Moyard

Maigh Ard

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Townland:                                Moyard

Civil Parish:                              Ballynakill

Barony:                                      Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                          Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                          1175.67 acres / 1175 acres, 2 roods, 27 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Map

Galway Library for Moyard

Logainm for Moyard

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Moyard

 

 

1911 Census for Moyard

Overview of Moyard in 1911

In the 1911 census there were 19 houses in Moyard of which 2 were uninhabited at the time, house 14 and house 15, which was Moyard national school. All the houses were built with stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 1, 2 and 16 having slate, iron or tiled roofing and the rest having thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. House 1 was a 1st class dwelling, houses 2, 4, 10 and 16 were 2nd class houses and the rest were 3rd class. Houses 5 and 6 had 2 rooms and 1 window, houses 3, 7-9 and 11-13 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 4 and 10 had 2 rooms an d3 windows, house 2 had 2 rooms and 6 windows, house 16 had 3 rooms and 4 windows and house 1 had 5 rooms and 5 windows. There were a total of 44 out buildings according to the out offices an farm-steadings form. Those included 10 stables, 2 coach houses, 1 harness room, 13 cow houses, 10 calf houses, 3 piggeries, a fowl house, a barn, a turf house, a store and a shed. There were a total of 51 people living in Moyard, 22 male and 29 female. The enumerator was Const. John Hickey.

 

Irwin                           (additional surnames: Hinde, Conneely and Faherty)

House 1 was the home of the Irwin family with Benjamin (68) as the head of the family. He lived with his wife Emily J. Burton Irwin (66) who he had been married to for 40 years and they’d had 10 children of which 7 had survived. They had 2 of their daughters in the house at that time and they were Mary Emily (30) and Millicent Hazell (25). There was a visitor at the time of the census, Muriel A. Hinde (22) and 2 servants, Mary Ellen Conneely (17) and Bridgid Mary Faherty (16). They could all read and write but only Mary Ellen could speak both Irish and English as there was nothing entered for the others, which possibly meant they could only speak English. Benjamin, Emily, Mary Emily and Millicent were Protestant Episcopalian Church of Ireland, Muriel was Church of England and Mary Ellen Conneely and Bridgid Mary Faherty were Roman Catholic. Benjamin was born in Co. Roscommon, Emily J. Burton was born in Co. Louth, Muriel A. Hinde was born in Lucknow and the other 4 were born in Co. Galway. Benjamin was a clerk in the holy order Church of Ireland, Mary Ellen was a cook domestic servant and Bridgid Mary was a house maid dom servt (sic). Their house was a 5 roomed 1st class dwelling with 3 stables, 2 coach houses, a harness room, a cow house, 3 calf houses, a fowl house, a barn, a turf house, a shed and a store. Rev. Benjamin Irwin was the landholder.

 

MacConrígh [i]                          (additional surname: Bean MacConrígh)

Head of the MacConrígh family was Peadáir (58) and his wife Brighid bean MacConrígh (56). Their children also lived in the house and they were Mícheál (21), Peadhráigh (19), Máire (18), Teresa (16) and Suibháin (14).

 

Adams

House 3 was that of the Adams family. Head of the family was Michael (74) and his wife Hanoria (sic) (65) and they’d been married for 39 years and had had 10 children of which 7 survived. Also living with them were 2 of their children Brigdid (sic) (20) and Patrick (19). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (74) and Hanoria (sic) could speak both Irish and English with Brigdid (sic) and Michael (19) only speaking English. Michael (74) could not read, Hanoria (sic) could only read while Brigdid (sic) could read and write. Michael (74) was a farmer, Brigdid (sic) was a farmer’s daughter and Michael (19) was a farmer’s son. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house, calf house and piggery. Michael Adams was the landholder.

