Ballynew

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Townland:                               Ballynew

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       525.15 acres / 525 acres, 0 roods, 23 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Ballynew  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Ballynew

1670 DownSurveyfor Ballynew

Logainm for Ballynew

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Ballynew

 

 

1911 Census for Ballynew

Overview of Ballynew in 1911

According to the 1911 census there were 21 buildings in the townland of Ballynew with one of them, house 21, being uninhabited and being in process of being built. All the houses were listed as being private dwellings but house 2 was also a shop. All the houses had stone, brick or concrete walls and houses 1 and 2 had Slate, iron or tiles for roofing with the other houses having thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 2 was a 1stclass dwelling. Houses 1, 4-7, 15, 18 and 20 were 2ndclass dwellings with the others being 3rdclass. Houses 8 and 9 had 1 room and 1 window, house 10 had 1 room but no window, houses 11 and 13 had 2 rooms and 1 window. Houses 3, 7, 14, 16 and 17-20 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front. Houses 4-6, 12 and 15 had 2 rooms with 3 windows, house 1 had 4 rooms and 5 windows, house 2 had 4 rooms and 7 windows. House 21, which was being built, had 6 windows but mention of the number of rooms. According to the out office and farm-steadings return form there were a total of 38 out buildings. These consisted of 11 stables, a coach house, 12 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 6 piggeries, a fowl house, 3 barns, a potato house and a store. There were a total of 55 people, 30 male and 25 female. 29 of the males were Roman Catholic and 1 was Church of Ireland with 24 if the females being Roman Catholic and 1 being Church of Ireland. The enumerator was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Millea Family

There were just the 2 members of the Millea family in house 1. Husband and wife William (76) and Jessie (70) who had been married for 49 years and had had 7 children of which only 4 survived. Both could read and write with William speaking both Irish and English and Jessie only speaking English. Both were Church of Ireland and William was born in Co Kilkenny and Jessie in Scotland. William was listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 4 roomed 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, a cow house, 2 calf houses, a piggery and a fowl house. William Millea was the landholder.

 

Reidy Family                                      (additional surnames: McLoughlinand Lacey)

Head of the family in house 2 was John (60), a widower. Living in the house with him at that time were his daughter Annie McLoughlin (27) who had been married to her husband Thomas (39) for 4 years and they’d had 3 children all of which had survived. Those children were John Joseph McLoughlin (3), Mary Mclaoughlin (1) and Thomas McLoughlin (6mths). As well as these there was a servant Ellen Lacey (17). The 3 children could not read but the others could read and write. All, with the exception of the 3 children, spoke both Irish and English. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. John was a farmer, Thomas (39) was a national teacher and Ellen was a general servant domestic. The house they lived in was a 2ndclass, 4 roomed dwelling with a stable, a coach house, a cow house, 2 calf houses, a piggery and a fowl house. The landholder was John Reidy.

 

Reidy Family

The Reidy family consisted of 8 members with Patrick (48) as the head of the family. Living with him was his wife Mary (48) who he had been married to for 19 years and they had had 7 children of which 6 had survived. Those 6 children also lived in the house and were Thomas (18), Martin (16), Mary Anne (14), John (12), Patrick (8) and Robert (4). All, with the exception of Robert, spoke both Irish and English and all, with the exception of Mary and Robert could read and write. All 8 were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Patrick (48) was a farmer, Thomas was a general servant domestic and Mary Anne, John and Patrick (8) were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Patrick Reidy was the landholder.

 

Sweeney Family                                 (additional surname: Lee)

The head of the Sweeney family was the widower John (71) who had been married for 40 years and had had 10 children with 9 of those surviving. In the house at that time were his daughter Annie (20) and a visitor John Lee (18). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. John was listed as a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a potato house. The landholder was John Sweeney.

 

Coyne Family

This Coyne family in house 5 consisted of only 2 people, the widow Bridget (69) and her son Michael (29). Both could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a barn. Bridget was the landholder.

 

Nee Family                             (additional surname: Moran)

Head of the Nee family in house 6 was Patrick (63) and his wife Mary (56) and they had been married for 34 years and had had 10 children of which 9 survived. Five of those children lived with at that time and they were John (28), Brigid (20), Patrick (18), Nora (16) and Peter (12). Also living with them was their granddaughter Anna Moran (4). Anna spoke only English and could not read while all the others could speak both Irish and English and could read and write. All were Roman Catholic with Anna being born in America and the rest in Co. Galway. Patrick (63) is recorded as being a farmer, John and Patrick (18) were farmer’s sons, Bridig and Nora were farmer’s daughters and Peter was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Patrick Nee was the landholder.

 

McDonnell Family

House 7 was the McDonnell house hold. The head of the family was Michael (78) and his wife Bridget (73) who had been married for 52 years and had had 8 children of which 6 survived. In the house with them at that time was their son-in-law Thomas (33), their daughter Catherine (32) who had been married for 7 years and had had 4 children but only 1 survived, and their granddaughter Annie Teresa (2). Annie Teresa could speak only English while the rest of the family spoke both Irish and English. Catherine and Thomas were the only members of the family that could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both Michael and Thomas were listed as being farmers. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a stable, cow house and piggery. Michael McDonnell was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

The couple that lived in house 8 were Thomas (84) and his wife Bridget (72). They had been married for 22 years but there were no children listed. Both spoke Irish and English but only Bridget could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic with Thomas being born in Co. Galway and Bridget in Co. Mayo. Thomas was an agricultural labourer. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Thomas was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family                                    (additional surname: Clancy)

The Mullen family in house 9 consisted of 9 members. Head of the household was Michael (51) who had been married to his wife Bridget (49) for 11 years and they’d had 4 children together and all survived. Living with them in the house were 3 of Michael’s step sons John Clancy (19), Thomas Clancy (17) and Joseph Clancy (14). As well as those, their 4 children also lived there and they were Mary Agnes (10), Delia (8), Honoria (5) and Andrew (3). All were Roman Catholic with John, Thomas, Joseph and Mary Agnes being born in America and the rest being born in Co. Galway. Michael, John, Thomas and Joseph were Agricultural labourers and Mary Agnes and Delia were scholars. Michael, Honoria and Andrew could not read but the rest could read and write. Michael and Bridget spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others[i]. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Michael Mullen was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

Head of the Mullen family in house 10 was John (39) and his wife Ellie who had been married for 3 years but had no children. Living in the house with them was John’s mother Mary (77). All spoke both Irish and English with John and Ellie being the only ones that could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John was listed as being a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and barn. John Mullen was the landholder.

 

Davis Family

The head of the Davis family was Anthony (52) and his wife Bridget (54) who had been married for 26 years and had had 7 children of which 6 had survived. Four of those children lived with them at that time and they were John (21), Patrick (15), Maggie (12) and Bridget (9). All were Roman Catholic and, with the exception of John, who was born in America, they were all born in Co. Galway. All of them could read and write, with Anthony, Bridget (54) and John speaking both Irish and English and the rest only speaking English. Anthony and John were listed as being farmers and Patrick, Maggie and Bridget (9) were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and a piggery. Anthony Davis was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

Then head of this Mullen family was the widow Bridget (74) who had given birth to 5 children but only 4 survived. Two of those children lived with her, Thomas (38) and Maria (28). All spoke both Irish and English but only Thomas and Maria could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were members of the Church of Ireland. Thomas was a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable. Bridget Mullen was the landholder.

 

Mullin Family

House 13 was another Mullen household. The head of this family was the widow Julia (68) who had been married for 32 years and had had 10 children of which 8 survived. Living with her at that time were 4 of her children Gregory (33), Thomas (30), Maggie (18) and Martin (16). All spoke both Irish and English and all, except Julia, could read and write. All were Roman Catholic but only Julia is listed under the birthplace column an she was born in Co. Galway. Gregory and Thomas are recorded as being farmers and Martin was a farm servant. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house. Julia was the landholder.

 

Davis Family                          (additional surname: Feeney)

Head of the Davis family in house 14 was the widow Mary (76) who had had 8 children but only 5 had survived. Living with her in the house at that time was her son Tom (49) and her niece Mary Feeney (12). All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Mary Feeney spoke English while the other 2 spoke both Irish and English. Mary (76) could not read but Tom and Mary Feeney could read and write. Tom was listed as being a farmer and Mary Feeney was a scholar. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and Mary Davis was the landholder.

 

Higgins Family

House 15 was the Higgins household. Head of the family was John (71) and his wife Honour (66) who had been married for 40 years and had had 6 children all of which survived. Two of those children lived with them and they were Anne (25) and Hounour (21). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All the family spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. John is recorded as being a farmer. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with stable. John Higgins was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

Head of this family was the widower John (74). In the house with him were his daughter Mary (43), son-in-law Michael (47), daughter Catherine (42), who had been married for 13 years and had had 5 children and 4 of those survived. Also in the house were those grandchildren John (12), Mary (10), Patrick (5) and Bridget (2). John (74), Mary (43), Michael, Catherine and John (12) spoke Irish and English. Catherine, John (12) and Mary (10) were the only ones that could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John (74) was listed as a farmer, Michael was a farm labourer and the 4 children were all scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. John Coyne was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

The Mullen family in house 17 consisted of 3 members. Head of the family was Martin (72) who had had 7 children of which only 3 survived. In the house with him were 2 of his children Thomas (33) and Bridget (26). All spoke both Irish and English but only Thomas and Bridget could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Martin was a farmer and Thomas a farm servant. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Martin Mullen was the landholder.

 

Mullen

The sole occupant of house 18 was John (40). He was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. John spoke Irish and English but could not read. He is listed as being a farmer and lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. He was also the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

Head of the Mullen family was Michael (42) who had been married to Mary Anne (30) for 3 years and they’d had 2 children but only 1 survived. That child lived with them and was Henry (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholics. Both Michael and Mary Anne spoke Irish and English and all 3 were recorded as being able to read and write[ii]. Michael is recorded as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house. Michael was the landholder.

 

Heanue Family                                   (additional surname: Connolly)

The last inhabited house in Ballynew was that of the Heanue family. Head of the family was John (45) and his wife Anne (53) who had been married for 10 years. Also in the house at that time was John’s 1stcousin Margaret Connelly (50). All spoke both Irish and English and could not read. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway John was recorded as being a farmer. Their house was a 2roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and a piggery. John Heanue was the landholder.

 

 

1901 Census for Ballynew

Overview of Ballynew in 1901.

There were 20 buildings in Ballynew in 1901 according to the census of that year. House 1 was a private dwelling and shop, house 3 was a school and the rest are recorded as being private dwellings. The landholder for the school was William Millen.  All the buildings were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 1 and 2 having slate iron or tiled roofs and the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable materials. House 4 was a 4thclass house, houses 1, 2 and 10 were 2ndclass dwellings and the rest were 3rdclass. House 1 had 2 rooms and 4 windows in the front, house 2 had 4 rooms and 5 windows, house 10 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 4 had 1 room but no windows. Houses 5, 9 and 20 had 2 rooms and 1 window and houses 6-8 and 11-19 all had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front. The enumerators abstract form only lists houses 1 to 11but in those houses there were a total of 52 people of which 22 were male and 30 female. 19 male and 25 female were Catholic and 3 male and 5 female were Church of Ireland. The enumerator was Const. Thos O’Grady.

 

Riedy Family                          (additional surnames: Burlerand Coyar)

Head of the Riedy family in house 1 was John (50) and his wife Celia (59). Also living with them was their daughters Mary N. Burler?[iii](24) and Annie (16), a visitor Martin (6) and servant John Coyar?[iv]

 

Millen Family

The Millen family consisted of only the 2 members. Head of the family was William (68) and his wife Jessie (62). William was born in Co. Kilkenny and Jessie in Scotland and they were members of the Church of Ireland. Both could read and write but nothing was listed under the Irish language column so that could suggest that they only spoke English. William is recorded as being a farmer. Their house was a 4 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and William was the landholder.

 

Faherty

The sole occupant of house 4 (house 3 was the school and unoccupied) was Maggie (50). She was a member of the Church of Ireland and was born in Co. Galway. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read. Her house was single roomed, 4thclass dwelling, and the landholder was William Millen.

 

Teirney                                   (additional surname: Flannery / Flamery[v])

There were 2 people living in house 5. The head of the household was Sally Teirney (80), and a boarder, Honor Flannery (or Flamery) (55). Both were Members of the Church of Ireland and were born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English but only Honor could read and write. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and William Millen was the landholder.

 

Nee Family

The Nee family in house 6 consisted of 9 members. Head of the family was Pat (50), and his wife, Mary (45). Seven of their children lived with them and they were John (17), Catherone (sic) (15), Ellen (13), Bridget (10), Patrick (6), Norah (4) and Peter (2). All were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. Norah and Peter could not read, Patrick could only read and the rest could read and write. Pat and Mary could speak both Irish and English. Pat is recorded as being a farmer with John being a farmer’s son, Catherone (sic) being a farmer’s daughter and Ellen, Bridget and Patrick were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Pat Nee was the landholder.

 

McDonnell Family                             (additional surname: Heanue)

House 7 was that of the McDonnell family. Head of the family was Michael (65) and his wife Bridget (63) along with his daughter Catherine (21) and Mary Heanue (15), granddaughter to no 2(sic) and Bridget Heanue (11), granddaughter to no 2(sic). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and, with the exception of Bridget McDonnell, they could all read and write. Michael is listed as being a farmer, Catherine was a farmer’s daughter and Mary and Bridget Heanue were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Michael McDonnell was the landholder.

 

Mullen family

Head of the Mullen family in house 8 was Thomas (65) and his wife Mary (60). Living with them were 4 of their children Anthony (28), John (23), Anne (19) and Bridget (25). All spoke both Irish and English but only Anthony and John could read and write. All the family were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Thomas was a farmer, Anthony and John wee farmer’s sons and Anne and Bridget were farmer’s daughters. Their house was a 2 roomed 3rdclass house and Tom Mullen ?[vi]was the landholder.

 

Davis Family                          (additional surname: Mullin)

Head of the Davis family was Anthony (40) and his wife Bridget (38). In the house with them at that time was Bridget’s mother, also Bridget (83) who was a widow and their children Mary (13), Anne (11), Patrick (8) and Margaret (1). Mary and Anne were born in America and the rest were born in Co. Galway and they were all Roman Catholic. Anthony, and the 2 Bridget’s, spoke both Irish and English with the rest only speaking English. Only Anthony, Mary and Anne could read and write. Anthony was listed as being a farmer, Mary was a farm labourer and Anne and Patrick were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Anthony Davis was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

Head of the Mullen Family in house 10 was Matthew (72) and his wife Bridget (56) along with their son Thomas (28). All 3 spoke both Irish and English and Matthew and Thomas could read and write. They were all members of the Church of Ireland and were born in Co. Galway. Matthew was a farmer, Bridget was a housekeeper and Thomas was a farm labourer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and Matthew was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family                                    (additional surname: Davis)

The head of this Mullen family was the widow Julia (59). Eight of her children lived with her and they were Gregory (22), Thomas (20), Martin (6), Mary (24), Bridget (17), Ellie (11), Maggie (9) and two nephews also lived with them, Richard Davis (16) and John Davis (15). All the Mullen’s could speak both Irish and English and apart from Julia and Martin they all could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and, apart from Richard and John, are listed as being born in Co. Galway. Julia is listed as being a land holder, Michael was a farm servant, Gregory was a fisherman, Thomas was a farmer and Ellie and Maggie were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Julia Mullen was the landholder.

