Cloonlooaun

Cluain Luáin

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                                  Cloonlooaun

Civil Parish:                                Ballynakill

Barony:                                       Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                          Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Rinvyle

Area:                                       816.71 acres / 816 acres, 2 roods, 33 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Cloonlooaun

Logainm for Cloonlooaun

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Cloonlooaun

 

1911 Census for Cloonlooaun

Overview of Cloonooaun in 1911.

According to the 1911 census there were 32 buildings in Cloonooaun. They were all listed as Private dwellings with the exception of house 32 which was the Eagles Nest national school. Houses 31 and 32 were not occupied at that time although Michael Flaherty was the landholder of house 31. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 2, 5, 19, 21, 22 and 25-27 having slate, iron or tiles for roofing and the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofs. House 26 was a 1st class dwelling, houses 1, 6, 7, 9, 10, 12, 16, 18, 20, 24, 28 and 29 were 3rd class dwellings and the rest were 2nd class. Houses 1, 6, 7, 9, 10, 12, 16, 18-20, 24, 25, 28 and 29 had 2 rooms and 2 windows. Houses 2, 3, 5, 8, 11, 13-15, 17, 21, 23, 27 and 30 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, House 22 had 3 rooms and 4 windows, house 4 had 3 rooms and 5 windows and house 26 had 4 rooms and 10 windows. The enumerators abstract return states that there were a total of 177 people in the townland, 91 male and 86 female, all of which were Roman Catholic. The out-offices and farm-steadings return states that there were a total of 84 out buildings and they consisted of 24 stables, 19 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 20 piggeries, 9 fowl houses, 4 barns, a turf house, 3 potato houses and 2 sheds. The enumerator was Const. John McCormick.

 

Conneely

The head of the first house in Cloonooaun was Peter (42) who had been married to his wife Bridget (38) for 5 years and they’d had 4 children that all survived. Those 4 children also lived in the house with them and they were Mary (4), Julia (3), Bridget (2) and Anne (11mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter and Bridget (38) spoke both Irish and English with the children only speaking English and none of the family was able to read. Peter was listed as a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. The landholder was Peter Conneely.

 

Connolly

The head of the Connolly household was Martin (38) who was married to his wife Maria (27) for 6 years and had had 4 children all of which survived. Those children lived with them and they were Mary (5), Bridget A. (4), Michael (3) and Patrick (1). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English except Patrick and only Martin and Maria could read and write. Martin was listed as a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house, calf house, piggery and fowl house. Martin Connolly was the landholder.

 

Flaherty                                  (additional surnames: Coyne)

The head of the Flaherty family in house 3 was the widow Mary (50) who had been married for 17 years and had had 7 children of which 5 survived. Those 5 children lived with her and were Anne (15), John (13), Mary (10), Michael (8) and Patrick (6) and also in the house was Mary’s cousin Thomas Coyne (28). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Michael and Patrick they all spoke both Irish and English but as there was nothing entered for Michael and Patrick it could mean that they only spoke English. Mary (50), Patrick and Thomas could not read but the others could read and write. Mary was a farmer, Anne and Mary (10) were famer’s daughters, John was a farmer’s son, Thomas was an unemployed baker and Michael and Patrick were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable and a piggery. Mary Flaherty was the landholder.

 

Ruddy

The heads of the Ruddy family was (66) and his wife Mary (54) who had been married for 29 years and had had 10 children and all of them survived. Also in the house at that time were 8 of their children, Patrick G. (12), Michael J. (10), Bridget (23), Catherine (22), Maggie (19), Helena (17), Sabina (14) and Teresa (6). All spoke both Irish and English apart from Teresa, who spoke only English, and apart from her they all could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was a farmer and Patrick G., Michael J. and Sabina were scholars. They shared a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. John Ruddy was the landholder.

 

Gannon

The head of the Gannon family in house 5 was Patrick (41) and his Mary (32) and lived in the house with Patrick’s sister Catherine (26). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick and Mary could both speak Irish and English with Catherine speaking only English. They could all read and write. Patrick was listed as a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Pat Gannon was the landholder.

 

King                            (additional surname: Heanue)

The head of the King family was the widow Mary (72) who had given birth to 9 children of which only 6 had survived. She lived with her son Martin (38) and her granddaughter Mary (4). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary (72) and Martin spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for Mary (4) which could indicate that she only spoke English. Only martin could read and write. Mary (72) was a farmer and Martin was a farmer’s son. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Mary King was the landholder.

 

Thornton

House 7 was that of the Thornton family and the head of that family was Patrick (78) who had been married to his wife Ellen (76) for 54 years and they had had 7 children of which 4 had survived. Also in the house were 2 of their sons Michael (52) and John (42) and their grandson Festus (15). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and Ellen could read but only Festus could read and write. Patrick was a farmer with Michael and John being farmer’s sons. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable, cow house, piggery and a barn. Pat Thornton was the landholder.

 

Heanue

The head of the Heanue family in house 8 was Patrick (53) and he had been married to his wife Ellen (44) for 22 years and they had had 9 children of which 8 had survived. Also in the house with them at that time were 7 of their children Michael (21), Patrick (18), Mary (15), Honoria (10), John (8), Festus (5) and Jeffrey (2).All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English except Jeffrey. With the exception of Patrick (53), Festus and Jeffrey, they could all read and write. Patrick (53) was a farmer, Michael and Patrick (18) were farmer’s sons and Honoria and John were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house, piggery and a fowl house. Pat Heanue (Anthony) was listed as the landholder.