 

Adams

House 4 was also an Adams family household. Head of the family was the widow Catherine (63) who had had 7 children of which 5 survived and 2 of her children Thady (33) and Mary (21) lived with her. All had both Irish and English language and could also read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Thady is recorded as being a farmer’s son. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class house with a stable, cow house and calf house. Kate Adams was listed as the landholder.

 

Lyden

Head of the Lyden family in house 5 was John (72) and his wife Bessie (63). They had been married for 41 years and had had 9 children of which 8 survived. Three of their children lived with them, they were Michael (35), Martin (28) and Maggie (24). All had both Irish and English as languages and all, except John, could read and write. all were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. John is listed as being a farmer, Michael and Martin were farmer’s sons and Maggie was a farmer’s daughter. Their house was a 2 roomed, third class house with a cow house, calf house and piggery. John Lyden was the landholder.

 

Gibbons

The sole occupant of house 6 in 1911 was John (74). He was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. He spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. He is listed as being a farmer. The house in which he lived was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a cow house. John was the landholder.

 

Lyden

This Lyden family consisted of 8 members. Head of the family was John (51) and his wife Bridget (42) who had been married for 10 years and had had 6 children all of which survived. Those children lived with them and were Mary (10), Sarah Jane (8), Martin Paul (6), John (4), Patrick (3) and Joseph (5mths). Peter and Bridget spoke both Irish and English. John, Bridget, Mary and Sarah Jane could read and write but the others in the family could not. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Peter was a farmer with Mary, Sarah Jane and Martin Paul being scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a stable, cow house and piggery. John Lyden was the landholder.

 

Lyden

The only occupant of house 8 was Jane (32). She could read and write, was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. There is nothing listed for language or occupation. Her house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house and a calf house. Jane was the landholder.

 

King

House 9 was the home of Martin (40) and his wife Catherine (25). Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Both spoke Irish and English and could read and write. John is listed as being a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with stable and cow house. Martin King was the landholder.

 

King                           (additional surnames: Lynch)

The head of the family in house 10 was Michael (72) and his wife Bridget (70) who had been married for had been marries for 40 years and had had 12 children but only 6 survived. Two of their children, James (27) and Annie (25) lived with them. A visitor, Joseph Lynch (5) was also listed as being in the house at that time. Joseph could not read. The others in the house could all speak Irish and English and could also read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael was a farmer, James was a farmer’s son and Annie a farmer’s daughter. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class house with a stable, cow house and calf house. Michael King was the landholder.

 

Canning

The Canning family consisted of 8 members. Head of the family was Pat (58) who had been married to his wife Bridget (47) for 25 years. They’d had 8 children of which 6 survived. Those 6 children were John (24), Mary (23), Bridget (18), Annie (16), Maggie (13) and (?)[ii](11) and they lived with them at that time. All, with the exception of Bridget (47) could read and write. Maggie and (?) (11) could speak only English but the others spoke both Irish and English. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Pat is recorded as a farmer, John was a farmer’s son, Mary and Bridget (18) were farmer’s daughters and the other children were scholars. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a stable , cow house and calf house. Pat Canning was the landholder.

 

McDonnell

The head of the McDonnell family was Festus (67) and his wife Mary (65) who had been married for 39 years and had had 8 children all of whom had survived. Four of those children lived with them and they were Thomas (30), Festus (27), Anthony (23) and Albert (8). All, with the exception of Albert, spoke both Irish and English.. Festus (67) and Mary could not read but the others could all read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus (67) was a shepherd, Thomas Festus (27) and Anthony were farmer servants and Albert was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with stable, cow house and calf house. Festus McDonnell was the landholder.

 

Canning

The head of the family was the widow Margaret (60) who had had 4 children of which 3 survived. Three of her children lived with her and they were William (18), James (16) and Mary (14). Also in the house with them at that time was a lodger Mary Canning (90) who was a widow and was also deaf. Mary (90) and Margaret could not read but the others could read and write. Mary (90) only spoke Irish but the others spoke both Irish and English. Margaret is listed as being, what looks like, Chatholic but the others were all Roman Catholic. William and James were born in America with the others being born in Co. Galway. William and James are listed as farmer’s sons and Mary (14) was a scholar. They shared a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house. Margaret canning was the landholder.