 

Davis Family                          (additional surname; Feeney)

House 12 was that of the Davis family. Head of the family was the widow May (60) and in the house with her at that time was her son Tom (35), Nephew, John (12) and granddaughter May Feeney (1). May Davis and Tom were Church of Ireland while John and May Feeney were Roman Catholic. John was born in America and the others were born in Co. Galway. May Davis and Tom spoke both Irish and English while John and May Feeney could only speak English. May Davis could read, Tom could read and write but John and May Feeney could not read. May Davis was a landholder, Tom was a farm labourer and John is listed as having no occupation. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and May Davis was the landholder.

 

 

Higgins Family

Head of the Higgins family was John (52) and his wife Honour (47). Also in the house at that time were their children Tom (20), Anne (14) and Honour (10). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All spoke Irish and English and could read and write. John is listed as being a farmer, Tom, a farmer’s son, Anne, a farmer’s daughter and, Honour, a Scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and John Higgins was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

The head of this Mullen family was Martin (84) and his wife Bridget (80). Also in the house were 2 of their children Barbara (27) and John (30). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Barbara and John could read and write. Martin is listed as being a farmer and John a farm labourer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Martin Mullen and ?[vii]were the landholders.

 

Mullen Family                                    (additional surname: Mullen Mick (sic))

House 15 was that of another Mullen family. The head of this family was Martin Mullen Mick (sic)(51). His wife was Bridget (48). Also in the house at that time were their children Peter (23), Thomas (21) and Bridget (10). All the family spoke both Irish and English but only Thomas and Bridget (10) could read and write. All the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin was a farmer, Peter and Thomas were farmer’s sons and Bridget (10) was a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and John Mullen was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

The Coyne family had the widow Bridget (54) as the head of the family.  Living with her  were 4 of her children, Terence (26), Michael (19), Mary Anne (18) and Patk (sic) (16). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All the family could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Bridget is listed as being a landholder, Terence and Michael, as farm labourers, Mary Anne, as a farmer’s daughter and Patk as a scholar. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Bridget Coyne was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

The head of this Coyne family was the widower John (65). Sharing the house with him were 4 of his children, Catherine (31), John (14), Michael (36) and Mary (32). They were all Roman Catholic but no birthplace is given. Apart from John (14), all the family spoke Irish and English but only Catherine could read and write. John and Michael were farmers and Mary is listed as a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and John Coyne was the landholder.

 

Reidy Family

The head of the Reidy family in house 18 was Pat (38) and his wife Mary (38) along with 3 of their children, Mary Anne (5), John (3) and Peter (10mths). All the family were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Only Pat could read and write and only Pat and Mary are listed as speaking Irish and English. Pat is recorded as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and pat Reidy was the landholder.

 

Sweeney Family

The head of the Sweeney family was John (58), who was a widower. Seven of his children also lived in the house and they were James (25), Catherine (22), Honor (20), Michael (18), Martin (16), Terence (11) and Anne (10). All the family spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. John was listed as being a farmer, Catherine and Honor were farmer’s daughters, Michael and Martin were farmer’s sons and Terence and Anne were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and John Sweeney was the landholder.

 

Mullen family                         (additional surname: Cain)

The last house in ballynew in 1901 was that of the Mullen family. Head of the family was John (70) and his wife Bridget (70) along with their daughter Annie (30) and their grandchildren Bridget Cain (14) and John (2). They were all Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. With the exception of John, they all spoke both Irish and English but none of the family could read. John is recorded as being a farmer, Catherine, was a farmer’s daughter and Bridget (14) was a scholar.  Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and John Mullen was the landholder.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864)for Ballynew

According to the Griffith’s valuation (1847-1864) for Ballynew, the immediate lessors for much of the land were the Directors of the Law Life Assurance Co. They leased a number of tenements to a number of people. The first plot of land with an area of 421 Acres, 3 Roods and 8 Perches was divided between 25 tenants. Patrick Faherty had a house and land for £2 10s for the land and 5s for the house, Terence Sweeney paid £4 3s for land and 7s for a house and offices, Gregory Heany also had land, house and offices for which he paid £3 5s for the land and 5s for the buildings. Michael King paid £1 12s for land and 5s for a house, Michael Ryan paid £1 13s for land and 5s for a house, Michael Mullen paid £1 12s for land and 5s for a house. Stephen Mullen paid £3 5s for land and 7s for a house, Francis Mullen paid £1 13s for land and 5s for a house, Owen Sweeny and Patrick Gibbons paid £3 5s for land and &s for a house each. Patrick Halloran leased land, offices and a house for £4 8s for the land and 7s for the buildings. James Vaughan paid £3 5s for some land and 5s for a house annually. John Teirney (Nichs.) (sic) had a house and land for £2 5s for the land and 5s for the house, Patrick Teirney (Nichs.) (sic) paid £4 8s for land and 7s for a house and forge. Mathias Cosgrave paid £1 13s for land and 5s for a house, Stephen Cosgrave paid £3 3s for land and 7s for a house and John Cosgrave paid £1 12s for land and 5s for a house. Patrick King leased land and a house for £3 5s for the land and 5s for the house. Michael Cosgrave had a house, office and land for which he paid £3 5s for the land and 8s for the buildings, Robert Reidy paid £2 5s for land and 5s for a house, Peter Reidy paid £2 5s for land and 5s for a house and office. Patrick Reidy and Thomas Nee paid £2 5s for land and 5s for a house each. Henry Hildebrande leased land for £18 annually and William Cottigham leased land for £3 5s annually. The Directors of |the Law Life Assurance Co. had land for themselves that they paid £6 annually. The Irish Church Mission Society lease a school house from Owen Sweeney that had an annual ratable valuation of £1.Michael Grogan and Margaret Barrett leased a house each off Henry Hildebrand (sic) for 5s each. Martin Mullen leased a house for 5s from The Directors of |the Law Life Assurance Co. Peter Teirney leased a house for 5s, John Cottingham leased a house from Stephen Cosgrave for 5s. John Teirney (Nicholas) leased a house to John Teirney for 5s, James Teirney Jun. leased a house from Patk Teirney (Nicholas) (sic) for 5s and there was a vacant house belonging to Stephen Cosgrave that he had to pay 5s for. James Teirney Sen., Patrick Teirney, Margaret Cosgrave, Mary Loyden (sic) and Philip McDonnell all leased house from The Directors of |the Law Life Assurance Co. for 5s. Patrick O’Toole, James Teirney, Bartholomew Toole (sic), William Churchill, Patrick Davis, Patrick Baker, Joseph Davin, Patrick Halloran, Terence Sweeney and Gregory Heany all jointly leased 56 Acres, 1 Rood and 32 Perches of mountain land from The Directors of |the Law Life Assurance Co. for £2 between them. There was also 15 Acres, 2 Roods and 16 Perches of water in Ballynew. There was an exemption of payment of £1 for the Irish Church Mission Society’s school house.

 

 

 

Bundouglas

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Bundouglas

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       92.44 acres / 92 acres, 1 rood, 31 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Logainm for Bundouglas

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Bundouglas

Map

Galway Library for Bundouglas

 

 

1911 Census for Bundouglas

Overview of Bundouglas in 1911.

According to the 1911 census there were 13 houses in Bundouglas all of which were private dwellings. All the buildings were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. Houses 2, 7 and 13 were 2ndclass dwellings, house 2 was a 4thclass dwelling and the rest were 2ndclass. House 10 had 1 room but no windows, house 12 had 1 room and 2 windows, houses, 3,4 and 9 had 2 rooms with 1 window in the front, houses 5, 6, 8, 10 and 11 had 2 rooms and 2 windows and houses 1, 7 and 13 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. According to the out-offices and farm-steadings return form there were a total of 17 out buildings consisting of 8 stables, 1 cow house and 8 barns. There were a total of 68 people, 35 male and 33 female. The enumerator was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Heanue family

The head of the Heanue family in house 1 was Patrick (48) and his wife Julia (50) who had been married for 23 years and had had 6 children all of which survived. Five of those children lived with them at that time and they were Michael (17), Peter (15), Bridget (13) Maggie (11) and Ellen (9). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Patrick and Julia could not read, Ellen could read only and the rest could read and write. Patrick and Julia are listed as speaking both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the rest of the family which may indicate that they only spoke English. Patrick was a farmer, Michael was a farm servant, Peter was a farmer’s son and Bridget, Maggie and Ellen were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Patrick Heanue was the landholder.

 

Conroy Family

Head of the Conroy family in house 2 was John (72) who lived there with his wife Catherine (72). They had been married for 47 years and had had 10 children of which only 1 survived. Both spoke Irish and English but neither of them could read. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John ws recorded as being an agricultural labourer. Their house was a  single roomed, 4thclass dwelling and John Conroy was the landholder.

 

Malley Family                                                (additional surname: Heanue)

The head of the Malley family was the widow Bridget Heanue (72). Her daughter Anne (44) and Anne’s husband Peter (50) lived with her and they had been married for 21 years and had had 10 children of which 9 had survived. Their children, Bridget Heanue’s grandchildren, were Michael (20), Bridget (17), Annie (15), John (11), Martin (9), Ellen (6), Patrick (5) and Cathleen (sic) (1). Bridget(72), Anne and Peter could speak both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Bridget (72), Anne, Ellen, Patrick and Cathleen (sic) could not read but the others could read and write. All were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. Peter and Michael are listed as being agricultural labouers and John mad Martin were Scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a barn. Bridget Heanue was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

Head of the Mullen family was Martin (60) who had been married to his wife Bridget (55) for 24 years and they’d had 7 children of which 6 survived. Also in the house were 4 of their children and they were Michael (20), Bridget (16), Martin (13) and Annie (11). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Martin and Annie, they all spoke both Irish and English. Only Martin (13), Bridget (16) and Annie could read and write. Martin (60) and Michael were agricultural labourers and Annie was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a barn. Martin Mullen was the landholder.

 

Lacy Family

Head of the Lacy family in house 5 was Festy (40) and his wife Norah (35)who had been married for 17 years and they’d had 7 children all of which survived. Six of those children lived with them at that time and they were John (14), Margaret (12), Festy (10), Anne (7), Ellen (5) and Patrick (2).  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Anne and Ellen spoke only English and, apart from Patrick, the rest spoke both Irish and English. Only Margaret and Festy (10) could read and write. Festy (40) was a farmer and Margaret and Festy (10) were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a barn. Festy Lacy was the landholder.

 

Davin Family                         (additional surname: Mullen)

The head of this household was the widower Patrick Mullen (74). Also in the house were his son-in-law Festy (45) who had been married to his daughter Margaret (50) for 10 years and had had 4 children all of which had survived. Festy and Margaret’s children also lived in the house and they were martin (9), Mary (7), Annie (5) and Honoria (3). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick, Festy and Margaret spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. None of the family could read. Patrick and Festy are listed as being farmers. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a barn. Patrick Mullen was the landholder.

 

Toole Family

The head of the Toole family was Martin (61) and his wife Mary (54) who had been married for 34 years and had had 11 children and 9 of those survived. Living with them were their children Peter (25), Patrick (23), Catherine (18), Ellen (15), Jane 913), Thomas (10) and Martin’s brother, Patrick (57). Martin, Mary and Patrick (57) spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which could indicate that they only spoke English. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All, apart from Martin, could read and write. Martin was a farmer, Peter was a farm servant, Patrick (23) was an agricultural labourer, Patrick (57) was a labourer in shipyards and Jane and Thomas were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with 2 stables. Martin Toole was the landholder.

 

Heanue Family

House 8 was the Heanue household and the head of the family was Gregory (53) and his wife Mary (51) who had been married for 27 years and had had 9 children but only 5 survived. Three of their children lived with them and they were Peter (15), Gregory (10) and Katie (2). All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Gregory (53) and Mary could speak both Irish and English while Peter, Gregory (10) and Katie only spoke English. All are listed as being able to read and write. Gregory (53) was recorded as being a farmer, Peter, a farmer’s son and Gregory (10), a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable. Gregory Heanue was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

The Mullen family in house 9 consisted of 7 members with the widower Joseph (86) being the head of the family. The rest of the family were his son Martin (33) and Martin’s wife Mary (35) who had been married for 7 years and they’d had 4 children, all of which survived. Those children (Joseph’s grandchildren) also lived in the house and they were John (6), Martin (4), Michael (2) and Peter (7mths). They were all Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Joseph, Martin (33) and Mary are listed as speaking both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. Only Mary could read and write. Joseph and Martin (33) are recorded as being farmers. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a barn. Joseph Mullen was the landholder.

 

Heanue Family

Head of the Heanue family in house 10 was Martin (76) and his wife Anne (70) who had been married for 48 years and had had 4 children all of which survived. Two of their children, Michael (30) and Anne (26), also lived in the house with them. All spoke both Irish and English but none of them could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Martin was a farmer And Michael a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a stable and a barn. Martin Heanue was the landholder.

 

Mullin                         (additional surname: Lacy)

Only 2 people lived in house 11 and the head of the family is listed as the widow Catherine (75). Catherine had been married for 44 years and had given birth to 10 children but only 4 survived. Also in the house with her at that time was her granddaughter Mary Lacy (15). Both spoke Irish and English but only Anne could read and write. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a barn. Catherine Mullin was the land holder.

 

Haney (sic) / Heanue Family

House 12 was that of the Haney (sic) / Heanue[viii]family. Head of the family was Thomas (40) and his wife Mary (32) who had been married for 10 years and had had 3 children, all of whom survived. Three of their children wee in the house with them and they were Thomas (9), Mary (8) and Anna (5). All were Roman Catholic and Thomas and Anna were born in America and the others were born in Co. Galway. Thomas (40) and Mary (32) spoke Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which may suggest that they only spoke English. Apart from Thomas (40), they could all read and write. Thomas (40) was a farmer and Thomas (9) and Mary (8) were scholars. The house they shared was a single roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with the land holder listed as Thomas Heanue.

 

Courcey family

The last house to be listed in the 1911 census for Bundouglas was that of the Courcey family. Head of the family was Michael (54) and his wife Mary (55) who had been married for 32 years and had had 6 children of which 5 survived. Four of their children lived with them at that time and they were Martin (28), Michael (25), Bridget (21) and Thomas (19). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and Mary and Martin could not read but the rest could read and write. Michael (54) was a farmer, Martin was an agricultural labourer, Michael, Bridget and Thomas are listed as being farmer’s sons (sic)[ix]Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and a barn. Michael Courcey was the landholder.

 

 

1901 Censusfor Bundouglas

Overview of Bundouglas in 1901

The 1901 census states that there were 14 houses in Bundouglas. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. All the houses were private dwellings. With the exception of house 6, which was a 4thclass dwelling, they were all 3rdclass dwellings. House 6 had 1 room and no windows, house 8 had 1 room and 2 windows in the front, house 7 had 2 rooms and no windows, houses 1, 8 and 14 had 2 rooms and 1 window and houses 2-5 and 10-13 had 2 rooms and 2 windows. According to the enumerators abstract form there were a total of 58 people in Bundouglas consisting of 28 male and 30 female. The enumerator was Const. Thos. O’Grady.

 

Conroy family

The Conroy family consisted of husband and wife John (60) and Catherine (60). Both spoke both Irish and English but could not read. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. John is recorded as being a farmer. Their house was 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and John Conroy was the landholder.

 

Heanue family

There were 7 members of the Heanue family in house 2 with the head of the family being Pat (38). Also in the house was his wife Julia (35) and their children Mary (9), Michl (sic) (7), Peter (4), Bridget (3) and Maggie (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. None of them could read, Pat and Julia spoke both Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. Pat was recorded as being a farmer, Julia, a house keeper and Mary a scholar. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with Pat Heanue being the landholder.

