Bunowen

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Townland:                                Bunowen

Civil Parish:                              Ballynakill

Barony:                                      Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                          Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                            1462.95 acres / 1462 acres, 3 roods, 31 perches

 

1911 Census for Bunowen

1901 Census for Bunowen

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Bunowen

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Bunowen

Map

Galway Library for Bunowen

1670 Down Survey for Bunowen

Logainm for Bunowen

NUI Galway Digital Collections forBunowen

 

1911 Census for Bunowen

Overview of Bunowen in 1911.

There was only the 1 building listed in the 1911 census for Bunowen. That was listed as a private dwelling with stone, brick or concrete walls and stone, iron or tile roofing. It had 2 rooms with 3 windows in the front and had 3 out offices and farm steadings and was occupied as a 2ndclass dwelling. The farm-steadings were a stable, cow house and piggery. There were a total of 5 persons, 3 males and 2 females. The enumerator was Act. Serg. Patrick Phelan.

 

 

Keane family

In the 1911 census there was 1 household in the townland of Bunowen occupied by the Keane family. Philip (75) was the head of the family and with his wife Mary (75) they had had 8 children of which 7 survived and at the time of this census they had 3 of their children living with them. They had been married for 45 years in 1911. Living with them were their daughter Annie (40), and sons Thomas (38) and Martin (30), all of whom where unmarried. All the family had both Irish and English language although only Annie could read and write. Philip is listed as a farmer and both Thomas and Martin listed as farmers sons. They occupied a 2ndclass, 4 room dwelling. The census return was collected on 05/04/1911.

 

 

1901 Census for Bunowen

Overview of Bunowen in 1901.

There was on 1 house listed in the 1901 census for Bunowen. It was listed as a private dwelling with stone, brick or concrete walls and a thatch, wood or other perishable material for a roof. It had 2 rooms with 1 window in the front and had 3 out offices and farm-steadings. It was occupied as a 3rdclass dwelling and C. H. Thompson was the landholder. There were 5 persons listed, 3 males and 2 females.

 

Keane family

In the 1901 census there is only one household listed in the townland of Bunowen occupied by the Keane family. Head of the family was Philip (62) and, with his wife Mary (62), they had 3 of their children living with them. The children were Thomas (20), John (18) and Annie (16). All could speak both Irish and English but only John and Annie could read and Annie was the only one who could also write. None of the children were married. Philip’s occupation is listed as Herd with Thomas and John being listed as herds son and Annie as Herds daughter. All were Roman Catholic.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Bunowen

Thomas Sullivan– Application No.: D10 20766. Thomas Sullivan applied for his pension on 19/09/1910.  Thomas’ parents are listed as Thomas and Catherine Sullivan and resided with John and Mary Joyce in 1841. The residence is listed as Bunowen, Co. Galway in the civil parish of Ballynakill in the Barony of Ballynahinch. On 02/10/1910 it is recorded that there were no returns of any Sullivans’

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Bunowen

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Alexander Thompson leased tenements to Michael Gibbons, Michael McDaniel, Philip Faherty and Marcus S. Blackden. Alexander Thompson retained a herd’s house and an area of land of 1320 acres, 3 roods and 25 perches for which he paid a total annual valuation rate of £53. Michael Gibbons paid an annual rate of 10s for a house and office. Michael McDaniel paid an annual rate of 10s for a house. Philip Faherty paid an annual rate of £1 for a house and an area of land consisting of 3 acres, 3 roods and 5 perches. Marcus S. Blackden paid an annual rate of £1 for an area of land (bog) consisting of 114 acrea, 2 roods and 9 perches. There was also an area of water with an area of 13 acres, 0 roods and 20 perches.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Bunowen

In the 1670 Down Survey, Bunowen was known by other names, these being, Keilemore, Glancarbdemore, Gortnefunshine, Rossynelee and Shanaharaghane. In 1641 the owner was Edmund O’Flaharty and in 1670 James Darcy, both were Catholic.

 

 

Crump Island

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Crump Island

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       79.87 acres / 79 acres, 3 roods, 18 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Crump Island  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Crump Island

1670 Down Survey forCrump Island

Logainm for Crump Island

NUI Galway Digital Collections forCrump Island

 

 

1911 Census for Crump Island

Overview of Crump Island in 1911.

There was on 1 house listed in the towland of Crump Island in 1911. That was recorded as a private dwelling with stone, brick or concrete walls and a slate, iron or tiled roof. It had 2 rooms with 3 windows in the front and also had a total of 5 out offices and farm-steadings. It was occupied as a 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house, calf house, barn potato house and store. Thee were a total of 5 persons living in the house, 4 male and 1 female.

 

O’Flaherty Family

The 1911 census lists only one household on Crump Island and occupied by the O’Flaherty Family. The family consisted of the head of the family James (72), and his children Charles (35), Catherine (23) and James (21) along with his grandson Michael Holleran (6). James (Snr), is listed as a widower. All could speaker both Irish and English with the exception of Michael Holleran, for whom there is no entry in that section. None of the family could read or write. James (Snr) is listed as a farmer and James (Jnr) and Charles listed as farmer’s son. Michael Holleran is listed as a Scholar.

 

 

1901 Census for Crump Island

Overwiew of Crump Island in 1901.

There was only house listed in the 1901 census for Crump Island. The house was listed as a private dwelling with stone, brick or concrete walls and slate, iron or tile roof. It had 2 rooms with 4 windows in the front and was occupied as a 2ndclass dwelling. There were a total of 8 people, 3 male and 5 female.

 

O’Flaherty Family

The 1901 census lists 1 household on Crump Island occupied by the O’Flaherty Family. The family consists of the head of the family, James (59), along with his wife, Mary (50). Living with them in the house they have their children Charles (24), Mary (20), Anne (16), Nappie[i](15), Kate (13) and James (11). All had both Irish and English as a language and all, with the exception of James (Snr) could read and write. James (Snr) is listed as being a farmer and his son, Charles, is listed as being a fisherman. Anne, Nappie, Kate and James are listed as Scholars. They lived in a 2ndclass, 3 roomed house and James O’Flaherty was the landholder. All were Roman Catholic.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Crump Island

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Fancis M.S. Taylor leased a Tenement to Ethelstane H. Blake. Ethelstane H. Blake had a herd’s house and land consisting of  63 Acres, 1 Rood and 8 Perches. An annual rate of £20 was put on the land and 5s on the building for total annual rate of £20 5s. Francis M.S. Taylor also own four Islands with no agricultural value of an area of  3 Roods and 22 perches.

 

 

Derrynacleigh

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Derrynacleigh

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       1070.18 acres / 1070 acres, 0 roods, 28 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Derrynacleigh

Logainm for Derrynacleigh

NUI Galway Digital Collections forDerrynacleigh

 

 

1911 CensusforDerrynacleigh

Overview of Derrynacleighin 1911.

In the 1911 census there are 7 households listed in the townland of Derrynacleigh with a total of 47 occupants, of which 26 were male and 21 female. There were 7 buildings recorded and all were listed as private dwellings. All buildings had stone, brick or concrete walls. Only 2 of the houses had slate, iron or tile roofing with the others having thatch, wood or other perishable materials. One of the houses had 4 rooms and 7 windows in the front, 4 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, 1 had 2 rooms with 3 windows and there was one with 2 rooms, but no windows. There was 1 1stclass, 1 2ndclass and 5 3rdclass dwellings. Between all the houses there were 2 stables, 7 cow houses, 4 piggeries, 2 fowl houses and 1 store.

 

Coyne Family           (additional surnames: Kilcoyne)

The Coyne family consisted of the head of family, Michael (65) and his wife, Anne (44) and they had been married for 20 years. They’d had 10 children of which 6 had survived. They had 3 sons and a daughter living with them at this time, John (12), Michael (10), Patrick (8) and Annie (3). Also living with them was a cousin Anne Kilcoyne (60) who is listed as being married for 26 years and had 2 children, neither her husband or children are listed in this household. All are listed as being Roman Catholic and had a birth place listed as Co. Galway. Anne, John and Michael (10) are listed as being able to read and write, with rest not able to. Michael (65) was a farmer, John (12), Michael (10), Patrick (8) and Annie (3) are listed as scholars, with Anne Kilcoyne being listed as a servant. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and Michael Coyne was the landholder. This census form was collected 05/04/191. They also had a cow house and a fowl house.

 

Faherty Family           (additional surnames: Conor)

The Faherty family consisted of Pinnie[ii](72) and a widow. Her son, John (35) and Michael Connor (12), listed as illegitimate. All were Roman Catholic and could not read. Pinnie could speak Irish and John and Michael could speak both Irish and English. Both Pinnie and john are listed as being farmers. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and Pinnie was the landholder. This census form was collected 05/04/1911. This household had a cow house and a piggery.

 

Faherty Family

The widowed Mary (76) was the head of the family. With her in the house were her son Patrick (40) and his wife, Kate (45). They had been married for 20 years and had had 8 children of which 7 survived. 6 of those children, Mary’s grandchildren, also lived in the house, they were Maichael (18), Anthony (17), Mary (15), John (9), Sarah (7) and Cathleen (5). All the family were Roman Catholic with a birthplace listed as Co. Galway. Mary could speak Irish and all the others could speak Irish and English. Mary Patrick and Cathleen are listed as not being able to read or write with Kate, John and Sarah being listed as being able to read. Michael, Anthony and Mary could read and write. Mary and Patrick are listed as being farmers, Anthony as a farmers son and Michael as a post boy. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and Mary Faherty was the landholder. Census for collected 05/04/1911. The O’Faherty’s also had a cow house.

 

Joyce Family

The 1911 census shows that the Joyce family consisted of the head of the family Patrick (50) and his wife Bridget (47). They were married for 29 years and had a total of 10 children of which 8 survived. All 8 were living with them at that time. They were Bridget (28), Thomas (13),  Michael (12), Catherine (10), Patrick (8), Peter (6), Matin (4) and Stephen (2). They were all Roman Catholic. None of the family could read Patrick, both Bridget’s, Thomas, Michael and Catherine are listed as able to speak both Irish and English. Patrick’s (50) occupation was listed as herd and Thomas, Michael, Catherine and Patrick (8) are listed as scholars.They lived in a 3rdclass 2 roomed house and the landholder was Michael O’Neill. There was also a cow house and a piggery.

 

O’Neill Family            (additional surnames: Tighe)

The 1911 census lists 4 people living in house 5. The head of the family was Mary (69), a widow. With her she had her son Patrick (34) and daughter Sarah Jane (24) along with a Michael Tighe (24) who’s relationship to the head of the family is described as Tea Dealer. Mary was married for 34 years and had a total of 9 children of which 5 survived. All members of this household could read and write, speak both Irish and English and were Roman Catholic. Mary, Patrick and Sarah Jane were born in Co. Galway and Michael Tighe was born in Co. Mayo. They lived in a 2ndclass 3 roomed house and Mary was the landholder. They also had 1 stable, 1 cow house and piggery.

 

Gibbons Family

In the 1911 census the Gibbons family consisted of 8 members living in house 6. The head of the family was Patrick (44) and his wife Mary (40) who had been married for 14 years and had had 8 children of which 6 survived. Their children were Bridget (10), Kathleen (9), Michael (7), Norah (5), Austin (3) and Patrick (1). Patrick, Mary, Bridget and Kathleen are listed as being able to read and write. The others could not. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway with Patrick, Mary and Bridget listed as being able to speak Irish and English. Patrick’s occupation is listed as publican and farmer and Bridget and Kathleen listed as scholars. They live in a 1stclass 9 roomed dwelling and Patrick was the landholder. They also had 1 stable, 1 cow house, 1 pigery and a store.

 

Lyden Family

The Lydon family consisted of 6 members of which Patrick (60) was the head of the family and his wife Catherine (50) who had been married for 12 years and had 5 children which all survived. Their children living in the house in 1911 were Michael (10), John (8), Mary (5) and Sarah (2). All, with the exception of Sarah, are listed as being able to speak Irish and English. Patrick, Mary and Sarah are listed as being not able to read or write. Catherine and Michael could read and write and John could read only. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Patrick’s occupation is listed as being a farm labourer and Michael and John were scholars. They lived in a 2ndclass 2 roomed dwelling and the landholder was Colonel Lambert. They also had a cow house and a fowl house.

 

 

1901 Census for Derrynacleigh

Overview of Derrynacleigh in 1901.

The 1901 census for Derrynacleigh lists 7 households with a total of 36 people, 18 male and 18 female. The enumerator was Constable Patrick Flannery. All of the houses were listed as private dwellings with all 7 having stone, brick o concrete walls. Only 2, houses 5 and 6, had slate, iron or tiled roofs, with the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 2,3,6 and 7 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, house 1 had 2 rooms and 1 window, house  had 1 room and 2 windows and house 5 had 4 rooms with 7 windows. With all that calculated it meant that there were 5 3rdclass, 1 2ndclass and 1 1stclass dwellings.

