Knocknahaw

Cnoc na hÁithe

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

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Townland:                                  Knocknahaw

Civil Parish:                                Ballynakill

Barony:                                       Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                          Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                           74.51 acres / 74 acres, 2 roods, 1 perch

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Knocknahaw (no records)

Map

Galway Library for Knocknahaw

Logainm for Knocknahaw

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Knocknahaw

 

 

1911 Census for Knocknahaw

Overview of Knocknahaw in 1911.

The 1911 census for Knocknahaw lists 7 houses. All had stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 5 and 6 having slate, iron or tiles for roofing and the other houses having thatch, wood or other perishable materials for roofing. House 5 was a 1st class dwelling, houses 1,3,4 and 6 were 2nd class dwellings and houses 2 and 7 were 3rd class. House 7 had 1 room and 1 window, house 2 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 1,3,4 and 6 had 2 rooms and 3 windows and house 5 had 5 rooms and 7 windows. There were a total of 19 out buildings consisting of 5 stables, a coach house, a harness room, 5 cow houses, 3 calf houses, 3 piggeries and a turf house. A total of 28 people lived there, 9 male and 19 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

Gannon

The head of the Gannon family was Michael (79) and along with his wife Bridget (80) had been married for 50 years and had had 1 child. Their son Own (sic) (30) and his wife, Michael’s daughter-in-law, Bridget (27) who had been married for a year also lived in the house with them. Michael and Bridget (80) are listed as being able to speak both Irish and English but on Bridget (27) could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael was a farmer and Own (sic) was a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2nd class, 2 roomed house with a stable, cow house and piggery. Michael Gannon was the landholder.

 

Conneely

The Conneely family consisted of 9 members with Michael (47) as the head of the family and his wife Honor (38) who had been married for 16 years and had had 7 children of which 6 survived. Sharing the house with them were their children John (10), William (8), Patrick (1), Mary (12), Ellen (6) and Sarah (4) and also Michael’s mother Mary (84). Michael, John, William and Mary (12) could speak both Irish and English, Mary (84) could only speak Irish but there was no entry for the others[i]. Only Michael (47), John, William and Mary (12) could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (47) is recorded as being a farmer and John, William and Mary (12) were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable, cow house and calf house. Michael Conneely was the landholder.

 

O’Brien

House 3 was that of the O’Brien family with the head of the family being the widow Julia (50) who had had 5 children of which 4 survived. Living with her were her son Michael (36) and her daughter-in-law Jane (37). All had both Irish and English language and Michael and Jane could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is recorded as being a farmer’s son. Their house was 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, cow house, calf house and piggery. Julia was the landholder.

 

Conneely

House 4 was the home of the Conneely family. Head of the family was Simon (84) and his wife Margret (sic) (86) who had been married for 60 years and had had 7 children of which 6 survived. Their daughter Margret (sic) (48) also lived with them. All spoke both Irish and English but none could read or write. All 3 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All 3 were recorded as being farmers. The house was a2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house, calf, house and piggery. The landholder was Simon Conneely.

 

Graham                                   (additional surnames: Walters/Watters and Mathews)

The head of the Graham family was Hector Robert Lushington Graham (22) and his wife Ellen Violet Mandsley (28) who had been married for only 1 year with no children. Hector’s mother, a widow who had had only 1 child, Minna (sic) (53) was also in the house at that time along with a visitor Edith Isabel Monsarrat Watters[ii] (30). There were also 2 females that in the relationship to the head section is described as by marriage cousin. They were Elizabeth Violet Gertrude Mathews (34) and Sarah Evelyne Constance Mathews (31). All could read and write. All were Church of Ireland, Episcopalian. Hector was born in Co. Fermanagh, Ellen was born in Co. Down, Minna (sic) was born in India, Edith was born in Co. Kilkenny and Elizabeth and Sarah were born in Co. Tyrone. Hector is listed as being a land owner. Their house was a 1st class 5 roomed dwelling with 2 stables, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house and a turf house. The landholder was Bernard Duane.

 

Laird

House 6 was the home of the Laird family. Head of the family was Elizabeth (41) who was married for 12 years and had had 3 children all of whom survived. In the house with her at that time was her granddaughter Mabel Minna (1). Elizabeth could read and write. Elizabeth was born in Co. Tyrone and Mabel Minna was born in Co. Galway and both were Church of Ireland, Episcopalian. The house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was Bernard Duane.

 

King

The sole occupant of the last house was Margret (72). She spoke both Irish and English but could not read or write. She was born in Co. Galway and was Roman Catholic. Her house was a 1 roomed 3rd class dwelling and Bernard Duane was the landholder.