 

Heanue family                         (additional surname: Ward)

The head of this Heanue family in house 3 was Gregory (35) and his wife Mary (32). Also in the house were their children John (15), Bridget (8), Peter (5) and Mary Ward (8)[x], a nephew, Patrick Ward (10) and Gregory’s mother Ellen (80). Apart from Peter and Mary (8) they all spoke both Irish and English but only Gregory and Mary (32) could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Gregory was listed as a farmer, John was a farm labourer and Bridget and Patrick were scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass delling and Gregory Heanue was the landholder.

 

Heanue Family

The Heanue family in house 4 had 6 members. The head of the family was Martin (60), and his wife Agnes (54). Also in the house with them at that time were 4 of their children, John (30), Michael (21), Annie (15) and Margaret (8). They all spoke both Irish and English but only Michael could read and write, however, Margaret could read only. All the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman catholic. Martin was a farmer, John and Michael were farm labourers and Margaret was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with Martin Heanue being the landholder.

 

Mullin Family

The head of the Mullin Family was Martin (40) and his wife Bridget (40). Also in the haouse with them at that time were 6 of their children, John (15), Michael (11), Mary (10), Bridget (8), Martin (60 and Annie (2). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All, with the exception of Annie, spoke both Irish and English but only Martin (40) could read and write. Martin (40) is recorded as being a farmer while John and Michael were farmer’s sons and Mary and Bridget (8) were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Martin Mullin was the landholder.

 

Baker Family

The Baker family consisted of only 2 people, husband and wife Tom (80) and Honor (75). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke both Irish and English but could not read. Tom is listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 1 roomed, 4thclass dwelling and Tom Baker was the landholder.

 

Courcey Family

Head of the Courcey family was Michael (40) and his wife (Mary (43). Also in the house were 3 of their children, Martin (14), Michael (11) and Bridget (8). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary spoke only Irish but the rest of the family spoke both Irish and English. Michael (40) could read and write, Michael (11) could read and the rest could not read. Michael (40) is listed as being a farmer and Michael 911) and Bridget were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Michael Courcey was the landholder.

 

Lacey Family

There were 6 members of the Lacey family in house 8 with the head of the family being Festy (29). Also in the house was his wife Honor (28) and their 4 children, Mary (6), John (4), Maggie (2) and Festy (3mths). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.Festy (29) and Honor are listed as speaking Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. Only Honor could read and write. Festy (29) was listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and Festy was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

The only 2 members of the Mullen family in house 9 were the widow Catherine (60) and her son Michael (21). Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English but only Michael could read and write. Catherine is listed as being a farmer and Michael as a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a single roomed, 3rdclass house and Catherine was the landholder.

 

Heanue Family

House 10 was home to the husband and wife Michael (70) and Bridget (70). They were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. They both spoke both Irish and English but could not read. Michael was listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and Michael was the landholder.

 

Toole Family

There were 10 members of the Toole family in house 11. The head of the family was Martin (45) and his wife Mary (40). Also in the house were 7 of their children, Martin (20), Mary (17), Peter (14), Patrick (12), Catherine (8), Ellie (5) and Jane (3). In addition Martin’s mother Bridget (82) also lived with them as she was a widow. All were Roman Catholic and with the exception of Bridget, they were all born in Co. Galway. There was no entry for Bridget’s birth place. Martin (45), Mary (40), Martin (20) and Peter spoke both irish and English but nothing was enetered for the others which may indicate that they spoke only English. Catherine could read, Mary (40), Martin (20), Mary (17), Peter and Patrick could read and write and the rest of the family could not read. Martin (45) was a farmer, Mary (40) was a farmer’s wife, Martin (20) and Peter were farmer’s sons, Mary (17) was a farmer’s daughter and Patrick and Catherine were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Martin Toole was the landholder.

 

Toole Family

Head of this Toole family was John (62) and his wife Honor (63) and also in the house was their son Patrick (33). All 3 were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All spoke both Irish and English but only John could read and write. John was listed as being a farmer, Honor, as a house keeper and Patrick, as a farmer’s son.  Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and John was the landholder.

 

Davin Family                          (additional surname: Mullen)

The head of the Davin family was Festy (40) and his wife Margaret (33). Also in the house was their son martin (1), Festy’s father-in-law, Pat Mullen (85), his nephew, Michl (sic) (6) and Niece, Bridget (5). Festy, Margaret and Pat Spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. None of them could read. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festy is listed as a farmer, Margaret, a house keeper and Michl (sic), a scholar. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and Festy was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

The last house in Bundouglas in 1901 was that of the Mullen family. The head of the family was Joe (80) and his wife Mary (75) and also in the house were 2 of their children Martin (26) and Mary (27). They all spoke both Irish and English but only Martin could read and write. They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Joe was a farmer, Martin, a farmer’s son and Mary (27), a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Joe was the landholder.

 

Old PensionCensus (1841-1851) for Bundouglas

Martin Toole– Application No. C/20 10753. Martin’s application was received on 10/ 12/1920 with an address of Ballinakill, Moyard, Co. Galway. Martin’s parents were given as Patrick and Bridget Toole (king). The search was returned on 11/12/1920 saying Patt and Brigid Toole Md – 1835.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Bundouglas

Accoding to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864), the Directors of the Law Life Assurance Co. owned the land around Bundouglas and leased tenements to a number of people. The area of that land was 88 Acres and 15 Perches. Patrick Toole leased a house and land at a rate of £3 for the land and 5s for the house, James Teirney and Bartholomew Toole leased a house and land for £1 10s for the land and 5s for the house each, William Churchill, Patrick Davis, Patrick Baker and Joseph Davin each leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 5s for the house. Patrick Halloran, Terence Sweeney and Gregory Heany Leased land at a rate of £3 annually.

 

1670 Down Survey for Bundouglas

The 1670 Down Survey names for this area were Keilemore, Glancarbdemore, Gortnefunshine, Rossynelee and Shanaharaghane. The 1641 owner was The Catholic Edmund O’Flaharty and in 1670 James Darcy was the owner, also a Catholic.

 

 

Cleggan

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Cleggan

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       951.36 acres / 951 acres, 1 rood, 17 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Cleggan

Logainm for Cleggan

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Cleggan

 

 

1911 Census for Cleggan

Overview for Cleggan in 1911

According to the 1911 census, Cleggan had 14 houses at that time, 2 of which were uninhabited, houses 13 and 14. Houses 13 and 14 had Julia Holbeaton as the landholder and all the house in Cleggan were listed as private dwellings. All the house were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 1 and 2 having thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing and the rest having slate, iron or tiled roofing. Houses 3, 4 and 13 were 1stclass dwellings, House 1 was a 3rdclass dwelling and the rest were 2ndclass. Houses 1, 6-9, 11 and 12 had 2 rooms and 2 windows in the front, houses 2 and 14 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 10 had 3 rooms 5 windows, house 3 had  3 rooms and 6 windows. House 5 had 5 rooms and 3 windows, house 13 had 6 rooms and 7 windows and house 4 had 6 rooms and 15 windows. According to the out-office and farm-steadings return there were a total of 26 out buildings in Cleggan. Those consisted of 4 stables, 2 coach houses, 2 harness rooms, 6 cow houses, 1 calf house, 1 dairy, 4 piggeries, 3 fowl houses, a barn and 2 stores. Looking at the enumerators abstract form it states that there were a total of 67 people, with 35 male and 32 female. 31 male and 24 female were Roman Catholic, 2 male and 1 female were church of Ireland, 1 male and 7 female were other protestant Episcopalians and there was 1 person of other persuasion. The enumerator was Edmund Moloney.

 

Mullen Family

The head of the Mullen family in house 1 was John (45) and his wife Jennie (35) who had been married for 14 years and had had 5 children that all survived.  Those children were John (13), Martin (11), Michael (9), Patrick (6) and May Jane (1). All were Roman Catholic with Jennie being born in Scotland, John (13) in America and the rest in Co. Galway. John (45) is listed as speaking both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. John (45), Patrick and Mary Jane could not read but the rest of the family could read and write. John (45) was a farmer and John (13), Martin and Michael were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a piggery. John Mullen was the landholder.

 

Churchill Family

The Churchill family consisted of 10 members with the head of the family being Michael (50) and his wife Honoria (40). They had been married for 18 years and had had 9 children of which 8 survived. Those children lived with them and were Catherine (17), John (16), Michael (14), Valentine (13), Mary Anne (10), Bridget (9), Ellen (7) and William (3). All of the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Bridget, Ellen and William the family spoke both Irish and English. All, with the exception of William, could read and write. Michael (50) was a farmer with Mary Anne, Bridget and Ellen being scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a barn. Michael Churchill was the landholder.

 

Scrivenor

The sole occupant of house 3 was Anny[xi]Frances (47). She was born in England and was a member of the Church of England. She could read and write and her occupation was listed as an independent. Her house was a 3 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable, coach house, cow house, piggery and a fowl house. The landholder was Catherine Irvining.

 

Irvining                                    (additional surnames: Kennedy, West, Jones, Sutherland, Browne, Montgomery, Shea, Pike andHalloran)

All though house 4 is listed as a private dwelling, it seems to be more like a small hospital or

medical centre. Head of the family is listed and Katerine Irvining (53). Others in the house were

Alfred Edmund Kennedy (69), Catherine Helena West (43), Annie Margaret Jones (43), May

Simpson Sutherland (26), Sadie Browne (48), George Edward Montgomery (18), Roland

William Shea (6), Evelyn Mary Pike (24) and Janie Halloran (15). All could read and write but

there was nothing listed under the Irish language column so that may indicate that they all only spoke English. Janie was a Roman Catholic, Roland William was Church of Ireland, Alfred Edmund was a Plymouth Bro (sic) and the rest were Church of England. Catherine and Janie were born in Co. Galway, Roland William was born in Co. Roscommon, May Simpson was born on the Isle Of Man, Annie Margaret was born in Wales and the rest were born in

England.Katherine was a hospital nurse, Alfred Edmund was a MRC SIR CP not practicing and is also listed as a lunatic in the specified illness’ column. Catherine Helena, Annie Margaret, George Edward and Roland William were visitors. May Simpson was a secretary, Sadie was a nurse, Evelyn Mary was a domestic servant house maid and Janie was a domestic servant general. The house was a 6 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable, coach house, harness room, cow house, calf house, dairy, piggery and fowl house. Katherine Irvining was the landholder.

 

Firbank Family

The Firbank family consisted of just the one couple, husband and wife Percy (42) and Beatrice Ada (39) who had been married for 17 years. Both were Church of Ireland and were born in England. Both could read and write. Percy is recorded as being a contractor for public works. Their house was a 5 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was Blanche Bailey.

 

Diegan Family

The head of the Diegan family was Patrick (53) and his wife Sophia (37) who had been married for 13 years and had had 7 children all of which survived. Those children lived with them in the house at that time and they were Ellen Maud (12), William (10), Sophia (8), Henerietta (sic) (6), Patrick (4), George Albert (2) and Joseph (2mths). Patrick (4), George Albert and Joseph could not read but the rest could all read and write. There was nothing listed under Irish language which possibly meant that they only spoke English. Patrick (53) was born in Ovidstown, Co. Kildare, Sophia (37) was born in Common Street, Dublin, Ellen Maud and William were born in Naas, Co. Kildare. Sophia (8) and Henerietta were born in Terenure, Dublin, Patrick and George Albert were born in Clifden Co. Galway and Joseph was born in Ballinakill, Co. Galway. Patrick (53) was a domestic servant coachman and Ellen Maud, William, Sophia and Henerietta were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was Catherine Irvining.

 

Mullen Family

Head of the Mullen household in house 7 was Thomas (45) and his wife Bridget (40) who had been married for 12 years and had had 3 children all of which survived. Thoase children lived with them at the time and were Bridget (11), Michael (10) and Mary (4). All the family were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Thomas and Bridget (40) spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others so that could indicate that they only spoke English. All, with the exception of Mary, could read and write. Thomas was a boot maker and all three of the children were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house and fowl house. Thomas Mullen was the landholder.

 

Cosgrove Family

There were just the 2 members of the Cosgrove family. They were husband and wife John J. (50) and Annie M. (44) who had been married for 18 years but had no children. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. They spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. John J.’s occupation is listed as an independent man. Their house was a 2 roomed 2ndclass dwelling and Catherine Irvining was the landholder.

 

Davis Family

Head of the Davis family in house 9 was Mary (48) who was a widow but had been marries for 25 years and had had 7 children. Six of those children lived with her and they were John (23), Mary (20), Thomas (16), Michael (14), Bridget (10) and Richard (7). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary (48), John, Thomas and Michael spoke both Irish and English with the others most likely speaking only English. Apart from Mary (48) and Richard they all could read and write. John was listed as being a rural postman, Thomas, a farm servant and Michael, Bridget and Richard were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a stable and a cow house. The landholder was Mary Davis.

 

Burke Family

Head of the Burke family was William (53) and his wife Sarah (50) who had been married for 32 years and they’d had 13 children of which 11 had survived. The children that were in the house at that time were Joseph (22), Cassandra (20), Patrick (16), John (14), Samuel (11), Evyln (sic) (7) and James (6). Under religion, only William and John are listed and they were Roman Catholic. William was born in Co. Kerry, Sarah in Co. Antrim, Joseph in Co. Clare and Cassandra in Co. Cork. Patrick was born in Co. Mayo, John was born in Co. Down, Samuel in Co. Derry, Evyln (sic) in Co. Kilkenny and John in Kilkenny city. Only William and Sarah were recorded as speaking English and nothing was listed for the others. Only William and John could read and write. William was a foreman of public works, Joseph was a foreman and driver, Patrick is listed as an office boy and John, Samuel, Evyln (sic) and James were scholars. Their house was a 3 roomed 2ndclass house with a piggery. Catherine Irvining was the landholder.

 

Faherty Family                                   (additional surname: Cantwell)

The head of the Faherty family was Thomas (69) and his wife Honar (sic) (73) who had been married for 45 years and had had 4 children of which 3 survived. Also in the house at that time were their Daughter Emily Cantwell (32) who was a widow, Grandson Thomas Cantwell (5) and grandchild Edward Cantwell (6). All were Roman Catholic with Thomas and Honar (sic) being born in Co. Galway, Emily was born in Co. Dublin and Thomas (5) and Edward were born in New York. Thomas (69) and Honar spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the rest of the family so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Honar (sic), Thomas (5) and Edward could read and the other 2 could read and write. Thomas (69) is listed as a farmer and Thomas (5) and Edward are listed as being scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. The landholder was Thomas Faherty.

 

Knox

The sole occupant of the house 12 was Alexander (52). He was a Presbyterian and was born in Co. Antrim. He could read and write and spoke English. He was listed as being a farmer. His house was a 2 roomed 2ndclass dwelling with 2 stores. Julia Holbeaton was the landholder.

 

 

 

1901 Census for Cleggan

Overview of Cleggan in 1901

The 1901 census lets us know that there were 9 buildings in the townland of Cleggan. All the houses were listed as private dwellings although 2 of those houses, houses 8 and 9, were uninhabited. The landholder on all the houses was F. Twining Esq. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and slate, iron or tiled roofs. Houses 1 and 9 were 1stclass dwellings, house 2 was a 3rdclass dwelling and the rest were 2ndclass. House 1 had 6 rooms and 7 windows in the front, house 2 had 1 room and 2 windows, houses 3, 4 and 6 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 5, 7 and 8 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 9 had 4 rooms and 8 windows. There were a total of 31 persons in Cleggan according to the enumerators abstract return form. That consisted of 13 male and 18 female. 12 male and 14 female were Roman Catholic and 1 male and 4 female being Church of Ireland. The enumerator was Const. Thos O’Grady.