 

Faherty Family           (additional surnames: Conor)

The Faherty household (house 1) in 1901 consisted of 4 members. Head of the family was Winnie (55), a widow, and her children John (21) and Maggie (17) and also her grandson Michael (2). Winnie could only speak Irish and John and Maggie could speak both Irish and English. All were Roman Catholic and none could read or write. Winnie is listed as a land owner, John as a farmers Son and Maggie as a farmers daughter. They lived in a 3rdclass 2 roomed house.

 

Faherty Family

The Faherty household (house 2) had 8 members. The head of the family was Patrick (32) and with him, his wife Kate (40). They had 3 sons and a daughter living with them in the house, they were Patrick (10), Michael (8), Anthony (6) and Mary (4). Also living with them were Patrick’s parents Anthony (70) and Mary (80). All were Roman Catholic and could speak both Irish and English, but Patrick (32) and his Parents Anthony and Mary and their son Anthony could not read or write. Patrick (10) and Michael could read and write and kate is listed as read only. All are listed as having a birth place of Co. Galway. Patrick (32) is listed as a farmer and Partick (10) and Michael were scholars. They lived in a 3rdclass 2 roomed home.

 

Walsh Family

House 3 in the 1901 census for Derrynacleigh was that of the Walsh family in which there were 6 members. The head of the family was the widow Sarah (46) and her 5 children Thomas (23), Bridget (18), John (16) Sarah (12) and Julia (10). All wee Roman Catholic and could speak both Irish and English and had a birth place of Co. Galway. Sarah (46) and Thomas could not read but the other children read and write. Their occupations are listed as Sarah (46) was a herd, Thomas was a herd’s son, Bridget a herd’s daughter, John a postman, Sarah (12) and Julia were scholars. They lived in a 3rdclass 2 bedroomed house and the landholder was Michael O’Neill.

 

O’Neill Family

The O’Neill family lived in house 4 as listed in the 1901 census. The head of the family was the widow, Mary (52) and 3 of her children Parick (26), Annie (20) and Sarah (16). All were Roman Catholic and could read and write. Mary, Patrick and Annie are listed as having both Irish and English and Patrick, Annie and Sarah were born in Co. Galway and their mother Mary in Co. Mayo. Mary’s occupation is listed as a farmer, Patrick a farmers son and Annie and Sarah as farmers daughters. They lived in a 2ndclass 3 roomed house and Mary was the landholder.

 

Gibbons Family          (additional surnames: Coyne)

The Gibbons family home had 4 people living in it. They were Patrick (30), the head of the family, his wife Mary (27), their daughter Bridget (1) and a servant, Mary Coyne (17). They were all born in Co. Galway with the exception of Mary who was born in Co. Mayo. Both Patrick and Mary’s occupations are listed as publicans and farmers and Mary Coyne as a domestic servant. They were all Roman Catholic, could read and write and were able to speak both Irish and English with the exception Bridget who was only a year old. They had a 1stclass building with 8 rooms and the landholder was Patrick Gibbons.

 

Lydon Family

The 1901 census lists the Lydon family dwelling as having 4 family members. Head of the family Patrick (45), his wife Kate (32) and their son Patrick (1), also living with them was Patrick’s brother John (38). Patrick is listed as a Caretaker and John as a postman. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick could not read but both Kate and John could read and write and all three could speak both Irish and English. The lived in a 2ndclass 2 roomed  dwelling and the landholder was [Guy] B. Lambert esq.

 

Coyne Family

The 1901census lists 6 members of the Coyne family living in house 7. They are family head Michael (45), his wife Anne (30) and their children Stephen (9), Mary (7), John (1) and Michael (3 months). All the family were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Only Anne could read and write and Michael, Anne, Stephen and Mary could speak both Irish and English. Michael was a farmer and Stephen and Mary were scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Michael Coyne was the landholder.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Derrynacleigh

John Gibbons–Application No. C22 1859. John Gibbons applied for his pension on 03/04/1922 and at that time gave an address of Glendavock, Drummirr, Westport Co. Mayo . Johns parents were Austin and Bridget Gibbons (nee O’Neill). On 12/04/1922 his parents were found to be married with one son John (2) in 1844. The application was certified on 13/04/1922 and a pension of 2s was awarded.

 

Patrick Lydon– Application No. C21 8011. Patrick Lydon applied for his pension on 28/12/1921 giving his address at that time as Derrynaclough, Leenane, Co. Galway. Patricks parents were Patrick and Honor (nee Coyne) and in 1851 lived in Derrynacleigh, Glencraff Co. Galway. Search was returned on 09/01/1922 and a pension of 3s was awarded.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation(1847-1864) for Derrynacleigh

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Alexander Thompson leased tenements to Alexander Lambert, Austin Gibbons and Marcus S. Blackden. The land leased to Alexander Lambert had an area of 95 Acres, 3 Roods and 21 perches and he paid an annual rate of £7. He then leased a house to each of John McDonnell and Michael Cribbins on his land. John McDonnell paid an annual rate of 7s and Michael Cribbins paid 8s for the houses. Austin Gibbons had land of  60 Acres, 3 Roods, 25 perches for which he paid an annual rate of £5 10s. On that land he had a hpouse and offices for which he paid an additional rate of 15s.  Marcus S. Blackden had a land area of 902 Acres, 0 roods, 24 Perches which he paid an annual rate of £32 on that land he had a house that he paid an extra £1 per year. He also leased a house and offices to John Keane at an annual rate of 10s

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Derrynacleigh

In The 1670 Down Survey Derrynacleigh was also known as Dirrenchillyn & Tullegihy. The owner in 1641 was Rory O’Flahartye who was a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was Richard Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic. There were 888 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 57 plantation acres of profitable land and 57 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

Foher

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Foher

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       629.79 acres / 629 acres, 3 roods, 6 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

1901 Census for Foher (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Foher

Logainm for Foher

NUI Galway Digital Collections forFoher

 

 

1911 Census for Foher

Overview of Foher in 1911.

Foher only had the one house in 1911 with 8 persons, 6 male and 2 female. The house is listed as a private dwelling with stone, brick or concrete walls and on thatch, wood or other perishable material for a roof. It had 2 rooms with no windows in the front and was occupied as a 3rdclass dwelling.

 

Walsh family               (additional surnames: O’Donagh)

The 1911 census lists only one household in Foher and that was of the Walsh family. There were 8 family members living there and the head of the family was Patrick (55) who had been married to his wife Annie (55) for 36 years. They had 12 children of which 10 survived. Living with them at that time were his children Martin (26), Margaret (23), Philip (18), John (15) and 2 nephews Cornelius O’Donagh (6) and Joseph O’Donagh (4). All except Joseph are listed as being able to speak both Irish and English and all were Roman Catholic. Cornelius and Joseph were born in England and the rest in Co. Galway. Martin, Margaret, Philip and John could read and write, the others could not read. Patrick’s occupation was a herd, Martin’s is listed as farming and Philip and John are listed as herds son. They lived in a 3rdclass 2 roomed house and the landholder was Captain Thompson. They also had 1 cow house.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Foher

Michael Coyne– Application No.: C16 7954. Michaels application was received on 21/12/1916, at that time he was 70 years of age and lived in Derryinver, Letterfrack, Co. Galway. His parents were Patrick and Honor Coyne. His residence in 1851 was Foher, in the Barony of Ballynahinch, in the Parish of Ballynakill, Co. Galway. The returned search was dated 22/12/1916 and that family not found

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Foher

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Alexander Thompson leased tenements the Church, Irish Church Mission and Alexander McGorn. Alexander Thompson had land of 623 Acres, 0 Roods and 23 Perches on which he had a herd’s house and offices for his own use. He paid a annual rate of £42 10s for the land and 10s for the buildings. The church and church yard had an area of 2 Roods and 30 Perches and had an annual valuation rate of  10s for the land and £4 for the building. The Irish Church Mission had a school house ant no rent but had an annual valuation rate of £1. Alexander McGorn had a house with an annual rate of £1. This amounted to a total Annual Valuation of £42 for the land and £6 10s for the buildings. However, there were exemptions for the church and school house of the full amount, so the final total valuation rate was £41 10s for the land and £1 10s for the buildings.

 

 

1670 DownSurvey for Foher

In the 1670 Down Survey, Foher was known as Freegh Island. The owner in 1641 was Edmund O’Flaharty and in 1670 the owner was Richard, earl of Westmeath and both were Catholic. I had 19 plantation acres of profitable land and 19 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

Glassillaun

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Glassillaun

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       342.19 acres / 342 acres, 0 roods, 29 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

1901 Census for Glassillaun  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Glassillaun

Logainm for Glassillaun

NUI Galway Digital Collections forGlassillaun

 

 

1911 Census for Glassillaun

Overview of Glassillaun in 1911.

The 1911 census for Glassillaun lists 21 households in the 22 houses. There were 103 persons with 53 males and 50 females. All the houses were listed as being private dwellings and all, except house 22, were inhabited. Patrick Walsh was the landholder of the un-inhabited house 22. All the houses had stone, brick or concrete walls, thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofs. There were 7 houses with 2 rooms and 1 window, 12 houses with 2 rooms and 2 windows, 1 house with 2 rooms and 3 windows and only 2 houses, houses 17 and 19 that had 1 room and no windows. All the occupied houses were 3rdclass dwellings with the exception of houses 17 and 19 that were 4thclass. The out offices and farm-steadings in Glassillaun at this time included 12 cow houses, 6 piggeries, 1 fowl house and 2 barns.

 

Walsh Family

The Walsh family in house 1 only had 2 members, John (75) and his wife Julia (74). They had been married for 47 years and had had no children. Both had both Irish and English language and neither could read or write. John’s occupation is listed as being a farmer. Both were Roman Catholic. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house. They also had a cow house.

 

Coyne Family

The Coyne consisted of 5 members, the head of the family Philip (52) who was a widower. With him lived his children, Annie (16), Nora (14), Michael (12) and Bridget (7). Bridget could speak only English, but the rest of the family could speak both Irish and English. Philip and Bridget could not read but the others could read and write. All were Roman Catholic. Philip’s occupation is listed as a farmer and Michael is listed as a scholar. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and Philip was the landholder. In addition, they had a cow house and a barn.

 

O’Malley Family        (additional surnames: Guthria, Faherty)

House 3 in the 1911 census for Glassillaun is the O’Malley household and consists of 5 members. The head of the family was Michael (69) and his wife Honor (68) who had been married for 41 years and had had 9 children of which 7 survived. Living with them at that time was their daughter Margaret (25) and their grandchildren Margaret Guthria (6) and Thomas Faherty (3). Michael and Margaret (25) could speak Irish and English, Honor could speak only Irish and Margaret (6) and Thomas could only speak English. Only Margaret (25) cor read and write, the others could not. All were Roman Catholic. Margaret Guthria was born in America and all the rest were born in Co. Galway. Michael is listed as being a farmer. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and Michael was the landholder. They also had a cow house.

 

McNamara Family

The McNamara family consisted of 6 members. The head of the family Martin (40) and his wife Annie (39) who had been married for 10 years and had had 5 children of which 3 survived. Living with them was Martin’s brother, Charles (28) and their three daughters Annie (9), Mary (8) and Bridget (6). All were born in Co. Galway and Roman Catholic. Martin, Annie (39) and Charles are listed as being able to speak Irish and English, and only Annie (39) could read and write. Martin is listed as being a farmer and Charles as a fisherman. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and Martin was the landholder. They also had a barn.

 

Coyne Family

House 5 in Glassillaun in the 1911 census was that of the Coyne family. Head of the family was John (66) and his wife Julia (62) who were married for 20 years and had had 1 child and who survived. Their son Michael (15) also lived with them. All had Irish and English language but only Michael could read and write. They were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. John’s occupation is listed as a farmer and Michael’s as a farmers son. They occupied a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling and John Coyne was the landholder. They also had a piggery.

 

Faherty Family

The Faherty family consisted of 10 members. John (68) was the head of the family and he had been married to his wife Bridget (49) for 30 years and had 13 children of which 12 survived. The children living with them were Charles (23), Philip (18), Anne (16), Bridget (14), Norah (12), Kate (10), John (8) and Gregory (6). All could speak Irish and English and all, except for John and Bridget, could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Johns occupation is listed as a shoe maker, Charles and Philip are listed as fishermen and the other children as scholars. They lived in a 2ndclass, 3 roomed house and they had a cow house. John was the landholder.

 

Mary Mulkerrin

House 7 had only one occupant, that was the widow Mary Mulkerrin (74) an retired farmer. She had Irish and English but could not read. She was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Mary lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and she was the landholder. She also had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house.

