Letterfrack

Leitir Fraic

Roger Harrison / Forum Connemara

Townland:                                 Letterfrack

Civil Parish:                               Ballynakill

Barony:                                      Ballynahinch

Church Parish:                          Letterfrack

District Electoral Division:     Ballynakill

Area:                                          1231.92 acres / 1231 acres, 3 roods, 26 perches

 

 

Baptism and Marriage records for Letterfrack R.C. Parish 1821-1886

Map

Galway Library for Letterfrack

Logainm for Letterfrack

NUI Galway Digital Collections for Letterfrack

 

1911 Census for Letterfrack

Overview of Letterfrack in 1911

According to the census of 1911, there were 28 buildings in Letterfrack. House 2 was an industrial school, houses 3, 4 and 5 were public houses, house 27 was a basket factory and 28 was the R.I.C. barracks. Houses 26 and 27 were not occupied. All buildings were constructed of stone, brick or concrete walls and buildings 5, 15, 17, 22, 23 and 24 had thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing while all the other buildings had slate, iron or tiled roofs. Buildings 1, 2, 18, 19, 20, 25 and 28 were 1st class dwellings, houses 5, 15, 17 and 21 were 3rd class buildings and the rest were 2nd class. The windows and rooms in the houses are as follows:

 

House 21 had 2 rooms and 1 window

Houses 9, 15, 16, and 17 had 2 rooms and 2 windows

Houses 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 22 and 23 had 2 rooms and 3 windows

House 14 had 3 rooms and 2 windows

House 5 had 3 rooms and 3 windows

House 4 had 3 rooms and 5 windows

Houses 3 and 8 had 4 rooms and 5 windows

House 19 had 4 rooms and 6windows

Houses 18 and 25 had 4 rooms and 7 windows

House 28 had 5 rooms and 5 windows

House 20 had 6 rooms and 9 windows

House 1 had 6 rooms and 13 windows

House 2 had 6 rooms and 23 windows.

 

There were a total of 88 out buildings consisting of 11 stables, 9 coach houses, a harness room, 13 cow houses, 2 calf houses 9 piggeries, 8 fowl houses, a boiling house, a barn, 5 turf houses, 2 potato houses, 8 workshops, 5 sheds, 6 stores, a forge, a laundry, a playhouse, a board room, an office, a meat room and an infirmary. There were a total of 224 people, 191 male and 33 female. The enumerator was Const. Thomas Casey.

 

House 1

House 1 was not a family home but a house for teachers, most likely for the neighboring industrial school. The teachers living there were the manager John F. Scannell (66) assistants Michael Ryan (67), James martin (50), John Hayes (37) William Cloonan (28), John Riordan (38), Daniel Moriarty (38), William Fennessy (29), Thomas Griffin (39), John Lavelle (22) and John Kelly (18). There were also two borders in the house at that time Christopher Byrne (26) and Thomas Gilleran (16). James Martin, Daniel Moriarty, Thomas Griffin, John Lavelle, John Kelly and Thomas Gilleran could speak Irish and English but there is no entry for the others[i]. All the house hold could read and write. All were Roman Catholic. John F. Scannell and John Riordan were born in Co. Cork, Michael Ryan and Thomas Griffin were born in Co. Limerick. James Martin and Christopher Byrne were born in Dublin City, John Hayes, William Fennessy and John Lavelle were born in Co. Tipperary. William Cloonan and Thomas Gilleran were born in Co. Galway, Daniel Moriarty was born in Co. Kerry and John Kelly was born in Co. Roscommon. Christopher Byrne is listed as a painter and Thomas Gilleran was a baker, all the rest were teachers. They lived in a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Letterfrack Industrial School 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

The second building in Letterfrack was the industrial school. It was a boarding school for boys and hence there were 153 residents.

The following boys were all 15 years old:

Patrick Farrell, Martin Morrin, Dennis Muldoon, Michael Moore, Francis Cusack, Joseph Shaughnessy, William Kelly, Patrick Mangan, Martin Linsky, Michael Linsky, John Gill, Martin Craughwell, Stephen Monaghan, William Rankins, John Collins, Michael McDermot, Martin Gilleran, Martin Sweeny, John Folan, Hubert Hogan, Robert Mulholland, John Keegan, James Cremer, Thomas Kenny, Cornelius Breen, William Darcy and Patrick Rielly

 

All these boys were Roman Catholic. Patrick Farrell, Martin Morrin, Dennis Muldoon, Michael Moore, Francis Cusack, Joseph Shaughnessy, William Kelly, Patrick Mangan, Martin Linsky, Michael Linsky and John Gill were born in Co. Mayo. Martin Craughwell, Stephen Monaghan, William Rankins, John Collins, Michael McDermot, Martin Gilleran, Martin Sweeny and John Folan were born in Co. Galway. Hubert Hogan, Robert Mulholland, John Keegan, James Cremer, Thomas Kenny and Cornelius Breen were born in Dublin City. William Darcy and Patrick Rielly were born in Co. Cavan. All of them could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

These boys were all 14 years old:

John Farrell, Edward Moore, James McHugh, Martin Conlan, Patrick Murphy, Martin Tarmey, John Rowland, Matthias Conneally (sic), Patrick McGrath, John Monaghan, Patrick Kilderry, Bernard Potter, Michael Heraghty, Michael Geary, Stephen Browne, Francis Rielly, Thomas Brazil, Francis Dornan, William Cullinane, William Ryan, John J. Byrne, John Peyton, Michael Connolly and Cyril Mulvanny.

 

All these boys were Roman Catholic. John Farrell, Edward Moore, James McHugh, Martin Conlan, Patrick Murphy and Martin Tarmey were born in Co. Mayo. John Rowland, Matthias Conneally (sic), Patrick McGrath, John Monaghan, Patrick Kilderry, Bernard Potter, Michael Heraghty, Michael Geary and Stephen Browne were born in Co. Galway. Francis Rielly, Thomas Brazil, Francis Dornan, William Cullinane and William Ryan were born in Dublin City. John J. Byrne was born in Co. Roscommon. John Peyton and Michael Connolly wee born in Co. Sligo and Cyril Mulvanny was born in Co. Westmeath. All these boys could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The follow boys were all 13 years old in 1911:

Robert Wallace, John Mchugh, Michael Dunleavy, Bartley Fury, Jomes Jennings, Michael Whelan, Patrick Fahy, Bryan Toole (sic), John Madden, William O’Driscoll, Thomas Burke, Richard Gileece, Thomas King, John Grealish, John O’Sullivan, Leo Keegan, Joseph Cahill, Edward Cremer, James Graves, John Byrne, John Rodgers and William Connell.

