Baunoge

An Bhánóg

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

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Townland:                                  Baunoge

Civil Parish:                                Ballynakill

Barony:                                       Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                          Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                       1059.77 acres / 1059 acres, 3 roods, 3 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Map

Galway Library for Baunoge

1670 Down Survey for Baunoge

Logainm for Baunoge

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Baunoge

 

1911 Census for Baunoge

Overview of baunoge in 1911

The 1911census records 7 houses in Baunoge, all of which were occupied and listed as private dwellings. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 1 and 6 were 2nd class dwellings with the rest being 3rd class. Houses 2,3,4,5 and 7 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front of the dwelling and houses 1 and 7 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. Altogether there were a total of 14 out offices and buildings, those being made up of 7 cow houses, 5 calf houses and 2 piggeries. There were a total of 41 people living in Baunoge, 21 male and 20 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

McDonnell                              (additional surnames: Mortimer)

House one was the home of the McDonnell family that consisted of 12 members. Head of the family was the widow Mary (70) who had given birth to 12 children of which only 7 survived. Living with her in the house were her daughter Bridget Mortimer (40) who had been married to Philip Mortimer for 12 years and had had 7 children. As well as those, her daughter Kate (24) and son Bartley (23), grandchildren Michael Mortimer (11), Philip Mortimer (10), Festus Mortimer (8), Mary Mortimer (7), Margaret Mortimer (5), John Mortimer (4) and Bridget Mortimer (1) shared the house as well. Mary (70), Bridget (40), Kate, Bartley and Philip (32) are listed as having both Irish and English as languages, there is no record under that heading for the rest[i]. Mary (70), Margaret, John and Bridget (1) could not read, all the others could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Bartley is recorded as being a shepherd, Philip (32), a farm servant and Michael, Philip (10), Festus and Mary (7) were all scholars. They shared a 2 roomed 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and calf house. The landholder was Hector R. L. Graham.

 

Mannion

The head of the Mannion family was James (65) with his wife Julia (41) who had been married for 18 years and had had 5 children, all of which had survived. In the house with them at that time were 4 of her children, Michael (17), Mary (13), Agnes (12) and Martin (10). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James and Julia had both Irish and English languages but could not read. The rest of the family had nothing listed in the language column but they could read and write. James was a farmer and Michael a farmer’s son with Mary, Agnes and Martin being scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house. James Mannion was the landholder.

 

Lyden

The Lyden family consisted of 6 members with the head of the family being John (71) and his wife Mary (72) who had been married for 36 years and had had 7 children. 4 of their children lived with them and they were Thomas (50), John (34), Peter (28) and Festus (24). John (71) and Mary are listed as speaking Irish and English and all could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John (71) was a farmer, Thomas was an unemployed blacksmith, John (34) and Festus were a farmer’s sons and Peter was a postman. They shared a 2 roomed 3rd class house with a cow house and a calf house. John Lyden was the landholder.

 

Conneely                                 (additional surnames: Mullen)

Head of the family in house 4 was Philip (41) with his wife Anne (40) who had been married for 8 years but had no children. Also in the house was Philip’s sister-in-law Honor (66). All spoke both Irish and English and Honor could not read, however, Philip and Anne could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Philip is listed as being a farmer. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and calf house. Philip was the landholder.

 

Connelly                                 (additional surnames: McDonnell)

House 5 was also a Conneely household and the head on this family was the widow Mary (49) who had had 12 children of which 10 survived. Her daughter and son-in-law, Anne McDonnell (25) and Festus McDonnell (24), who had been married for a year, lived in the house, as did her other children, Joseph (23), Michael (21), Martin (18), Margaret (17), Bridget (14) Ellen (10). All, except Ellen, are listed as speaking both Irish and English and all except Mary, could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus was a farm servant, Joseph, Michael and Martin were farmer’s sons, Margaret was a cook domestic servant, Bridget was a farmer’s daughter and Ellen a scholar. The house they shared at that time was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house, calf house and a piggery. Mary Conneely was the landholder.