 

Coyne Family

John (60) was the head of the family and had been married to his wife Margaret (58) for 6 years and had no children. Both had Irish and English but John could not read, Margaret could read and write however. Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway and Johns occupation is listed as a farmer. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house and John was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

The 8 members of the Coyne family were headed by Philip (52) and his wife Anne (48) who had been married for 20 years and had had 7 children of which 6 survived. Their children were Patrick (18), Mary (17), John (15), Philip (14), Michael (7) and Bridget (6).  All had both Irish and English as a language but Philip (52), Michael and Bridget could not read. All the others could read and write. Anne was born in Co. Mayo and the rest in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholic. Philip’s occupation is listed as a fisherman, Patrick and John as fisherman’s sons and Mary as a fisherman’s daughter. Philip (14) and Michael are listed as scholars.  They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and Philip was the landholder.

 

Kane Family

House 10 in Glassillaun was occupied by the Kane family. Head of the family was Thomas (90) who was a widower but had fathered 10 Children of which 8 survived. His Son and daughter-in-law, Philip (55) and Mary (37) had been married for 7 years and had 3 children, all of whom survived. Thomas’s grandchildren were Michael (6), Thomas (4) and Mary (1).  Philip and Mary (37) could speak both Irish and English, Thomas (90) only Irish and Michael and Thomas (4) only English. All were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. Thomas (90) and Philip had their occupations listed as Fishermen. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with Thomas Kane being the landholder and they also had a cow house and a piggery.

 

Kane family                (additional surnames: Faherty, Laffey)

The family of Philip Kane (77) lived in house 11 according to the 1911 census. He lived there with his wife Mary (74), to whom he had been married for 60 years and they had had 11 children of which 8 had survived. Living in the house with them were his two sons John (39) and Peter (37) along with their niece Sarah Faherty (14) and nephew John Laffey (12). All could speak both Irish and English with John (39), Peter, Sarah and John (12) all being able to read and write and Philip and Mary not being able to read. All were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. Philip (77), John (39) and Peter are listed as being fishermen and Sarah and John (12) as scholars. They all lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling with Philip being the landholder and also had a cow house.

 

Coyne family

Head of the family in this Coyne family was Michael (69) along with his wife Mary (66). Married for 34 years they had had 9 children of which 6 had survived. Living with them they had their son Martin (17) and daughter Norah (15). Michael, Mary and Martin are listed as having both Irish and English, Martin and Norah could read and write but neither Michael or Mary could read. All were Roman Catholic and Michael, Mary and Martin are listed as being born in Co. Galway. Michael’s occupation is listed as a farmer and Martin’s as a farmer’s son. They had a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house along with a cow house and a piggery. Michael was the landholder.

 

Laffey Family

House 13 was the Laffey household. There were 10 members of the Laffey family listed in the 1911 census. Head of the family was Patrick (60) and his wife Sarah (42). Married for 20 years they had had 10 children of which 8 survived. Those children were Thomas (17), Sarah (14), Stephen (12), Anne (10), Julia (8), Patrick (5), Norah (3) and John (1).  All could speak both Irish and English. Sarah (42), Thomas, Sarah (14), Stephen and Anne could read and write but the others could not read. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Patrick (60) had his occupation listed as a farmer and Thomas as a farmers son, Stephen and Anne are listed as Scolars. The dwelling was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and in addition they had a cow house and a piggery. Patrick was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family             (additional surnames: Coyne Andrew)

The Coyne family household was house 14 in the 1911 census and consisted of 4 members. Head of the family was the widow Mary (96). Living with her were her children John (71), Anne (69) and Patrick (67), both John and Patrick were widowers. Mary could only speak Irish but the rest of the family could speak both Irish and English and none could read. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Mary and Patrick are listed as farmers, John a general labourer and Anne as spinning wool. They had a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and a cow house, with Mary being the landholder.

 

Kane Family

This Kane family consisted of 5 members with Mary (70) being the head of the family and a widow. Living with her were her children Tom (25), John (23), Anne (20) and Julia (17). All had both Irish and English but only John, Anne and Julia could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Mary’s occupation is listed as a Farmer, Tom and John as farmer’s sons and Anne and Julia as farmer’s daughters. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house, they also had a cow house and piggery. The landholder is listed as Mary Keane.

 

Kane Family

House 16 was another Kane family, this time with 6 members. Head of the family was Michael (70) and his wife Bridget (50) who had been married for 30 years and had had 10 children of which 7 survived. The children living in their house were Winifred (21), Patrick (19), Ellen (15) and Peter (12). All had both Irish and English and Winifred, Patrick, Ellen and peter could read and write but their parents, Michael and Bridget could not read. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Michael’s occupation is listed as farmer, Winifred’s as a hotel waitress, domestic servant, Patrick as a farmer’s son and Ellen’s as a farmer’s daughter. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and a piggery. Landholder is listed as Michael Keane.

 

Faherty Family

The Faherty family consisted of just 3 members. Head of the family was the widower Edward (74) and Patrick (34) and Kate (24), his children lived with him. All had both Irish and English but only Kate could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Edward is listed as a farmer and Patrick a farmer’s son. They lived in a 1 room, 4thclass house with a barn. Edward was the landholder.

 

Conroy Family

The Conroy family lived in house 18 in Glassillaun as listed in the 1911 census. Head of the household was James (68) who had been married to his wife Mary (66) for 38 years in which time they had had 11 children of which 9 survived. Living with them they had their children Philip (26), John (19), Annie (17) and Tom (15). All had both Irish and English but only Philip, John, Annie and Tom could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James’ occupation is listed as a farmer, Philip and John’s as fishermen and Annie as farming. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house with cow house, calf house and a piggery, and James was the landholder.

 

Walsh Family

The Walsh family consisted of 6 members in the house 19 in Glassillaun in the 1911 census. Head of the family was John (38) who was married to his wife Mary Anne (32) for 11 years and  had 4 children all of whom survived. Their children were Bridget (10), Mary Anne (8), Annie (5) and Ellen (2). All had both Irish and English but only John, Mary Anne (32) and Bridget could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway and John’s occupation is listed as a fisherman. They lived in a 4thclass, 1 roomed house

And John was the landholder.

 

Walsh Family

House 20 belonged to the Walsh family with three occupants. Head of the family was John (76) who was married to Bridget (74) for 56 years in which time they had had 11 children of which only 5 survived. Their son Pat (30) also lived in the house with them. All three had both Irish and English but only Pat could read and write. John was born in Co. Mayo and Bridget and Pat were born in Co. Galway and all three were Roman Catholic. John was a farmer and Pat a farm labourer. The house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling with John being the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

Only two members of the Coyne family listed in this house. Head of the family was the widower Martin (95) and his son Phill (30). Neither could read, martin only had Irish and Phill had both Irish and English. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin’s occupation is listed as a farmer and Phill as a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house with a cow house, calf house and a piggery with Martin being the landholder.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Glassillaun

Mary Conroy– Application No.: C17 8703 Mary’s application was received on 15/11/1917 and an address of Mrs John Coyne Senr, Lettergesh East, Renvyle, Co. Galway is given. Her parents were Michael and Sarah (or sally) (Lyden). Her address in 1851 is given as Glassillaun Co. Galway. The search was returned on 19/11/1917 saying that Michael and Sarah were not found but a Michael and Isabella, married in 1842 was found with the children being Patt(15), Thos (10), Nancy (7), Bridget (4) and Mary (1 ½). A hand written note says “Note: the mother’s name is given as Isabella but the names of the children correspond to those given by you” and dated 04/12/1917

 

Patrick Joyce– Application No.: C17 2922. Patrick’s application was received on 11/04/17 with an address at that time of c/o Mrs Elizabeth Flaherty, No. 18 Edward Street, South Shields, Co. Durham. Patrick’s parents were Patrick and Bridget Joyce nee Faherty, This was Bridget’s second husband as she was married first to Austin Coyne. His address in 1851 is given as Culfin, Glassillaun Co. Galway. The search return is dated 16/04/1917 with the wording “Family of Patk and Bridget Joyce not found. Found two families of Patk and Bridget Coyne see other side” Patrick was granted a pension of 2s on 17/04/1917.

 

On the other sideof this application were some hand written notes:

Sheet 5 Glassillaun

Pat                   Coyne             45        Head    married 1843

Bridget                        “                      45        wife

Pat                   “                      16        son

Mary               “                      11        dau

Kate                “                      6          “

Anne               “                      2          “

John                “                      7          son      Died 1843

Bridget            “                      2          dau      “          “

Anne               “                      2mths  “          “       1847

 

Sheet 8 Salrock

Bridget                        Cain                 40        Head    Married 1836

Martin             “                      13        son

Patk                 “                      9          “

Mary               “                      7          dau

Catherine         “                      2          “

Patk                 Cain                 40        husband          absent in America

John                “                      5          son      dies      1849

Thos                “                      1          “          “          1849

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation(1847-1864) for Glassillaun

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Alexander Thompson leased tenements to Connor Faherty, James Faherty, Martin Faherty, Michael Conroy, Charles Faherty, John Faherty, John Martin, Michael Keane, Thomas Keane, Martin Coyne, Daniel Keane, Philip Coyne, Patrick Coyne and John Gaffney. Alexander Thompson had a total of 322 Acres of land of which he kept 242 Acres 3 Roods and 25 Perches for himself at a ratable annual valuation of £14. He leased 2 sections of land jointly to Connor, James and Martin Faherty. The first section had an area of 15 Acres, 2 Roods and 35 Perches which each man had an annual rate of £1 10s. Martin Faherty also had a house on this piece of land at an annual rate of 5s. The second section of land had an area of 12 Acres, 2 Roods and 10 Perches and this land had an annual ratable valuation of £1 to each man. Connor and James also had a house and office each on this land for which they had an annual rate of 7s for Connor and 8s for James.  Michael Conroy, Charles Faherty and John Faherty jointly leased land of 13 Acres, 2 Roods and 32 Perches from Alexander at an annual valuation of £1 15s for Michael Conroy and Charles Faherty and £1 2s for John Faherty. They also had a house each and Michael Conroy had an office as well for which each had an annual rate of 5s. John Martin and Michael Keane lease an area of 10 Acres, 1 Rood and 37 Perches at an annual rate of £1 15s each John Martin also paid 8s for a house and Michael Keane paid 5s for his house. Thomas Keane leased an area of 6 Acres, 1 rood at an annual rate of £2 and he had a house at a rate of 5s. Martin Coyne leased an area of land of 15 acres, 2 roods and 2 Perches at a rate of £2 10s he also had a house at a rate of 5s. Daniel Keane and Philip Coyne jointly lease 4 Acres, 3 Roods and 27 perches from Alexander for 15s each and each had a house for the rate of 5s annually. Patrick Coyne leased just a house at an annual rate of 5s. John Gaffney also only leased a house at 15s annually.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Glassillaun

The down survey name for Glassillaun was Ilandcrunny Island. In 1641 the owner was Sir Robert Cressey and in 1670 the owner was Cressey Taseborough and both where protestant. It had 41 plantation acres of profitable land and 41 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

Glencraff

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Glencraff

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       1556.26 acres / 1556 acres, 1 rood, 1 perch

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Glencraff

Logainm for Glencraff

NUI Galway Digital Collections forGlencraff

 

 

1911 Censusfor Glencraff

Overview of Glencraff in 1911.

The 1911 census lists 3 households in Glencraff with 22 persons, 11 male and 11 female. The enumerator was Acting Sergeant Patrick Phelam. The return forms were collected on 11/04/1911. All 3 houses in Glencraff had stone, brick or concrete walls, houses 1 and 3 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and house 2 had thatch, wood or other perishable material for a roof. All are recorded as private dwellings. House 1 had 3 rooms and 5 windows in the front, house 2 had 2 rooms and 2 windows and house 3 had 4 rooms and 3 windows. All houses were occupied with houses 1 and 3 being 2ndclass and house 2 being 3rdclass dwellings. All together there were 3 stables, 1 coach house, 3 cow houses, 3 piggeries, 1 shed and 1 store.

 

O’Neill Family            (additional surnames: Joyce)

House 1 in the 1911 census for Glencraff was the home of the O’Neill family. Head of the family was the widower John (74). With him in the house were his son James (38) and his wife Anne (31) who had been married for 8 years and had had 4 children all of whom survived. Their children Sarah J (5), Bridget C (4), and Patrick J. (2) were also in the house along with a Bridget Joyce ((18) who is listed as a servant. The children, Sarah J., Bridget C and Patrick S. could only speak English while the others had both Irish and English. Bridget C. and Patrick S. could not read, Sarah J. could read and the rest could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Both John and James are listed as being farmers, Sarah J. and Bridget C. are listed as scholars while Bridget Joyce is listed as a domestic servant. They lived in a 2ndclass 5, roomed house with a stable, a coach house, a cow house and a piggery. James O’Neill was the landholder.