 

All the 13 year olds were Roman Catholic. Robert Wallace, John Mchugh and Michael Dunleavy were born in Co. Mayo. Bartley Fury, Jomes Jennings, Michael Whelan, Patrick Fahy, Bryan Toole (sic), John Madden, William O’Driscoll, Thomas Burke, Richard Gileece, Thomas King and John Grealish were born in Co. Galway. John O’Sullivan was born in Co. Dublin. Leo Keegan, Joseph Cahill, Edward Cremer, James Graves and John Byrne were born in Dublin City and John Rodgers and William Connell were born in Co. Roscommon. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The following boys were 12 years old:

Thomas Morley, Stephen Grimes, John Doyle, Bernard O’Rorke (sic), Michael Nee, Patrick Hogan, Edward Gilleran, Patrick Gore, Hugh McCann, Laurence Carroll, John Russell, James Byrne, Edward Gordon, Joseph O’Hara, William Robson, Peter Sullivan, John Shields, Philip Bradshaw and Thomas Lowry.

All these boys were Roman Catholic. Thomas Morley was born in Co. Mayo. Stephen Grimes, John Doyle, Bernard O’Rorke (sic), Michael Nee, Patrick Hogan, Edward Gilleran and Patrick Gore were born in Co. Galway. Hugh McCann and Laurence Carroll were born in Co. Dublin. John Russell and James Byrne were born in Dublin City. Edward Gordon was born in Co. Sligo and Joseph O’Hara was born in Co. Tyrone. William Robson was born in Belfast City and Peter Sullivan and John Shields were born in Co. Louth. Philip Bradshaw was born in Co Tipperary and Thomas Lowry was born in Co. Kildare. All were able to read and write and were listed as pupils.

These boys were all 11 years old:

John Molloy, Thomas Kelly, Patrick Cooney, Vincent Gogarty (sic), Dominic Tarmey, John Fleming, Thomas Connolly, John Heraghty, Martin Elwood, Thomas Toole (sic), Patrick Geary, Walter Butler, Charles Redmond, James Rankins, William Burke, Walter Keegan, James Cahill, Thomas McCann, Joseph Harper, Hugh Gallagher, Peter Hand and William Higgins.

 

All these boys were Roman Catholic. John Molloy, Thomas Kelly, Patrick Cooney, Vincent Gogarty (sic), Dominic Tarmey and John Fleming were born in Co. Mayo. Thomas Connolly, John Heraghty, Martin Elwood, Thomas Toole (sic), Patrick Geary, Walter Butler, Charles Redmond, James Rankins and William Burke were born in Co. Galway. Walter Keegan, James Cahill and Thomas McCann were born in Dublin City. Joseph Harper was born in Co. Roscommon and Hugh Gallagher was born in Co. Tyrone. Peter Hand was born in Co. Monaghan and William Higgins was born in Belfast City. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The 10 year old boys were:

John Cooney, Patrick Gogarty (sic), Anthony Burke, James Devers, Michael Coghlan, John Duggan, William O’Sullivan, Jeremiah Byrne, John Fox, Michael Mullen, Michael Meehan, Francis Moran, Patrick Griffith, Peter Reyonalds (sic), John Bradshaw and John Brien (sic).

 

All the 10 year old boys were Roman Catholic. John Cooney, Patrick Gogarty (sic), Anthony Burke and James Devers were born in Co. Mayo. Michael Coghlan and John Duggan were born in Co. Galway. William O’Sullivan were born in Co. Dublin and Jeremiah Byrne was born in Dublin City. John Fox was born in Co. Cavan and Michael Mullen was born in Co. Roscommon. Francis Moran was born in Co. Leitrm, Michael Meehan was born in Co. Kilkenny and Patrick Griffith, Peter Reyonalds (sic) were born in Co. Louth. John Bradshaw was born in Co Tipperary and John Brien (sic) was born in Co. Westmeath. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The following were 9 year old boys

Thomas Geary, Thomas Elwood, Owen McDonagh, Patrick Shaughnessy, Cormac Cullinane, William Fox and Patrick Looney.

 

All these boys were Roman Catholic. Thomas Geary, Thomas Elwood, Owen McDonagh and Patrick Shaughnessy were born in Co. Galway. Cormac Cullinane was born in Dublin City, William Fox was born in Co. Cavan and Patrick Looney was born in Co. Kildare. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The 8 year old boys were:

John O’Brien, Patrick Corcoran, James Cooke, Michael Caffery, John McCormack, John Shaw, Patrick Shaw, Alfred Renick, John Burns,

 

All the 8 year olds were Roman Catholic. John O’Brien was born in Co. Mayo and Patrick Corcoran, James Cooke and Michael Caffery were born in Co. Galway. John Shaw and Patrick Shaw were born in Dublin City. Alfred Renick was born in Co. Sligo and John Burns was born in Co. Wicklow. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The 7 year old boys were:

Patrick Duggan, Patrick Fox, Timothy Mullen and George Renick.

 

These boys were all Roman Catholic. Patrick Duggan was born in Co. Galway, Patrick Fox was born in Co. Cavan, Timothy Mullen was born in Co. Roscomman and George Renick was born in Co. Sligo. All could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The only two 6 year old boys were:

Thomas Heanne and Daniel Kelly.

 

Both Thomas and Daniel were Roman Catholic. Thomas was born in Co. Galway and Daniel was born in Co. Sligo. Both could read and write and were listed as pupils.

 

The industrial school building was a 1st class, 6 roomed building with a stable, coach house, harness room, 2 cow houses, 2 calf houses, 4 piggeries, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, 8 workshops, 5 sheds, 3 stores, a forge, a laundry, a play hall, a boardroom, a meat house and an infirmary. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Coyne                          (additional surnames; Faherty and Maley)

House 3 in Letterfrack was that of the Coyne family. Head of the family was John J. (37) and his wife Kathleen (28) who had been married for 4 years and had had 4 children of which 3 had survived. The 3 surviving daughters lived with them and they were Mary (2), Margaret (1) and Isabel (3mths). Also in the house with them at that time were 2 domestic servants Annie Faherty (15) and Annie Maley (15). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. The 3 children Mary, Margaret and Isabel could not read but the others could read and write. John J. is listed as speaking both Irish an English. John J. was a wine and spirit merchant and the 2 Annie’s were domestic servants. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 2nd class public house with a stable, coach house, piggery and fowl house. The landholder was John J. Coyne.