 

Coyne

Head of the Coyne family in house 6 was the widow Anne (74) who had had 9 children of which 7 survived. 2 of her children Peter (27) and Ellen (24) lived with her at that time. All had both Irish and English language but only Ellen could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter is listed as being a farmer’s son and Ellen a farmer’s daughter. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class house with a cow house, a calf house and a piggery. The landholder was Anne Coyne.

 

Gibbons

The head of the Gibbons family was the widow Bridget (60) who had had 10 children but only 5 had survived. Living with her in house was her son Michael (29). Michael could read and write while Bridget could read only. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is recorded as being a farm servant. The house was a 3rd class, 2 roomed dwelling with a cow house and Pat Lyden was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Baunoge

Overview of Baunoge in 1901

The 1901 census lists 8 houses in Baunoge all were private dwellings with the exception of house 8 which is listed as a lodging house. All had stone, brick or concrete walls with thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. All dwellings were 3rd class houses with the exception of house 8 which was a 2nd class dwelling. Houses 1 and 5 had 1 room and 1 window in the front of the house, houses 2,3,4 and 7 had 1 room and 2 windows, house 6 had 1 roome and 3 windows and house 8 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were a total of 13 out buildings recorded on the out office and farm-steadings return. They were a stable, 8 cow houses and 4 piggeries. There were a total of 44 people living in Baunoge in 1901, 26 male and 18 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Coyne                          (additional surnames: Faherty)

House 1 was the home of the Coyne family and the head of the family was Martin (80) and his wife Mary (56). Sharing the house with them were their children Peter (23) and Onnie (sic)[ii] (21) and their nephew John Faherty (8). All could speak both Irish and English but only Onnie (sic) and John could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin was a farmer, Peter was a farmer’s son, Onnie (sic) was a farmer’s daughter and John a scholar. The house they lived in was a 1 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house and piggery. The landholder was Martin Coyne.

 

Conneely

The head of the Conneely family was Peter (55) and his wife Mary (40) and with them in the house were their children Anne (24), Peter (16), Joseph (14) , Michael (12), Martin (9), Maggie (5) and Bridget (3). Peter and Mary had both Irish and English language, but nothing listed for the rest of them. With the exception of Mary, Maggie and Bridget they could all read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter (55) was a wool weaver, Anne was a domestic servant and Peter (16), Joseph, Michael, Martin and Maggie were scholars. The home they shared was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Peter Conneely was the landholder.

Mannion

The head of the Mannion family in house 3 was James (40) and his wife Julia (33). With them in the house at that time were their children Michael (8), Thomas (7), Mary (5), Agnus (sic) (2) and Martin (6mths). James and Julia could speak both Irish and English and only Michael could read and write with Thomas being able to read only. The others could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James was a farmer and Michael and Thomas were scholars. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a Stable and a cow house. James Mannion was the landholder.

Heanue

The head of the Heanue family was Patrick (45) and his wife Margaret (40). With them in the house were their children Annie (4), Patrick (3) and Anthony (1mth). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick and Margaret are listed as speaking both Irish and English but there is no entry in column for the rest of them. Only Patrick could read and write. Patrick was a farmer and Margaret is listed as a farmer’s wife. They lived in a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house. Patrick Heanue was the landholder.

Lyden

The sole occupant of house 5 was Thaddy (75) who was a widower. He had both Irish and English but could not read. He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic and is listed as being a farmer. The house he occupied was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house. He was also the landholder.

 

Conneely

House 6 also only had the one occupant and that was Philip (33). Philip had both Irish and English languages and could read and write. He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. His occupation was a wool weaver. The house he lived in was a 1 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house. Philip was also the landholder.

 

Lydon

House 7 was the Lydon family household and John (45) was the head of the family. He shared the house with his wife Mary (45) and their children Thomas (19), Bridget (17), John (12), Peter (10) and Festus (8). John (45) and Mary could speak both Irish and English but the rest of the family only had English. Thomas could not read, Mary could read only and the readt could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John (45 was a wool weaver, Mary was a house keeper, Thomas was a farmer, Bridget, a farmer’s daughter and John (12), Peter and Festus were scholars. The house that they lived in was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and John Lydon was the landholder.