 

Thornton Family

The Thornton family in house 2 consisted of 3 members. Head of the family was John (50) and Anne (47) who had been married for 14 years and had 1 child, a daughter, Mary (12) who survived and was living in the house. While John and Anne could speak both Irish and English, Mary could only speak English. John could not read but Anne and Mary could both read and write. All three were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. John is listed as being a farmer and Mary as being a scholar. They lived in a 3rdclass, 4 roomed house with a stable, cow house and piggery, and John Thornton was the landholder.

 

O’Neill family             (additional surname: Coyne)

The O’Neill household (house 3) had 12 people in the house on the night 02/04/1911. The head of the family was Michael (58) who had been married to his wife Bridget (48) for 30 years and had had 13 children of which 9 survived. With them in the house were their children Kate A. (24), Patrick J. (23), Anna (17), John F. (13), Helena (11), James H. (9), Bridget M. (7), Michael M. (5) and Christopher S. (3), also in the house that night was Stephen Coyne (20). James H., Bridget M., Michael M. and Christopher S. could only speak English with all the others having both Irish and English. Michael M. and Christopher S. could not read, Bridget M. could read only and all the other members of the household could both read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Occupations are listed as Michael being a farmer, Patrick J. as a farmer’s son and Stephen Coyne as a farm labourer. They lived in a 2ndclass, 9 roomed house with a stable, cow house, piggery, shed and a store. Michael O’Neill was the landholder.

 

 

1901 Censusfor Glencraff

Overview of Glencraff in 1901.

There were 3 houses listed in the 1901 census for Glencraff but only 2 were inhabited with a total of 12 persons, 6 male and 6 female. Michael O’Neill was the landholder of the uninhabited house 3. All three house were listed as private dwellings. Both house 1 and house 2 had stone, iron or concrete for walls, house 1 had thatch, wood or other perishable material for a roof while house 2 had slate, iron or tiles for roofing. House 1 had 2 rooms with 2 windows and house 2 had 5 rooms and 3 windows.

 

Thornton Family

Head of the household was John (40) and his wife Annie (40) and with them in the house was their daughter Mary (2). Both John and Annie could speak both Irish and English, but only Annie could read only. All three were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. John is listed as being a farmer. They lived in a 3rdclass, 3 roomed house and John was the landholder.

 

O’Neill Family            (additional surname: O’Malley)

Head of the household was Michael (46) and his wife Bridget (37). Also in the house were their children, Katie A. (15), Patrick J. (13), Anne (8), John F. (4) Helena (2) and James H. (1). Also in the house was James O’Malley (19). All with the exception John F., Helena and James H. had both Irish and English Language. John F., Helena and James H. could not read, Anne could read and the rest could read and write. All were members of the Catholic Church and born in Co. Galway. Michael and Bridget are listed as farmers, Katie A and Patrick J are listed as Scholars, and James O’Malley listed as a servant.  They lived in a 2ndclass, 10 roomed house and Michael was the landholder.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Glencraff

Catherine Thornton– Application No. C16 6421. Catherine’s application was received on 25/10/1916 with an address given as Mrs Catherine Sullivan, Tooreena, Renvyle, Galway. Her parents are listed as Thady and Mary Thornton. The search was returned on 26/10/1916 and a copy was dispatched to the applicants address on 28/10/1916.

 

Patrick Lyden– Application No. C21 8011. Patrick’s application was received on 28/12/1921 with an address at Derrynaclough, Leenane, Co. Galway. His parents are given as Patrick and Honor Lyden (Coyne). Address given in 1851 is Derrynacleigh, Glencraff. Search was returned on 09/01/1922

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Glencraff

In the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Glencraff in states that Alexander Thompson leased tenements to 3 persons, Marcus S. Blackden, Patrick O’Neill and Thaddeus Thornton. Marcus S. Blackden leased an area of 300 Acres, 1 Rood and 32 Perches on which he had a herd’s house. For this his annual ratable valuation was £20 for the land and 5s for the building. Patrick O’Neill and Thaddeus Thornton jointly leased and area of land of 375 Acres, 2 Roods and 25 Perches and they both had houses and offices there. For this, their annual rate was, for Patrick, £14 15s for the land and £2 5s for the buildings and Thaddeus paid £13 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Patrick O’Neill also leased an area of land of 820 Acres, 3 Roods and 7 Perches on which he had a herd’s house. For this his annual rate was £29 10s for the land and 10s for the building.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Glencraff

The downs survey name for this area was Glancrawe. In 1641 the owner was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and in 1670 Sir Thomas Meredith was the owner and he was a protestant. There were 2029 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 319 plantation acres of profitable land and 319 acres were forfeited.

 

 

Inishbarna

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Inishbarna

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       25.53 acres / 25 acres, 2 roods, 5 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

1911 Census for Inishbarna  (no records)

1901 Census for Inishbarna  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Inishbarna  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Inishbarna

1670 Down Survey for Inishbarna

Logainm for Inishbarna

NUI Galway Digital Collections forInishbarna  (no records)

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation(1847-1864) for Inishbarna

Alexander Thompson was the immediate Lessor of the area that was Inishbarna Island according to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864). For this he had an annual ratable valuation of £1 5s for the area of 19 Acres, 3 Roods and 28 Perches.

 

 

Kylemore

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Kylemore

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       5032.54 acres / 5032 acres, 2 roods, 6 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Kylemore

1670 DownSurvey for Kylemore

Logainm for Kylemore

NUI Galway Digital Collections forKylemore

 

 

1911 Censusfor Kylemore

Overview of Kylemore in 1911

The 1911 census lists 13 buildings in Kylmore, 12 of which were inhabited and the enumerator was Const. Thomas Casey. House 10 was the national school with all the others recorded as private dwellings. The landholder for the national school was Lord Ardilaun. All the houses had stone, brick or concrete walls. 5 of the house’s (1,2,6,7and 13) had slate, iron or tiles as roofing with the other inhabited dwellings having thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House’s 1 and 6 were 1stclass dwellings with house 1 having 6 rooms and 9 windows in the front and house 6 having 4 rooms and 6 windows. House’s 2,4,5,7,9 and 13 were 2ndclass houses with  house’s 4,5 and 9 having 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 7 having 2 rooms and 4 windows, house 2 having 3 rooms and 2 windows, house 13 having 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were a total of 60 persons living in Kylemore with 30 each of male and female. Out offices and farm-steadings included 7 stables, 2 coach houses, a harness room, 12 cow houses, 2 piggeries, a fowl house, 4 stores and a boat house.

 

 McNabb family         (additional surname: McNamara)

House 1 in Kylemore was the residence of Emma McNabb (42) and a boarder, Delia McNamara (24). Emma is listed as having both Irish and English language and both could read and write. Emma was Church of Ireland and Delia Roman Catholic and both were born in Co. Mayo. Emma’s occupation is listed as housekeeper domestic servant and Delia is listed as a national school teacher. The building was a 1stclass, 24 roomed building and Lord Ardilaun was the landholder. With the house they also had a stable, coach house, harness room, piggery, barn, 4 stores and a boat house.

 

Cunningham Family

Head of the family was George (48) and living with him was his wife Frances Clarence (47) who had been married for 25 years. Both could read and write but language is not listed. George was born in Co. Louth and Francis in Co. Wicklow and both were Church of Ireland. George’s occupation is listed as a land steward. The house they occupied was a 2ndclass, 5 roomed house and the landholder was Lord Ardilaun. They also had a cow house and a barn.

 

Conry Family

Head of the family was Thomas (58) who had been married to his wife, Mary Anne (50) for 26 years and they had had 10 children, all of whom survived. Their children listed in the house were Mary (23), Norah (17), Ellen (14), Catherine (13), Thomas (11), Stephen (9), Margaret (5) and Julia E. (3). There is no listing under language for Margaret and Julia E. but all the rest had both Irish and English. Mary Anne, Margaret and Julia E. could not read, Stephen could read and the rest could all both read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas’ occupation is listed as farmer and Catherine, Thomas and Stephen were scholars. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and Thomas Conry was the landholder. In addition they had a stable, cow house and a piggery.

 

Conroy Family

In house 4 the Conroy family consisted of 6 members with the head of the family being Patt (70) along with his wife Bridget (64) who had been married for 42 years and had had 13 children of which 12 survived. 4 of their children were in the house at this time and they were Michael (25), Maggie (23), Dan (20) and Thomas (18). All could read and write and all had both Irish and English language. They were all born in Co. Galway and Roman Catholic. Patt’s occupation is listed as a farmer and Michael, Dan and Thomas as farmer’s sons. The house they occupied was a 2ndclass, 5 roomed dwelling with a stable and 2 cow houses. Patrick Conroy was the landholder.

 

Conroy Family

Another Conroy family lived in house 5 in the 1911 census. Head of the family was the widow Ellen (90) who had been married for 68 years and had had 9 children, of which 7 had survived. In the house with her were her son John (47) and his wife Anne (38) who had been married for 15 years and had had 2 children, both of which had survived. John and Anne’s children, Bridget (14) and Anne (11) also lived in the house. All had both Irish and English and all, except Ellen, could read and write. All the family were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. John’s occupation is listed as a farmer and Bridget’s is listed as a farmer’s son (for some reason?), with Anne down as a scholar. They had a 2ndclass, 3 roomed house and Ellen Conroy was the landholder.

 

Conroy Family           (additional surnames: King, Walsh)

House 6 was yet another Conroy household. Head of the family here is not listed so was probably absent on the day of the census. The heads wife was Sarah Jane (22) who had been married for 4 years and had 3 children, Daniel Webster (3), Margaret Christina (2) and Angela Nora (1). Also in the house were 2 servants, Bridget King (18) and Colman Walsh (20). Only Bridget and Colman are listed as having a language and both had Irish and English. Sarah Jane, Bridget and Colman could read and write while the others could not. All were Roman Catholic and were born in County Galway and Bridget is listed as a domestic servant and Colman a farm servant. The dwelling was a 1stclass, 7 roomed house with a stable, coach house cow house and fowl house. The landholder was Lord Ardilaun.

 

Conroy Family           (additional surname: Joyce)

The head of this Conroy household was John D. (55) and his wife Honorah (sic) (56) who were married for 23 years and had had 9 children of which 8 survived, their children were John (19), Peter (16), Thomas (9) Daniel J. (7), Patrick Laurence (sic)  (1), Delia Agnes (17), Mary Anne (14) and Barbra Ellen (11). All, with the exception of Patrick Larence (sic) had Irish and English language. Patrick Larence (sic) and Honorah (sic) could not read but all the rest could read and write. All the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John D’s occupation is listed as a farmer, John and peters are listed as farmer’s sons and Thomas, Daniel J., Delia Agnes, Mary Anne and Barbra Ellen were scholars. The dwelling was a 2ndclass, 3 roomed house and they had a stable and a cow house. Lord Ardilaun was the landholder.

 

Conroy Family           (additional surnames: Joyce, Nee)

Michael D. (39), a single man was the head of the family. In the house with him were his 2 nephews, Michael H. Joyce (20) and Patrick Joyce (18) as well as his niece Delia A. Nee (20). All could read and write and all had Irish and English language. Michael D, Michael H and Patrick were born in Glencorbet and Delia was born in Lugnanaugh, all were Roman Catholic. Michael D. is listed as a farmer, Michael H. and Patrick are listed as farm servants with Delia being a general servant. The house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house with 2 cow houses and the landholder was Lord Ardilaun.

 

Walsh Family

House 9 in the 1911 census was that of the Walsh family consisting of 9 members. Patrick (50) was the head of the family and married to his wife Honour (sic)(40) for 20 years in which time they had 10 children of which 9 survived. Their children in the house were Anne (16), Michael (13), Patrick (11), Thomas (9), Nora (7), Gregory (5) and James (1). With the exception of Nora, Gregory and James they could all speak Irish and English. Honour (sic) and Gregory could read, James could not read and the others could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and Born in Co. Galway. Patrick (50) is listed as being a farmer and Michael a farmer’s son. Patrick (11), Thomas, Nora and Gregory were scholars. They lived in a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house with stable. Patrick Walsh was the landholder.

 

Joyce Family

House 11 on the 1911 census for Kylmore was the Joyce household, house 10 was the national school. Head of the family was Thomas (60) a widower. Also living with him was his brother John (58) and his sister-in-law Honor (40), her and john had been married for 8 years and had had 2 children. Those children were also in the house and they were John Joseph (6) and Mary Alice (3). There was also a John Joyce (15) in the house and was listed under ‘relation to head’ as servant. Thomas, John (58), Honor and John (15) had both Irish and English as a language but only Honor could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Thomas is listed as being a farmer, John (15) as being a farm servant and John Joseph as being a scholar. The house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass building with a stable and a cow house. The landholder was Lord Ardilaun.