 

Twining Family                                  (additional surnames: Grey, ?eey[xii],Landwith / Sandwith)

Frederick (78) is listed as the head of the family in house 1. Also in the house was his wife Elizabeth (68), the widow Emilie Rache (sic) Grey (52), Isabel (sic) Ra? ?eey[xiii](35) and Ann Eley Landwith / Sandwith[xiv](24). All could read and write but none had Irish as a language. Emilie Rache and Isabel Ra? Were Church of England and Frederick was Irish Church and the other 2 were Church of Ireland. Frederick was born in D? Court, Strand, Landon, Elizabeth was born in Bermuda, Emilie Rache (sic) was born in Wandstead, Essex, Isabel Ra? was born in Buscot, Farrey, Don, Berkshire and Ann Eley was born in Limerick City. Frederick’s occupation is listed as gentleman and Elizabeth’s as gentlewoman. Emilie Rache and Isabel Ra? were nurses and Ann Eley was a cook. The building was a 6 roomed 1stclass dwelling and the landholder was F. Twining Esq.

 

Churchill Family

Head of the Churchill family was Michael (40) and his wife Norah (30)Also in the house were their children Catherine (7), John (6), Michael (5), Valentine (3) and Mary Anne (8mths). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Only Michael (40) and Norah spoke Irish and English and there was nothing entered for the other members of the family so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Michael (40), Norah and Catherine could read and write, John could read but the others could not read. There were no entries under occupation. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass house and the landholder was F. Twining Esq.

 

Mullen Family

House 3 was the Mullen household and the head of the family was Thomas (30) and his wife Bridget (28). Also in the house at that time was their daughter Bridget (1). Apart from baby Bridget, they could all speak Irish and English and read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas was a boot maker. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was F. Twining Esq.

 

Mullen Family                                    (additional surname: Nee)

The widow Mary (80) was the head of this family. Living with her was her sister Margt (sic) Nee (71) and her nephew Martin Nee (34). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Martin could read and write. Martin was listed as being a labourer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and F. Twining Esq. was the landholder.

 

Davis Family

Head of the Davis family in house 5 was Rodger (43) and his wife Mary (35). Also in the house at that time were, 6 of thechildren,John (14), Anne (12), Mary (10), Thos (sic) (6), Michael (4) and Bridget (8mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Rodger, Mary (35) and John spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. Michael and Bridget could not read, Thos (sic) could read and the rest could read and write. Rodger is listed as being a herd and John, Anne, Mary (10) and Thos (sic) were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was F. Twining Esq.

 

Churchill Family                                 (additional surnames: Conneely)

The head of this family in house 6 was John (80) and his wife Mary (70) and also in the house was Niece Maggie Conneely (34). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Maggie could read and write. There were no occupations listed. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and F. Twining Esq. was the landholder.

 

Faherty Family

House 7 was the home of the Faherty couple, husband and wife Thomas (55) and Hanah (65). Both spoke both Irish and English but only Thomas could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic and born in Cleggan, Co. Galway. Thomas was listed as being the harbour master. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and the landholder was F. Twining Esq.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Cleggan

Winifred Coyne– Application No. C/16 4616. The application was received on 11/08/1916. Winifred’s address at that time was given as The Secy (sic), L.G.B. Edinburgh. Her Parents names were given as Michael and Barbara Coyne (Lacey) with an Uncle by the name of William Burke also given. The search was returned on 14/08/1916 with the note saying “Neither family found”

 

John Blakney King– Application No. C/21 1680. The application was received on 26/02/1921. The applicants name is given as John Blakney King (14 June 1838), with an address of Rev B.L. Jackson, The Rectory, Belmullet, Co. Mayo. John’s parents are given as Thomas and Elizabeth King. The search was returned on 19/03/1921 with not “not found 1851 or 1841”

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Cleggan

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) the townland of Cleggan was owned by Frederick Twining who leased tenements to a number of people. The area of land he had was 869 Acres and 22 Perches. On that he had a house, steward’s house, and offices (exclusive of recent improvements valued at £60 and exempt from taxation until 1860) He paid £160 for the land and £20 for the buildings. He then leased houses to James Lilly, _Roberts, _Roberts and William Pagin for £1 each. Richard Farrington and Peter Reidy leased houses from Frederick for £1 5s annually and James Mahon leased a house for 15s from Frederick Twining. There was also 20 Acres and 10 Perches of water.

 

1670 Down Survey for Cleggan

The name for this area in the 1670 Down Survey was Cleggin. The owner in 1641 was the Catholic Bryan McMurrough O’Flahartye and in 1670 the owners were John Brown and Nicholas Bayly, both Protestant. There were 702 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 415 plantation acres of profitable land and 415 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

 

Knockbrack

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Knockbrack

Civil Parish:                            Omey

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Clifden

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       202.79 acres / 202 acres, 3 roods, 7 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Knockbrack

Logainm for Knockbrack

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Knockbrack

 

1911 Census for Knockbrack

Overview of Knockbrack in 1911

Accordibg to the housing and building return in the 1911 census there were 33 buildings in Knockbrack. Houses 13, 32 and 33 were not inhabited. Houses 11, 12, 14, 15 and 19 were shops, house 16 was the post office, and houses 6, 17 and 20 were public houses. House 31 was the R.I.C. barracks, house 32 was the Cleggan national school and house 33 was the Cleggan P.S. courthouse. All the houses were built with stone, brick or concrete walls. Houses 5, 6, 10, 11, 12, 14, 17, 19, 20, 25, 31, 32 and 33 had slate, iron or tiled roofs with the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 10, 17, 19, 20 and 31 were 1stclass dwellings, houses 4-6, 9, 12, 14-16, 18, 22, 25 and 29 were 2ndclass, house 8 was a 4thclass dwelling and the rest were 3rdclass dwellings. House 8 had 1 room but no window, house 7 had 1 room and 1 window, houses 1-3, 21, 23, 24, 26, 28 and 30 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 4, 9, 22, 25, 27 and 29 had 2 rooms and 3 windows. House 5 had 2 rooms and 5 windows, house 6 had 3 rooms and 4 windows, house 16 had 3 rooms and 5 windows and houses 11, 12 and 19 had 4 rooms and 6 windows. House 31 had 4 rooms and 7 windows, house 17 had 5 rooms and 7 windows and houses 10 and 20 had 5 rooms and 8 windows. According to the out-offices and farm-steadings return there were a total of 68 out buildings in Knockbrack. They consisted of  19 stables, 2 coach houses, 15 cow houses, 13 piggeries, 2 fowl houses, a barn, a turf house, 2 potato houses, 3 sheds, 9 stores and a forge. The Enumerator’s Abstract form lists a total of 142 people, 72 male and 70 female. 71 male amd 69 female were Roman Catholic with 1 male and 1 female being Presbyterians. The enumerator for the townland was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Tierney Family

The head of the Tierney family in house 1 was John (46). Also in the house at that time were his siblings Mary (50), Patrick (48) and Honoria (39). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They could all speak both Irish and English but none of them could read. John was a farmer and Patrick was an agricultural labourer. There house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a piggery. John Tierney was the landholder.

 

Connolly Family

House 2 was that of the Connolly family and the head of the family was John (67) and his wife Honoria (60) who had been married for 32 years and had had 9 children all of which survived. Also in the house with them was their daughter Alice (16). All wee Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. John and Honoria spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for Alice which may indicate that she only spoke English. Only John and Alice could read and write. John is listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. John Connolly was the landholder.

 

Burke Family                          (additional surname: Flaherty)

The head of the Burke family was Patrick (55) and his wife Bridget (48) who had been married for 17 years and had had 7 children of which 6 survived. Also in the house were 4 of their children Patrick (15), Delia (14), Michael (12), Thomas (10) and Patrick’s mother-in-law Catherine Flaherty (73) who was a widow. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick (55), Bridget and Catherine spoke both Irish and English while the others only spoke English. Bridget and Catherine could not read but the others could all read and write. The 2 Patrick’s were listed as being labourers and Delia, Michael and Thomas were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable, cow house piggery and fowl house. Patrick Burke was the landholder.

 

Kelly Family                           (additional surname: Connolly)

House 4 was that of the Kelly family and the head of the family was John (67) and his wife Bridget (66) who had been married for 44 years and had had 7 children all of which survived. Also in the hosue with them at that time were 2 of their grandchildren John Connolly (8) and Matthew Connolly (5). All were Roman Catholic and John Kelly and Bridget were born in Co. Galway while John and Matthew Connolly were born in Scotland. John Kelly and Bridget spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for Connolly brothers so that may indicate that they only spoke English. None of the family could read. John Kelly was listed as being a farmer and John (8) and Matthew were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. John Kelly was the landholder.

 

King Family

The king family only had the 2 members. Head of the family was the widower Michael (73) and his son Henry J. (43). Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Michael was listed as speaking both Irish and English but nothing was entered for Henry J. so that may indicate that he only spoke English. Both could read and write. Michael was listed as being a farmer and Henry J. a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Henry J. King was the landholder.

 

McEvilly Family                    (additional surnames: Greenaway and Connolly)

The head of the McEvilly family was Anthony (70) and his wife Mary Anne (64) who had been married for 41 years and had had 9 children of which 7 survived. In the house with them were their son Richard (35), their married daughter, Mary Greenaway (25), Their Daughter Margaret (21) and, a servant, Thomas Connolly (38). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Anthony, Mary Anne and Thomas spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Anthony and Thomas could not read but the rest could read and write. Anthony was a publican and a farmer, Richaed was a fish merchant, Margaret was a publican’s daughter and Thomas was a general servant. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house, piggery and fowl house. Anthony McEvilly was the landholder.

 

Cook

The sole occupant of house 7 was Bridget (50). She was Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read. Her house was a 1 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and the landholder was Bridget King.

 

King

The sole occupant of house 8 was Bridget King. She was a Roman catholic and was born in Co. Galway. She spoke Irish and English but could not read. Her house was a 1 rommed, 4thclass dwelling and she was the landholder.

 

McLouglin Family                              (additional surname: Conroy)

The head of the McLoughlin family was the widow Ellen (66). Also in the house with her at that time were her son John (32), daughters, Annie Conroy (30), who was married for 5 years and had had 2 children, Mary (24), Bridgid (23), Nora (21) and her grandchildren Mary Margaret Conroy (4) and Anna Conroy (1). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Mary Margaret and Anna, They could all speak both Irish and English and could read and write. John was listed as being a fish merchant. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable. Ellen McLoughlin was the landholder.

 

King Family                            (additional surname:Coyne)

The head of the King family was the widow Anne (51) and also in the house were 6 of her children, Thomas (28), Mary (21), John (20), Harry (17), James (14) and Annie J. (6). In addition there was a servant Peter (36). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Anne and Peter spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the rest of the family so that could indicate that they spoke only English. Apart from Annie J., they could all read and write. Anne was a shopkeeper publican, Thomas and Harry were listed as shopkeeper’s sons, Mary was a shopkeeper’s daughter, John was a farmer, Peter was a servant and James was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with 2 stables, a cow house, a shed and a store. Anne King was the landholder.

 

King Family                            (additional surnames: Crehan, Thompson and Coyne)

The king family in house 11 had, as their head, the widow Bridget (47). Six of her children lived with her at that time and they were Anthony (21), Mary (19), Pat (17), Festy (14), Stephen (12) and Bridget (10). Also in the house were 2 boarders, Thomas Crehan (53) and Patrick Thompson (29) along with a servant Peter Coyne (50). They were all Roman Catholic and Thomas Crehan was born in Co. Cork, Patrick Thompson was born in Co. Wicklow and the rest were born in Co. Galway. Only Bridget (47) could speak both Irish and English and there was nothing entered for the rest so that could mean that they all could speak only English. They could all read and write. Bridget (47) was a shopkeeper, Anthony, Festy and Stephen were listed as shopkeeper’s sons, Mary and Bridget (10) were shopkeeper’s daughters, Thomas was a fish buyer, Patrick was a plasterer and Peter was a general labourer. The house was a 4 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with 2 stables, a cow house, and 2 piggeries. Bridget King was the landholder.

 

King Family

The King family in house 12 had 3 members. Head of the family was Honoria (60) who had been married for 36 years and had had 10 children  of which 9 had survived. In the house with her were 2 of her sons, Thomas (26) and Festus (14). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Honoria and Festus could speak both Irish and English and all of the family could read and write. Honoria was a shopkeeper,  Thomas was a shopkeeper’s son and Festus was a scholar. Their house was a roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a shed and store. Honor (sic) King was the landholder.

 

Tool (sic)

The only occupant of house 13 was Patrick (36). Patrick was born in Co. Galway and was Roman Catholic. He spoke Irish and English and could read and write. He was listed as being a tailor. Honor King was the landholder.

 

Davis Family

Head of the Davis family in house 14 was Patrick (43) and his wife Nora (40). They had been married for 19 years but had no children listed in this census. They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They both spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Both are listed as shopkeepers. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a shed. Patrick Davis was the landholder.

 

Sweeney Family                                 (additional surnames: Hogan, Laceyand Glancy)

Head of the Sweeney family in house 15 was James (34) and his wife Mary Jane (24) who had been married for 2 years and had 1 child. That child also lived in the house with them and he was John Patrick (<2 mths). Also in the house were 2 servants Edward Hogan (22) and Mary Lacey (25) along with a boarder Maggie Jane Glancy (sic) (22). All were Roman Catholic with James, Mary Jane, John Patrick and Mary lacey being born in Co Galway, Edward Hogan being born in Co. Wicklow and Maggie Jane Glancy being born in Co. Roscommon. James, Mary Jane and Maggie Jane spoke both Irish and English but nothing was listed for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. Apart from John Patrick, they could all read and write. James was a shopkeeper, Edward was a general labourer, Mary was a servant and Maggie Jane was a national school teacher. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with 2 stores. James Sweeney was the landholder.

 

Murphy

The sole occupant of house 16 was the widow Mary Florence (39). She was born in Wales and was a Roman Catholic. Nothing was entered under “Irish Language” so that could indicate that she only spoke English. She could read and write. Mary Florence was the post mistress. Her house was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and Bridget Fitzgerald was the landholder.

 

Fitzgerald Family                                (additional surname: King)

House 17 was that of the Fitzgerald family with the head of the family being Patrick (43) and his wife Bridget (49). They had been married for 19 years and had had 4 children of which 2 had survived. Patrick had 3 step children and they were Anthony P. King (29), Mary Adeline King (24) and Martin Henry King (25). They also had both of their own children in the house and they were Anne Maria (15) and Helen Francis (14). They were all Roman Catholic with Patrick being born in Co. Tipperary and the rest being born in Co. Galway. All could read and write but only Bridget and Anne Maria could speak both Irish and English. Patrick is listed as being a General Merchant, Anthony P. was a fish buyer and linen (sic) and Martin Henry was a boat owner. Their house was a 5 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable, coach house, cow house, a piggery and 3 stores. Bridget Fitzgerald was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

Head of the Coyne family in house 18 was Martin (58) and his wife Bridget (60) who had been married for 23 years and had had 5 children all of which survived. Also in the house were 4 of their children Catherine (18), Michael (16), Rosannie (13) and John (12). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin, Bridget, Rosannie and John spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for Catherine and Michael which could indicate that they spoke only English. Apart from Michael, they could all read and write. Martin is listed as being a farmer, Michael, a farmer’s son and Rosannie and John were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. Martin Coyne was the landholder.

