the landholder.

 

Joyce

The head of this Joyce family was Peter (60) and his wife, Bessie (56) who lived with3 of their children, Patrick (18), Annie (19[viii]) and Thomas (7). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English apart from Thomas, who only spoke English. Bessie could not read but the rest of the family could read and write. Peter was a famer, Bessie was a farmer’s wife, Patrick was a farmer’s son, Annie was a farmer’s daughter and Thomas was a scholar. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Peter Joyce was the landholder.

 

King                            (additional surname: Lyden)

The head of the King family in house 23 was Martin Thomas (66), who lived with his wife Mary (60) and 2 of their Children Peter (26) and Maggie (15) and a Mary’s nephew, Peter Lyden (6). All spoke both Irish and English except Maggie, who only spoke English. Only Peter and Maggie could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin Thomas was farmer, Mary was a farmer’s wife, Peter (26) was a farmer’s son, Maggie was a farmer’s daughter and Peter Lyden was a scholar. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Martin King was the landholder.

 

Lyden

The Lyden family in house 24 consisted of 9 members and the head of the family was Patrick (45) and his wife, Kate (40). They shared the house with 7 of their children, Mary Anne (15), John (13), Michael (12), Patrick (8), Peter (7), Willie (3) and Agness (sic) (1). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick (45) and Kate spoke both Irish and English and the rest of the family spoke only English. Kate, Willie and Agness (sic) could not read, Peter could read only and the rest of the family could read and write. Patrick (45) was recorded as being a farmer, Kate, a farmer’s wife, Mary Anne, was a farmer’s daughter, John and Michael were farmer’s sons and Patrick (8), Peter, Willie and Agness (sic) were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Patrick Lyden was the landholder.

 

Lydon

The head of this Lydon family was Micheal (55) and his wife Honor (45) and they lived with their children, Anthony (22), Martin (20), Pat (18), Saraha (sic) (17), Peter (15), Thomas (12) and Joseph (10). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. There was nothing entered for Peter, Thomas and Joseph under Irish Language, so that could indicate that they only spoke English but the rest of the family all spoke both Irish and English. Micheal, Honor and Joseph could not read but the rest of the family could all read and write. Micheal, Anthony, Martin Pat and Peter were labourers, Honor was a labourer’s wife, Saraha (sic) was a general servant and Thomas was a scholar. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Micheal Lydon was the landholder.

 

Malia                           (additional surname: Diamond)

The head of the Malia family was the widow Hanagh (sic) (70) and she ;lived with her daughter-in-law, Anne (30) and her grandchildren, Michael (11), Mary (9), Bridget (6), Anne (4), Hannagh (sic) (2) and John (11mths) and also a lodger, Maggie Diamond (80). Maggie spoke only Irish, Hanagh, Anne and Michael spoke both Irish and English and there was nothing entered for the others so that may indicate that they only spoke English. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Hanagh (sic) was a general farm manager, Anne was an assistant, Michael, Mary, Bridget and Anne were scholars and Maggie was a domestic servant. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was recorded as Hannagh (sic) Malia.

 

Mongan

House 27 was the home of the Mongan family, with the head of the family being John (50) and his wife, Mary (49) and they lived with 6 of their children, Michael (19), Mary (18), Annie (15), Bridget (12), Patrick (9) and John (6). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Bridget, Patrick and John had nothing entered under Irish Language which could mean that they only spoke English but the rest all spoke both Irish and English. Mary (49) could not read but the rest of the family could all read and write. John (50) was a farmer, Mary (49) was a farmer’s wife, Michael was a farmer’s son, Mary (18), Annie and Bridget were farmer’s daughters and Patrick and John were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John Mongan was the landholder.

 

Joyce

The head of this Joyce family in house 28 was Tom (70) and his wife Mary (50) and they shared the house with their children, Stephen (23), Honor (19), Martin (14) and James (10). All spoke both Irish and English but only Honor, Martin and James could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Tom and Stephen were farmers, Mary was a farmer’s wife and Martin and James were scholars. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Tom Joyce was the landholder.

 

Mongan

The head of this Mongan family was Pat (86) and his wife Catherine (80) and they lived with, what was listed as their children?[ix], Mary (10), Annie (8), John (4), Kate (3) and Thomas (11mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Pat, Catherine, Mary and Annie all spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the other members of the family, so that could mean that they only spoke English. Only Pat, Mary and Annie could read and write. Pat was a farmer, Catherine was a farmer’s wife and all the children were listed as Scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Pat Mongan was the landholder.