 

King

The King family in house 4 consisted of 2 sisters. Head of the family was Bridget (26) and with her in the house was Julia (19). Both spoke Irish and English and both could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. There was no occupation entered for them on this census return. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 2nd class public house with 2 stables, a coach house, a cow house, a piggery and a store. The landholder was Nellie Walsh.

 

Mullen                                    (additional surnames: Lydan (sic), Coyne, O’Neill and Mannion)

House 5 was that of the Mullen family. Head of the family was the widower Michael (56). Five of his children lived there with him and they were May (16), Bridget (15), Martin (14), Patrick (12) and Michael (10). Also in the house were 2 servants Bridget Lydan (sic) (25) and John Coyne (18). There were also 2 relatives in the house at that time Christine A. O’Neill (25) and Ellen Mannion (21). Michael (56), Bridget Lydan, John Coyne, Christine A. O’Neill and Ellen Mannion could all speak both Irish and English but there was no entry for the others[ii]. All could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway with Christine A. and Ellen listed as being Roman Catholic and the rest being in the Roman Catholic Church of Rome. Michael (56) is listed as a spirit grocer shop keeper, Bridget Lydan was a general domestic servant, John Coyne is listed as a car driver etc. and Martin, Patrick and Michael (10) were scholars. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 3rd class public house with a stable, a coach house, cow house, piggery and a store. The landholder was Michael Mullen.

 

O’Flynn

The head of the O’Flynn family was James (34) and his wife Annie (29) who had been married for 10 years and had had 5 children all of which survived. Four of those children were in the house at that time and they were Mary (9), Annie (5), James (2) and Gretta (6mths). James (34) was born in Co. Clare, Annie (28) was born in Co. Tipperary and the 4 children were born in Co. Galway. All were Roman Catholic. James (34), Annie (28) and Mary could read and write but the other younger children could not read. James (34) is recorded as being a tailor with Mary and Annie (5) being scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2 class dwelling. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Coyne

There were only residents in house 7 and the head was the widow Mary (39) who had been married for 17 years and had had 2 children, both of which survived. Her son Stephen (14) lived in the house with her. They were both Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Mary could speak both Irish and English. Mary was a domestic servant and Stephen was a scholar. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a fowl house. The Christian Brothers were the landholders.

 

Joyce

The Joyce family consisted of 9 members. The head of the family was John (68) and his wife Mary (54) who had been married for 22 years and they’d had 9 children all of whom survived. Seven of their children lived with them at that time and they were Patrick (20), Stephen (17), Brigid (sic) (16), Margaret (14), Catherine (12), Ellen (10) and Elizabeth (7). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All could speak both Irish and English and could read and write. John and Patrick were Agricultural Labourers while Margaret, Catherine, Ellen and Elizabeth were scholars. The house they lived in was a 4 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house. The landholder was John Joyce.

 

Flanagan

House 9 was that of the Flanagan family. The head of the family was William (42) who had been married to his wife Johanna (32) for 15 years and they’d had 8 children all of which had survived. Those 8 children were living with them art that time and they were Mary (13), William (12), Sarah (11), Patrick (9), Daniel (7), Thomas (5), Joseph (3) and John (2). All were Roman Catholic and William was listed as being born in Co. Galway, although nothing was entered for the others. Only Thomas, Joseph and John could not read, all the others could both read and write. William (42) was recorded as a shoemaker and Mary, William (12), Sarah, Patrick and Daniel were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Unsworth

There were only 2 occupants of house 10 in Letterfrack in 1911. Head of the family was the widow Catherine (67) who had been married for 30 years and had had 2 children, both of which had survived. One of her daughters Katie (23) lived with her. Catherine could speak both Irish and English while Katie could only speak English. Katie could read and write but Catherine could only read. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Katie was recorded as being a dressmaker. Their house was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Connolly

The head of the Connolly family in house 11 was Peter (37) along with his wife Anne (40) who had been married for 18 years and they’d had 8 children of which 7 survived. Five of their children lived with them at that time and they were Patrick (14), Bridget (11), Annie (9), Michael Joseph (7) and Julia (5). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Peter and Anne could speak both Irish and English. Michael Joseph and Julia could read and the other members of the family could read and write. Peter was recorded as being a carpenter and all the children were scholars. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Moran

The head of the Moran family was Peter (45) and his wife Bridget (30) who had been married for 11 years and had had 6 children of which 5 survived. Those 5 children lived with them and were John (8), Annie (7), Julia (6), Bridgid (5) and Norah (2). Peter and Bridget were born in Co. Mayo and all the children were born in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholic. Norah could not read, Bridgid could read and the rest could read and write. Peter was a blacksmith and John, Annie, Julia and Bridgid were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Faherty

Head of the Faherty family in house 13 was Martin (57) and his wife Mary (40). They had been married for 19 years and had had 9 children of which 7 survived. Six of those children, Martin (14), Patrick (12), Annie (10), Peter (8), Julia (5) and Elizabeth (2) also lived with them. Also in the house at that time was Martin’s sister-in-law Honoria (35). Martin (57), Mary and Honoria could speak both Irish and English although nothing was entered for the others. Julia and Elizabeth could not read, Peter could read and the rest of the family could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin (57) was a farmer and Martin (14) was recorded as a farmer’s son. Patrick, Annie, Peter and Julia were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, coach house and a cow house. The landholder was Martin Faherty.

 

Browne                                   (additional surnames: Fox)

There were only 2 occupants in house 14 in 1911. William Browne (34) and Annie Fox (40). Both were Roman Catholic, William was born in Co. Mayo and Annie was born in Co. Donegal. William could speak both Irish and English and Annie only spoke English. William could read and write but Annie could only read. William was a R. C. clergyman while Annie was a cook domestic servant. Annie was married and had been for 22 years and had had 5 children of which 4 survived. The house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable and a coach house. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Aspell

The head of the Aspell family was Thomas (34). He had been married to his wife Winifred (33) for 11 years in which time they had had 7 children, 6 of which had survived. Those 6 children lived with them and were Ellen (10), Stephen (9), Joseph (7), James (5), Christina (4) and Thomas (2). James, Christina and Thomas could not read but the rest of the family could read and write. Thomas could speak both Irish and English but there is nothing entered for the rest of the family so that may mean they spoke only English. Winifred was born in England and the rest of the family were born in Co. Galway. All were Roman Catholic. Thomas is listed as being a house painter and Ellen, Stephen and Joseph were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class building with a cow house. Thomas Aspell was the landholder.