 

Murphy Family

Head of the Murphy family was Michael (26) and his wife Sadie (30) along with Michael’s sister, Bridget (18).  They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. They could all read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Michael was a shopkeeper. Their house was a 4 roomed, 1stclass house with a stable. Michael Murphy was the landholder.

 

King                            (additional surname: Geoghegan)

There were only 2 people in house 20 and both were single. The head of the family was Patrick King (52). Also in the house was Joe Geoghegan (20). Both were Roman Catholic with Patrick being born in Co. Galway and Joe being born in Dublin City. Both could read and write with Patrick speaking both Irish and English and Joe speaking only English. Patrick wa a publican and Joe was a general servant domestic. The house they shared was a 5 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a stable and 2 stores. Patrick King was the landholder.

 

King Family

Head of the King family in house 21 was James (72) who had been married to his wife Bridget (82) for 43 years and they’d had 5 children of which 4 had survived. Also living in the house was James sister Bridget (76), their son Thomas (31) and their daughter-in-law Annie (32). All spoke both Irish and English but only Thomas and Annie could read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. James was a farmer and Thomas was a farmer and fish buyer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a stable. James King was the landholder.

 

Mongan Family                                  (additional surname: Madara)

Head of the Mongan family was Simon (77), a widower. Also in the house were his children, Mary (49), who had been married for 3 years and had 1 child, his son, James (39) and another daughter, Celia (26). Also in the house were his grandchildren Michael (17), Honoria (9) and Margaret Madara (8). All were Roman Catholic and all, apart from Margaret who was born in America, were born in Co. Galway. Simon and Mary are listed as speaking both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which could indicate that they spoke only English. With the exception of Simon, they could all read and write. Simon, James and Michael were all listed as being blacksmiths. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a stable, piggery and forge. Simon Mongan was the landholder.

 

Malley Family

There were only 2 members of the Malley family in house 23. The head of the family was John (78) and also in the house was his sister-in-law Bridget (72) who was a widow. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English with John being able to read only. John was a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a stable. John was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

Head of the Coyne family in house 24 was Owen (57) and his wife Sarah (35) who had been married for 16 years and had had 8 children all of which survived. Also living in house with them at that time were 7 of their children Mary Anne (15), Margaret (12), Patrick (10), Peter (8), Michael (7), Hannah (3) and Joseph (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Owen and Hannah spoke only English and all the others, with the exception of baby Joseph, spoke both Irish and English. Owen, Hannah and Joseph could not read while all the others could read and write. Owen was a farmer, Mary Anne and Margaret were farmer’s daughters and Patrick, Peter and Michael were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house and a piggery. Owen Coyne was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family                        (additional surname: Rabbett)

The head of this Coyne family was the widow Jane (70) who had given birth to 10 children of which 8 had survived. Also in the house with her were her children Patrick (27), Maggie (22) and Katie (17) and her niece Nora Jane Rabbett (18). All of them, except Nora Jane who was born in Co. Clare, were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Jane is listed as speaking both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which may indicate that they spoke only English. All of them could read and write. Patrick was a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a stable, cow house, piggery and potato house. Jane Coyne was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

There were only 2 occupants of house 26 and they were brother and sister Matthias (90) and Mary (79). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but could not read. Matthias was listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house. Matthias was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family                                    (additional surnames: Gorham)

There were 5 people in house 27 with the head of the family being John (55) and his wife Mary (55) who had been married for 21 years and had had 1 child and she had survived. Living with them in the house were their son-in-law John Gorham (26), their daughter Delia Gorham (17), who had been married for 1 year and had 1 child, and their grandson Joseph (< 1mth). All were Roman Catholic with John Gorham being born in America and the rest being born in Co. Galway. Mary and the 2 Johns spoke Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the others so that may indicate that they spoke only English.  Mary and Joseph could not read but the others could read and write. Both the John’s were farmers. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a cow house, piggery and potato house. John Mullen was the landholder.

 

Cloherty Family

House 28 was that of the Cloherty family with Dennis (72) being the head of the family. Also living in the house with him were his wife Honor (73), who he had been married to for 46 years and they had had 5 children, of which 4 survived. In addition, they had 2 of their children living in the house at that time and they were Stephen (27) and Bridget (28). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Dennis and Honor spoke both Irish and English but could not read while Stephen and Bridget spoke only English and could read and write. Denis was a farmer and Stephen was listed as being a farmer’s son and Bridget was a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a barn. Dennis Cloherty was the landholder.

 

Cosgrove Family

The Cosgrove family lived in house 29 and there were 9 of the family living there at that time. Head of the family was Patrick (44) and his wife Ellen (35) who had been married for 14 years and had had 7 children, all of which survived. Thos 7 children were Mary A. (11), Michael J. (9), Maggie (8), Katie E. (5), Patrick (4), Nellie (1) and Thomas (3 mths). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Patrick (44), Ellen, Mary A., Michael J. and Maggie spoke both Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the others which could indicate that they spoke only English. Apart from Patrick (4), Nellie and Thomas, they all could read and write. Patrick (44) was a farmer and Mary A., Michael J., Maggie and Katie E were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house and piggery. The landholder was Patrick Cosgrove.

 

Cloherty Family

Head of this Cloherty family was the widow Honor (51) who had given birth to 5 children all of which survived. Living with her at that time were 3 of her children, Joseph (26), Patrick (25) and Ellen (21). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Honor was listed as speaking both Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the others so that may mean that they only spoke English. Honor could not read but the others in the family could all read and write. Honor is listed as being a farmer with Joseph and Patrick being farmer’s sons and Ellen a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable. Honor Cloherty was the landholder.

 

R.I.C. Barracks(1)(2)                                  (additional surnames: Youngand Moloney)

House 31 in Knockbrack was the R.I.C. barracks. Members of the R.I.C. were usually only identified by their initials although we can see by the household return for house 31.1 that A.Y. was Sergeant Andrew Young (53) and, by looking at the household returns again where the enumerator for this area was a Const. Edmund Moloney, it is likely that E.M. would be him. Andrew Young lived there with his wife Elizabeth (41) and they had been married for 23 years. Elizabeth could read and write, was born in Co. Mayo and was a Presbyterian. A.Y. (Andrew Young) was born in Co. Donegal and was a Presbyterian. He could read and write. He was a farmer’s son before joining the R.I.C.  J.C. (39) was a Roman Catholic who was born in Co. Limerick. He was a farmer’s son before joining the R.I.C. and he could read and write. E.M. (Edmund Moloney) (30) was born in Co. Tipperary and was a Roman Catholic. He could read and write. Before joining the R.I.C. he was a cooper. M.G. (22) was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Roscommon. He could read and write and before joining the R.I.C. he was a farmer’s son. The build that was the R.I.C. barracks was a 4 roomed, 1stclass building with a stable, coach house and turf house. The landholder was Alfred W. Hazell.

 

 

1901 Census for Knockbrack

Overview of Knockbrack in 1901.

According to the 1901 census there were 32 buildings in Knockbrack. House 30, which was the national school, and house 31, which was a shop wee uninhabited at the time of that census. All the houses were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls. Houses 1, 3, 6, 23, 30, 31 and 32 had slate, iron or tiled roofs while the others had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. Houses 6, 9 and 32 were shops, house 31 was the R.I.C. barracks, house 30 was the national school, house 3 was the post office and the rest were private dwellings. Houses 1, 9, 24 and 31 where 1stclass dwellings, houses 3, 5, 10, 11, 20, 23, 29 and 32 were 2ndclass dwellings, house 28 was a 4thclass dwelling and the rest were 3rdclass. House 28 had 1 room and no windows, houses 7, 8, 16 and 17 had 1 room and 1 window, house 4 had 2 rooms but no windows, house 13 had 2 rooms and 1 window and houses 2, 12, 14, 15, 18, 19, 21-23 and 25-27 had 2 rooms and 2 windows. Houses 10, 11 and 29 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 5 had 2 rooms and 4 windows, house 20 had 3 rooms and 3 windows, house 32 had 3 rooms and 4 windows and houses 24 and 31 had 3 rooms and 8 windows. House 3 had 4 rooms and 3 windows, house 1 had 5 rooms and 6 windows, house 9 had 5 rooms and 8 windows and house 6 had 6 rooms and 7 windows. The out offices and farm-steadings return only lists up to house 15. In those houses there were a total of 29 out houses consisting of 5 stables, a coach house, 11 cow houses, a calf house, 2 piggeries, 5 barns, 2 potato houses and 3 stores. According to the enumerators return there were a total of 167 people in knockbrack, 83 male and 84 female. 76 male and 82 female were Roman Catholic while 7 male and 2 female were Protestant. The enumerator was Const Thos O’Grady.

 

King Family                            (additional surnames: Sullivan, Coyne, Crehan, Hacknew and Smith)

There were 14 people in house 1 at the time of the 1901 census. Head of the family was Myles (40) and his wife Anne (35). Also in the house were 6 of their children Thomas (16), Michael (14), Mary (12), John (9), Henry (7) and James (5). Also in the house were 3 servants Ellen Sullivan (20), Maggie Coyne (16) and Michael Coyne (16) as well as 3 boarders, Thomas Crehan (35), Anthony Hacknew (57) and Joseph Thos Smith (23). Anthony Hacknew and Joseph Thos Smith were Church of England and were born in England. Thomas Crehan was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Clare and the rest were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. Myles, Anne and Thomas Crehan spoke both Irish and English but there was no record entered for the rest of them which could indicate that they spoke only English. Apart from Ellen Sullivan and Michael Coyne, they could all read and write. Myles was recorded as a farmer and shop keeper, Thomas King, Michael king, Mary, John, Henry and James were scholars. Ellen Sullivan and Maggie Coyne were domestic servants, Michael Coyne was a sevant, Thomas Crehan and Anthony Hacknew were fish buyers and Joseph Thos Smith was a fish merchant. The house they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1srt class dwelling with a stable, cow house, calf house, piggery, 2 barns and a store. Myles King was the landholder.

 

King Family

Head of the King family in house 2 was Festus (50) and his wife Bridget (35) along with their children Anthony (10), Mary (8), Pat (6), Festy (5) and Stephen (2). They were all Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Festus and Bridget spoke both Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the pothers which could mean that they only spoke English.  Apart from the youngest 2, Festy and Stephen, they could all read and write. Festus is listed as being a farmer, Bridget, as a farmer’s wife and Anthony, Mary, Pat and Festy were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with 2 barns. Festus King was the landholder.

 

McEvilly Family                                (additional surnames: O’Connor and Cloonan)

The head of the family in house 3 was Anthony (60) and his wife Maryanne (55). Also in the house were their children Bridget (22), Richard (24), Mary (16), Walter (19), Willie (18) and Maggie (12) along with a boarder Michael O’Connor (19) and a servant, Mary Cloonan (20). All were Roman Catholic and Anthony was born in Co. Mayo, Michael O’Connor was born in Co. Clare and the rest were born in Co. Galway. Anthony, Maryanne and Mary Cloonan could speak both Irish and English but there was no record for the rest which could indicate that they only spoke English. All of them could read and write. Anthony was a farmer and shop keeper, Maryanne was the post mistress, Bridget and Mary were telegraphists, Richard and Michael O’Connor were fish buyers, Walter was a farm labourer, Willie was a rural postman, Maggie was scholar and Mary Cloonan was a domestic servant. Their house was a 4 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and cow house. Festy King was the landholder.

 

Toole Family

The head of the Toole family was Pat (26) and his sister Keough (sic)(16). Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Both spoke both Irish and English and both could read and write. Pat was a tailor and Keough was a farmer’s daughter. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Myles King was the landholder.

 

McLoughlin Family

The head of the family in house 5 was John (63) and his wife Ellen (52). Also in the house with them at that time were 6 of their children Thomas (29), John (27), James (19), Mary (16), Bridget (14) and Honoria (12). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway.  All could read and write and John, Ellen and Thomas spoke both Irish and English while the others only spoke English. John was a farmer, Thomas was a teacher, John Was a farmer’s son and James, Mary, Bridget and Honoria were scholars.  Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a sstable and a cow house. John McLoughlin was the landholder.

 

Fitzgerald Family                                (additional surnames: King, Lydon and Heanue)

Head of the Fitzgerald family in house 6 was Patrick (33) and his wife Bridget (39). Also in the house was Patrick’s brother-in-law StephaBridget and Stephan n King (50), Stepson, Anthony King (19), step daughter, May King (17), step son, Henry King (16), daughters Anne M. (15) and Helen (4). Also in the house were 2 servants Bridget Lydon (17) and Anthony Heanue (18). All were Roman Catholic and Patrick was born in Co. Tipperary while the rest were born in Co. Galway. Apart from Helen, the whole family could read and write. Bridget (39), Stephan, Bridget Lydon and Anthony Heanue could speak both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others which possibly indicated that they spoke only English. Patrick was a shop keeper, Stephan was a farmer, Anthony King was a student, Mary and Henry were shop assistants, Anne M. and Helen were scholars, Bridget Lydon was a domestic servant and Anthony Heanue was a sorter. The house was a 6 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with stable, coach house, cow house, a barn and a store. Patk (sic) Fitzgerald was the landholder.

 

Faherty Family

House 7 was the home of mother and daughter, the widow Margaret (60) and Catherine (40). Both were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway. Both of them spoke both Irish and English but could not read. Margaret was a washer woman and Catherine was a charwoman. Their house was a single roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and the landholder was Bridget Lydon.

 

Cooke family

Another mother and daughter house with the head of the family being the widow Mary (40) and Bridget (28). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but could not read. Mary was a dressmaker and Bridget was a charwoman. The house they shared was a single roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and Bridget Lydon was the landholder.

 

Mongan                                   (additional surnames: Dowdand King)

The head of this household, James Mongan, can only be ascertained from the signature on the bottom of the household return and there are no other details in the main body of that form. Others living in that house were Michael King (40), John Dowd (45), a widower, and Michl (sic) King (32). All three were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. All three spoke Irish and English but only Michael and Michl (sic) could read and write. Michael and John were servants and Michl (sic) was a carpenter. The house they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with a cow house. James King was the landholder.

 

King Family

The head of the King family in house 10 was James (60) and his wife Bridget (60) and living with them were their 2 sons, Thomas (21) and Festus (19) along with James’ sister Bridget (55). All of the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English but only Thomas and Festus could read and write. James was listed as a farmer, Bridget (60) was a farmer’s wife Thomas and Festus were fishermen and Bridget (55) was a servant. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house. James King was the landholder.

 

Mongan Family                                  (additional surname: Burke)

Head of the Mongan family in house 11 was Simon (68) and his wife Bridget (60). Also in the house were 4 of their children Mary (35), James (30), Honor (20) and Celia (18) along with their grandson Michael 970 and a boarder Joseph Burke (25). Apart from Michael all the family spoke both Irish and English and all the family except Bridget could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway, except Joseph Burke who was born in Co. Clare, and all were Roman Catholic. Simon was listed as being a blacksmith, Mary, Honor and Celia were blacksmith’s daughters, James was a blacksmith’s son, Michael was a scholar and Joseph was a fish buyer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house and a store. Simon Mongan was the landholder.