 

Coyne

House 9 was the Coyne household and the head of the family was John (93) and his wife Bridget (80) who had been married for 45 years and had had 9 children of which 8 had survived. They lived with 1 of their sons Michael (39 and their grandson Martin (19). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Martin could read and write. John was a farmer and Michael was a farmer’s son. The house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable and a piggery. John Coyne was the landholder.

 

Heanue

Head of the Heanue family was the Widow Bridget (37) who had given birth to 3 children and all 3 had survived. Those 3 children lived with her and they were John (7), Thomas (5) and Bridget (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English except baby Bridget and none of the family could read. Bridget (37) was a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable and a piggery. Bridget Heanue was the landholder.

 

Lally                            (additional surname: Walsh)

The head of the Lally family was the widow Annie (92) who had given birth to 9 children with only 2 surviving at that time. She lived with her daughter Mary Walsh (70), also a widow and she had had 14 children of which only 7 had survived. Along with them, Annie’s grandson John Walsh (36) also lived there. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only John could read and write. John was listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house, piggery and a barn. Mary Walsh was the landholder.

 

Hehir

House 12 was the home of the Hehir family. Head of the family was John (70) who had been married to his wife Bridget (60) for 36 years and they had had 10 children of which 7 had survived. Two of those children lived with them at that time and they were Michael (20) and Annie (12). Annie (12). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Michael and Annie could read and write. John was a farmer, Michael was a farmer’s son and Annie was a scholar. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a stable, piggery and a fowl house. John Hehir was the landholder.

 

Hynes

The head of the Hynes family was Martin (58) and his wife Mary (50) who had been married for 23 years and had had 5 children and all those had survived. Four of those children lived with them and they were Francis (20), Mary (15), Patrick (13) and Martin (11). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin (58), Mary and Francis spoke both Irish and English with the other 3 speaking only English. Martin (58) and Mary could not read but the others could read and write. Martin (58) was Farmer, Francis was a labourer and Patrick and Martin (11) were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable. Martin Hynes was the landholder.

 

Coyne                                      (additional surnames: Connelly)

Thomas (68) was the head of the family in house 14. He lived with his wife Margaret (60) who he had been married to for 36 years. Thomas was listed as having 5 children, all of which had survived and Margaret was listed as having 8 children with 7 surviving[i]. Living with them at that time were their children Thomas (17), Margaret (21), John (31) and Mary Ann (14) and also a niece, Mary Ann Connelly (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas (68), Margaret (60) and John spoke both Irish and English and the rest of the family spoke only English. Thomas (68) was a farmer, Margaret (60) was a wool weaver, Thomas (17) and John were farmer’s sons, Margaret (21) was a farm servant and Mary Ann was a house servant. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable and a piggery. Thomas Coyne was the landholder.

 

Salmon

The Salmon family in house 15 consisted of 12 members. Head of the family was Pat (45) who had been married to his wife Mary (49) for 29 years and had had 15 children of which 14 had survived. Of those children, 10 lived with them at that time and they were John (19), Patrick (16), Peter (14), Thomas (12), Maggie (10), Mary (8), Thady (9), Joseph (5), Julia (4) and Stephen (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thady, Joseph, Julia and Stephen had nothing listed under language so that could indicate that they only spoke English but all the rest spoke both Irish and English. Mary (49), Joseph, Julia and Stephen could not read but the rest could all read and write. Pat and Mary (49) were listed as farmers, Patrick and Peter were farmer’s sons, John was a postman and Thomas, Maggie, Mary (8) and Thady were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, piggery and potato house. Pat Salmon was the landholder.

 

Walsh

Head of the family in house 16 was Thomas (42) who lived with his wife Maggie (38) and they had been married for 15 years and had had 7 children and they all survived. Those children all lived with then at that time and were John (13), Delia (11), Martin (9), Stephen (7), Thomas (5), Mary (3) and Norah (10). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas (42), Maggie, John, Delia and Martin spoke both Irish and English with the others speaking only English. None of the family could read. Thomas (42) was a farmer, John, Delia, Martin and Stephen were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3d class dwelling with a stable and a piggery. Thomas Walsh was the landholder.

 

Hyland

The head of the Hyland family was Michael (50) and his wife Bridget (49) who had been married for 27 years and had had 8 children of which 6 had survived. Five of those children lived with them at that time and they were Michael (23), James (14), Annie (13), Bridget (5) and Margaret (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English except Bridget (5) and Margaret, who spoke only English. Only Michael (23), James and Annie could read and write. Michael (50) was a farmer, Michael (23) was a labourer and James was a scholar. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Michael Hyland was the landholder.

 

Hyland

The head of this Hyland family was Thomas (60) who had been married to his wife Mary (53) for 30 years and they had had 10 children of which 8 had survived. The 5 children that lived with them at that time were Martin (25), William (17), James (12), Mary (9) and Peter (7). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and Thomas and Mary (53) could not read while the others could all read and write. Thomas was a farmer, Martin and William were farmer’s sons and James, Mary (9) and Peter were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable, piggery, fowl house, barn and potato house. Thomas Hyland was the landholder.