 

McDonnell                              (additional surnames: Mortimer)

The head of the McDonnell family was Bartley (60) and his wife Mary (45). Also in the house with them at that time were their children Bridget Mortimer (27), John (25), Mary (17), Catherine (14), Bartley (12), Julia (10 and their grandson Michael Mortimer (6mths). Bartley (60), Mary, Bridget and John were listed as having both Irish and English, with nothing entered for the others. Bartley (60), John and Michael could not read, Mary could read only and the rest could read and write. They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Bartley (60) is recorded as being a shepherd, agricultural labourer, John was a farm labourer, Mary (17) and Catherine were domestic servants and Bartley (12) and Julia were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was Thomas Graham of Kulkyle.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Baunoge

Anne Coyne –Application No. C21 3276. Anne’s application was received on 03/05/1921 with an address of John Faherty, Attyrowerty, Moyard Co. Galway. Her parent’s names were given as Peter and Mary Coyne. There are 2 sets of handwritten notes but it is difficult to read all the text in them. Those two sets were crossed out by hand. On the left hand side of the form there is a handwritten list of names and ages as follows;

yrs

Michael          (89)

John                87

Bridget            85

Patrick             83

Thomas           81

Martin             79

Anthony          77

Philip              75

Maria               73

Anne               71

Honor              69

 

A handwritten note on the right of the form says:

 

NB

Note daughter 1 month

no christian name:

entered “ So

FW

 

The return search date was the 05/05/1921 stating that Peter and Mary Coyne married in 1831

Added to that on 21/05/1921 was the handwritten note:

 

Sheets              Mick                20 yrs              son

John                18 ”                 “

Pat                   14 ”                 “

Thos                12 “                 “

x          Maria               2 “                   daught

x             “                   1 month              do

 

The application was certified on 31/05/1921 and a copy dispatched to the applicant on 09/06/1921. The original pension awarded was 2s 3d on 18/05/1921, 2s was added on the 26/05/1921 and then a further addition of 9d was added on the 07/06/1921 to give a total pension of 5s.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Baunoge

The Griffith’s valuation (1847-1864) records that Robert Graham lease a number of tenements to people. John Mullen leased an area of land of 8 Acres, 1 rood and 11 Perches on which there was a house. He paid an annual rate of £1 15s for the land and 10s for the house. James Conneely, John Conneely, Jerimiah Coyne, Thomas Coyne, and Roger Mealy jointly leased an area of land of 44 Acres and 16 Perches. Each of them had a house as well as the land and Jerimiah Coyne also had offices. James Conneely paid £1 3s for the land and 5s for the house, John Connelly paid £1 2s for the land and 5s for the house, Jerimiah Coyne paid £2 5s for the land and 10s for the buildings. Thomas Coyne paid £2 5s for the land and 10 s for the house, Roger mealy paid £2 5s for the land and 5s for the house. John Conneely then leased the house on his part of the land to Rose Moran for 5s and Roger Mealy leased the house he had on the land to John Folan for 5s annually. Mary Folan leased a house from Free (sic) (?) for a rate of 5s. William Yates leased an area of land of 33 Acres from Robert Graham on which he had an office and house. He paid an annual rate of £5 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Charles McClinton leased 2 plots of land from William Yates. One area of land was 30 Acres, 3 Roods and 12 Perches and the other was 72 Acres, 3 Roods and 26 Perches. He paid £8 10s for the smaller plot and £9 10s for the larger. Peter Coyne leased some land from an immediate lessor[iii]. The land had an area of 14 Acres, 2 Roods and 26 Perches on which there was a house. He paid £4 for the land and 10s for the house. Martin and Peter Coyne leased some land of 7 Acres, 1 Rood and 18 Perches from Robert Graham. Martin had a house and paid £1 7s for the land and 5s for the house. Peter paid 13s for his piece of land. Robert Graham retained 703 Acres, 2 Roods and 26 Perches of land that was mountain and bog land, for which he paid a rate of £6 annually. There was, in addition, 19 Acres of water.

 

[i] Could possibly mean that the rest only had English.

[ii] Possibly another name for Honor?

[iii] Possibly the lessor didn’t want to be named or their name wasn’t known.

This page was added on 17/07/2018.

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