 

Malley Family

Head of the Malley family was Bridget (50). Living with her in the house at that time were he children Patrick (20) and Ellen (18) and her brother-in-law John (69). They could all speak Irish and English with Bridget not being able to read, John could read and the other 2 could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Bridget was a farmer, Patrick, a farmer’s son, Ellen, a farmer’s daughter and John a farm servant. The house they shred was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and piggery. The landholder was Bridget Malley.

 

Coyne Family                        (additional surname: Conneely)

The head of the Coyne family in house 13 was Owen (45) and his wife Sarah (25). Owen was deaf. In the house with them were 3 of their children Mary Anne (5), Maggie (2) and Patk (sic) John (6mths) along with a visitor Bridget Conneely (14). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Only Sarah was listed as speaking both Irish and English but there were no records for the others which could mean that they only spoke English. Maggie and Patk (sic) John could not read, Owen and Mary Anne could read only and Sarah and Bridget could read and write. Owen was a farmer, Sarah, a farmer’s wife, Mary Anne, Maggie and Bridget were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and potato house. Owen Coyne was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

House 14 was another Coyne household. The head of this family was Patrick (60) and his wife Jane (55) and also in the house were 4 of their children Patrick (16), Janie (13), Maggie (11) and Katie (7). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All could read and write, Katie spoke English while the rest of the family spoke both Irish and English. Patrick was a farmer, Jane was a farmer’s wife and the children were all scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house. Pat Coyne was the landholder.

 

Mullen Family

There were only 2 occupants of house 15 and they were brothers Matthias (74) and Gregory (71). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but could not read. Both of them were farmers. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and a potato house. The landholder was Matthias Mullen.

 

Sullivan Family

Just the husband and wife, Pat (70) and Mary (60) lived in house 16. Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but could not read. Pat was a farm servant. The house they shared was a single roomed, 3rdclass house and the landholder was Myles King.

 

Mullen Family                                    (additional surname; Cloherty)

Head of the family was John (40) and his wife Mary (40). Also in the house at that time were their daughter Delia (7) and 2 of Mary’s nieces, Honor Cloherty (7) and Mar (sic) James Cloherty (9). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All spoke both Irish and English, with Honor able to read only and the rest being able to read and write. John was recorded as a farmer and Delia, Honor and Mar (sic) James were scholars. Their house was a single roomed, 3rdclass house and John Mullen was the landholder.

 

Cloherty Family

Head of the family in house 18 was Denis (56) and his wife Honor (50) along with 2 of their children Stephen (20) and Bridget (21).All the family spoke Irish and English but only Stephen and Bridget could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Dennis is listed as a farmer, Stephen, as a farmer’s son and Bridget, as a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and Denis Cloherty was the landholder.

 

Lyden

The sole occupant of house 19 was the widow Margaret (60). She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read. She was listed as a farmer.  Her house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Margaret was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

The Coyne household in house 20 consisted of 10 members. Head of the family was Martin (40) and his wife Bridget (48). In the house with them at that time were their children Honor (10), Kate (8), Michael (6) and Rose (4) along with Bridget’s children[xv]John (2)[xvi], Martin (22), Mary (20) and Anne (14). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Apart from Michael Rose and John, who may have only spoken English, the family spoke both Irish and English. With the exception of Michael Rose and John, They could all read and write. Martin (40) was a farmer, Honor, Kate and Michael were scholars and Martin (22) was a farm labourer. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 2ndclass house and Martin Coyne was the landholder.

 

Cloherty Family

Head of the Cloherty family in house 21 was Thomas (80) and his wife Catherine (70). Also living in the house was their grandson Patk (sic) (15), Honor (37) described as daughter No. 1 and Patk (sic) (48), described as son No. 1[xvii]. As well as those, there were also 2 granddaughters, Bridget (13) and Ellen (11) and another grandson, Joseph (17). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Thomas, Catherine, Patk (sic) (48) and Honor spoke both Irish and English but could not read while the rest could all read and write but there was no record under the Irish Language column so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Thomas was a farmer, Honor was listed as a farmer’s daughter and Patk (sic) (48) was a farmer’s son while Patk (sic) (15), Bridget and Ellen were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3d class dwelling and Thomas Cloherty was the landholder.

 

Cogrove Family

Head of the Cosgrove family was Patt (29) and his wife Ellen (25) who lived in house 22 with their daughter Mary Anne (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patt and Ellen spoke both Irish and English and could read and write while Mary Anne spoke only English and could not read. Patt was a boot and shoe maker. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and Patt Cosgrove was the landholder.

 

Lydon Family

The 2 occupants of house 23 were mother and son Bridget (50), who was a widow and Stephen (18). Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English with Bridget Being able to read and write and Stephen only able to read. Bridget is listed as being a farmer and Stephen was a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and Bridget Lydon was the landholder.

 

King Family                            (additional surnames: Sinclair, Keane and Early)

The head of the King family was Michael (63) and his wife Matilda (58) along with 2 of their children Robert (27) and Amelia (18). Also in the house were boarder, John Sinclair (29), a farm servant, James Keane (17) and a servant, Thomas Early (16). Michael was a Roman Catholic, John Sinclair was Church of England and the rest were Church of Ireland. John Sinclair was born in Scotland and the rest were born in Co. Galway. They could all read and write with Michael, James and Thomas speaking both Irish and English and the rest speaking only English. Michael’s occupation is listed as a farmer etc. (sic), Matilda was a house keeper, Robert was a merchant and farmer, Amelia was a mother’s help, John was a cooper, and James and Thomas were farm servants. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 1stclass dwelling and Michael King was the landholder.

 

Burke Family                         (additional surname; Flaherty)

House 25 was the Burke household and the head of the family was Patt (40). Also in the house was his wife Bridget (36), 6 of their children, Mary (13), John (10), Pat (5), Bridget (4), Michael (2) and Thomas (1) along with Patt’s mother-in-law Catherine Flaherty (50). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patt and Bridget (36) spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others which could indicate that they spoke only English. Only Patt, Mary and John could read and write. Patt was a farmer and Mary and John were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Pat Burke is listed as the landholder.

 

Connolly family

Head of the family in house 26 was John (50) and his wife Honor (40). Also in the house were their children Michael (17), Anne (15), Onnie (sic) (14), John (12), Maggie (10), Katie (9) and Alice (6). They were all Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. John spoke both Irish and English while the rest only spoke English and all the family could read and write. John was listed as a farmer, Michael, a farmer’s son and the rest of the children were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and John Connolly was the landholder.

 

Burke                          (additional surname: Kelly)

There were only the 2 occupants of house 27. They were the widow Winifred (60) and her grandson Michael Kelly (12). Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English but only Michael could read and write. Michael was a labourer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with Winifred being the landholder.

 

King

The sole occupant of house 28 was Bridget (60). She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She spoke both Irish and English and could read only. Her occupation is listed as a charwoman. The house she lived in was a 1 roomed, 4thclass dwelling and the landholder was Festy King.

 

Conaty Family

The head of the Conaty family was Patrick (35) and his wife Elizabeth (27). They lived with 2 of her children, Bridget S. (6) and Patrick J. (5). Elizabeth Patrick was born in Co. Clare and the children were born in Co. Galway and all 3 were Roman Catholic. Nothing was entered in the Irish Language column, so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Patrick J. could read only while the other 2 could read and write. Patrick was a constable with the R.I.C. and Bridget and Patrick were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and Patt and Elizabeth Conaty were the landholders.

 

Haran Family

Head of the Haran family was John (39) and his wife Minnie J. (32). They lived with their children Mary H. (10), Margaret M. (8), John J. (6), Anne C. (5), Honoria B. (1) Rose A. (3mths). All were Roman Catholic, Minnie J., Margaret M and John J. were born in Co. Kerry, Anne C. was born in Co. Sligo and the rest were born in Co. Galway. Apart from Anne C., Honoria B. and Rose A., they could all read and write. There was nothing entered under the Irish Language so that could indicate that they spoke only English. John was listed in the Military, R.I. Constabulary or Metropolitan Police in Barracks return as an acting sergeant in the R.I.C., Mary H., Margaret M. and John J. were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 1stclass dwelling.

 

R.I.C. Barracks                                  (additional surnames: Conaty, Haran and O’Grady)

House 31 was the R.I.C. barracks and members are normally only identified by their initials. In this case we do know the names of three members from the signatures on the bottom of the Conaty and Haran family’s household returns and the fact that Thos. O’Grady was the enumerator for this area. Living in the house were J.H. (John Haran) (39), Patk (sic) Conaty (35), Thos O’Grady (32), P.H. (28) and W.J.H. (23). W.J.H. was a member of the Irish Church and the rest were Roman Catholic, J.H. (John Haran) and P.H. were born in Co. Sligo, Thos O’Grady and W.J.H. were born in Co. Mayo and Patk (sic) was born in Co. Cavan. All could read and write. Before joining the R.I.C. J.H. (John Haran), Patk(sic) Conaty and P.H. were farmer’s sons. The building was a 3 roomed, 1stclass dwelling.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851)for Knockbrack

Thomas Toole– Application No. C/21 2886. Thomas’ application was received on 13/04/1921. The address given at that time was 444 Dunbarton Road Dalinuir (?) N.B. Thomas’ parents are given as Michael and Fanny Toole, Michael was a shoemaker. A handwritten note in the left hand margin lists 3 names and ages, Mary 9, Patt 7, Honor 2 and John (no age). The search was returned on 19/04/1921 with the note “Michael and Fanny Toole married 1840 no return for Thomas”

 

Winifred Coyne– Application No. C/16 5278. Winifreds application was received on 12/09/1916. Her address at the time of application was The Secy L.G.B. Edinburgh. Her parents are listed as John and Mary Coyne (Gallagher) and the head of the family with which the applicant resided was Daniel and Barbara Coyne (Lacy) There were 2 searches done and they were returned on 19/09/1916 with the note to say see over for A and B (the searches). On the second pagethere are hand written notes as follows:

 

40           35

John and Mary Coyne married 1835

Patt Michl  Mary  Peter John  Honoria

12      9        7        5         3        6/12 (6mths)

Martin

Dead                     No return for Winifred

Sheet 34 Knockbrack

______________________________________________

No return for Daniel and Barbara Coyne

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Knockbrack

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) a large proportion of Knockbrack was owned by the Rev. Anthony Magee. He leased 194Acres, 2 Roods and 33 Perches of land and buildings between 18 tenants as follows. Patrick Cloherty (Jas) leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 5s for the house, Martin Lynch leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 10s for the house, James price leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 5s for the house. Simon King leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 10s for the house, Margaret Higgins leased a house and land for £3 for the land and 8s for the house and William Cottingham leased a house, office and land for £4 15s for the land and 15s for the buildings. John Maley leased a house and garden for 10s for the land and 15s for the house, Owen Lacey and John McDonnell leased land and house for £3 for the land and 5s for the house each, Samuel Freyer leased a house, office and land £6 for the land and £1 for the buildings and Patrick Conneely leased land and a house for £3 for the land and 7s for the house. John Mongan leased a house, office and land for £6 for the land and 10s for the buildings. Thomas Conys, Pat Cloherty (Denis) and Penelope Mullen each leased land and a house for £3 for the land and 5s for the house each. James Lyden leased land, office and a house for £6 for the land and 10s for the buildings, James Dunne leased land and a house for £3 for the land and 5s for the house, John Coyne leased a house , office and land for £6 for the land and 10s for the buildings. Anthony Davin leased a house and land from James Lyden for £3 for the land and 5s for the house and Thomas Courcey leased a house and land from James Lyden for £1 15s for the land and 5s for the house. Michael Nee leased a house, office and garden with an area of 3 Roods from Francis Giles for 10s for the land and £1 10s for the buildings, Francis Giles leased a house and office from the Rev. Anthony Magee for £1 5s. John Burke leased a house from the Rev. Anthony Magee for 7s, Patrick King leased a house from James Lyden for 7s, Catherine McDonnell leased a house from Simon King for 5s, John Cunningham leased a house from John Mongan for 15s, There was a vacant house belonging to Samuel Freyer that had an annual ratable valuation of 7s, and Mary Mullen leased a house from the Rev. Anthony Magee for 5s annually. Mary Maley had a house that had an annual ratable valuation of 15s, Margaret Mullen leased a house from Thomas Coneys for 5s,Anne Lacey leased a house from Thomas Coneys for 5s, William Manning leased a house from John Mongan for 10s and John Mongan had a vacant house with an annual ratable valuation of 5s. Michael O’Toole leased a house from John Coyne for 5s, Ellen Mullen had a house that had an annual ratable valuation of 5s and the board of customs leased a boat house from John Mongan for 10s.

 

1670 DownSurveyfor Knockbrack

The names for this area in the Down Survey were Caheigale and Knockbracke. The 1641 owner wasBryan McMurrough O’Flahartye, a Catholic and in 1670 the owner was the protestant John Brown. There were 52 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 64 plantation acres of profitable land with 64 a plantation acres being forfeited.

 

Laghtanabba

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Laghtanabba

Civil Parish:                            Omey

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Clifden

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       204.45 acres / 204 acres, 1 rood, 32 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

1911 Census for Laghtanabba  (no records)

1901 Census for Laghtanabba  (no records)

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Laghtanabba  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Laghtanabba

Logainm for Laghtanabba

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Laghtanabba

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Laghtanabba

In the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) it states that the Rev. Anthony Magee owned 207 Acres and 11 Perches of land in Laghtanabba with an annual ratable valuation of £3 10s.

 

1670 Down Survey for Laghtanabba

The Down Survey name for this area was Loughanagappie. The 1641 owner the Catholic Donnell O Voyd O’Flaherty and in 1670 the owner was the Catholic Richard Martin. There were 33 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 3 plantation acres of profitable land and 3 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

Shanboolard

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Shanboolard

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       289.01 acres / 289 acres, 0 roods, 1 perch

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Shanboolard  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Shanboolard

Logainm for Shanboolard

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Shanboolard

 

1911 Census for Shanboolard

Overview of Shanboolard in 1911

There was only the house in Shanboolard in 1911. The house was constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and slate, iron or tiled roof. It was a 1stclass dwelling with 6 rooms and 7 windows in the front. It had 3 stables, a coach house, 2 harness rooms, 2 cow houses, 3 calf houses, a dairy, a piggery, 3 fowl houses, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, 2 potato houses, 6 sheds, 2 stores, a forge and a laundry. There were a total of 5 people living in the townland, 2 male and 3 female. 2 of the females were Roman Catholic and 1 was Protestant while both the males were Protestant. The enumerator was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Trullock                                  (additional surnames: Fisher, King, McDonnell, Newsome and Eades)

Head of this family islisted as Catherine but no other information is listed for her. Also in the house were 5 servants Harriet Fisher (54) who was married and had been for 20 years, Bridget King (18), Bridget McDonnell (15), Thomas Newsome (31) and William Eades (24). The 2 Bridget’s were Roman Catholic, Harriet was Irish Church and Thomas and William were Church of Ireland. Harriet and Thomas were born in Co. Wicklow, the 2 Bridget’s were born in Co. Galway and William was born in Co. Dublin. All could read and write, The 2 Bridget’s spoke both |Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which could indicate that they spoke only English. Harriet is listed as a cook (domestic servant), Bridget King, a house maid (domestic servant), Bridget McDonnell, a kitchen maid (domestic servant), Thomas, a gardener (domestic servant) and William, a groom (domestic servant). The house was a 6 roomed, 1stclass dwelling with 3 stables, a coach house, 2 harness rooms, 2 cow houses, 3 calf houses, a dairy, a piggery, 3 fowl houses, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, 2 potato houses, 6 sheds, 2 stores, a forge and a laundry. The landholder was Catherine Tullock.