 

Conneely Family

Head of the Conneely family in house 30 was Mary (50) and she lived there with 4 of her children Thomas (21), Catherine (14), Maggie (11) and Honor (9). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and all, apart from Mary, could read and write. Mary was a farm manager, Thomas was a farm manager and Maggie and Honor were scholars. They all lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Mary Conneely was the landholder.

 

Conneely

The head of this Conneely family was Pat (80) and his wife Bridget (60) who lived in the house with their son John (30) and their grandson, Michael (12). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Michael could read and write. Pat and John were farmers and Bridget was listed as a farmer’s wife. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Pat Conneely was the landholder.

 

Joyce                           (additional surname: Butler)

The last house in Dawrosmore was that of the Joyce family. The head of the family was Tobias (57) and his wife, Ellen (40) and they shared the house with 5 of their children, Mary (17), Anne (15), John (12), Kate (9) and Thomas (7) and also Tobias’ mother-in-law, Mary Butler (80). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English, except Kate and Thomas, who spoke only English. Only Anne, John and Kate could read and write. Tobias was recorded as being a farmer, Ellen, as a farmer’s wife, Mary and Anne, as servants, John, as a labourer and Kate and Thomas were scholars. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Tobias Joyce was the landholder.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Dawrosmore

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) the townland of Dawrosmore had Robert J. Wilberforce as the only immediate lessor and he leased a number of tenements. Edward Vallaley leased 7 acres, 2 roods and 27 perches including a house for which he paid 18s for the land and 7s for the house. Martin R. Harte leased a herds house and offices on 340acres, 1 rood and 6 perches of land for £49 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Plot 3 was an area of 123 acres, 1 rood and 38 perches of land and was jointly leased by the following. John Heany leased a house and land for £3 8s for the land and 7s for the house, roger Coyne leased a house and land for £2 7s for the land and 5s for the house, Mary Joyce leased a house and land for £1 3s for the land and 5s for the house and John Lydon leased a house and land for £3 10s for the land and 5 s for the house. Bridget Conneely leased a house, offices and land for £3 18s for the land and 7s for the buildings, Thomas Conneely leased a house and land for £2 for the land and 7 s for the house and Thomas Coyne leased a house and land for £2 for the land and 5s for the house. William Wallace leased a house and land for £2 for the land 5s for the house, Michael Butler, Patrick Mongan and John Conroy each had houses and land for which they paid £2 for the land and 7s for the houses each. Robert J. Wilberforce leased 141 acres, and 13 perches of land to the following people. Doctor Lane had an office and land for £3 for the land and 5s for the office. Margaret Butler had a house and land for 25s for the land and 5s for the house, John Kelly had a house, office and land for which he paid £3 for the land and 10s for the buildings and martin Walsh paid 15s for some land and 10s for a house. John Nee had a house and land for £1 for the house and 10s for the house, Michael Mullen had a house and land for 13s for the land and 5s for the house, Thomas Kelly had a house and land for £1 3s for the land and 10s for the house and Margaret Fitzpatrick leased a house and land for15s for the land and 5s for the house. Henry Mongan leased a house and land for 13s for the land and 5s for the house, Ambrose Bourke had a house and land for 31 for the land and 5s for the house and Michael Cannivan, Margaret Kealy and Hugh Bourke all leased a house and land for 10s for the land and 5s for the houses each. There were 3 islands belonging to the tenants of Dawrosmore of no agricultural value and they had an area of 28 perches.

 

1670 Down Survey for Dawrosmore

The 1670 name for this area was Dawrus and the 1641 owner was the Protestant Earl of Clanrickard and the owners in 1670 were the Catholic Ulick Burke, earl of Clanricard and the Protestant, earl of Clanrickard. There were 64 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 42 plantation acres of profitable land and 42 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

[i] Old name for Co. Offaly

[ii] Obviuosly a mistake, Mary Ann would be a farmer’s daughter.

[iii] Probably a mistake, most likely should be a farmer’s daughter.

[iv] Although no children were entered on this census, there were grandchildren so there had to have been a child / children.

[v] Age is undraedable

[vi] Carpenter?

[vii] infant

[viii] Age hard to read, maybe 10 and not 19.

[ix] Think this could possibly be a mistake given that this would mean that Catherine would have had to have given birth to Thomas when she was 79? More likely that these would be grandchildren.

 

Derryinver Bridge

This page was added on 12/06/2018.

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