 

Mannion Family

The head of the Mannion family was the widow Mary (43) who had been married for 25 years and had had 6 children. With her in the house were her children Thomas (22), Mary Anne (20), John (17), Bridgit (14) and Norah (11). All had both Irish and English language and all, apart from Mary, could read and write. All the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary’s occupation is listed as a farmer with Thomas being listed as a shepherd and John, Bridgit and Norah were scholars. The building they lived in was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling and had a cow house. Mary Mannion was the landholder.

 

Joyce Family

The last house on the 1911 census for Kylemore was that of the Joyce family that consisted of 4 members. The head of the family was Patrick (45) and his wife Barbra E.(sic)  (34) and they had been married for 11 years and had 1 child. Their son Michael H (6 mths) also lived with them along with John Joyce (21) who is listed under ‘Relation to Head’ as Servant. All, apart from Michael H. could speak both Irish and English but only Barbra E.(sic) could read and write. Patrick was born in Lesoughter, Co. Galway, Barbra E. and Michael H. were born in Glencorbet, Co. Galway and John in Deravama, Co. Galway. All were Roman Catholic. Patrick is listed as a shepherd and John as a general servant. The building was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house with a cow house. The landholder was Lord Ardilaun.

 

 

1901 Censusfor Kylemore

Overview of Kylemore in 1901.

The 1901 census lists 12 dwellings in Kylemore, of which 11 were inhabited. The enumerator was Const. Thomas Burke. There were a total of 68 people living there with 31 male and 37 female. They all had stone, brick or concrete walls, with 4 (houses 1,8,11 and 12) having slate, iron or tiles for roofing. The rest had only thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. All houses were listed as private dwellings although house 12 was uninhabited but the landholder was Lord Ardilaun. Houses 3,4,5,6,7,9,and 10 were 3rdclass dwellings, houses 1,2 and 8 were 2ndclass dwellings and houses 11 and 12 were 1stclass dwellings. Houses 3,4,5,6,7,9 and 10 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front of the house, houses 2 and 8 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 11 had 6 rooms and 6 windows in the front and house 12 4 rooms and 6 windows.

 

Joyce Family              (additional surname: Coyne)

House 1 was the Joyce household and the head was Pat (82) along with his wife Alice (80). In the house with them were their grandchildren Bridget Coyne (19) and John Coyne (10). All could speak both Irish and English but none could read or write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Pat is listed as being a caretaker and Alice as a caretaker’s wife. Bridget was a domestic servant and John a scholar. They had a 2ndclass, 6 roomed building and Lord Ardilaun was the landholder.

 

Conroy Family

The Conroy household consisted of 10 members. Head of the family was John (27) and his wife Anne (25). With them lived John’s mother Ellen (75) and their children Bridget (3) and Anne (2). Also in the house was John’s cousin Thomas (30) and his wife Mary (25) along with their children Mary (5), Patrick (4) and Ellie (1). John, Anne, Ellen, Thomas and Mary are listed as having both Irish and English and John, Anne, Thomas and Mary could read and write but the others couldn’t. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. John and Thomas have their occupations listed as farmer’s, Anne and Mary as farmer’s wives and Ellen as farmer’s mother. They had a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house and John Conroy was the landholder.

 

Walsh Family

House 3 was the Walsh household of 7 members. The head was Pat (40) and his wife Norah (30) along with their children Mary (8), Anne (6), Kate (4), Michael (3) and Patrick (1). Pat, Norah, Mary and Kate are listed as speaking both Irish and English and, along with Kate, could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Pat’s occupation is listed as a farmer, Norah, a farmer’s wife, Mary, Anne and Kate as farmer’s daughters and Michael and Patrick as farmer’s sons. The building was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling and John Walsh was the landholder.

 

Conry Family

The Conry family consisted of 9 members with Patt (57) being the head of the family. With him were his wife Bridget (49) and their children Patrick (22), Norah (20), Peter (17), Michael (15), Margaret (13), Daniel (9) and Thomas (6). All, with the exception of Thomas, could read and write and had both Irish and English, Thomas could read only and only had English. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Patrick is listed as being a farmer, Bridget as a farmer’s wife, Patrick, Peter and Michael as farmer’s sons, Norah as farmers daughter and Margaret, Daniel and Thomas as scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and Pat Conry was the landholder.

 

Joyce Family

The head of the Joyce family was Tom (48) who lived with his brother John (43) and niece Bridget (15). All had both Irish and English language but only Bridget could read and write. All three were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Tom and John are listed as being farmers and Bridget a servant. The house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and Tom Joyce was the landholder.

 

Conry Family

House 6 in the 1901 census was that of the 9 members of the Conry family. Head of the family was Thomas (47) and his wife Mary (36). With them in the house were there 7 children, Mary (12), Bridget (10), Anne (9), Norah (8), Elly (7), Kate (6) and Thomas (1). Thomas and the two Mary’s are listed as having both Irish and English but nothing is listed for the others. Mary (36), Elly, Kate and Thomas are listed as ‘cannot read’, the others could both read and write.

All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas is listed as being a farmer, Mary (36) as a farmer’s wife, Mary (12), Bridget, Anne, Norah, Elly and Kate listed as farmer’s daughters and Thomas (1) as a farmer’s son. The house was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house and the landholder was Thomas Conry.

 

Joyce Family

The Joyce family lived what is listed as house 7 and consisted of only 2 members. Head of the family Patrick (33) and his wife Barbra (24). Both could speak Irish and English, Patrick could not read but Barbra could read and write. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick’s occupation is listed as a herd and Barbra’s as a herd’s wife. Their house was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed dwelling and Patrick Joyce was the landholder.

 

Conroy family                        (additional surname: Joyce)

The Conroy family in house 8 consisted of 8 members. John (34) was the head and his wife Honor (30) along with their children, John (9), Peter (7), Delea (8), Mary Anne (5), Barbara (2) and a sevant, Peter Joyce (12). All had Irish and English and Honor and Barbara could not read, Mary Anne could read only and the rest could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. John’s occupation is listed as a heard and Honor as a heard’s wife. The children, John, Peter, Delea, Mary Anne and Barbara were scholars. Their house was a 2ndclass, 8 roomed house and John Conroy was the landholder.

 

Mannion Family

The 1901 census lists house 9 in Kylemore as that of the Mannion family. The head of the family was Pat (60) and his wife Mary (40). Their 5 children also lived with them and they were Thomas (13), Martin (11), Mary (10), John (6) and Bridget (2). Pat, Mary (40) and Martin could speak both Irish and English and the others only had English. Thomas, Martin and Mary (10) could read and write and the others could not. The family were all born in Co. Galway and were also all Roman Catholic. Pat is listed as being a farmer, Mary (40), a farmer’s wife while Thomas, Martin, Mary (10) and John were scholars. Their house was a 3rdClass, 2 roomed dwelling and Pat was the landholder.

 

Conroy Family           (additional Names: Joyce)

House 10 was that of the Conroy family that consisted of 5 members. The head of the family was Honor (56), a widow. With her in the house was her son Michael (28), her daughter Honor Joyce (26), also a widow and her 2 grandsons Michael Joyce (10) and Patrick Joyce (8). Honor (56) could speak both Irish and English but the other members of the family could only speak English, all could read and write. The family were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Honor’s occupation was listed as a farmer with Michael listed as a farmer’s son and Honor Joyce as a farmer’s daughter. Michael and Patrick Joyce were scholars. Their house was a 3rdclass 2 roomed dwelling and the landholder was Honor Conroy.

 

McNab Family

The 4 members of the McNab family had Thomas (66) as their head. His wife Honor (64) and their 2 daughters, Emma (34) and Margaret (29) also lived in the house. They could all read and write although only Thomas and Honor are listed with a language and that was only English. All were born in Co. Mayo and their religion is listed as Episcopalian. Thomas was a farmer and Honor a farmer’s wife with Emma listed as a house keeper. Their house was a 1stclass, 14 roomed house and the landholder was Lord Ardilaun.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Kylemore

 

Thomas Conroy (Ellen)– Application No. C21 7140. Thomas’ application was dated 16/11/1921 and gave an address of Kylemore Co. Galway. His parents are listed as Patrick and Honor Conroy (Mannion) There are two addresses are given on the application for 1851. (A) was Kylemore in the parish of Ballynakill, in the barony of Ballynahinch in the County of Galway. (B) was Kylemore in the parish of Ballynakill, the barony of Leitrim in the county of Galway. A cross was entered under the first address. 7 names are hand written in the left column, they are Barbara 5 yrs, Patrick 8 yrs then Bridget, Mary, Honor, Ellen and John but no ages for those. Search was returned on 02/12/1921 saying ‘found married 1840 ? son Thomas ?. Thomas was awarded a pension of 3s.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Kylemore

Thomas Eyre leased an area of land of 328 Acres, 1 Rood and 28 Perches to the Rev. Joseph Duncan on which he had a hotel and office. For this there was an annual ratable valuation of £5 for the land and £18 for the buildings. In addition, Rev. Duncan had a schoolhouse and land of 1 Acre, 1 Rood and 18 Perches for which had a ratable valuation of 7s for the land and £1 8s for the building. These charges were exempt from payment however. Patrick O’Neill leased an area of land of 907 Acres, 1 Rood and 29 Perches from Thomas Eyre for which he paid £21 annually.

John Hillaun, Patrick Lyden and Michael Conroy jointly leased an area of land 1030 Acres, 1 Rood and 24 Perches from Thomas Eyre. John Hillaun had a house and offices on the land for which he paid £10 10s for the land and 10s for the buildings. Patrick Lyden and Michael Conroy had a house each on the land and they paid £5 5s each for the land and 10s each for the buildings. William Joyce also leased land, house and offices from Thomas Eyre of an area of 105 Acres and 17 Perches. For this he paid £5 for the land and 15s for the buildings. Martin Joyce leased an area of land of 187 Acres and 3 Roods, again, from Thomas Eyre for an annual rate of £7 10s. Next was Austin Gibbons who leased an area of 238 Acres, 0 roods and 38 Perches on which he had a herd’s house. For this he paid £5 10s for the land and 5s for the building. Thomas Eyre leased an area of 417 Acres 3 Roods and 33 Perches jointly to Thad Prendergast, John Mullin, Patrick Browne and Patrick McDonnell. They had no buildings so Thad, John and Patrick paid £4 5s for their share and Patrick paid £3 5s for his. Thadeus Prendergast and Partners leased a herd’s house from Thomas Eyre and 5s per year. 466 Acres, 2 Roods and 19 Perches were leased from Thomas Eyre jointly by Patrick Conroy, Patrick Manning, John Manning, Daniel Conroy, John Conroy and Edward Diamond. On this land Patrick Manning had a house, John Manning had a house and office and John Conroy had a herd’s house. Patrick Conroy, Patrick Manning and John Manning paid £2 for the land and Patrick and John Manning paid 10s each for the buildings. Daniel Conroy, John Conroy and Edward Diamond paid £2 5s each for their share of the land and John Conroy paid 5s for the herd’s house. Peter Lyden, John Manning, John Hillaun and Patrick Lyden leased equally from Thomas Eyre and area of land of 1334 Acres, 3 Roods and 34 Perches for which they paid £4 each, there no buildings. Also in Kylemore there was 18 Acres, 1 Rood and 7 Perches of water.

 

 

Lecknavarna

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Lecknavarna

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       1275.82 acres / 1275 acres, 3 roods, 10 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Lecknavarna  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Lecknavarna

Logainm for Lecknavarna

NUI Galway Digital Collections forLecknavarna

 

 

1911 Censusfor Lecknavarna

Overview of Lecknavarna in 1911.

The 1911 census for lecknavarna lists only 1 household with 5 males and 4 females. The house is recorded as being a private dwelling with stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. It had 2 rooms with 3 windows in the front of the house.

 

Connelly Family

The Connelly household consisted of 9 members at the time of the 1911 census. Head of the family was William (67) who had been married to his wife Julia (52) for 30 years and had had 10 children of which 7 survived. Their children were Simon (20), Michael (18), Patrick (15), Bridget (14), Alice (12), Martin (8) and Julia (6). All could speak both Irish and English, Julia (52) and Julia (6) could not read, Martin could read and the rest of the family could both read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and Roman Catholic. William and Simon are listed as being shepherds and Michael as a labourer. They lived in a 2ndclass, 3 roomed house with a cow house and a piggery. Michael O’Neill was the landholder.

 

1901 Census forLecknavarna

Overview of Lecknavarna in 1901.

The 1901 census lists 2 houses with only the first one being inhabited. There were a total of 10 people with 6 male and 4 females. The landholder of the second house was Lord Ardilaun. Both houses had stone, brick or concrete for walls. House 1 had thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing where as house 2 had slate, iron or tiles for a roof. House 1 was a 3rdclass house with 2 rooms and 2 windows and house 2 was a 2ndclass house with 4 rooms and 4 windows.