 

 

1901 Census for Shanboolard

Overview of Shanboolard in 1901.

There was only 1 house recorded in Shanboolard in the 1901 census. The house was constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls with slate, iron or tiled roofing. It was a 1stclass dwelling with 6 rooms and 7 windows in the front. According to the enumerators return there were 11 people living there, 2 male and 9 female. 2 male and 2 female were Roman Catholic and the others were Protestant. The enumerator was Const Thos O’Grady.

 

Armstrong-Lushington-Tullock                      (additional surnames: Graham, Fisher, Coyne, Boardman, May, Courcey, Patterson, McDonnell and Conneely)

Head of this family was Kate Mary (45), a widow, and with her in the house was her daughter Edna (18), her sister, Minna Graham (43) and 7 servants. Those servants were Harriot Fisher (48), Mary Coyne (40), Ellen Boardman (30), Lilly May (20), Mary Anne Courcey (19), Michael McDonnell (27) and Patrick Conneely (22) along with a visitor’s servant, Eliza Jane Patterson (25). Mary Kate, Edna and Minna were Church of England, Harriot, Ellen, Lilly and Eliza Jane were Church of Ireland and the others were Roman Catholic. Kate May and Minna were born in India, Edna was born in America, Harriot was born in Co. Wicklow, Mary, Mary Anne, Michael and Patrick were born in Co. Galway. Ellen was born in Co. Fermanagh, Lilly was born in Co. Kerry and Eliza Jane was born in Co. Leitrim. Apart from Mary Anne Courcey, the whole household could read and write. Mary, Mary Anne, Michael and Patrick spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. Harriot was a cook domestic servant, Mary was a nurse domestic servant, Ellen was a parlour maid domestic servant, Lilly was a house maid domestic servant and Mary Anne was a kitchen maid domestic servant. Eliza Jane was a lady’s maid domestic servant, Michael was a coachman domestic servant and Patrick was a cowman domestic servant. The house was a 6 roomed, 1stclass dwelling and the landholder was ? A.L. Tullock.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Shanboolard

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) the land in Shanboolard was owned by Edward Whitwell who leased a number of tenements. He had for himself houses and offices on a land area of 254 Acres and 28 Perches. He leased houses to John Conneely, Timothy Heaney and Michael Conway for 10s annually and to Valentine Conway, Patrick Heany and Patrick King for 5s annually. Michael Conway also leased 2 areas of land from Edward Whitwell. The first plot of land was of 2 Acres and 1 Rood for 7s and the second plot was of 7 Acres and 2 Roods for £3 3s. There were also 19 Acres, 1 Rood and 26 Perches of water.

 

1670 Down Survey for Shanboolard

The 1670 Down Survey name for this area was Shanballyard. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Edmund O’Flaharty and the 1670 owner was the Protestant Francis Browne. There were 139 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 50 plantation acres of profitable land and 50 plantation acres of land were forfeited.

 

Sheeauns

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Sheeauns

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       667.80 acres / 667 acres, 3 roods, 7 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Sheeauns  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Sheeauns

Logainm for Sheeauns

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Sheeauns

 

1911 Census for Sheeauns

Overview of Sheeauns in 1911

The 1911 census lists 5 houses in Sheeauns. All the houses were built of stone, brick or concrete and had thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. All houses were private dwellings with house 3 being a 3rdclass dwelling and the rest being 2ndclass. House 3 had 2 rooms and 2 windows while the rest had 2 rooms and 3 windows. According to the out offices and farm-steadings return there were a total of 13 out buildings consisting of 4 stables, 4 cow houses, 4 piggeries and a barn. The enumerator’s abstract return states that there were a total of 32 people in Sheeauns, 14 male and 18 female. The enumerator was Const Edmund Moloney.

 

Coyne Family

The head of the Coyne family in house 1 was the widow Honoria (70). Also in the house were 3 of   her children John (37), Martin (28) and Hannah (26). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Honoria and John spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the other 2 which could mean they only spoke English. All could read and write. John was a fish merchant and martin was a farmer. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. Honoria Coyne was the landholder.

 

Conroy Family

House 2 was that of the Conroy family with the head of the family being John (65) and his wife Elizabeth (53) who had been married for 30 years and had had 9 children of which 9 survived. Also in the house with them at that time were 5 of their children Annie (19), Michael (17), Patrick (14) Daniel (10) and James (6). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. John and Elizabeth spoke both Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the others which could indicate that they only spoke English. John and James ciuld not read but the others could read and write. John was a farmer, Elizabeth, a farmer’s wife, Annie, a farmer’s daughter, Michael, a farmer’s son and Patrick, Daniel and James were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house, piggery and a barn. The landholder was John Conroy.

 

Conroy Family

The head of this Conroy family was Michael (50) and his wife Anne (40) who had been married for 18 years and had had 9 children of which 8 survived. Also in the house with them were their 8 children Delia (17), Marie (15), Anna F. (13), Nora (11), Teresa (9), Agnes (8), Eileen (3) and Michael J. (1). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. With the exception of Agnes, Eileen and Michael J. they all spoke both Irish and English. Apart from Eileen and Michael J. they could all read and write. Michael was a farmer and Nora, Teresa and Agnes were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed 3rdclass house with a cow house and piggery. The landholder was Michael Conroy.

 

Coyne Family

The head of the family in house 4 was the widow Catherine (69) who had been married for 33 years and had had 11 children of which 8 had survived. Also in the house with her were 4 of her children Patrick (35), Catherine (29), Thomas (26) and Michael (23). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Catherine (69) was a famer, Patrick, Thomas and Michael were farmer’s sons and Catherine (29) was a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. Catherine Coyne was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family                                    (additional surnames: Mullen)

The head of this, the last house, was Margaret (74), a widow. In the house with her were daughter Ellen Mullen (29) who had been married to her husband Michael (36) for 3 years and had had 2 children of which both survived. Their 2 children, Margaret’s grandchildren, were Thomas (2) and Mary (1) and in addition, there was another grandchild Catherine Coyne (13). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Margaret, Ellen and Michael spoke both Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the others which could indicate that they only spoke English. Only Ellen, Michael and Catherine could read and write. Michael was listed as being a farmer and Catherin was a scholar.  Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass house with a stable. Margaret Coyne was the landholder.

 

 

1901 Census for Sheeauns

Overview of Sheeauns in 1901.

There were 5 houses listed in the 1901 census for sheeauns. All were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls with thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. All the houses were listed as private dwellings. House 1, 2 and 4 were 2ndclass dwellings while houses 3 and 5 were 3rdclass. House 3 had 2 rooms and 1 window, house 5 had 2 rooms and 2 windows and the rest had 2 rooms and 3 windows. According to the out-offices and farm-steadings return there were a total of 13 out buildings consisting of 5 stables, 7 cow houses and a piggery. There were a total of 37 people, 17 male and 20 female in the townland. They were all Roman Catholic.

 

Coyne family                          (additional surname: Clancy)

The head of the Coyne family was Michael (66) and his wife Honoria (59). Also in the house with them at that time were Their 3 children Margaret (22), Martin (18) and Honoria (14) as well as their grandchildren John F. Clancy (8), Thomas V. Clancy (6) and Joseph U. Clancy (4). All were Roman Catholic and John F. Clancy, Thomas V. Clancy and Joseph U. Clancy were born in America while the rest were born in Co. Galway. Michael and Honoria (59) could speak both Irish and English while the rest ofmthe family spoke only English. All the family, with the exception of Joseph U., could read and write. Michael was a farmer, Margaret and Honoria (14) were farmer’s daughters, Martin was a farmer’s son and John F. and Thomas V. were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and 2 cow houses and Michael Coyne was the landholder.

 

Conroy Family                                   (additional surname: Faherty)

The head of the Conroy family in house 2 was John (45) along with his wife Bessie (35). Also, in the house were their children Bridget (16), John (13), Onnie (sic) (11), Annie (9), Michael (6), Patrick (3) and Dan (1mth) along with a border Honor Faherty (84). All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Annie, Michael and Patrick are listed as speaking only English while the rest spoke both Irish and English. John (45), Michael, Patrick, Dan and Honor Faherty could not read but all the others could read and write. John (45) was listed as being a farmer, Bessie, a farmer’s wife, Bridget, Onnie (sic) and Annie, farmer’s daughters, John (13), Michael, Patrick and Dan, farmer’s sons and Honor Faherty was a general servant. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and 2 cow houses. John Conroy was the landholder.

 

Conroy Family

House 3 was also a Conroy household. Head of this family was Michael (38) and his wife Anne (29) and their daughters Delia, (7), Maria (4) Ann Francis (5) and Norah (1) and also Michael’s mother, Honor (80). They were all Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Michael and Honor are listed as speaking both Irish and English and Delia spoke only English. There was nothing recorded for the rest of the family. Michael and Anne could read and write, Delia could read only and the rest could not read. Michael was a farmer and Delia was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Michael Conroy was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

Head of this Coyne family was Peter (65) and he shared the house with his wife Margaret (52), their children Patrick (21), Helina (18) and Kate (3). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Apart from Kate, they are all listed as speaking both Irish and English with Margaret being able to read, Kate not being able to read and the rest able to read and write. Peter was a farmer, Patrick was a farmer’s son and Helina was a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and piggery. Peter Coyne ws the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

The last house, house 5, was another Coyne household. Head of this family was the widow Catherine (56) who lived in the house with her children John (27), Pat (25), Ellen (20), Kate (16), Thomas (14) and Michael (11). The whole family spoke both Irish and English and they could all read and write. They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Catherine’s occupation is listed as a landholder, John and Pat were farmers and Thomas and Michael were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house and Catherine was the landholder.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Sheeauns

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) it was Henry G. Fletcher that owned this area. At that time he kept the land for himself and there were no leased tenements. The area of the land was 632 Acres, 2 Roods and 21 Perches on which there were a herd’s house and offices. There was an annual ratable valuation of £42 on the land and £1 on the buildings.  There was also 33Acres, 3 Roods and 30 Perches of water.

 

1670 Down Survey for Sheeauns

The 1670 Downs Survey name for this area was Treany. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Jeffry Martin and the owner in 1670 was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic. There were 44 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 62 plantation acres of profitable land with 62 plantation acres being forfeited.

 

 

Shinnanagh

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Shinnanagh

Civil Parish:                            Omey

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Clifden

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       639.99 acres / 639 acres, 3 roods, 37 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Shinnanagh  (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Shinnanagh

Logainm for Shinnanagh

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Shinnanagh

 

1911 Census for Shinnanagh

Overview of Shinnanagh in 1911

There was only the 1 house in Shinnanagh in 1901 according to that year’s census. It was constructed of stone, brick or concrete and had slate, iron or tiled roofing. It was a 1stclass dwelling with 4 rooms and 6 windows in the front. There was also a cow house. According to the enumerator’s abstract return form, there was only 1 resident living there, a male. The enumerator was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Walsh

The sole occupant of the only house in Shannanagh was Festus (28). He was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. He spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Festus’ occupation is listed as a shepherd (domestic servant). The house he lived in was a 4 roomed, 1stclass house with a cow house. The landholder was Richard Kearney.

 

1901 Census for Shinnanagh

Overview of Shannanagh in 1901

According to the 1901 census, there was only 1 house in the townland of Shannanagh in that year. It was constructed of stone, brick or concrete and had slate, iron or tiled roofing. It was a 2ndclass dwelling with 2 rooms and 4 windows in the front. There were a total of 3 persons living in the townland, 2 male and a female. The enumerator was Const. Thomas O’Grady.

 

Walsh Family                          (additional surname: Cribbins)

The head of the Walsh family was Pat (40) along with his son Festy (15) and Pat’s mother-in-law, Barbara Cribbins (55) who was a widow. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All of them spoke both Irish and English but only Festy could read and write. Pat was recorded as being a Herd and Festy, a herd’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling. The landholder was R. Kearney Esq.

 

Griffith’s Valuation(1847-1864) for Shinnanagh

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Edmund O’Flaherty owned the land in this area and leased 327 Acres, 1 Rood and 2 Perches of land with house and offices to Gartside Shea at an annual rate of £20 for the land and £6 for the buildings. Gartside Shea then leased 2 tenements, one to William Collis and another to Charles P. Archer. William Collis leased 120 Acres, 1 Rood and 24 Perches along with a house for £7 for the land and £2 for the house. Charles P. Archer leased a house, offices and 182 Acres, 1 Rood and 34 Perches of land for £8 for the land and £4 for the buildings.

 

1670 Down Survey for Shinnanagh

The Downs Survey name for this area was Sinnanagh. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Donnell O Voyd O’Flaherty and in 1670 the owner was the Protestant Sir Robert Holmes. There were 300 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 43 plantation acres of profitable land with 43 plantation acres being forfeited.

 

 

Tooreen

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Tooreen

Civil Parish:                            Ballynakill

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       785.96 acres / 785 acres, 3 roods, 34 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Tooreen

1670 Down Survey for Tooreen

Logainm for Tooreen

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Tooreen

 

 

1911 Census for Tooreen

Overview of Tooreen in 1911

According to the census of 1911 there were 5 houses in Tooreen, all of which were private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls with house 2 having slate, iron or tiled roofing and the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 1 and 2 were 2ndclass dwellings and the rest were 3rdclass. House 1 had 2 rooms and 3 windows in the front, houses 2, 3 and 4 had 2 rooms and 2 windows with house 5 having 2 rooms and 1 window. The out-offices and farm-steadings return states that there were a total of 4 out buildings consisting of 2 cow houses and 2 piggeries. There a total of 30 people living in the townland, 15 each of male and female. They were all Roman Catholic. The enumerator was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Coyne Family

The head of the Coyne family in house 1 was Thomas (330 and his wife Maggie (30) who had been married for 6 years and had had 3 children all of which had survived. Also in the house with them at that time were 2 of their children Anthony (5) and Michael (6mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thomas and Maggie spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Thomas was listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a cow house and a piggery. The landholder was Thomas Coyne.

 

Barry Family

House 2 was that of the Barry family and the head of the family was William (52) and his wife Mary (39) who had been married for 21 years and had had 10 children, all of which had survived.  Also in the house with them at that time were 7 of their children, Patrick (18), John (13), Michael Joseph (11), Ellen (7), Hanora (sic) (4), Thomas (2) and Catherine (7mths). All were Roman Catholic, John was born in Co. Donegal and the rest were born in Co. Galway. Mary spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which may indicate that they only spoke English. William, Patrick, John and Michael Joseph could read and write but the others could not read. William was a farmer, Patrick was a farm servant and John and Michael Joseph were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling and William Barry was the landholder.

 

Mongan family                                  (additional surname: Lyden)

The head of this family was the widow Mary (73) who had been married for 16 years and had had 6 children but only 2 had survived. Living with her in the house were her children Catherine (32), who is described as an imbecile. Her son, Michael Lyden (40) and his wife Mary Francis Lyden (16) who had been married for less than a year.  All were Roman Catholic with Mary Francis being born in Co. Donegal and the rest born in Co. Galway. Mary, Catherine and Michael could speak both Irish and English but with nothing entered for Mary Francis it could indicate that she only spoke English. Mary Francis was the only one to be able to read and write. Michael was listed as a farm servant. Their house was a 2 roomed 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house. Mary was the landholder.