 

Tuite

There were only 2 occupants of house 16 in 1911. They were husband and wife Edward (30) and Teresa (29). Both were Roman Catholic and could read and write. Both were born in Co. Westmeath. Edward was a shepherd. They lived in a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a fowl house. The landholders were the Christian Brothers.

Mannion

There were 2 occupants of house 17, they were father and daughter Martin (56), who was a widower, and Mary A. (19). Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Martin could speak both Irish and English and could read while Mary A. spoke English and could read and write. Martin is listed as being a farmer. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with a piggery and a fowl house. Martin was the landholder.

 

McNab

House 18 was leased to 4 families. The McNab family was the first with the head of that family being Michael John (43) with his wife Catherine (32) who had been married for 1 year. Their son Thomas Hilliard (8) also lived with them. Michael John was listed as speaking Irish and English and all three could read and write. Michael John was born in Co. Mayo, Catherine was born in Co. Cork and Thomas Hilliard was born in Co. Tipperary. All were Roman Catholic. Michael John is listed as being an inspector of fisheries and Thomas Hilliard was a scholar. The house they shared with the other 3 families was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Mongan

Mary (74) was the only occupant of the second room in house 18. She was a widow who had been married for 42 years and had had 6 children of which 4 survived. She spoke both Irish and English but could not read. She was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. The house she shared with the other 3 families was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Kenny

The third family in house 18 was the Kenny family. The head of the family was the widow Mary (62) who had been married for 33 years and had had 4 children of which 3 survived. Living with her was her son James (29). Mary could speak both Irish and English and could read while James could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Mary is recorded as being a cook domestic servant and James was a general servant. The house they shared with the other 3 families was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

Cranston

The sole occupant of the 4th room in house 18 was Mary (78) who was a widow and was married for 44 years and had had 4 children of which only 1 survived. She could read and could speak both Irish and English. She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. The house she shared with the other 3 families was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling and the landholders were the Christian Brothers.

 

McAndrew                              (additional surnames: Gibbons and Coyne)

House 19 was occupied by Bartholomew (69) and 2 servants, Margaret Gibbons (40) and Mark Coyne (19). Bartholomew and Margaret could speak both Irish and English and Mark only had English. All 3 could read and write. All 3 were Roman Catholic and Bartholomew and Margaret were born in Co. Mayo with Mark being born in Co. Galway. Bartholomew was listed as a parish priest and canon and both Margaret and Mark were domestic servants. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a stable, cow house and a fowl house. The Rev. B. McAndrew was the landholder.

 

Henry                          (additional surnames: Murray, Joyce and Doran)

Florence Vaughan Henry (40) was the head of the household in house 20. In the house with her at that time were Lena Murray (58), Mary Kate Joyce (21), Teresa Doran (53) and Ellen Doran (15). Teresa Doran was married, and had been for 30 years and had had 8 children of which 7 survived. All of them could read and write. Florence Vaughan was born in London and was a member of the Church of England. The others were Roman Catholic with Len being born in Kent, Mary Kate was born in Co. Galway, Teresa was born in Stratford-on-Avon and Ellen was born in Leamington. Lena was a recorded as a being a lady’s maid, Mary Kate and Ellen were domestic servants and Teresa was a cook. The house they shared was a 6 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a stable 2, coach houses, a cow house, a turf house and a store. Florence Henry was the landholder.

 

Connolly

The sole occupant of house 21 was Michael (55). He could read and was able to speak both Irish and English. He was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway and was a general servant. His house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Florence Henry was the landholder.

 

Joyce

House 22 in Letterfrack in the 1911 census was that of the Joyce family. Head of the family was Michael (66) and his wife Ellen (64) who had been married for 33 years and they’d had 8 children, all of whom had survived. Four of their children lived with them at that time and they were Mary (28), Walter (27), Eliza (19) and Alice (14). Michael, Ellen, Mary and Walter could speak both Irish and English and all the family living there could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is listed as being a mason, Walter, a farmer’s son and Eliza a post office assistant. The house that they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class house with a cow house, piggery, fowl house, turf house and a potato house. Michael Joyce was the landholder.

 

Cassidy                                   (additional surnames: Gibbons)

Head of the Cassidy family in house 23 was John (73) and his wife Catherine (72) who had been married for 46 years and had had 1 child, although the census says that there were no living children. Living in the house with them were their 2 nieces Catherine Agnes Gibbons (23) and Mary Elizabeth Gibbons (16). All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. All 4 of them could speak both Irish and English and, with the exception of John who could only read, all could both read and write. John is recorded as being a farmer stone mason. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house. John Cassidy was the landholder.

 

Joyce

There was only 1 occupant of house 24 and that was Mary (60). She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. Mary could read and write and could speak both Irish and English. The house she lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house. Mary was the landholder.

 

Nelly                           (additional surnames: Kenny and Lyden)

Head of the family in house 25 was the widow Anne Teresa (71) who had been married for 41 years and had had 1 daughter who had survived. Living in the house with her was her daughter Mary Elizabeth Kenny (40) who was also a widow who had been married for 16 years and had had 3 children of which 2 survived. Those 2 children, Anne Teresa’s grandchildren, lived in the house as well and they where John Francis Kenny (15) and Mary Teresa Kenny (13). In addition they also had a servant Patrick Lyden (60) living in the house as well. Mary Teresa and Patrick could speak both Irish and English but there was nothing entered for the others that may indicate that they spoke only English. Patrick could not read but the others in the house could read and write. All were Roman Catholic. Anne Teresa was born in England, Mary Elizabeth was born in America, John Francis and Patrick were born in Co. Galway and Mary Teresa was born in Co. Mayo. John Francis and Mary Teresa were listed as being scholars and Patrick was a farm servant. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a stable, a cow house and a store. Anne Teresa was the landholder.

 

 

House 28 was the Royal Irish Constabulary Barracks and that had 2 census returns. One form (form H) was for the constables working and living there but they were only identified by their initials. The second form was a household return form for the acting sergeant’s family.

 

Padden

Head of the Padden family in house 28 (R.I.C. Barracks) was William (39) and his wife Margaret (34) and they had been married for 9 years and had had 4 children, all of whom survived. Their children lived with them and they were John James (8), Winifred Mary (6), Margaret Anne (4) and Patrick Michael (2). All were Roman Catholic with William being born in Co. Mayo and the rest of the family being born in Co. Galway ER. Margaret Anne and Patrick Michael could not read, but the rest of the family could read and write. William could speak Irish and English. William was the acting sergeant and before signing up to the R.I.C. he was a farmer’s son. John James and Winifred Mary were scholars. The building they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1st class building with a turf house. Hector Graham was the landholder.