 

Conneely family

Head of the Conneely family was William (48) and his wife Julia (37) and with them lived their 8 children. Their children were Mary (16), Joseph (14), John (13), Simon (10), Michael (7), Patrick (4), Bridget (3) and Anne (1). Only William, Julia, Mary, Joseph and Simon are listed as speaking Irish and English, there is no entry for the others in the family. Julia, Patrick, Bridget and Anne could not read, the others could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. William is listed as being a shepherd, Julia a shepherd’s wife and Mary a shepherd’s daughter. The other children, with the exception of Anne, were listed as being scholars. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and William was the landholder.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Lecknavarna

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) the immediate lessor in Lecknavarna was the Rev. Joseph Duncan. He had an area of land of 1261 Acres, 1 Rood and 11 Perches for which he paid an annual rate of £16 5s for the land and 15s for a herd’s house. He leased a house to each of Abraham Shannon, Anthony Nee and Mary Joyce. Abraham paid a rate of 10s and Anthony and Mary a rate of 5s per year. There was also a Roman Catholic chapel that had an annual ratable valuation of £2 but that was exempt from payment. There was also an area of 14 Acres, 1 Rood and 35 Perches of water in Lecknavarna.

 

 

1670 Down Survey forLecknavarna

The Down Survey name for Lecknavarna was Licknevarne & Candughell. The 1641 owner was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was the College of Dublin. There were 482 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 32 plantation acres of profitable land. 32 plantation acres of land were forteited.

 

 

 

Letterettrin

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Letterettrin

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       404.91 acres / 404 acres, 3 roods, 26 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Letterettrin  (no records)

Logainm for Letterettrin

NUI Galway Digital Collections forLetterettrin

Map

Galway Library for Letterettrin

 

 

1911 Census for Letterettrin

Overview of Letterettrin in 1911.

The 1911 census lists 4 houses in Letterettrin of which house 2 was uninhabited but the landholder was Captain Mack. There were 16 people, 10 male and 6 female. The enumerator was Patrick Phelan. All houses had stone, brick or concrete for walls and houses 1 and 2 having Slate, iron or tiles for roofing and houses 3 and 4 having thatch, wood or other perishable material. All houses were private dwellings. Houses 1 and 3 were 3rdclass buildings with 2 rooms and 2 windows, house 2 was a 1stclass house with 5 rooms and 6 windows but house 4 was a 4thclass house with 1 room and no windows. The out office and farm-steadings return lists 1 stable, 2 coach houses, 3 cow houses, 2 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, 1 turf house and a shed.

 

McDonnell Family

House 1 in Letterettrin was that of the McDonnell family with 9 members. Head of the family was Michael (37) along with his wife Ellen (34) who had been married for 15 years and had had 8 children of which 7 survived. Their children were Patrick (13), Ellen (9), Katie (8), John (6), Philip (5), Michael (3) and Auntony (sic) (1). Michael (37), Ellen (34) and Patrick had both Irish and English language and the rest only had English. Michael (37), Ellen (34), Patrick, Ellen (9) and Katie could read and write but the others could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael’s occupation is listed as a caretaker, Ellen (34) a house keeper, Patrick a school boy and Ellen and Katie as school girls. The house as a 2ndclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a fowl house. Captain Mack was the landholder.

 

Keane Family

The Keane family had 4 members in 1911. The head of the family was Thomas (42) who had been married to his wife May 42) for 12 years and they had had 3 children of which 2 had survived. Their children were Mary Agnes (8) and John (1). Thomas, Mary and Mary Agnes could speak Irish and English. Thomas could read, Mary and Mary Agnes could read and write and John could not read. Thomas, Mary and John were born in Co. Galway and Mary Agnes was born in America and all were Roman Catholic. Thomas was a farmer and Mary Agnes a scholar. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a cow house, piggery and a shed and Thomas Keane was the landholder.

 

Keane Family

The second Keane family in Letterettrin was headed by Philip (46) who had been married to his wife Annie (34) for 4 years and had had 2 children but only 1 had survived. That child was Patrick (1). Philip and Annie had both Irish and English language and only Annie could read and write. All 3 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Philip was a farmer. The house they occupied was a 4thclass, 1 roomed dwelling with a cow house and a piggery. Philip was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Letterettrin

Ovweview of Letterettrin in 1901.

The 1901 census lists 3 buildings in Letterettrin although house 2 was uninhabited but the landholder was C.H. Thomson Esq, all are listed as private dwellings. The enumerator was Const. Patrick Flannery. There were a total of  5 people, 2 male and 3 female living there. The 2 inhabited houses had stone, brick or concrete for walls. House 1 Thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing and house 3 had slate, iron or tiles. Both inhabited houses had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front of the house, house 1 was a 3rdclass dwelling with house 3 being 2ndclass.

 

McDonnell family

This McDonnell family was headed by the widow Mary (52) and with her in the house was her daughter Bridget (13). Both had Irish and English and could read and write. Both were born in Co. Galway and Roman Catholic. Mary was a farmer and Bridget a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling and the landholder was C.H. Thomson Esq.

 

McDonnell Family

In this McDonnell family the head of the family was Michael (29) and his wife Ellen (30) and their son Patrick (3). Michael and Ellen could speak both Irish and English and both could also read and write. All 3 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is listed as being a caretaker. The lived in a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house and the landholder was C. H. Thomson Esq.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Letterettrin

Alexander Thompson had an area of land for himself of 383 Acres, 1 Rood and 30 Perches at an annual ratable valuation of £9. He leased an area of 13 Acres, 0 roods and 30 Perches to Surgeon Wilde on which there was an unfurnished house. He paid £1 for the land. Also, there was an area of water of 3Acres, 0 Roods and 6 Perches.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Letterettrin

The Down Survey name for Letterettrin was Glancrawe. The 1640 owner was Edmund O’Flaharty who was Catholic. In 1670, the owner was Sir Thomas Meredith who was a Protestant.

 

 

Lettershanbally

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Lettershanbally

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       1378.03 acres / 1378 acres, 0 roods, 4 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Lettershanbally

Logainm for Lettershanbally

NUI Galway Digital Collections forLettershanbally

 

 

1911 Censusfor Lettershanbally

Overview of Lettershanbally in 1911.

The 1911 census lists only the 1 household in Lettershanbally with a total of 12 persons, 8 male and 4 female. The house is listed as a private dwelling with stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. It was a 3rdclass dwelling with 2 rooms and no windows.. There was a stable, cow house and piggery The enumerator was Patrick Phelan.

 

Faherty Family

Head of the Faherty family in Lettershanbally was Philip (74) and his wife Anne (75). The two had been married for 56 years and had had 9 children of which 8 survived. They had 2 of their sons living with them, Tom (55) and Martin (32). Tom also had his wife Mary (40) living there as well. They had been married for 4 years and had 3 children. 7 of Philip and Mary’s grandchildren also lived in the house. They were Patrick (12), Stephen (12), Annie (8), Peter (6), Bridget (3), Philip (2) and Michael (7mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Philip, Anne, Tom, Martin, Mary, Patrick, Stephen and Annie were listed as having Irish and English as a language. Martin could read, Anne could read and write but all the others could not read. Philip is listed as being a retired herd, Tom, a herd and Martin, a farm labourer. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a Stable, cow house and a piggery.

 

1901 Census for Lettershanbally

Overview of Lettershanbally in 1901.

Only one listed household in the 1901 census. The building is listed as a private dwelling with stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable material for a roof. It was a 3rdclass building with 2 rooms and a window. There were a total of 8 people, 6 male and 2 female. Const. Patrick Flannery was the enumerator.

 

Faherty Family           (additional surname: Mealia)

Head of the Faherty family was Thomas (40) and his wife Anne (40). They had 2 of their sons Patrick (2) and Stiphin (sic) (2) along with their nephew Peter (5). Thomas also had his parents Philip (68) and Anne (68) and also his brother Martin (20). All, except Patrick and Seiphin, could speak both Irish and English. Bridget and Martin could read and write but the others could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas and Martin are both listed as being a herd. They lived in a 3rdClass, 2 roomed house and Patrick O’Neill was the landholder.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Lettershanbally

Patrick Lydon–Application No. C21 2808 and was received on 11/04/1921. Patricks address at the time of the application was Derrynaclough, Leenane, Co. Galway. His parents were Patrick and Honor Lydon (Coyne). The 1851 address is given as Lettershanbally Glencraff, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 14/04/1921 with nothing found. Patrick was awarded a pension of 2s.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Lettershanbally

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Alexander Thompson leased an area of land of  1381 Acres, 0 Roods and 8 Perches to Patrick O’Neill. On this land he had a herd’s house and for all this he paid £34 10s for the land and 10s for the herd’s house. There was also 1 Acre and 8 Perches of water.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Lettershanbally

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Glancrawe. The 1640 owner was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and the 1670 owner was Sir Thomas Meredith, a protestant.

 

 

Rosroe

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Rosroe

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       325.24 acres / 325 acres, 0 roods, 38 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Rosroe

1670 DownSurvey for Rosroe

Logainm for Rosroe

NUI Galway Digital Collections forRosroe

 

 

1911 Census for Rosroe

Overview of Rosroe in 1911.

There were 10 houses listed for Rosroe in the 1911 census all of which were inhabited. All houses had stone, brick or concrete for walls. Only houses 9 and 10 had slate, iron or tiles for a roof, the others had thatch, wood or other perishable materials. Houses 1 to 8 were 3rdclass dwellings with houses 9 and 10 being 2ndclass. House 1 had 1 room and 1 window, houses 56 had 2 rooms but no windows, house 7 had 2 rooms and 1 window, houses 2,3,4, and 8 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, house 10 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 9  had 3 rooms and 6 windows. The out offices and farm-steadings return lists a total of 3 cow houses, I piggeriy, I fowl house, 3 barns, 1 turf house and a shed. The enumerator was Patrick Phelen.

 

Coyne Family

The 7 members of the Coyne family were headed by Michael (60) and his wife Mary (56) who had been married for 21 years and had had 6 children of which 5 survived. Their children were Brigid (20), Patrick (18) Mary Anne (13), Peter (11) and Norah (10). All had Irish and English but only Mary Anne, Peter and Norah could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Michael is listed as a farmer, Brigid as a farmer’s daughter and Patrick as a farmer’s son. Mary Anne, Peter and Norah were scholars. They lived in a 3rdclass, 1 roomed house and Michael Coyne was the landholder.

 

Kane Family

The first of 3 Kane families in Rosroe lived in house 2 on the 1991 census. The head of the family was Patrick (63) and his wife Brigid (50). They had been married for 26 years and had  7 children. 4 of their children were in the house at the time of the census, they were Philp (18), Brigid (15), Winifred (12) and Michael (10). All had both Irish and English language and all, with the exception of Patrick, could read and write. All were also born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick is listed as being a farmer, Philip, a farmer’s son, Brigid a farmer’s daughter and Winifred and Michael as scholars. They occupied a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling with Patrick Keane being the landholder.

 

Kane Family

The second of the Kane families in Rosroe was headed by Michael (40) and his wife Catherine (30) who had been married for 12 years and had 6 children. The children were Philip (11), John (8), Mary (6), Norah (4), Brigid (2) and Kate (8 mths). All, except Brigid (2) and Kate, could speak both Irish and English and all were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Catherine, Philip and John were the only ones that could read and write. Michael is listed as being a farmer while Philip and John were scholars. Their dwelling was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house with a barn. Michael Keane was the landholder.

 

Kane Family

The last of the Kane families listed in Rosroe was headed by Patrick (61) who had been married to Anne for 30 years and had had 8 children of which 6 survived. 4 of their children lived with them and they were Peter (19), Michael (17), Nappy[iii](15) and Julia (12). All could speak both Irish and English and all the children could read and write while their parents Patrick and Anne could not read. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Patrick is listed as being a farmer, Peter and Michael as farmer’s sons, Nappy as a farmer’s daughter and Julia as a scholar. Their house was a 3rdclass, 3 roomed house with a cow house. Patrick Keane was the landholder.

 

Mortimer family

House 5 was that of the Mortimer household and at the head of the family was Michael (45) along with his wife Margaret (44). They had been married for 16 years and had had 9 children of which 7 survived. All the children lived with them and they were Mary Anne (13), Margaret (11), Marie (9), Nora (7), Catherine (5), John (3) and Brigid (8mths). Michael and Margaret (44) are listed as having both Irish and English and Mary Anne as having English only. Margaret (44), Mary Anne and Margaret (11) could read and write but the others could not read. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Michael is listed as being a farmer and Mary Anne, Margaret (11) and Nora are listed as scholars. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a cow house and a barn. Michael Mortimer was the landholder.