 

Corcoran

Thomas (56) was the head of the Corcoran family in house 19 and he lived with his wife Mary (53) who he had been married to for 27 years and they’d had 10 children and all of those survived. Of those children, 6 of them lived in the house and they were Thomas (23), Micheal (15), John (15), Martin (14), Julia (8) and James (12). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and, apart from Thomas and Mary, they all could read and write. Thomas was listed as being a farmer, Thomas, Micheal and John were farmer’s sons and Martin, Julia and James were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Thomas Corcoran was the landholder.

 

Kane

House 20 was that of the Kane family and the head of the family was Thomas (69) along with his wife, Bridget (68) and they had been married for 44 years and had had 7 children all of which survived. Also in the house with them at that time were 2 of their children Michael (43) and Patrick (41). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Michael and Patrick could read and write. Thomas was a farmer and Michael and Patrick were farmer’s sons. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Thomas Keane was the landholder.

 

Keane

The head of the Keane family in house 21 was Thomas (46) and his wife Mary (32) and they had been married for 6 years and had had 3 children of which 2 had survived. Those 2 children also lived in the house and they were James (1) and Mary (1mth). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas and Mary (32) spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Thomas was listed as a farmer. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house, piggery and fowl house. Thomas Keane (Jas) was the landholder.

 

Coyne                                     (additional surnames: Walsh)

House 22 was that of the Coyne family and the head of that family was John (35) and his wife Bridget (34) and they had been married for 11 years and had had 5 children of which 4 had survived. Three of their children also lived in the house and they were Aileen (8), Nora (7), Christina (4) and a servant Kate Walsh (15). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John spoke both Irish and English while the rest only spoke English. With the exception of Christina, they could all read and write. John and Bridget were national teachers, Kate Walsh was a general domestic servant and Aileen and Nora were scholars. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house, piggery, fowl house and a shed. John F. Coyne was the landholder.

 

Ribbon

The head of the Ribbon family was Joseph (70) and his wife Mary (58) and they were married for 37 years and had had 10 children with 6 surviving. Also in the house with them were 2 of their sons, Joseph (22) and Michael (17). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Joseph (22) and Michael could read and write. Joseph (70) was a farmer and Joseph (22) and Michael were farmer’s sons. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and a calf house. Joseph Ribbon was the landholder.

 

Holleran

The head of the Holleran family in house 24 was the widow Catherine (74) who had given birth to 6 children of which 5 survived. Also in the house were her son James (40) who had been married to his wife Mary (31) for 9 years and they’d had 4 children and they had all survived. There were three of their children, Catherine’s grandchildren, also in the house and they were Thomas (8), Katie (4) and Mary (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Catherine, James and Mary (31) all spoke both Irish and English while the others spoke just English. Only James, Mary (31) and Thomas could read and write. James was a carpenter and Thomas was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house. James Holleran was the landholder.

 

Flaherty                                  (additional surnames: Heanue)

Head of the Flaherty family was Michael (69) and his wife Catherine (68) who had been married for 45 years and had had 11 children of which 10 survived. Also living in the house with them were 3 of their children, Michael (38), Peter (30) and Honor (25) and their granddaughter Kate Heanue (5). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Kate, all spoke both Irish and Englishbut only Michael (38) peter and Honor could read and write. Michael (69) was listed as a farmer with Michael (38) and Peter listed as farmer’s sons. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house, piggery, fowl house and barn. Michael Flaherty was the landholder.

 

Persse                          (additional surnames: Carberry)

The head of the Persse family was Francis Fitzadelm (58) who had been married to his wife Rose (22) for 1 year. Also in the house at that time was a domestic servant cook, Elizabeth Carberry (33). Francis Fitzadelm and Rose were born in Co. Galway with Elizabeth being born in Kings County[ii]. Francis Fitzadelm was a member of the Church of Ireland while the other 2 were Roman Catholic. There was nothing listed under language so that could indicate that they all only spoke English. They could all read and write. Francis Fitzadelm was a justice of the peace and land agent and Elizabeth was a cook. The house they lived in was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a fowl house and a shed. The landholder was Mrs. C.J. Blake.

 

Wallace                                   (additional surnames: McHarty and Davis)

The head of the Wallace family in house 27 was John (50) and his wife Ellen (33) and they had been married for 11 years and had had 3 children and all had survived. Also in the house with them at that time were their 3 children, Catherine (7), Stephen (5) and Pathrick (sic) (1), a visitor Leny McHarty (16) and John’s mother-in-law, Mary Davis (73). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic, except Leny, who was born in America. John, Ellen and Mary spoke both Irish and English and the others, apart from baby Pathrick (sic), spoke only English. Only John and Leny could read and write. John was listed as a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable and cow house. John Wallace was the landholder.