 

R.I.C. Barracks

As mentioned, the R.I.C. staff were only identified by their initials, however, W.P. on the form H, was William Padden. The occupants were W.P. (39), T.C. (26), J.H. (24), J.C. (23), J.S. (26) and J.C. (26). They could all read and write but only W.P. was listed as speaking both Irish and English which may indicate that the others only spoke English. All were Roman Catholic. W.P., T.C. and J.C. (26) were born in Co. Mayo. J.H. was born in Co. Westmeath, J.C. (23) was born in Co. Roscommon and J.S. was born in Co. Limerick. W.P. was the acting sergeant and the rest were constables. Before they joined the R.I.C. W.P., J.H. and the 2 J.C.’s were a farmer’s sons, T.C. was a soldier and J.S. was a commercial traveler. The building they lived in was a 5 roomed, 1st class building with a turf house. Hector Graham was the landholder.

 

 

 

1901 Census for Letterfrack

Overview of Letterfrack in 1901

There were 32 buildings in Letterfrack according to the 1901 census although house 3 was not occupied. All the houses had stone, brick or concrete walls with houses 8, 10, 16, 17, 26, 27, 28 and 30 having thatch, wood or other perishable material for roofing and the rest having slate, iron or tiled roofing. House 1 was the industrial school and house 2 was the police barracks. Houses 5 and houses 18 to 23 were lodgings. Houses 6, 8 and 32 were shops. House 9 is described as a public building and all the rest were private dwellings. Houses 1, 4, 5 and 24 were 1st class dwellings, houses 16, 17, 18 to 23, 27 and 30 were 3rd class dwellings and the rest were 2nd class. The windows and rooms in each building were as follows:

 

Houses 18 to 23 had 2 rooms and 1 window

Houses 16, 17, 27, 29 and 30 had 2 rooms and 2 windows

Houses 26 and 28 had 2 rooms and 3 windows

House 32 had 2 rooms and 4 windows

House 23 had 2 rooms and 5 windows

Houses 10 and 12 to 15 had 3 rooms and 2 windows

Houses 9 and 31 had3 rooms and 3 windows

House 7 had 3 rooms and 6 windows

House 2 and 11 had 4 rooms and 5 windows

House 24 had 4 rooms and 6 windows

House 5 had 5 rooms and 6 windows

House 4 had 5 rooms and 8 windows

Houses 6 and 8 had 6 rooms and 3 windows

House 1 had 6 rooms and 20 windows

 

There were a total of 42 out buildings according to the out offices and farm-steadings return. They consisted of 9 stables, 5 coach houses, 2 harness rooms, 6 cow houses, 2 calf houses, a dairy, a piggery, 2 fowl houses, a boiling house, a barn, 3 turf houses, a potato house, a shed, a workshop, 2 stores, a forge and a laundry. A total of 211 people were in Letterfrack at that time of which 190 were male and 21 female. The enumerator was Const. Thomas Burke.

 

Letterfrack Industrial School 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

The first building listed on the 1901 census for Letterfrack was the Letterfrack Indusrial School. There were 163 residents there at that time of which 12 were staff members. They were Thomas G. Stephens (56), James H. Nolan (59), David C. O’Brien (35), Patrick M. MacManus (42), Thos (sic) G. Scott (39), Patrick D. O’Riordan (30), John A. O’Shea (28), Thomas Griffin (28), Francis Ormsby (18), Dan Delaney (19), William Egan (18) and Mary Sullivan (42). They were all able to speak both Irish and English except Mary, who only English. All could read and write. All were Roman Catholic. James H. Nolan, Thos (sic) G. Scott and John A. O’Shea Were born in Co. Tipperary, David C. O’Brien and Patrick D. O’Riordan were born in Co. Cork. Thomas G. Stephens was born in Co. Mayo, Patrick M. MacManus was born in Co. Cavan, Thomas Griffin was born in Co. Limerick and Dan Delaney was born in Dublin city. William Egan was born in Co. Cork and Mary Sullivan was born in Dublin City. Thomas Griffin, Francis Ormsby and Dan Delaney are listed as professors, William Egan was a painter, Mary Sullivan was a nurse and the other members of staff were listed as fellows.

 

The 151 male pupils are listed here under age groups.

15 year olds:

Nicholas Pelan, Denis O’Brien, James Ennis, John Flanagan, Francis Fox, James Jackson, Patrick Connolly, Stephen Joyce, Patrick Mortimer, John McGuirk, Thomas Keary, Patrick Hill, William Flynn, John Hall, James Conway, Peter O’Connor, Thomas Cooke and John Flynn.

 

All the 15 year old boys could read and write and were Roman Catholic. James Jackson, John McGuirk, Thomas Keary, and John Flynn could only speak English with the other boys being anle to speak both Irish and English. James Jackson, John McGuirk, Thomas Keary and John Flynn could only speak English but the others could speak both Irish and English. All were Roman Catholic. Nicholas Pelan, Francis Fox, James Jackson, Patrick Connolly, Stephen Joyce and Peter O’Connor were born in Co. Galway. John Hall, Patrick Mortimer, John McGuirk, Denis O’Brien and James Ennis were born in Dublin City. Patrick Hill, William Flynn, James Conway, Thomas Cooke, John Flynn and John Flanagan were born in Co. Mayo and Thomas Keary was born in Co. Kilkenny. All these boys are listed as pupils.

 

 

 

14 year olds:

Thomas King, Tom Hazell, Michael MacManamon, George Power, Thomas Egan, Bartley Cooks, Thomas Lydon,

 

All these boys were Roman Catholic and could read and write. Thomas King, Michael MacManamon and Thomas Lydon could speak both Irish and English while the other 14 year olds could only speak English. Tom Hazell, George Power, Thomas Egan and Bartly Cooks could only speak English while Thomas King, Thomas Lydon and Michael MacManamon could speak both Irish and English. All these boys could read and write. Thomas King was born in Co. Galway and Tom Hazell in Galway City. George Power was born in Co. Dublin, Thomas Egan in Dublin City and Michael MacManamon, Bartley Cooks and Thomas Lydon were born in Co. Mayo. All were listed as pupils.

 

13 year olds:

Patrick Curley, John Fox, Martin Laffey, John Mitchell, Thomas Beaumon, John Davis, Patrick Flynn, Patrick Ginnelly, Tom Garvey, John Glynn, Edward Hogan, Patrick Mannion, Joseph Quinn, Peter Sullivan, William Conway, Joseph Flood, Peter Hayden, John Kearney, Laurence Lalor (sic), Geroge McDermott, Patrick Conroy, Patrick Flynn and John McNeela.