 

Coyne family

House 6 was that of the Coyne family with the widow Mary (80) as the head of the family. She had her son Philip (39) and his wife Brigid (39) living with her. They had been married for 13 years and had had 8 children. Their children, Mary’s grandchildren, also lived in the house and they were John (12), Mary (11), Brigid (10), Peter (8), Julia (7), Margaret (5), Thomas (3) and Patrick (1). All with the exception of Thomas and Patrick could speak both Irish and English but only John, Mary and Brigid could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Mary (80) and Philip were farmers with John, Mary (11) and Brigid being scholars. Their dwelling was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house with a barn. Philip Coyne was the landholder.

 

Mortimer Family

House 7 was that of the second Mortimer family. The head of the family was George (71) and his wife Brigid (70) who had been married for 46 years and had had 11 children of which 7 survived. Two of their children were in the house at this time and they were Brigid (30) and Festus (27). All had both Irish and English language but only Brigid (30) and Festus could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. George was a farmer, Brigid (30) was a farmer’s daughter and Festus a farmer’s son. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a cow house.  George Mortimer was the landholder.

 

Mortimer Family

House 8 was that of the Mortimer family in Rosroe at the time of the 1911 census. Head of the family was George (35) who had been married to his wife Kate (40) for 10 years and they’d had 6 children. Those 6 children also lived in the house with them and they were Mary (10), Brigid (8), Norah (6), Michael (4), Kate (2) and Margaret (9mths). All, with the exception of Margaret could speak both Irish and English but only Kate (40) and Mary could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. George is listed as being a farmer and Mary as a scholar. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a piggery. George Mortimer was the landholder.

 

Conboy family

Head of the Conboy household was James (38) who had been married to Norah (30) for 3 years and they’d had 3 children. Their children were Malachy (2), Mary Elizabeth (1) and Michael James (8mths). James and Norah could both read and write. All were Roman Catholic, James was born in Co. Leitrim, Norah in Co. Kerry and the children in Co. Galway. James was a national school teacher. They lived in a 2ndclass, 3 roomed house with a turf house. James was the landholder.

 

Mortimer Family

The last house, house 10, in Rosroe at the time of the 1911 census was that of another Mortimer family. Head of the family was Philip (75) and his wife Brigid (71) who had been married for 48 years and had had 10 children of which 7 survived. Two of their children, Philip (37) and Julia (23) also lived with them. All could speak both Irish and English but only Julia could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Philip (75) is listed as a farmer and Philip (37) a farmer’s son. They lived in a 2ndclass, 3 roomed dwelling with a fowl house and a shed. Philip Mortimer was the landholder.

 

 

1901 Census for Rosroe

Overview of Rosroe in 1901.

The 1901 census for Rosroe lists 10 private dwellings and a R.C church. The landholder for the church was C.H. Thomson Esq. All the private dwellings had stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 2 and 6 have slate, iron or tiles for roofing and the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable materials. Houses 2 and 6 were 2ndclass dwellings and the rest were 3rdclass. Houses 1 and 8 had 1 room and a window, houses 3,4,5,7,9 and 10 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, house 2 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 6 had 3 rooms and 5 windows. There were a total of 51 people, 23 male and 28 female. Const. Patrick Flannery was the enumerator.

 

Coyne Family             (additional surname: Mullen)

The first house was that of the Coyne family with Michael (40) and his wife Mary (40). Their children were Bridget (9), Patrick (7), Mary A. (3), Peter (1) and Nora (3mths). Also living with them was Michael’s father-in-law Patrick Mullen (80). With the exception of Mary A., Peter and Nora, They could all speak both Irish and English but none of them could read or write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway and Michael is listed as being a farmer. They lived in a 3rdclass, 1 roomed dwelling and Michael Coyne was the landholder.

 

Mortimer Family        (additional surname: Lydon)

Head of the household in house 2 was Philip (41) and his wife Bridget (40). They shared the house with their children Philip (20) and John (18). Also in the house was Philip (40)’s Mother-in-Law Honor Lydon (60) who was a widow. All could speak both Irish and English but only John could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Philip was a farmer and both Philip (20) and John are listed as farmer’s sons. The dwelling was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed house and Philip Mortimer was the landholder.

 

Mortimer Family        (additional surname: Faherty)

The second Mortimer family in Rosroe at this time was headed by Michael (33) and his wife Margaret (30). With them in the house were their children Mary Anne (3) and Margaret (1) along with Michael’s cousin John Faherty (60). All the adults could speak both Irish and English but only Margaret (30) could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic.  Michael is listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 3rdclass, 3 roomed and Michael was the landholder.

 

Mortimer Family

In house 4 there was another Mortimer family, this time George (55) was the head of the household. In the house with him were his wife Bridget (56) and 2 of their children, Maggie (20) and Fessie[iv](18). All the family could speak both Irish and English but only Maggie could read and write.  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. George was a farmer, Maggie a farmer’s daughter and Festie a farmer’s son. The house they occupied was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and George Mortimer was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

The Coyne family head was Philip (27) and his wife Bridget (31). With them in the house were their children John (3), Mary (1) and Bridget (3mths) and George’s parents Patrick (80) and Mary (70). All the adults are listed as speaking both Irish and English but none of them could read or write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Philip is listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed houses and Philip was the landholder.

 

Sherlock Family          (additional surnames: Mortimer, Caine)

House 6 was the home of the Sherlock family. Head of the family was Henry (28) and his wife Annie (30) with them in the house they had 2 servants, George Mortimer (18) and Bridget Caine (13) and also Henry’s mother Edith Sherwood Sherlock (52) who was a widow. George could speak Irish and English, but the others only had English. All could read and write. Henry, Annie and Edith Sherwood were Protestant and George and Bridget were Roman Catholic. Henry was born in Canada, Annie in England, Edith Sherwood in Bath and George and Bridget in Connemara. Henry’s occupation is listed Mining[v]Engineer, George was a personal attendant and Bridget a domestic servant. The house was a 2ndclass, 6 roomed house and the landholder was C.H. Thomson Esq.

 

Kane Family

Head of the Kane family was Patrick (40) with his wife Anne (42). Living with them were their children Mary (18), Bridget (16), Nora (14), Peter (12), Michael (9), Belinda (7) and Julia (4). All, except Julia, could speak both Irish and English. Mary, Bridget, Nora and peter were the only ones that could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Patrick is listed as a farmer, Mary and Bridget listed as farmer’s daughters and Nora and Peter were Scholars. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and the landholder was Patrick Kane.

 

Kane Family

House 8 was the home of the Kane family with Michael (24) at its head. Also in the house were his wife Kate (23), their son Philip (1) and Michael’s mother Honor (60) who was a widow. All could speak both Irish and English but only Kate could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael’s occupation was a farmer. Their house was a 3rdclass, 1 roomed dwelling and Michael was the landholder.

 

Mortimer Family

House 9 was the home of George (30) and Mary (28). Both had Irish and English but neither could read or write. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. George was a farmer and they lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and George was the landholder.

 

Mulkerrins family

The last house was that of the Mulkerrins household, consisting of John (30) and Lizzie (25). Both had Irish and English and both could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. John Was a steward and gardener and Lizzie was a dressmaker. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and the landholder was C.H. Thomson Esq.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Rosroe

 

Bridget McNamara– Application No. C17 5440. Bridget’s application was received on 24/07/1917 with an address at Mr. W. Minihane, Master Tailor, Army Service Corps, Aldershot. Her parents were Anthony and Mary McNamara (Keane). Her Address in 1851 was Rosroe, Co. Galway. Her search was returned on 09/08/1917.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Rosroe

The Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) states that Alexander Thompson owned 296 Acres, 2 Roods and 18 Perches of land in Rosroe for which he paid an annual rate of £25. Jeremiah Coyne, Patrick Coyne, Mary Bennett, Joseph Connor, Patrick Keane, Matrin Faherty, Michael Mortimer and James McDonnell leased houses from Alexander Thompson at a rate of 5s each per year. Thomas W. Christy and Bartholomew Foherty both leased a house and office from Alexander for which Thomas W. Christy paid £2 5s a year and Bartholomew paid 5s. Andrew Coyne and Martin Keane leased a house and a small garden from Alexander Thompson at a rate of 5s.

 

 

Salrock

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Salrock

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       292.11 acres / 292 acres, 0 roods, 18 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Salrock

Map

Galway Library for Salrock

Logainm for Salrock

NUI Galway Digital Collections forSalrock

 

 

1911 Censusfor Salrock

Overview of Salrock in 1911.

The 1911 census lists 11 buildings in Salrock, 9 private dwellings, a national school and a Church of Ireland. The landholder of the national school and church was captain Thomson. All the buildings had stone, brick or concrete walls, houses 3, 6,7 and 8 had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. The other buildings all had slate, brick or tiled roofs. House 9 was a 1stclass building, houses 1,2,4,5,6 and the church were 2ndclass buildings and houses 3,7,8 and the school were 3rdclass. The national school had 1 room and 2 windows, house 8 had 2 rooms and a window, houses 3,4,5 and 7 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, house 1 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 6 and the church had 2 rooms and 4 windows, house 2 had 4 rooms and 2 windows and house 9 had 6 rooms and 8 windows. The out offices and farm-steadings return lists a total of 4 stables 2 coach houses, a harness room, 8 cow houses, 3 calf houses, a dairy, a piggery, a fowl house, a turf house, a shed and 3 stores. There were a total of 38 people, 16 male and 22 female present in Salrock.

 

Coyne Family

House 1 was home to the Coyne family. Head of the family was the widower Thomas (58). With him lived his sister Julia (31) and his children Mary (13), Philip (12) and Festy (6). All, with the exception of Festy, could speak both Irish and English, but only Mary and Philip could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas was a fisherman and Mary and Philip were scholars. Their house was a 2ndclass, 3 roomed home with a stable. Thomas Coyne was the landholder.

 

Drury Family              (additional surname: Coyne)

House 2 only had 2 occupants at that time. Listed as the head of the family was Pamela Elizabeth (69) and in the house with her she had a servant Maggie Coyne (20). Pamela Elizabeth could speak English and Maggie had both Irish and English and both could read and write. Pamela Elizabeth was born in Dublin and was a Protestant Episcopalian and Maggie was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman catholic. Under ‘Occupation’ Pamela Elizabeth is listed as a lady and Maggie a domestic servant. The home they shared was a 2ndclass, 8 roomed building with a stable, coach house, cow house, calf house and a store. Pamela Drury was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

The Coyne family in house 3 had as its head the widow Anne (60). With her in the house were her son John (26) and daughter Anne (18). All three could speak both Irish and English and only Anne (60) could not read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Anne (60) is listed as a farmer with John as a farmer’s son and Anne (18) as a farmer’s daughter. They had a 3rd class, 2 roomed with a cow house. Anne Coyne was the landholder.

 

Moran Family

The Moran family consisted of three members. The head of the family was the widow Mary (60) and with her she had her son John (25) and daughter Margaret (19). All had both Irish and English but only John and Margaret could read and write. All three were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary was a farmer and John, a farmer’s son. Their house was a 2ndclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a cow house. Mary Moran was the landholder.

 

Coyne family

The head of this Coyne family was John (36) who had been married to his wife Bridget (35) for 11 years and they had had 5 children. Their children were Thomas (10), Norah (9), Mary (7), Michael (5) and Martin (1). John and Bridget are listed as having both Irish and English. John, Bridget, Thomas and Norah could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was a farmer and Thomas and Norah were scholars.  They lived in a 2ndclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a cow house. John was the landholder.

 

Mulkerrin Family       (additional surnames: Heaney)

House 6 was the home of the Mulkerrin family with John (56) as the head of the family. He was married to Lizzy (33) for 10 years and they had had 5 children. 4 of the children were in the house at this time, they were Stephen (8), Mary (7), Michael Norman (6) and Anne Maria (4). Also in the house was servant Anne Heaney (15). John, Lizzy and Anne are listed as having both Irish and English. John, Lizzy, Stephen and Anne could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. John is listed as being a gardener, domestic servant, Anne as a general household work, domestic servant. Both Stephen and Michael Norman are listed as scholars. They lived in a 2ndclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a cow house and John Mulkerrins was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

House 7 was the home of another Coyne family. In this house the head of the family was martin (79) who had been married to Maggie (76) for 71 (?) years and had had 11 children of which 8 survived. 2 children lived with them and they were Peter (29) and Maggie (28). All could speak both Irish and English but only Peter and Maggie (28) could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin was a farmer and Peter a farmer’s son and Maggie (28) a farmer’s daughter. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house with a cow house. Martin Coyne was the landholder.

 

Keane Family

The Keane household in house 8 only consisted of 2 members. The head of the family was the widow Mary (73) who lived with her son Festy (36). Both had Irish and English but ony Festy could read. Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Both were listed as being farmers. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed home with a cow house and calf house. Mary was the landholder.