 

Heanue

The Heanue family in house 28 consisted of 11 people with Patrick (56) being the head and he had been married to his wife, Mary A. (42) for 16 years and they had had 8 children all of which had survived. Seven of those children lived with them and they were Thos (15, 6mths), Annie (14, 3 mths), Michael (12), Geoffrey (10), Bridget (8, 2 mths), Patrick (2mths)[iii] and James (7mths). Also living there were, Patrick’s mother, Mary (88) who was a widow and had given birth to 6 children of which 3 had survived and, his sister, Mary (66). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick (56), Mary A. and Mary (66) spoke both Irish and English and the rest, apart from the babies Patrick and James, all spoke only English. Only Patrick (56), Thos, Annie, Michael, Geoffrey and Bridget could read and write. Patrick (56) was a farmer, Thos was a farmer’s son, Annie, Michael Geoffrey and Bridget were scholars and Mary (88) was an old age pensioner. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house, piggery, fowl house, turf house and potato house. Pat Heanue was the landholder.

 

Ribbon

The head of this Ribbon family was the widow Mary (40) who had given birth to 4 children that all survived. Living with her in the house were 3 of her children, Patrick (11), Mary Ellen (13) and Bridget (9). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and all, apart from Mary, could read and write. Mary was listed as a farmer and Patrick and Bridget were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house and piggery. Mary Ribbon was the landholder.

 

Flaherty

Head of the family in the last house in Cloonlooaun was the widow Mary (64) who had given birth to 6 children, all of which had survived. Living with her was her daughter Ellen (22). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Ellen could read and write. Mary was listed as being a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable. Mary Flaherty was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Cloonlooaun

Overview of Cloonlooaun in 1901.

According to the 1901 census there were 34 houses in Cloonlooaun with 32 of them being occupied. House 33 was the Cloonlooaun national school and house 34 was the Cloonlooaun mission chapel. The landholder of the school was C.J. Blake and the landholder of the mission chapel was Elizabeth Corbin. The houses in the townland were all listed as being private dwellings. All the buildings were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls. House 2, 4 and 12 had slate, iron or tiled roofs but the others all had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 1, 2 and 4 were 2nd class dwellings while all the others were 3rd class. Houses 7, 13, 22, 23, 25, 26 and 30 had 2 rooms and 1 window, house 27 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, houses 1 and 2 had 2 rooms and 4 windows, house 4 had 3 rooms and 5 windows and the rest of the houses had 2 rooms and 2 windows. There were a total of 188 people living in the townland of Cloonlooaun, 93 male and 95 female. The enumerator was Const. Peter Carre.

 

Ruddy                                     (additional surname: Mulholland)

The head of the Ruddy family was John (56) and his wife Mary (40) and they lived with their children Mary A. (18), Anne (16), Bridget (13), Catherin (sic) (11), Maggie (8), Lena (6), Sabina (4) and Patrick J. (2) along with a boarder Rose Mulholland (25). All were born in Co. Galway except Rose, who was born in Co. Louth, and all were Roman Catholic. Apart from Patrick J. and Rose, they all spoke both Irish and English. Lena could read, Sabina and Patrick J. could not read and the rest could all read and write. John was listed as a farmer, Mary A. and Anne were farmer’s daughters, Bridget, Catherin (sic), Maggie, Lena and Sabina were scholars and Rose was a school teacher. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and John Ruddy was the landholder.

 

Ruddy

Head of this Ruddy family was James (45) and his wife Marian Teresa (33). They lived with their children Mary Teresa (14), Patrick Joseph (13), Michael Alfd (sic) (11), John Thomas (6), Annie Edith (4) and Alice Kathleen (1). Marian Teresa was born in Co. Mayo but all the others were born in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholic. James and Marian Teresa spoke both Irish and English while the others spoke only English and, apart from Annie Edith and Alice Kathleen, they could all read and write. James was a farmer, Marian Teresa was a farmer’s wife, Mary Teresa, Patrick Joseph, Michael Alfd (sic), John Thomas and Annie Edith were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and James Ruddy was the landholder.

 

Coyne

Head of the Coyne family in house 3 was John (81) and his wife Bridget (62) and they lived with 3 of their children, Martin (32), Pat (21) and Money / Miney? (sic) (26). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Pat could read and write. John was a farmer, Martin and Pat were farmer’s sons and Money / Miney (sic) was a farmer’s daughter. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John Coyne was the landholder.

 

Coyne                         (additional surname: Heanue)

Head of this Coyne family was John (25) and his wife Bridget (25) along with a servant Anne Heanue (16). Bridget was born in Co. Cork and the other 2 were born in Co. Galway and all wee Roman Catholic. John and Anne spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for Bridget which may indicate that she only spoke English. Both John and Bridget were national school teachers and Anne was a domestic servant. The house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and C.J. Blake was the landholder.

 

Walsh

House 5 was that of the Walsh family and the head of that family was the widow Bridget (70) and she lived with her son Tom (30), her daughter-in-law, Maggie (26) and her grandchildren John (3) and Bridget (1). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from the 2 children all spoke both Irish and English but only Tom and Maggie could read and write. Bridget (70) was a general servant and Tom was a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Bridget Walsh was the landholder.

 

Holleran

Head of the Holleran family in house 6 was John (65) along with his wife Catherine (37) and 3 of their children, James (27), Anne (23) and Bridget (19). Catherine was born in Co. Mayo and was Roman Catholic and the rest were all were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only James, Anne and Bridget could read and write. John and James were Carpenters, Catherine was a housekeeper and Anne and Bridget were farmer’s daughters. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and John Holleran was the landholder.