 

All the 13 year old boys were Roman Catholic and could read and write. John Davis, Patrick Flynn, Patrick Ginnelly, John Glynn, Joseph Quinn, William Conway, Joseph Flood, Peter Hayden, John Kearney, Laurence Lalor (sic), Patrick Flynn and John McNeela could only speak English while the other 13 year olds could speak both Irish and English. Patrick Curley and Patrick Flynn were born in Co. Roscommon and John Fox, Thomas Beaumon, Patrick Conroy, were born in Co. Galway. Martin Laffey, John Davis, Patrick Flynn, Patrick Ginnelly, Tom Garvey, Patrick Mannion, Joseph Quinn, William Conway, John Kearney and John McNeela were born in Co. Mayo and John Mitchell, Peter Sullivan, Joseph Flood, Laurence Lalor (sic), Geroge McDermott, were born in Dublin City. John Glynn was born in Co. Dublin and Edward Hogan was born in Co. Wicklow with Peter Hayden being born in Co. Kilkenny. All these boys were listed as pupils.

 

12 year olds:

John Hynes, George Millar, Walter Macken, James McNulty, Thomas Neiland, Patrick Nolan, John Philbin, Tom Stanton (sic), Stephen Brady, Patrick Kennedy, Patrick King, James McDermott, James McDonnell, Michael Mannion, Thady Rorke (sic), John Smyth, Patrick Walshe, Patrick Whelan, William Wynne, Stephen Conroy, John Devany, Walter Eggy, Michael Flanagan, Patrick Folan, Patrick Flynn, Thomas Feeney, John Green, John Hennelly, Martin Murphy, Patrick Mannion, Thomas Mulkerrin, William O’Neill, John Quinn, George Sherlock, Thomas Smyth, William Thompson, Patrick Bourke, John Beattie, John Bourke, Martin Granen (sic) and Michael McAndrew.

 

The largest age group in the Letterfrack Industrial School in 1901 was the 12 year olds with 41 pupils of that age. All were Roman Catholic and all could read and write. John Hynes, George Millar, Walter Macken, James McNulty, Patrick Nolan, John Philbin, Thady Rorke (sic), Stephen Conroy, John Devany and Thomas Mulkerrin could all speak Irish and English with all the other 12 year olds only speaking English. Thomas Neiland, Patrick Nolan, Patrick Walshe, Stephen Conroy, John Devany, Michael Flanagan, Patrick Folan, Patrick Flynn, Thomas Feeney, John Hennelly, Thomas Mulkerrin and Patrick Bourke were all born in Co. Galway. Walter Macken, James McNulty, John Philbin, Michael Mannion, Walter Eggy, Martin Murphy, Patrick Mannion, George Sherlock, Thomas Smyth, John Bourke and Martin Granen (sic) were all born in Co. Mayo. George Millar, Stephen Brady, Patrick Kennedy, Patrick King, James McDermott, James McDonnell, John Smyth, Patrick Whelan, William Wynne, John Green and William O’Neill were all born in Dublin City. John Hynes was born in Co. Dublin, Thady Rorke (sic) was born in Co. Roscommon and William Thompson was born in Galway City. Tom Stanton (sic) was born in Co. Wexford, Michael McAndrew was born in Co. Sligo, John Beattie was born in England and there is no place of birth recorded for John Quinn. All the boys are listed as pupils.

 

11 year olds:

John Tully, Christy Limmins, Stephen Coy, Michl (sic) Fletcher, Henry Murphy, William Neiland, Charles Davis, Patrick Fulham, Patrick Healy, Michael Macken, Michael Nolan, John Neiland, Michael Rorke (sic), Patrick Bourke, Bernard Brady, John Flynn, John Finlan, Thomas Hennelly, Michael Kennedy, Michael Murphy, Michael O’Donnell, John Sherlock, Willie Bermingham, Stephen Connelly, Michael Duffy, William Gordon, Patrick Heary (sic), James Kelly, Thomas Kelly and Thomas Ashe.

 

Again, all these boys were Roman Catholic and all of them could read and write. Michael Macken and Thomas Ashe could speak Irish and English while all the other 11 year old pupils could only speak English. Stephen Coy, William Neiland, Thomas Hennelly, Michael O’Donnell and Thomas Ashe were born in Co. Galway. Charles Davis, Patrick Healy, Michael Macken, John Neiland, Patrick Bourke, John Flynn, Michael Murphy, John Sherlock, Stephen Connelly and Patrick Heary (sic) were born in Co. Mayo. Christy Limmins, Michl (sic) Fletcher, Henry Murphy, Patrick Fulham, Bernard Brady, John Finlan, Michael Kennedy, William Gordon and James Kelly were all born in Dublin City. Willie Bermingham and Michael Duffy were born in Co. Dublin. Michael Rorke (sic) was born in Co. Roscommon, John Tully and Michael Nolan were born in Galway City and Thomas Kelly was born in Co. Monaghan. All these boys were listed as pupils.

 

10 year olds:

Edward O’Brien, John Conneely, Joseph Folan, Thomas Macken, Joseph McAuley, Michael McNeela, Festus McDonagal, Patrick Mulkerrins, Hubert Neilus, James Bourke, William Donaldson, Bernard Kelly, Edward Kearney, Thomas Macken, John McIntyre, John McDonagh, Patrick Daly, Joseph Farrell and Thomas Bodie.

 

All these boys could read and write and were Roman Catholic. Patrick Mulkerrins and Thomas Macken could speak both Irish and English while all the other boys only had English. Thomas Macken, Joseph McAuley, Michael McNeela, Hubert Neilus, James Bourke, William Donaldson, Thomas Macken, Edward Kearney and John McDonagh were born in Co. Mayo. John Conneely, Joseph Folan, Festus McDonagal, Patrick Mulkerrins and Bernard Kelly were born in Co. Galway. John McIntyre and Thomas Bodie were born in Dublin City, Patrick Daly was born in Co. Dublin, Joseph Farrell in Kilkenny City and Edward O’Brien was born in Co. Waterford. All boys were recorded as pupils.

 

 

9 year olds:

James O’Donnell, James O’Rorke, James Jennings, Michael Linskey, Michael Kearney, John Lavelle, Richard Macken, John Macken and Patrick Murphy.

 

All the 9 year old boys could read and write and were Roman Catholic. They all could only speak English. James O’Donnell, James Jennings, Michael Linskey and John Lavelle were born in Co. Galway. Michael Kearney, Richard Macken, John Macken and Patrick Murphy were born in Co. Mayo and James O’Rorke was born in Co. Roscommon. All were listed as pupils.