 

Neild

The last occupied house in Moyard in 1911 was that of the Neild family. Head of the family was Benjamin (26) and his wife Catherine (27) who had been married for 3 years and had had 2 children, both surviving. Their children were Catherine (2) and Benjamin (7mths). Only Benjamin (26) and Catherine (27) could read and write. Benjamin was a member of the Church of Ireland while the others were Roman Catholic. Benjamin (7mths) was born in Co. Galway while the others were all born in England. Benjamin (26) was a groom. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 2nd class house with a shed. The landholder was the Rev. Benjamin Irwin.

 

1901 Census for Moyard

Overview of Moyard in 1901

There were 17 buildings in Moyard in the 1901 census with all except house 16, which was a lodging house, being private dwellings. All houses were built of stone, brick or concrete walls. Houses 1 and 5 had slate, iron or tiled roofs and the rest had thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing. House 7 was a 4th class dwelling, Houses 1, 4, 5, 6 and 10 were 2nd class dwellings and the rest were 3rd class. Houses 3, 9, 11-13 and 16 had 1 room and 1 window in the front, Houses 2, 8, 14, 15, and 17 had 1 room and 2 windows, house 10 had 2 rooms and 2 windows, houses 4 and 6 had 2 rooms and 3 windows, house 5 had 3 rooms and 6 windows, house 1 had 4 rooms and 4 windows but house 7 had no rooms and no windows. There were a total of 53 people, 19 male and 34 female. The enumerator was Const. Edward Robinson.

 

Irwin                           (additional surnames: McRobert, Joyce and King)

The head of the Irwin family was Benjamin (58) and his wife Emily B. (56). Also living in the house were Benjamin’s mother Frances (82), their children Lily (16), Hazell (15) and Emily J. (13). As well as those, there were 4 visitors Lydia M. McRobert (43), Annie McRobert (14), Alfred M.B. Irwin (47) and Kathleen E. Irwin (15) and 2 servants Fanny Joyce (17) and Margaret King (17). Fanny and Margaret spoke both Irish and English but nothing was entered for the rest which could mean that they only spoke English. All of the household could read and write. Benjamin, Lydia M. and Alfred M.B. were born in Co. Roscommon, Emily B. was born in Co. Louth, Frances was born in Dublin, Lily, Hazell, Emily J., Fanny and Margaret were born in Co. Galway. Annie was born in Co. Down and Kathleen E. was born in Burma. Fanny and Margaret were Roman Catholic, Lydia M. and Annie were Presbyterian and the rest were Church of Ireland. Benjamin was listed as being a clergyman Insurance, Lily, Hazell, Emily J., Annie and Kathleen E. were scholars, Alfred M.B. was with the Indian civil service, Fanny was a housemaid-domestic and Margaret was a cook-domestic. They shared a 4 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with Benjamin Irwin being the landholder.

 

McDonnell

The McDonnell family had 4 members. The head of the family was Michael (31) and his wife Mary (30) and their 2 children Bridget (4) and John (3). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael and Mary could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Michael was a farmer, Mary, a farmer’s wife, Bridget, a farmer’s daughter and John, a farmer’s son. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Michael McDonnell was the landholder.

 

Gibbons                                  (additional surnames: Maddin (sic))

Head of the Gibbons family was the widow Bridget (81) and with her in the house were her son John (35) and a boarder Anne Maddin (90). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All spoke Irish and English but only John could read and write. Bridget was in farming and John was a farmer’s son. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Bridget was the landholder.

 

Lyden

House 4 was that of the Lyden family with the head of the family being the widow Jane (70). With her in the house at that time were her son Peter (30) and his wife Delia (25) and Jane’s granddaughter Jane (18). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Jane (70) was a farmer, Peter was a farmer’s son, Delia was a farmer’s wife and Jane (18) was a farmer’s daughter. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class house and Jane Lyden was the landholder.