 

Thornton

House 7 was the Thornton household and the head of the family was Pat (70) and his wife Ellen (65) and they lived with 2 of their sons, Michl (sic) (41) and John (32) and also their Grandson Festy (6). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Festy all spoke both Irish and English but none of the family could read. Pat was a farmer, Ellen was a farm attendant, Michl (sic) was a game keeper and John was a farmer’s son. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Pat Thornton was the landholder.

 

Heanue

Head of this Heanue family was Mark (32) and, an unlisted relative, Mary (14). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English but only Mary could read and write. Mark was a farmer and Mary was a general servant. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Mark Heanue was the landholder.

 

Kane

House 8 was that of the Kane family and the head of the family was James (67) and his wife Nora (70) and they lived with a son Thomas (35). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. James and Thomas spoke both Irish and English and Nora only spoke Irish. Only Thomas could read and write. James was listed as being a farmer and Thomas a farmer’s son. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and James Keane was listed as the landholder.

 

Gannon

The head of the Gannon family was the widower Patrick (69) and he lived with 3 of his children, Patrick (26), Stephen (18) and Kate (16). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and, apart from Patrick (69), they could all read and write. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Pat Gannon was the landholder.

 

Davis                           (additional surnames: Wallace, Downey and McCarthy)

The head of the Davis family was the widow Mary (60). She lived with her son-in-law, John Wallace (25), her daughter-in-law, Ellen Wallace (20), her Daughter, Kate (18) and her 2 grandsons Tom Downey (5) and George McCarthy (5). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and Mary and Tom could not read but the others could read and write. Mary was a housekeeper and John was a farmer. They shared a 2 roomed, 3d class dwelling and Mary Davis was the landholder.

 

Byrne

The sole occupant of house 12 was Dominic F. (62). He was born in Co. Mayo and was a Roman Catholic. There was nothing entered for the Irish language so that could indicate that he only spoke English and he could read and write. He was a retired pensioner NA school teacher. His house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Tom Hyland was the landholder.

 

Hynes

The Hynes family consisted of 9 members and the head of the family was Martin (44) and his wife Mary (36). They had 7 of their children living with them and they were John (18), Anne (16), Friancis (sic) (11), Bridget (9), Mary (7), Pat (5) and Martin (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Mary (7), Pat and Martin (2), they all spoke both Irish and English but only Bridget could read and write. Martin (44) was a farmer, Mary (36) was a housekeeper, John, Friancis (sic), Pat and Martin (2) were farmer’s sons, Anne and Mary (7) were farmer’s daughters and Bridget was a scholar. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Martin Hynes was the landholder.

 

Salmon

There were 11 people in the Salmon family and they had Patrick (34) as the head. He lived with his wife, Mary (36) and 9 of their children Catherine (13), Michael (11), Delia (11), John (9), Honor (7), Patrick (5), Peter (3), Thos (2) and Maraget (sic) (4mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick (34), Mary, Catherine, Michael, Delia all spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Only Patrick (34), Catherine, Michael and Delia could read and write. Patrick (34) was a farmer, Mary was a housekeeper and Catherine, Michael and Delia were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Patrick Salmon was the landholder.

 

Whelan

House 16 was the home of the Whelan family and the head of the family was Michael (35) and his wife, Biddy (sic) (33). They lived with 4 of their children, Mary (13), Michael (12), James (5) and Anne (3). Apart from James and Anne they all spoke both Irish and English but none of them could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (35) was a farmer, Biddy was a farmer’s wife, Mary was a farmer’s daughter and Michael (12) was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Michael Whelan was the landholder.

 

Whelan

Head of the Whelan family in house 16 was Tom (50) and his wife Mary (43). They lived with 6 of their children, Michael (18), John (14), Thos (10), William (9), James (3) and Mary (1mth). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary (43) spoke only Irish and the others spoke both Irish and English except for baby Mary. Only Thos, William and James could read and write. Tom was listed as a farmer, Mary (43), as a housekeeper, Michael and John were farmer’s sons, Thos and William were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Tom Whelan was the landholder.

 

Ribbon                                    (additional surnames: Canavan)

The head of the Ribbon family was Michl (sic) (35) and his wife Mary (29) who lived with their children Mary (3) and Patrick (1) and their Grandmother Bridget (82) and a niece, Maria Canavan (16). Apart from baby Patrick they all spoke both Irish and English but only Maria could write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michl (sic) was a farmer, Mary (29) was housekeeper, Mary (3) was a farmer’s daughter, Patrick was a farmer’s son, Bridget was farmer’s attendant and Maria was an attendant. The house they shared was a 2roomed, 3rd class house and Michl (sic) was the landholder.

 

Keane

The head of this Keane family was Thos (60) and his wife (Bridget (60) and they lived with 4 of their children, Michl (sic) (30), Martin (26), Mary (22) and Ann (18). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and Michl (sic), Martin, Mary and Ann could read and write. Thos was a farmer, Bridget was a housekeeper, Michl (sic) and Martin were farmer’s sons, Mary was a farmer’s daughter and Ann was a scholar. They shared a 2 roomed 3rd class dwelling and Thos Keane was the landholder.