8 year olds:

Joseph McDonnell, Martin Jennings and Peter Ashe.

 

The three 9 year olds were Roman Catholic and could read and write. They were all born in Co. Galway. Peter Ashe could only speak Irish and Joseph McDonnell and Martin Jennings could only speak English.

 

7 and 6 year olds:

Colman Curlin (6) and Thomas McDonagh (7).

 

Both these boys were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Colman Curlin could not read but Thomas McDonagh could read and write. Thomas could speak only English while Colman could speak both Irish and English. Both boys are listed as pupils.

 

The building that was the industrial school was a 6 roomed, 1st class building with 3 stables, 2 coach houses, a harness room, 2 cow houses, a calf house, a dairy, a piggery, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a turf house, a potato house, a workshop, a shed, a store, a forge and a laundry. The landholder was Rev. D. McEvilly.

 

 

House 3 was the Royal Irish Constabulary barracks and had 2 census return forms. The first was that of the sergeant’s family and the second was that for the sergeant and constables that lived in the barracks.

 

Duffy

The head of the Duffy family was Patrick (44). This information is found in the H form and the house and building return (form B1). His wife was Ellen (31) and their 4 children Andrew John (8), Patrick Joseph (7), Ellen (2) and Margaret (8 mths). All were Roman Catholic and Patrick was born in Co. Sligo, Ellen was born in Co. Limerick and the children were born in Co. Galway W R. With the exception of Ellen (2) and Margaret they could all read and write. Patrick was a sergeant with the R.I.C., Andrew John and Patrick Joseph were scholars and Ellen (2) and Margaret were listed as infants. The building was a 4 roomed, 2nd class building with a turf house. Lucia Bolton was the landholder.

 

R.I.C. Barracks

The R.I.C. occupants were only identified by their initials although P.D. was Patrick Duffy (44). The others were E.R. (29), P.C. (27), T.B. (28) and F.J.M. (22). All were able to read and write. E.R. was a member of the Protestant Church of Ireland while the others were Roman Catholic. P.D. and P.C. were born in Co. Sligo, E.R. was born in Co. Mayo, T.B. was born in Co. Galway WR and F.J.M. was born in Co. Leitrim. P.D. was the sergeant with the others being constables. Before joining the R.I.C. P.C. was a publican’s son and the others were all farmer’s sons. The building was a 4 roomed, 2nd class building with a turf house. Lucia Bolton was the landholder.

 

MacDonnell                            (additional surnames: Mullen and Hyland)

The occupants of house 4 were John Joseph (46) and with him in the house at that time were 2 servants Mary Mullen (60) and Martin Hyland (15). Mary and Martin could speak both Irish and English but nothing was entered for John Joseph. Mary could not read but both John Joseph and Martin could read and write. All were Roman Catholic with Mary and Martin being born in Co. Galway and John Joseph being born in Co. Roscommon. John Joseph is listed as General Practitioner F A Q P Y S Enlinst(sic) on Journey Doctor and Mary and Martin were listed as general servants. The house they occupied was a 5 roomed, 1st class dwelling with a stable, a coach house, a harness room and a cow house. John Joseph was the landholder.

 

Mongan

The Mongan family consisted of just 2. Those being Harry (68) and his wife Mary (63). Both could speak both Irish and English but only Harry could read and write. Both were Roman catholic and born in Co. Galway WR. Harry is recorded as being a postman and Mary a housekeeper. Their house was a 5 roomed, 1st class lodging house. The landholder was (?) D. Board[iii].

 

Sullivan                                   (additional surname: O’Malley)

There were 2 occupants of house 6, those being Frank Sullivan (25) and Michael O’Malley (18). Both could speak both Irish and English and could read and write. Both were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Mayo. Both were listed as being shop assistants. The building they shared was a 6 roomed, 2nd class shop with a stable, coach house and turf house. The Land holder was R. O’Grady.

 

Nelly                           (additional Surnames: Kenny, Shanahan and Lyden)

Head of the family in house 7 was Annie T. (50). Living with her was her widowed daughter Mary E. Kenny (27) and her grandchildren John F. Kenny (5) and Mary T. Kenny (3). Also in the house were a boarder Bridget Shanahan (20) and a servant Patrick Lyden (30). All were Roman Catholic. Annie T. was born in White Haven, England, Mary E. was born in New York, John F. and Patrick were born in Co. Galway, Mary T. was born in Co. Mayo and Bridget was born in Co. Limerick. Patrick spoke both Irish and English while the others spoke only English. Mary T. could not read, Patrick could read only and the rest could read and write. Annie T. is recorded as being a post office official, Mary T. was a post office assistant, Bridget was a telegraphist (sic), Patrick was a farm labourer and Mary E. and John F. were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, a coach house, cow house, calf house and a fowl house. Annie T. Nelly was the landholder.

 

Mullen                                    (additional surname: King)

House 8 was the home of the Mullen family. Head of the family was Michael (42) and his wife Ellen (25). Four of their children lived with them at that time, they were May (5), Bridget (4), Martin (3) and Patrick (2). Also in the house were 2 servants Kate King (19) and John Mullen (19) along with Michael’s sister Anne (27). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. May, Bridget, Martin, Patrick and Kate could not read but the others could read and write. Michael, Ellen, Kate, John and Anne could speak both Irish and English. Michael and Ellen are listed as being shopkeepers, Kate and John were general servants and May and Bridget were scholars. Their house was a 6 roomed, 2nd class shop with a stable, coach house, cow house and store. The landholder was Michael Mullen.

 

Lydon                                      (additional surname: Conneely)

There were only 2 occupants of house 9 in Letterfrack in 1901. The widow Mary Lydon (60) was recorded as the head of the family and living with her was a boarder, Mary Conneely (65). Both were born in Co. Galway WR and were Roman Catholic. Neither could read, Mary Lydon could speak both Irish and English and Mary Conneely could only speak Irish. Mary Lydon was a house keeper and Mary Conneely was a domestic servant. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling. The landholder was the Council of Clifden Union.

 

Gibbons                                  (additional surname: Coyne)

Head of the Gibbons family was the widow Bridget (46). She had 5 of her sons living in the house as well and they were Patrick (25), Martin (23), Michael (21), William (19) and John (9). As well as these there was a lodger, Martin Coyne (80) who was a widower. John could speak English but all the others had both Irish and English language. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin Coyne could not read, Bridget could read only and the rest could read and write. Bridget is listed as being a house keeper, Patrick was a basket maker, Martin Gibbons was a carpenter, Michael and William were labourers, John ws a scholar and Martin Coyne was a Tailor. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was Rev. D. McEvilly.