 

King

The King family in house 5 consisted of 7 members. The head of the family was Peter (41) and his wife Delia (39). Five of their children also lived with them and they were Michael (11), Patrick (10), Mary Kate (7), Teresia (sic) (5) and Julia (3). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All, with the exception of Julia spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Peter is recorded as a farmer and sub postman, Delia was in farming and an assistant SP mistress. All the children were scholars. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class house and Peter King was the landholder.

 

Adams

The head of the Adams family in house 6 was the widow Catherine (49). Living with her at that time were 3 of her children Theady (sic) (26), Kate (16) and Mary (14). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Kate could not read and there was nothing entered under language. The others all spoke Irish and English and could read and write. Catherine was in farming with Theady (sic) being a farmer’s son, Kate a farmer’s daughter and Mary was a scholar. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Catherine Adams was the landholder.

 

Coyne

There were just the 2 family members living in house 7. Head of the family was Michael (60) and his wife Annie (61). They were roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Both spoke both Irish and English but could not read. Michael was a farmer and Annie was a farmer’s wife. The house they shared was a 4th class house that had no rooms recorded. Michael Coyne was the landholder.

 

King

House 8 was the King household. Head of the family was Mark (81) and living with him were his wife Margret (72) and his son Martin (28). They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All 3 spoke both Irish and English with Mark and Martin being able to read and write and Margret only being able to read. Mark was listed as being a farmer, Margret, a farmer’s wife and Mark a farmer’s son. Their house was a single roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Mark King was the landholder.

 

King

Head of this King family was Michael (70) and his wife Bridget (50). Also living with them were their children Anne (20), James (18) and Fanny (16). All spoke both Irish and English and all could read and write with the exception of Michael who could only read. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael was listed as being a farmer, his wife Bridget, a farmer’s wife, Anne and Fanny were famer’s daughters and James a farmer’s son. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Michael King was the landholder.

 

Pollington                               (additional surname: Mullin)

Head of the Pollington family was Hennery (sic) (29). Also in the house at that time were his wife Mary (26), his children, Charlie (4), Thomas (2) and Annie (6mths) along with Hennery’s (sic) sister-in-law Maria Mullin (18). Mary and Maria spoke both Irish and English with the rest, apart from baby Annie, spoke only English. Charlie could read only, Thomas and Annie could not read and the rest could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were members of the Church of Ireland. Hennery (sic) was a coachman, Charlie is listed as being a schollar (sic) and Mary Mullin was a farmer’s daughter. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was Benjamin Irwin.

 

Canning

House 11 was the Canning household. Head of that family was Michael (90) and living with him were his wife Mary (70) and a visitor, Bridget Canning (65). All spoke Irish but none of them could read. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Michael was a farmer, Mary, a farmer’s wife and Bridget a farmer’s daughter. They lived in a 1 roomed, 3rd class house and Michael Canning was the landholder.

 

Canning

This Canning family in house 12 had 9 members. Head of the family was Patrick (40) and his wife Bridget (30). With them in the house were their 7 children John (15), Mary (13), Patrick (11), Bridget (9), Anney (sic) (5), Maggy (3) and Katie (3mths). Patrick (40), Bridget (30) and John spoke both Irish and English but there was no entry for the others, possible meant they only spoke English. The 2 youngest, Maggy and Katie could not read, Patrick (40), John and Mary could read and write and the others could read only. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Patrick (40) was recorded as being a farmer, Bridget (30) was a farmer’s wife, John was a farmer’s son and Mary, Patrick (11), Bridget (9) and Anney (sic) were scholars. The house they lived in was a single roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Patrick Canning.