 

Coyne

The head of the Coyne family in house 19 was Tom (55) ho lived with his wife, Maraget (sic) (38) and 6 of their children John (18), Catherine (15), Michl (sic) (12), Tom (10), Mary Ann (7) and Maraget (sic) (4). Apart from May Ann and Maraget (sic) (4) they all spoke both Irish and English but only Michl (sic), Tom and Mary Ann could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Tom (55) was a farmer, John was a farmer’s son, Catherine was a farmer’s daughter, Michl (sic), Tom (10) and Mary Ann were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Thos Coyne was the landholder.

 

Hare

Head of the family was John (60) and he lived with his wife, Bridget (44) and 4 of their children, Michl (sic) (10), Maggie (7), John (4) and Annie (2). Apart from Annie, they all spoke both Irish and English but only Michl (sic) and Maggie could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was farmer and Michl (sic) and Maggie were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and John Hare was the landholder.

 

Walsh                          (additional surname: Lally)

Head of the Walsh family in house 21 was the widow Mary (50). She shared the house with her mother Annie Lally (80) and 4 of her children, John (24), Philip (21), Pat (13) and Annie (18). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and John, Philip, Pat and Annie could all read and write. Mary was a farmer’s wife, Annie Lally was an attendant, John, Philip and Pat were farmer’s sons and Annie was a farmer’s daughter. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Mary Walsh was the landholder.

 

Heanue

House 22 was that of the Heanue family and the head of this family was the widow Honor (80). She lived with her son Pat (40), her daughter-in-law, Ellen (32) and her grandchildren, Michl (sic) (11), Kate (8), Patrick (7), Mary (4) and Honor (3mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and Pat, Ellen, Michl (sic) and Kate could read and write. Honor (80) was a general housekeeper, Pat was a farmer and Michl (sic) and Kate were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Honor Heanue was the landholder.

 

Flaherty                                   (additional surname: McDonnell)

The head of the Flaherty family was Michael (60) and he lived with his wife, Catherine McDonnell (58) and 5 of their children, Michael (21), Peter (18), Kate (16), Julia (14) and Honor (12). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and, apart from Catherine, they could all read and write. Michael (60) was a farmer, Catherine was a farmer’s wife, Michael (21) and Peter were farmer’s sons, Kate and Julia were farmer’s daughters and Honor was a farmer’s daughter scolar (sic). The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Michael Flaherty was the landholder.

 

Heanue

Head of this Heanue family was the widow Mary (80) and she lived with her Son Pat (50), her daughter-in-law, Mary A. (40), her grandchildren, Tomie (sic) (6), Annie 94), Michael (2) and Jeffary (sic) (6mths) and also her daughter, Mary (40). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary (80), Pat, Mary A. and Mary (40) spoke both Irish and English and the others, with the exception of baby Jeffary (sic), spoke only English. Pat was the only one listed as being able to read and write. Mary (80) was a housekeeper, Pat was a farmer, Tomie (sic) and Annie were scholars and Mary (40) was a servant. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Mary Heanue was the landholder.

 

Ribbon                                    (additional surnames: Halloran and Coyne)

House 25 was that of the Ribbon family and the head of that family was Joseph (50) and he lived with his wife Mary (40) and 4 of their children Patrick (20), Joseph (10), Julia (8) and Michael (5) also in the house were Joseph’s sister Mary Halloran (60) and a nephew, Martin Coyne (18). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and none of the family could read. Joseph was listed as being a farmer, Mary (40), a housekeeper, Patrick and Martin Coyne were labourers, Mary (60) was a domestic servant and Joseph (10) and Julia were scholars. They all shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Joe Ribbon was listed as the landholder.

 

Flaherty                                   (additional surname: Malley)

Head of the Flaherty family in house 26 was Anne (80), a widow, who lived with her son, Daniel (30), her daughter-in-law, Mary (35), her grandchildren, Anne (5), John (2) and Mary (8mths) and also a servant, Honor Malley (12). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Ann and John spoke only English while all the others spoke both Irish and English with the exception of baby Mary. Honor could read and Daniel could read and write while the other members of the family could not read. The occupation of Anne (80), Daniel and Mary (35) was farming and Anne (5) and john were skollars (sic)[iv] and Honor was listed as a skholar (sic)[v]. Their house was a 2roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Anne Flaherty was the landholder.

 

Carleton

Head of the family in house 27 was the widow Elizabeth (67) and she lived her daughter with Elizabeth (32) and her granddaughter Elizabeth (14). Elizabeth (67) was born in Co Tyrone, Elizabeth (32) was born in Co. Galway and Elizabeth (14) was born in Canada and they were all Church of Ireland. There was nothing entered in the language column so that could indicate that they spoke only English. They could all read and write. Elizabeth (67) was a housekeeper and Elizabeth (14) was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Elizabeth Carleton was the landholder.

 

Corcoran                                 (additional surname: Hyland)

The head of the household in house 28 was Thos Hyland (100) who was a widower. The rest of the household were all Corcorans and they were Thos’ step son Thos (43), his daughter, Mary (37) and his grandchildren, Bridget (14), Patrick (12), Thos (10), Mary Anne (9), Kate (8), Michael (5), John (5), Martin (3) and James (1). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thos (100), Thos (43), Mary, Bridget, Patrick and Thos (10) all spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Only Bridget, Patrick, Thos (10), Mary Anne, Kate and Michael could read and write. Thos (100) and Thos (43) were farmers, Mary was a housekeeper and Bridget, Patrick, Thos (10), Mary Anne and Kate were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Tom Hyland was the landholder.