 

Thomson Family        (additional surnames: McClelland, Coyne, Welsh)

The last occupied house was the Thomson household, Head of the family was Louisa (59) and her daughter Ruth (15). Also in the house were a visitor, Charlotte McClelland (56) and 2 servants, Mary Coyne (17) and Patrick Welsh (26). Louisa and Ruth could speak English while Mary and Patrick had both Irish and English. All could read and write except Patrick. Louisa, Ruth and Charlotte were Protestant Episcopalian with Louisa born in Co. Wicklow, Ruth born in Co. Galway and Charlotte born in Waterford. Mary and Patrick were born in Co. Galway and were  Roman Catholic. Louisa is listed as being a lady (retired landlord), Mary was a domestic servant and Patrick a coachman. The house was a 1stclass, 8 roomed house with 2 stables, a coach house, harness room, cow house, calf house, dairy, piggery, fowl house, a turf house, shed and 2 stores. Capt. Thompson was the landholder.

 

 

1901 Census for Salrock

Overview of Salrock in 1901.

The 1901 census lists 8 buildings in Salrock, 7 private dwellings (1 uninhabited) and Salrock national school. The landholders of  the uninhabited house 7 and the national school was Captain Thompson. All the inhabited houses had stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 2 and 6 having slate, iron or tiles for roofing and the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable materials. Houses 1, 3 4 and 5 were 3rdclass houses, house 2 was a 2ndclass house and house 6 a 1stclass. Houses 1,3,4 and 5 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front, house 2 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 6 had 4 rooms and 6 windows. There were a total of 26 people, 12 male and 14 female. Const. Edward Burke was the enumerator.

 

Coyne Family

The head of the Coyne family in house 1 was Martin (60) who lived with his wife Margaret (50) along with their 2 of their children Peter (20) and Margaret (18). All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. All had both Irish and English language but only Peter and Margaret could read and write.  Martin was a farmer, Peter a farmer’s son and Margaret, a farmer’s daughter. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house and Martin was the landholder.

 

Moran Family

The Moran family consisted of 4 members with the widow Mary (42) being the head of the family. She had living with her, her 3 sons Pat (22), Philip (18) and John (16). All 4 could speak both Irish and English and all, except Mary, could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary was a farmer and the three boys are listed as farmer’s sons. The house they shared was a 2ndclass, 4 roomed dwelling and Mary was the landholder.

 

Kane Family

House 3 was that of the Kane Family. The head of the family was the widow Mary (66) who shared the house with 2 of her children Festus (24) and Anne (21). All of them could speak both Irish and English and Festus and Anne could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary was a farmer, Festus, a farmer’s son and Anne, a farmer’s daughter. The house they shared was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling and the landholder was Mary Keane.

 

Coyne Family

The head of the Coyne family was the widow Anne (45) who shared the house with her children Mary (20), Philip (18), John (16), Michael (12), Anne (12) and Jane (9). All had both Irish and English and only Anne (45) and Philip could not read. All the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Anne is listed as a farmer, Mary, a farmer’s daughter, Philip and John as farmer’s sons and Michael, Anne (12) and Jane were scholars. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling and Anne Coyne was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

House 5 was that of the Coyne family consisting of 4 members.  Head of the family was Thomas (40) and his wife Honor (32). Also in the house at that time were their daughter Mary (3) and son Philip (1). Both Thomas and Honor had Irish and English but none of the family could read or write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas is listed as being a farmer with Mary listed as a farmer’s daughter and Philip as a farmer’s son. Their house was a 3rdclass, 3 roomed house and Thomas Coyne was the landholder.

 

Drury family               (additional surnames: Sullivan, Hoban)

The last house in the 1901 census was that of the Drury family. Head of the family was Maurice O’Connor Drury (44). Living in the house were his sister Pamela Elizabeth (59) and 2 servants, Katherine Sullivan (22) and Annie Hoban (18). All could read and write although there is nothing listed under ‘Language’. Both Maurice and Pamela were Church of England and born in Co. Dublin while Katherine was born in Co. Galway and Anne was born in Co. Mayo and both were Roman Catholic. Maurice is listed as ? RCSI ? CPI Major late RAM Corps retired[vi].  Pamela is listed as a lady. Katherine and Anne are listed as servants, the house they shared was a 1stclass, 8 roomed dwelling and the landholder was Maurice O’Connor Drury.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Salrock

The Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) states that tenements were leased by Alexander Thompson to Patrick Moran and the Rev. W. Kilbride. Alexander Thompson had a house and offices of his own on an area of land measuring 240 Acres 3 Roods and 14 Perches. He paid a rate of £23 for the land and £17 for the buildings. Patrick Moran leased 11 Acres of land and a house and office for which he paid an annual rate of £3 for the land and 10s for the buildings. The Rev. W. Kilbride leased a house and land of 3 Acres, 0 Roods and 20 Perches. He paid 15s for the land and £4 5s for the buildings. There was an area of water of 4 Acres, 3 Roods and 34 Perches and Alexander also owned 13 islands of no agricultural value of an area of  7 Acres, 1 Rood and 3 Perches.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Salrock

The 1670 Down Survey had the names Keilemore, Glancarbdemore, Gortnefunshine,Rossynelee, Shanaharaghane for this area. The 1641 owner was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was James Darcy, also a Catholic.

 

 

Tooreenacoona

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Tooreenacoona

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       538.76 acres / 538 acres, 3 roods, 1 perch

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Tooreenacoona (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Tooreenacoona

Logainm for Tooreenacoona

NUI Galway Digital Collections forTooreenacoona

 

 

1911 Census for Tooreenacoona

Overview of Tooreenacoona in 1911.

The 1911 census lists 2 households in Tooreenacoona, both Mannions and consisting of 9 people, 4 male and 5 female. Both houses had stone, brick or concrete walls with thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Both were 3rdclass houses with house 1 having 2 rooms and 1 window in the front and house 2 having 2 rooms and 2 windows. There was a total of 2 cow houses and a stable.  The enumerator was Act. Serg. Patrick Phelen.

 

Mannion Family                     (additional surnames: King)

The head of the Mannion family in this house was James (76) who had been married to his wife Maria (75) for 56 years. They’d had 6 children of which 5 survived. Living with them in the house was their granddaughter Annie King (13). James and Maria had both Irish and English while Annie only had English as a language and only Annie could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James was a retired farmer and Annie a scholar. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house with a cow house. James Mannion was the landholder.

 

Mannion Family

House 2 also housed a Mannion family. Head of this family was Patrick (37) and his wife Bridget (38) who had been married for 10 years and had had 4 children. Their 4 children were Mary (9), Bridget (4), Thomas (2) and Michael (4mths). Bridget (4), Thomas and Michael only had English as a language but Patrick, Bridget (38) and Mary had both Irish and English. Patrick and Bridget (38) could read and write and Mary could read only. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick was a farmer, Bridget (38) a housekeeper and Mary a scholar. They lived in a 3rdclass, 2 roomed house with a stable and a cow house. Patrick Mannion was the landholder.

 

 

1901 Census for Tooreenacoona

Overview of Toorenacoona in 1901.

There was only the 1 house in tooreenacoona in 1901 and it was listed as a private dwelling. It had Stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable materials for a roof. It was a 2nd class house that had 2 rooms and 3 windows. There were a total of 5 people, 2 male and 3 female.

 

Mannion Family

The only household listed in the 1901 census for Tooreenacoona was that for the Mannion family. Head of the family was James (60) and his wife Mary (60). Sharing the house were their children Patrick (27) and Nora (25) and their granddaughter Annie (3). All are listed as having both Irish and English as a language except Annie. Mary, Patrick and Nora could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James is listed as being a farmer, Patrick a farmer’s son and Nora a farmer’s daughter. They lived in a 2ndclass, 3 roomed house and James was the landholder.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Tooreenacoona

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Thomas Eastwood leased a house and land to each of Patrick Walsh and Bartholomew Keane. They each paid £4 5s for their share of the land and 5s for their houses. The combined land area was 539 Acres, 3 Roods and 1 Perch.

 

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Tooreenacoona

The 1670 Down Survey names for the area were Logetirne & Tuorin Icoony. The 1641 owner was the earl of Clanrickard who was a Protestant and the owners in 1670 were Richard Martin, a Catholic and The earl of Clanrickard.

 

 

 

Tullyconor

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Tullyconor

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cushkillary

Area:                                       437.95 acres / 437 acres, 3 roods, 31 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Tullyconor (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Tullyconor

Logainm for Tullyconor

NUI Galway Digital Collections forTullyconor

 

 

1911 Census forTullyconor

Overview of Tullyconor in 1911.

Only two houses are listed in the 1911 census, both listed as private dwellings. Both houses had stone, brick or concrete for walls and slate, iron or tiles for roofing. House 1 was a 1stclass house with 6 rooms and 6 windows in the front. House 2 was a 2ndclass house with 2 rooms and 2 windows. A total of 11 people lived there, 8 male and 3 female. There was also a total of 1 stable, a coach house, a cow house, a piggery, a turf house, a workshop, a laundary, a motor house and a boat house. The enumerator was Act. Sergt. Patrick Phelen.

 

Lambert                       (additional surnames:Sargent, Muirhead, Vince)

Of the 4 occupants of house 1, the head is listed as Guy Lambert (21) and in the house with him were visitors, John Sargent (22), John Muirhead (21) and Bernard Vince (20). Language is not listed but all could read and write. Guy was born in England and was a Protestant Episcopalian, John Sargent and Bernard Vince were born in England and were Church of England. John Muirhead was born in Scotland and was a member of the United Free Church of Scotland. All 4 were Students. The house they occupied was a 1stclass, 20 roomed building and the landholder was Colonel Lambert. There were also a stable, coach house, cow house, piggery, turf house, workshop, laundry, motor house and boat house.

 

Moran Family             (additional surnames: Mannion)

Head of the Moran family was Patrick (67) along with his wife Mary (59) who had been married for 21 years and had had 7 children of which 5 survived. 4 of the children that also lived in the house were John (19), Bridget (18), Julia (14), Patrick (12) and a boarder Martin Mannion (45). They all spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write with the exception of Patrick, who could read only. All were Roman Catholic and Patrick (67), Patrick (12) and Martin were born in Co. Galway and the rest were born in Co. Mayo. Patrick (67) and John were general servants, Mary was a cook, Bridget, a domestic servant and Julia and Patrick (12) were scholars. Their house was a 2ndclass, 3 roomed building and the landholder was Colonel Lambert.

 

 

1901 Census for Tullyconor

Overview of Tullyconor in 1901.

The 1901 census lists 2 houses in Tullyconor, both listed as private dwellings. Both had stone, brick or concrete for walls and slate, iron or tiles for roofing. House 1 was a 1stclass house with 6 rooms and 8 windows in the front of the house. House 2 was a 2ndclass house with 3 rooms and 4 windows. There were a total of 11 people, 5 male and 6 female.  Const. Patrick Flannery was the enumerator.

 

Morrin (Morn) Family[vii]        (additional surnames: Faherty)

The head of the Morrin/Morn family was Patrick (32) and his wife Mary (30) Sharing the house with them were their 5 children John (8), Elley (sic) (8), Bridget (7), Julia (5) and Patrick (2). Along with those Patrick’s mother-in-law, Mary Faherty (75), also lived with them and she was a widow. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Only Mary (30) and John could read and write and all, except Patrick (2), had both Irish and English language. Patrick (32) is listed as a caretaker and John as a scholar. They occupied a 1stclass, 3 roomed dwelling and Guy B. lambert was the landholder.

 

O’Neill family

The O’Neill family consisted of 3 members of which the widower John (56) was the head. With him in the house at that times were 2 of his children James (25) and Mary E. (18). All could speak both Irish and English and all could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Catholic. John is listed as being a farmer, James, a farmer’s son and Mary E., a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2ndclass, 6 roomed house and John O’Neill was the landholder.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Tullyconor

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Alexander Thompson leased 2 tenements, 1 each to Alexander Lambert and Marcus S. Blackden. Alexander Lambert had a house and offices on an area of land consisting of 163 Acres. For this he paid an annual rate of £12 10s for the land and £10 10s for the buildings. Marcus S. Blackden had 258 Acres, 1 Rood and 4 Perches of land that he paid £7 10s annually for. There was also an area of 3 Acres and 2 Roods of water.

 

 

1670 DownSurvey for Tullyconor

Down Survey names for this area also included Keilemore, Glancarbdemore, Gortnefunshine,Rossynelee, Shanaharaghane. The owner in 1641 was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and in 1670 the onwer was James Darcy, also a Catholic.

 

 

 

[i]Nappy is a local name for Penelope

[ii]Pinny is a local name for Penelope

[iii]Nappy is a local name for Penelope

[iv]Fessie would be a local name for Festus

[v]Difficult to read

[vi]Difficult to decipher

[vii]It should be noted that the census  form gives two different spellings for the name, that being Morn and Morrin

This page was added on 17/07/2018.

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