 

King Family

Head of the king family was the widower Michael (52). Living in the house with him at that time were 6 of his children Mary Anne (20), Michael (15), Honoria (13), Margaret (9), Catherine (8) and john (6). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Michael (52) spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the others which could indicate that they spoke only English. Michael (52) and John could not read but the rest of the family could read and write. Michael was listed as being a shepherd (domestic servant), Michael (15) was an agricultural labourer and Honoria, Catherine and Margaret were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a piggery. Charlotte Browne was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

The head of this Coyne family in house 5 was the widow Margaret (65). She had 5 of her children living with her at that time and they were Philip (27), Patrick (20), Annie (15), Catherine (10) and Thomas (8). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Margaret and Philip spoke both Irish and English but nothing was recorded for the others which could indicate that they spoke only English. Margaret, Thomas and Patrick could not read, Philip could read only and Annie and Catherine could read and write. Philip and Patrick were agricultural labourers. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling. Margaret Coyne was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Tooreen

Overview of Tooreen in 1901

According to the 1901 census there were 5 houses in Tooreen, all of which were private dwellings. They were all constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. All were 3rdclass dwellings. Houses 3 and 4 had 2 rooms and 1 window while the others had 2 rooms and 2 windows. The enumerator’s abstract return states that there were a total of 26 people in the townland at that time, 12 male and 14 female. The enumerator was Const. Thos O’Grady.

 

King Family

House 1 was that of the King family and the head of that family was Michael (40) along with his wife Bridget (35). They also had 6 of their children living with them, Ellen (13), Pat (12), Mary Anne (10), Michael (5), Honor (4) and Margaret (9mths). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholics. Michael (40), Bridget, Ellen, Pat, and Mary Anne spoke both Irish and English and it is likely that the others spoke only English as there was nothing recorded for them under that heading. Michael (40), Michael (5), Honor and Margaret could not read but the others could read and write. Michael (40) was listed as a herd and Pat and Mary Anne were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed 3rdclass house. Michael King was the landholder.

 

Mongan Family                                  (additional surname: Lydon)

Head of the family was the widow Mary (60). Living in the house with her were 3 of her children Michael Lydon (30)[xviii], Kate (26) and James (23). All spoke only English but only James could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Mary was a farmer, Michael and James were farmer’s sons and Kate was a farmer’s daughter.  The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling. Mary Mongan was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

House 3 was that of the Coyne family and the head of that family was Pat (50) along with his wife Margaret (50). They had 7 of their children living with them and they were Peter (25), Philip (12), Mary (10), Patrick (9), Bridget (8), Annie (4) and Katie (1). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Pat, Margaret, Peter and Patrick spoke Irish and English but there was nothing recorded for the rest of the family so that may indicate that they only spoke English. Peter, Philip, and Mary could read only but the rest of the family could not read. Pat was a farmer, Peter and Philip were farmer’s sons and Mary was a scholar. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling. Pat Coyne was the landholder.

 

Cosgrove Family

The head of the Cosgrove family was John (80) along with his wife Mary (60) and their son Stephen (22). All were born in County Galway and were Roman Catholic. All 3 spoke both Irish and English but only Stephen could read and write. John was a farmer and Stephen is listed as a farmer’s son. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling. John Cosgrove was the landholder.

 

Coyne Family

There were only 2 occupants of house 5 with the head of the house being the widow Mary (60) and her grandson Tom (20). Both were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both of them also spoke both Irish and English but only Tom could read and write. Mary was a farmer and Tom was a boot maker. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling and Mary was the landholder.

 

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Tooreen

Eliza Davis– Application No. C/17 1165. The date of Eliza’s application was 05/02/1917. Her address at that time was given as Frallagh, Claddaghduff, Co. Galway.  Her parent’s names were given as Tom and Mary Davis (Sullivan). The search was returned on 07/02/1917 with nothing found.

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Tooreen

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert J. Wilberforce leased land with an area of 831 Acres and 38 Perches to Sir John L. Clowes at a rate of £68 annually. Michael Morrin leased 6 Acres, 3 Roods and 20 Perches of land and a house from Sir John L. Clowes at an annual valuation of £1 for the land and10s for the house. Sir John L. Clowes also leased tenements to the following people. Anthony Faherty leased 6 Acres, 2 Roods and 20 Perches including a house for £1 5s for the land and 5s for the house, John Garvey leased 3 Acres, £ roods and 20 Perches of land including a house for 15s for the land and 5s for the house and Patrick Coyne leased 5 Acres, 3 Roods and 36 Perches of land with a house and offices for 17s for the land and 8s for the buildings. Thomas Heany leased 4 Acres, 3 Roods and 23 Perches with a house for 10s for the land and 5s for the house, Michael Sullivan leased 22 Acres, 1 Rood and 38 Perches of land with a house and office for £3 for the land and 15s for the buildings. Finally, Thomas Sullivan leased 3 Acres, 3 Roods and 36 Perches of land with a house for £1 5s for the land and 5s for the house.

 

 

 

Trean

Author: Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

 

Townland:                               Trean

Civil Parish:                            Omey

Barony:                                   Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                                    Clifden

District Electoral Division:     Cleggan

Area:                                       109.85 acres / 109 acres, 3 roods, 16 perches

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Clifden R.C. Parish 1821-1881

Map

Galway Library for Trean

Logainm for Trean

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Trean

 

1911 Census for Trean

Overview of Trean in 1911

According to the house and building return in the 1911 census there were 7 houses in Trean. All were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls with Thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. They are all described as private dwellings with house 7 being a 2ndclass house and the rest were 3rdclass. House 5 had 1 room and 1 window, house 2 had 2 rooms and 1 window, house 7 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and the others had 2 rooms and 2 windows. The out-buildings and farm-steadings return shows that there were a total of 15 out buildings. They consisted of 5 stables, 6 cow houses, 2 piggeries, a barn and a shed. The enumerators abstract return says that there were a total of 34 people in the towland of Trean, those being 18 male and 16 female. They were all Roman Catholic.  The enumerator for this area was Const. Edmund Moloney.

 

Higgins

The sole occupant of house 1 was Anne (40). Anne was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. There was no occupation listed for her. The house she lived in was a 2 roomed. 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and Anne was the landholder.

 

Cosgrove Family

House 2 was the house of the Cosgrove family, a husband and wife, Stephen (83) and Mary (78) who had been married for 55 years and had had 10 children but only 4 had survived. They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Both spoke Irish and English but only Stephen could read and write. Stephen was listed as being a farmer. Their house was a 3rdclass, 2 roomed dwelling with a stable and cow house. Stephen Cosgrove was the landholder.

 

King Family

The king family in house 3 had 9 members with the head of the family being John (45). He had been married to his wife Bridget (35) for 15 years and they had had 8 children and all of them had survived. They had 7 of those children living with them at that time and they were Bridget (14), Mary Anne (12), John (9), Ellie (7), Michael (5), Annie (2) and Honoria (11mths). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Only John (45) was listed as speaking Irish and English which could indicate that the others only spoke English. Michael, Annie and Honoria could not read but the others could read and write. John (45) was a farmer and Bridget (14), Mary Anne, John and Ellie were scholars. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. John King was the landholder.

 

Hetch Family

The head of the Hetch family was the widow Catherin (sic) (70) and she had 3 of her children in the house with her at that time as well. They were John (29), Thomas (27) and Barbara (42). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All the family could speak both Irish and English and, apart from Catherin (sic), they could all read and write. Johnis listed as being a farmer and Thomas an agricultural labourer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a stable, cow house, piggery and a barn. John Hetch was the landholder.

 

Toole Family

House 5 was the home of the husband and wife John (65) and Bridget (67) who had been married for 24 years but had no children. They were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Theu both spoke Irish and English but only John could read and write. Nothing was listed for an occupation. The house they shared was a single roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with and John Hetch was the landholder.

 

Hetch Family                          (additional surname: Fitzgerald)

The head of the Hetch family in house 6 was Martin (83) and his wife Honoria (75) and they had been married for 47 years and had had 9 children of which all survived. Living with them in the house were their son, Thomas (36) and his wife, Margaret (32) who had been married for a year and had 1 child, Patrick (2mths). Also in the house were another son Festus (27) and a visitor Martin Fitzgerald (24). All were Roman Catholic with Martin Fitzgerald being born in America and the rest in Co. Galway. Martin, Honoria, Thomas, Margaret and Festus could speak both Irish and English but nothing was listed for the other 2 so that could indicate that they only spoke English. Martin, Honoria and Patrick could not read but the others could all read and write. Martin and Thomas were farmers, Festus was a boilermaker and Martin Fitzgerald was a machinist. The house they all shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a stable, cow house and a piggery. Martin Hetch was the landholder.

 

McEvilly Family

There were 9 members of the McEvilly family in house 7 with the head of the family being Patrick (58) with his wife Bridget (49) who had been married for 18 years and had had 7 children of which 6 survived[xix]. Also living with the in the house were their children Thomas (26), Mary Anne (17), Richard (15), Patrick (13), Walter (8), John (5) and Bridget (2). All the family was born in Co. Galway and they were Roman Catholic.  Apart from John and Bridget (2), they all spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Patrick (58) was a farmer and fisherman, Thomas was a fisherman and Richard, Patrick and Walter were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable, cow house and a shed. Patrick McEvilly was the landholder.

 

1901 Censusfor Trean

Overview of Trean in 1901.

According to the 1901 census there were 8 houses in the townland of Trean. All the houses were listed as private dwellings. They were all constructed stone, brick or concrete walls and thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 6 was a 2ndclass dwelling with the rest being 3rdclass. House 1, 2, 4 and 5 had 2 rooms and a single window, house 3 and 8 had 2 rooms and 2 windows and house 6 had 2 rooms with 4 windows. According to the out-building and farm-steading return there were a total of 10 out buildings. They consisted of a stable, 6 cow houses, a piggery and 2 potato houses. The enumerator’s abstract return states that there were a total of 31 people living in Trean, 17 male and 14 female. The enumerator was Const. Thos O’Grady.

 

Cosgrove Family

Head of this family was Stephan (sic) (70) and his wife Mary (67) along with their son, Michael (26). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. They all spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Stephan (sic) and Mary were farmers with Michael being listed as a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and potato house. Stephan Cosgrove was the landholder.

 

Higgins Family

The head of the Higgins family in house 2 was the widower Gregory (64) and he lived with his daughter Anne (28). They were both Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. They both spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Both of them were listed as farmers. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house and Gregory Higgins was the landholder.

 

King Family

House 3 was the home of the King family. Head of the family was John (32) and his wife Bridget (23). Also in the house were 3 of their children Bridges (sic) (4), Mary Anne (2) and Kate (6mths). The whole family was born in Co. Galway and was Roman Catholic. John and Bridget spoke both Irish and English, and could read and write. John was listed as a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed 3rdclass dwelling and John King was the landholder.

 

Toole Family

The husband and wife couple that lived in house 4 was John (50) and Bridget (50). They were both born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They both spoke Irish and English but only John could read and write. John is listed as being a farmer. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and piggery. John Toole was the landholder.

 

Hetch Family

The head of the Hetch family was Martin (50) and his wife Honor (40) along with 2 of their children Festy (17) and Anne (15). All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. All spoke both Irish and English but only Fasty and Anne could read and write. Martin was listed as being a farmer with Festy, a farmer’s son and Anne, a farmer’s daughter. They lived in a 2 roomed, 3rdclass dwelling with a cow house and a potato house. The landholder was Martin Hetch.

 

McEvilly Family

There were 8 members of the McEvilly family in house 6 with the head of the family being Pat (40). Also in the house were his wife Bridget (34) and 6 of their children Thomas (15), Michael (13), Maryanne (7), Richard (5), Patrick (2) and Willie (5mths). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Pat, Bridget, Thomas and Michael are all listed as speaking both Irish and English but there was nothing listed for the others which could indicate that they only spoke English. Apart from Richard, Patrick and Willie, they all could read and write. Pat is listed as a farmer and Thomas, a farmer’s daughter with Michael and Maryanne being scholars. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2ndclass dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Pat McEvilly was the landholder.

 

Hetch Family

Head of the Hetch family in house 7 was the widow Catherine (50). Living with nher in the house at that time were her sons, Michael (25), John (21) and Thomas (19). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All spoke both Irish and English and, apart from Catherine, they could all read and write. Catherine’s occupation is listed as a landholder while Michael John and Thomas were fishermen. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house with a cow house. Catherine Hetch was the landholder.

 

Tierney Family

Head of the Tierney family was the widow Anne (60), who was a widow. Also in the hosue with her were 2 of her children Honor (24) and John (26). They were all Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. They all spoke both Irish and English but none of them could read. Honor was a washerwoman and John was an farm labourer. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rdclass house and Catherine Hetch was the landholder.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Trean

Winifred Coyne– Application No. C/16 5278. Winifreds application was received on 12/09/1916. Her address at the time of application was The Secy L.G.B. Edinburgh. Her parents are listed as John and Mary Coyne (Gallagher) and the head of the family with which the applicant resided was Daniel and Barbara Coyne (Lacy) There were 2 searches done and they were returned on 19/09/1916 with the note to say see over for A and B (the searches). On the second pagethere are hand written notes as follows:

 

40           35

John and Mary Coyne married 1835

Patt Michl  Mary  Peter  John  Honoria

12      9        7        5         3         6/12 (6mths)

Martin

Dead                     No return for Winifred

Sheet 34 Knockbrack

______________________________________________

No return for Daniel and Barbara Coyne

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Trean

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) the Rev. Anthony Magee leased tenements to 6 people jointly with a total of 93 Acres and 1 Rood including houses and offices. John McAveely and Mary Grodin paid £2 15s for the land and 5s for a house each and as well as that Mary Grodin also leased a pound for no charge. Thomas Clogherty and Thomas Higgins paid £2 15s for their share of the land and 10s for houses and offices each. Thomas McAveely leased land for £1 5s and for a house he paid 10s annually. Morgan Mullin leased his share of the land for £2 15s and paid 5s for a house. John Toole leased a share of land from Thomas McAveely £1 5s and then a further 5s for a house. There was also 12 Acres and 10 Perches of water.

 

1670 Down Survey for Trean

The Downs Survey name for this area was Towerskehin & Loghanna. The 1641 owner was the Catholic Edmund O’Flaharty and in 1670 the owner was the Protestant Thomas Cunny.

 

[i]May indicate they only spoke English.

[ii]Being only 2 years old, stating that Henry could read and write maybe a mistake.

[iii]Very difficult to read this surname on the household return form. Possibly Butler? Also states that she is not married.

[iv]Difficult to read this surname on the household return form.

[v]This surname is difficult to read on the census household return

[vi]The landholder’s name was Tom Mullen and something else, but difficult to read.

[vii]Martin Mullen and another name are listed as the landholders but the second name is difficult to read.

[viii]In the household return the name of this family is listed as Haney, however in the house and building return, Thomas Heanue is listed as the head of the family.

[ix]Bridget’s listing as a farmer’s son is obviously wrong and should be farmer’s daughter.

[x]The household return says that Mary Ward is a daughter. Seeing as Patrick Ward is a Nephew, it maybe possible that Mary was a niece.

[xi]Possibly Amy

[xii]This name is unreadable.

[xiii]This name is unreadable.

[xiv]Hard to tell if this surname is Landwith or Sandwith as both are surnames.

[xv]Probably from a previous marriage.

[xvi]Judging by the age, possibly Martin and Bridget’s son and a mistake on the household return form.

[xvii]Being described as daughter No.1 and son No. 1 for Honor and Patk could mean that they were Thomas’ children from a previous marriage.

[xviii]Possibly a son from a previous marriage.

[xix]Thomas is listed as a son but is 26, so that could indicate that he was from a previous marriage.

This page was added on 12/06/2018.

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