 

Conneely

The head of this Conneely family was the widow Mary (63) who lived with 2 of her sons, Peter (30) and Patrick (28). All spoke both Irish and English but only Patrick could read and write. Mary was born in Co. Mayo and Peter and Patrick were born in Co Galway and they were all Roman Catholic. Mary was listed as a farmer and Peter and Patrick were listed as farmer’s sons. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Mary Conneely was the landholder.

 

Coyne

Head of this Coyne family was the widower Tom (64) and he lived with his son Tom (16). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English but neither of them could read. Both were general Labourers. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Tom Conneely was the landholder.

 

Connolly

The occupants of house 31 were brother and sister, Martin (27) and Honoria (24). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Martin was listed as a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Martin Connolly was the landholder.

 

Flaherty

The last house in Cloonlooaun was that of the Flaherty family and the head of this family was the widow Mary (46) and she lived with 3 of her daughters and they were Anne (20), Maria (13) and Ellen (11).All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and Mary could not read but the others could read and write. Mary was listed as a farmeress (sic), Anne and Ellen were farmer’s daughters and Maria was listed as a farmer’s daughter and attendant. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Mary Flaherty was the landholder.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Cloonlooaun

John Flaherty – Application No. C/17 6966. The application was received on 10/09/1917 and he was aged 70. John’s address at that time was Ardnagreevagh, Renvyle, Galway. His parents were given as Michael and Nancy (Anne) Flaherty. Their residence in 1851 was Cloonlooaun in the parish of Ballynakill, in the Barony of Ballynahinch Co. Galway. In the left hand margin there were hand written names as follows: Ned 5, May 3, John 9 Mths, Peter, Pat, Stephen, Thomas, Paul, Daniel, Maggie and Patk (sic) dead. In the right hand margin was another hand written note saying “The names of the children JM + AF of Cloonlooaun are Michael, Edmund, Mary and John and also a Patrick (who died young)” The search was returned on 13/09/1917 with the note saying “Found parents married 1841son peter, not on return sheet 4.

 

Catherine Heanue – Application No. C/17 1390. The application was received on 12/02/ 1917. Catherine’s address at that time was given as Mrs C. Connolly, Tullyrue, Renvyle, Co. Galway. Her parent’s names were given as Pat and Anne Heanue and their address in 1851 was Cloonlooaun, in the parish of Ballynakill, in Barony of Ballynahinch Co. Galway. The search was returned on 15/02/1917 and certified on 16/02/17.

 

Thomas Hyland – Application No. C/21 7960. The application was received on 22/12/1921. Thomas’ address at time was Cloonluane, Renvyle Co. Galway. Thomas’ parent’s names were given as Thomas and Bridget Hyland (King). Their address in 1851 was Cloonlooaun, in the parish of Ballynakill, in the Barony of Ballynahinch Co. Galway. The search was returned on 22/02/1921with the note “Frank Thomas & Bridget Hillane (?) married 1849. No children sheet 15”

 

James and Anne Heanue – Application No. C/20 6367. The application was received on 01/06/1920. The address given was Mrs. C. Crehan, Cloonluane, Renvyle, Clifden Co. Galway. Their parent’s names were given as Geoffrey and Mary Heanue with an address in 1851 of Try Cloonlooaun in the parish of Ballynakill, in the Barony of Ballynahinch Co. Galway. The search was returned on 02/06/1920 and certified on 03/06/1920.

 

Mary Quigley – Application No. C/21 247. Mary’s application was received on 11/01/1921 and her address at that time was given as Mrs. Mary Canavan, Cashleen, Renvyle, Clifden. Mary’s parents were given as John and Mary Quigley and an 1851 address of Cloonooaun, Cashleen, in the parish of Ballynakill, in the barony of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. The search was returned on 15/01/1921 with the note “not found”.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Cloonlooaun