 

Canning

House 13 was the home of another Canning family. The head of this family was the widow Margret[iii] (38). Living with her were 3 of her children William (7), James (5) and Mary (3). All were Roman Catholic and Margret and Mary were born in Co. Galway, while William and James were born in America. All with the exception of Mary spoke both Irish and English. William and James could read only, Mary could not read and Margret could read and write. Margret was in farming and William and James were scholars. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rd class house and Margaret Canning was the landholder.

 

Adams

The head of this Adams family was Michael (62). In the house with him were his wife Hnor (sic) (47) and their children John (23), Michael (16), Martin (14), Bridget (12) and Patrick (8). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael (62) and Hnor (sic) could not read while the others could read and write. Michael (62), Hnor (sic), John, Michael (16) and Martin spoke both Irish and English. Michael (62) is listed as a farmer, Hnor (sic), john and Michael were listed as farming and Martin, Bridget and Patrick were scholars. Their house was a single roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Michael Adams.

 

Lyden

House 15 was home to the Lyden family. Head of the family was John (56) and his wife Bessie (48). Their children also lived with them and they were Michael (22), Norah (19), Kate (16), Maggie (14) and Martin (10). Maggie and Martin spoke only English but the rest could speak both Irish and English. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All, except John, could read and write.John was recorded as being a farmer, Bessie, a farmer’s wife, Michael, a farmer’s son and Norah and Kate, farmer’s daughters. Maggie and Martin were scholars. The house they shared was a single roomed, 3rd class house and John Lyden was the landholder.

 

McDonnell

The last family listed in the 1901 census for Moyard was the McDonnell family. Head of the family was Festus (50) and his wife Mary (48). Also in the house with them at that time were their 4 sons John (24), Thomas (22), Anthony (24?)[iv] and Joseph (14). Anthony and Joseph could only speak English while the rest of the family spoke both Irish and English. Festus and Mary could not read while the rest could read and write. All of the family were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Festus and Thomas were herdsmen, John, an assistant herdsman, Mary, a house keeper and Anthony and Joseph were scholars. Their house was a 1 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Josephine McDonnell from Keelkyle.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Moyard

Celia / Catherine Mullen – Application No. C16 6622. The application was received on 03/11/1916. The applicants name is given as Celia and Catherine Mullen. The address given was Mr Michael Corbett Senr. Attyrowerty, Moyard Co. Galway. Parents names were given as Patrick and Bonnugh or Bab (that was crossed out and Catherine was inserted) (Murphy). The address in 1851 was Moyard, Ballinakill, Ballynahinch, Co. Galway. In the left hand margin the names Mary, John, Celia, Patt and Dorcus were written in. The search was returned 06/11/1916 with a note saying ‘fam not found see over’. On 07/11/1916 another note added to that saying ‘not found 1841’. On a second page some hand written notes saying the following:

 

Patt (with an arrow pointing to the words ‘a publican’) and Catherine married 1835

 

John                Mary               Celea               Catherine

14                   12                   10                      7

 

Bridget                        Doratha (?)      Patt                  Honord (?)

5                       3                   1                       dead

 