 

1901 Census for Knocknahaw

Overview of Knocknahaw in 1901.

According to the 1901 census for knocknahaw there were 7 houses in the townland. All the houses were built with stone, brick or concrete walls with house 1 having slate, iron or tiles for roofing and the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable material. House 6 was classified as a lodging house while all the rest were private dwellings. House 1 was a 1st class dwelling, house 2and 4 were 2nd class and houses 2,5,6 and7 were 3rd class dwellings. There were a total of 12 out buildings consisting of 2 stables, 7 cow houses and 3 piggeries. At total of 32 people lived in the townland of which 14 were male and 18 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Duane                          (additional surnames: O’Malley and Brown)

The head of the Duane family was Bernard S. (62) and his wife Barbara (60). In the house with them at that time were their 4 children May T. (29), Barbara M. (26), Mathias S. (23) and Bernard S. (21) and also a servant Mary O’Malley (18) and a fisherman Peter Brown (40).All could read and write and Peter Brown could only speak English with all the rest having both Irish and English for languages. All were Roman Catholic. Peter was born in Co. Wicklow and the rest in Co. Galway. Bernard S. (62) is listed as a farmer, Barbara, as a farmer’s wife, Mary T. and Barbara M, as farmer’s daughters, Mathias S. and Bernard S. (21), as farmer’s sons, mary O’Malley was a domestic Servant cook and Peter a fisherman. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a stable and a cow house. Bernard Duane was the landholder.

 

Conneely

House 2 was the home of the Conneely family that consisted of 5 members. Head of the family was Simon (62) and his wife Margaret (60). Also in the house were 2 of their daughters Mary (40) and Maggie (18) along with 1 of their granddaughters Mary (20). All 5 were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All could speak both Irish and English but only Maggie and Mary (20) could read and write. Simon is recorded as a farmer, Margaret was a farmer’s wife, Mary 940) a cook domestic servant and Maggie and Mary (20) were listed as farmer’s daughters. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class house with a cow house and piggery. The landholder was Simon Conneely.

 

Connor                                   (additional surnames: Connolly)

The Connor family occupied house 3. The head of the family was Patrick (50) and his wife Bridget (48). Also in the house were 3 of their children Michael (23), Festus (18), Bridget (15) and their grandson Michael Connolly (5). All could speak, both, Irish and English but only Michael, Festus and Bridget (15) could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick was a farmer and Bridget (48) a farmer’s wife. The 2 Michaels and Festus were listed as farmer’s sons and Bridget (15) a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 1 roomed 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Patrick Connor was the landholder.

 

O’Brien

The head of the O’Brien family was the widow Julia (84). In the house with her at that time were her children Margaret (34) and Michael (32). All 3 could speak Irish and English but only Michael could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Julia was a farmer, Margaret, a farmer’s daughter and Michael a farmer’s son. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable and cow house. Julia was the landholder.

 

Gannon

House 5 was the Gannon household and the head of the family was Michael (64) and his wife Bridget (64). Also in the house at that time was there son Owen (24). They could all speak Irish and English but none of them could read or write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is listed as a farmer and Owen a fisherman. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house and piggery. Michael was the landholder.

 

King

The sole occupant of house 6 was Margaret (50). She could speak Irish and English but could not read or write. She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway She was listed as a farmer servant. Her house was a 1 roomed 3rd class dwelling. Thomas Russell was the landholder.

 

Conneely                                 (additional surname: Heanue)

The last house in Knocknahaw was that of the Conneely family. Head of the family was William (94) and his wife Mary (70). In the house at that time were his son Michael (34), daughter-in-law Nora (25), a niece Mary (2) and a visitor, Bridget Heanue (60). Mary (2) could speak only English but the rest had both Irish and English languages. Only Michael could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. William was a farmer with Mary (70) a farmer’s wife, Michael, a farmer’s son and Nora and Mary were listed as farmer’s daughters. The house was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with 2 cow houses. William Conneely was the landholder.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Knocknahaw

In the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) it states that Edward Whitwell leased 17 Acres, 2 Roods and 26 Perches of land and buildings from Charles P. Archer for £8 10s for the land and £5 10s for the buildings. Charles P. Archer in turn leased 54 Acres, 1 Rood and 30 Perches from Robert Graham for £20 10s for the land and 10s for a herd’s house.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Knocknahaw

According to the 1670 Down Survey the 1641 owner of this area was Edmund O’Flaharty, a Catholic and the 1670 owner was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic.

 

[i] Probably indicates that they spoke only English

[ii] This name on the household return form is difficult to read. Looks like Watters or maybe Walters.

This page was added on 17/07/2018.

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