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864), most of the land was owned by Henry Blake and he leased a number of tenements in that area. Messrs. Blake leased 2 plots of land, 1 of 79 acres, and 36 perches and the other of 217 acres and 2 roods for which they paid an annual rate of £23 for the smaller plot and £4 for the larger. James Conneely leased a house and office on 1 acre, 2 roods and 7 perches of land and for that he paid 15s each for the land and the buildings. Michael Coyne leased a house and office on 1 acre, 3 roods and 15 perches of land for which he paid 17s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Marcus Keane leased 1 acre, 3 roods and 15 perches of land from Henry Blake for 15s, Peter Conneely leased 3 roods and 28 perches of land for 10s and Geoffrey Heany leased a house and office on 1 acre, 3 roods and 25 perches of land for 18s for the land and 17s for the buildings. Martin Nee leased 1 acre, 3 roods and 25 perches of land with a house and office for an annual rate of 18s for the lad and 12s for the buildings and Margaret Conneely leased house for 5s. Mary Baker leased a house on 3 acres and 29 perches of land for £1 7s for the land and 8s for the house. Thomas Lubbert leased a house for £1 per annum and Michael Flaherty leased a house on 19 acres and 17 perches of land for £5 10s for the land and 10s for the house. John Ruddy leased offices and house on 50 acres and 32 perches of land for which he paid £13 5s for the land and £1 5s for the buildings. In turn John Ruddy leased a school house to the Irish Church Missions for £1 and he had to also pay a half annual rent of £3. Thomas Walsh leased a house on 6 acres and 3 roods of land from Henry Blake for £2 10s for the land and 10s for the house. Thomas Mealy leased a house for 10s and separate area of 3 acres, 2 roods and 10 perches of land for £1 10s, again from Henry Blake. John Heany leased a house on 3 acres, 1 rood and 20 perches of land for which he paid £1 8s for the land and 7s for the house. Geoffrey Heany leased a house for 7s and a separate area of 3 acres, 1 rood and 20 perches of land for £1 8s. Edward Flaherty leased 2 tenements. The first was a house and offices on 12 acres, 3 roods and 11 perches of land for which he paid £3 for the land and 15s for the buildings, in addition, he leased 1 acre and 10 perches of land for 10s. Michael Nee leased a house on 1o acres of land and he paid £3 15s for the land and 5s for the house, Francis Flaherty leased a house, offices and land of 6 acres, 2 roods and 25 perches and he paid £2 2s for the land and 13s for the buildings. Joseph Ribbons leased 8 acres and 20 perches of land including a house and paid £1 13s for the land and 7s for the house. Patrick McGowan leased a house and 6 acres, 2 roods and 9 perches of land for £1 10s for the land and 10s for the house, John Kealy leased a house and offices on 19 acres, 3 roods and 28 perches of land and he paid £3 15s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Henry Blake also had 76 acres and 2 roods of bog for himself for which he had to pay an annual ratable valuation of £1. Patrick Murray leased from Henry Blake, a house on 3 acres 1 rood 23 perches for which he paid 15s for the land and 5s for the house and Thomas Hyland house and office on 6 acres 2 roods and 25 perches of land and paid £2 for the land and 10s for the house. Owen and John McDermott jointly leased 13 acres, 3 roods and 28 perches of land and Owen had a house and offices and John had a house. Owen paid £1 12s for his share of the land and 8s for the buildings and John paid £1 13s for his share of the land and 7s for the house. James King leased 14 acres, 2 roods and 7 perches of land along with a house and offices on that land and he paid £2 15s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Patrick Heany (Luke) leased 9 acres 1 rood and 22 perches of land that included a house and for that he paid £1 7s for the land and 8s for the house. Martin Nee leased 15 acres, 3 roods and 7 perches of land for £3 10s, Patk (sic) Conneely (Francis) leased 8 Acres and 2 roods of land for £2 and James Heany (Peter) leased a house and office on 8 acres, 3 roods and 22 perches of land foe £ 2 3s for the land and 7s for the buildings. Michael Conneely leased 8 acres, 3 roods and 30 perches of land with a house and offices for which he paid £1 5s for the land and 10s for the buildings. Edward Coyne leased 6 acres, 1 rood and 30 perches including a house and office and he paid £1 for the land and 5s for the buildings. Anthony Heany leased 6 acres of land for £1, James Cawley leased a house and offices on 19 acres, 3 roods and 10 perches of land for £1 for the land and 5s for the buildings. John Mullen leased 5 acres, 2roods and 24 perches of land for10s and Anthony Mealy leased 5 acres, 2 roods and 17 perches of land, again, from Henry Blake, for 10s annually. John Heany (Marcus) leased a house on 10 acres and 8 perches of land and paid £1 10s for the land and 10s for house. Michael Coyne leased a house on 9 acres, 1 rood and 37 perches of land for £1 10s for the land and 10s for the land and Anthony Heany leased 7 acres and 2 roods of land with a house for £ 2s for the land and 8s for the house. Michael Heany leased a house and offices on 6 acres and 36 perches of land and he paid £1 for the land and 5s for the buildings. John Heany (Timothy) leased 6acres, 2 roods and 34 perches of land for 15s and John Healy leased 6 acres and 30 perches of land for 10s. Bartholomew Baker leased a house on 10 acres, 3 roods and 10 perches of land from Messrs. Blake for £2 2s for the land and 8s for the buildings. John Baker leased 6acres, 1 rood and 23 perches of land from Henry Blake for 15s annually and Owen Heany leased 15 acres and 8 perches of land with a house for £2 15s for the land and 5s for the house. Simon Heany leased 22 acres, 3roods and 20 perches of land for £4 10s and Michael Conneely leased 13 acres, 2 roods and 12 perches of land for £4. Thomas Navin leased a house from Michael Conneely for 5s and John Conneely leased 3 roods and 20 perches of land from Henry Blake for £2 and 5s. James Fitzpatrick leased a house from John Conneely for 8s annually. There were also 39 acres, 2 roods and 13 perches of water in Cloonlooaun. The Irish Church Mission Society’s school house was exempt the annual rate of £1.

 

1670 Down Survey for Cloonlooaun

Other names for this area listed in the 1670 Down Survey were Corvocullin and Knocknerath. The 1641 owner was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and the 1670 owner was the Catholic Richard, Earl of Westmeath. There were 437 plantation acres of unprofitable land. There were 64 plantation acres of profitable land and 64 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

[i] This is a little confusing. Maybe there were children from a previous marriage?.

[ii] County Offaly

[iii] Possibly 2 years?

[iv] Scholars

[v] Scholar

This page was added on 12/06/2018.

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