Sheet 25

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Moyard

According to the Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert Graham leased tenements to a number of people in Moyard. The church leased a church and yard on an area on land of 2 Acres and 2 Roods. For this they paid an annual rate of £1 10s for the land and £8 10s for the buildings. Thomas C. Butler leased an area of 1 Acre, 3 Roods and 10 Perches from Robert Graham for £1 annually. Rev. John Lynch leased an area of land of 37 Acres, 2 Roods and 3 Perches for an annual ratable valuation of £11 for the land and £15 for houses and offices on that land. The Porochial school lease a house at no rent but it had an annual ratable valuation of £5 10s. The Rev. John Lynch in turn leased some of the houses that he had leased to Patrick Browne, Stephen Conrey and Patrick Coyne. Patrick Browne paid 10s, Stephen Conrey paid 5s and Patrick Coyne paid 10s. John Gibbons leased 10 Acres of land from Robert Graham at a rate of £1 10s. Martin Conneely, John Lydon, Patrick Browne and Marcus King jointly leased 17 Acres, 1 Rood and 10 Perches of land, with houses and office from Robert Graham. Martin paid 13s for the land and 7s for the house and an office, John paid £1 2s for his piece of land and 8s for the house, Patrick paid 12s his part of the land and 8s for the house and Marcus paid £1 2s for the land and 8s for the house. Martin O’Mealy, Michael Thornton, Joseph Lynch and John Gibbons also jointly leased a plot of land with an area of 8 Acres and 1 Rood. Each had a house and some land and each paid 15s for their share of the land and 5s for the houses. James Mullen, Bridget King and James King leased 1 Acre and 3 Perches of land from Robert Graham for which James King paid 4s and the other 2 paid 2s. The same 3 also leased a separate area of 10 Aces and 34 Perches of land with a house each. James Mullen paid 18s for the land and 5s for the house, Bridget King paid 17s for the land and 5s for the house and James King paid 15s for the land an 10s for the house. Patrick Mullen leased a house, offices and land of an area of 11 Acres, 3 Roods and 8 Perches from Robert Graham. For this he paid £3 10s for the land and £1 for the buildings. Patrick and Peter Adams leased 10 Acres, 1 Rood and 15 Perches of land that had a house and offices on and paid £1 15s for the land and 10s for the buildings each. Timothy Adams, Honoria Browne and Thomas Browne leased 22 Acres and 34 Perches of land and buildings. Timothy paid £3 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings, Honoria paid £1 13s for the land and 7s for the buildings and Thomas paid £1 12s for the land and 8s for the house and offices. Michael Concannon and Hugh Conneely leased 11 Acres , 1 Rood and 7 Perches from Robert Graham on which they also had a house. Michael paid £1 7s for the land and 10s for the house annually while Hugh paid £1 8s for the land and 7s for the house. James Conneely then leased the house from Hugh Conneely for 5s. John and Mary Mullen and Mary Healy leased and area of 9 Acres, 2 Roods and 13 Perches from Robert Graham which also had buildings. John Paid £1 for his part of the land and 7s for the house, Mary Mullen paid 10s for the land and 5s for the house and Mary Healy paid £1 10s for the land and 8s for the buildings. Peter Joyce leased a house on an area of land of 11 Acres, 3 Roods and 30 Perches for which he paid £3 for the land and 10 s for the house. Joseph McDonnell leased land of an area of 21 Acres and 10 Perches on which there were houses and offices. For this he paid an annual rate of £7 for the land and £1 for the buildings. He then leased those houses to Martin Heany, William Conneely, Thomas Davin and Peter Nyland. Martin paid 10s annually for his house and the other 3 paid 5s for theirs. Timothy Nyland and William Reilly leased 10 Acres and 14 Perches of land containing a house each from Robert Graham for an annual rate of £1 10s for the land and 10s for the house each. Tennents of the townland leased 977 Acres, 1 Rood and 7 Perches of mountain land from Robert Graham at an annual rate of £10. There were 2 exemptions for payment. The church and yard had their £1 10s for the land and £8 10s for the building exempt from payment and the paorochial school had their £5 10s exempt from payment as well.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Moyard

According to the 1670 Down Survey the 1841 owners of this area were Murrogh O’Flahartye, Mart O’Flahartye and Ne O’Flahartye, all were Catholic. The owner in 1670 was Richard, Earl of Westmeath also a Catholic. There were 522 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 167 plantation acres of profitable land. 167 plantation acres were forfeited.

 

[i] The census return for the MacConrígh family was written all in Irish.

[ii] Difficult to decipher this name. It ends in “atie” by the look of it, so maybe Katie?

[iii] On the household return her name was spelt “Margret” and on the house and building return her name was spelt “Margaret”.

[iv] Possibly 14?

 

This page was added on 17/07/2018.

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