 

Faherty                                    (additional surname: Moran)

Head of the Faherty family in house 11 was Martin (45) and his wife Mary (40) along with their children Mary (7), Martin (4), Patrick (2) and Anne (6mths). Also in the house was a boarder John Moran (25). All were Roman Catholic, John Moran was born in Co. Mayo and the others were born in Co. Galway WR. Martin (45), Mary (40) and John could speak both Irish and English while Mary (7), Martin (4) and Patrick could only speak English. Martin (4), Patrick and Anne could not read but the others, with the exception of baby Anne, could read and write. Martin (45) was a farmer, Mary (40) was a farmer’s wife, Mary (7) was a scholar and John Moran is listed as being a backer. The house they shared was a 4 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a stable, coach house and a cow house. Martin Faherty was the landholder.

 

Flanagan                                 (additional surname: Maher)

The head of the Flanagan family was William (26) and his wife Johanna (24) along with their children Mary (2), Willey (sic) (1) and Sarah (3 mths). Also living with them was William’s niece Katie Maher (14). All, with the exception baby Sarah, had English as a language. William, Johanna and Katie could read and write. Sarah was born in Co. Galway while the others were born in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. All were Roman Catholic. William was a boot and shoe maker, Johanna was a dressmaker and Katie was a scholar. The house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was the Rev. D. McEvilly.

 

Francis

House 13 was that of the Francis family and the head of the family was Michael (36). Living in the house with him were his wife Sarah (30) and their children Ellen (8), Thomas (4), Martin (2) and Mary Keate (sic) (5mths). Martin could speak English while the others, with the exception of baby Mary, could speak both Irish and English. Michael, Sarah and Ellen could read and write with the others not being able to. All were catholic and born in Galway City. Michael was a tailor and Sarah, Ellen and Thomas were scholars. The house they lived in was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was the Rev. D. McEvilly.

 

Conneely

Head of the Conneely family was Peter (26) and his wife Anne (29). Also living with them at that time were their children Mary Ellen (5), Patrick (3) and Bridget (1). Mary Ellen and Patrick had only English as a language but Peter and Anne could speak both Irish and English. Peter and Anne were only ones to be able to read and write. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Peter was a carpenter while Mary Ellen and Patrick were scholars. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was the Rev. D. McEvilly.

 

Moran

There were only 2 occupants of house 15 with the head of the household being Peter (40) and his nephew Paul (14). Both could read and write, Paul could only speak English while Peter could speak both Irish and English. Both were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Mayo. Peter is listed as being a blacksmith and Paul a pupil. The house they shared was a 3 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and the landholder was the Re. D. McEvilly.

 

Carter

The Carter family consisted of 6 members with the head of the family being the widow Catherine (50). Also in the house with her were her children Kate (20), Bridget (19), Martin (16), Margaret (10) and Elizabeth (6). All were members of the Roman Catholic Church and were born in Co Galway. All, with the exception of Elizabeth, could read and write and Catherine could speak both Irish and English with the rest speaking only English. Catherine was a farmer, Kate and Bridget were domestic servants, Martin was a basket maker and Margaret was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with the landholder being Mitchel Henry.

 

Ownsworth

The head of the Ownsworth family was the widow Kate (48) and her 2 daughters Katie (17) and Julia (15). Kate could speak both Irish and English while Katie and Julia only had English as a language. Katie and Julia could read and write while Kate could not read. All were Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. Kate was a farmer and Katie and Julia were assistants. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling with Mitchel Henry as the landholder.

 

Morgan

The sole occupant of house 18 was the widow Mary (60). She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. She could not read and spoke both Irish and English. She is listed as being a domestic servant. The house she lived in was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Walsh

There was only the one occupant in house 19 and that was the widow Bridget (60). She was a Roman Catholic and born in Co. Galway. She could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Bridget was a general servant. Her house was a 2 roomed 3rd class dwelling and Mitchel Henry was the landholder.

 

Conroy

There was only a sole occupant of house 20. That was the widow Honor (80). Honor could not read but could speak both Irish and English. She was a Roman catholic and was born in Co. Galway. Honor was listed as a general servant. Her house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Daley[iv]

The widow Margret (60) lived alone in house 21. She was a Roman Catholic and was born in Co. Galway. She could not read but could speak both Irish and English. Margret was a general servant. Her house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Cranston

Head of the Cranston family was Mary (60). Living with her were 2 of her sons, Joseph (30) and Arthur (22). All three could read and write with Mary speaking both Irish and English while Joseph and Arthur only had English as a language. All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Daly                            (additional surname: Kenny)

Head of the family was the widow Ellen (70) and her 2 grandsons John Kenny (20) and James Kenny (18). All the family were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. All could speak both Irish and English with John and James being able to read and write and Ellen not being able to. Ellen was a general servant while both John and James were labourers. The house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

Kenny

The only occupant of house 24 was Mary Kenny (46) who was a widow. She could read and write and could speak both Irish and English. She was born in Co. Galway and was a Roman Catholic. Her occupation is listed as a housekeeper. The house she lived in was a 4 roomed, 1st class dwelling and the landholder was Mitchel Henry.

 

McAndrew                              (additional surnames: Gibbons and McDonnell)

Head of the household in house 25 was Bartholomew (59). Also in the house were 2 servants Margaret Gibbons (38) and Thomas McDonnell (15). All 3 could speak both Irish and English and could read and write. All 3 were Roman Catholic with Thomas being born in Co. Galway and the other 2 being born in Co. Mayo. Bartholomew was a parish priest and Margaret and Thomas were domestic servants. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Bartholomew McAndrew was the landholder.

 

Joyce

The Joyce family consisted of 8 members with the head of the family being Michael (48). Also in the house were his wife Ellen (44) and their 6 daughters Mary (19), Norah (17), Bridget (15), Ellen (12), Elizabeth (11) and Alice (4). All, with the exception of Alice, could read and write. Michael, Ellen (44) and Mary could speak Irish and English while Norah, Bridget and Ellen (12) only had English for a language. Nothing was entered for Elizabeth and Alice. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Michael is recorded as being a mason, Ellen (44), Mary and Norah were housekeepers and Bridget, Ellen (12) and Elizabeth were scholars. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling and Michael Joyce was the landholder.

 

Kelly

The Kelly family in house 27 consisted of John (80) and his wife Margret (95). Both spoke Irish and English but could not read. Both were born in Co. Tipperary and were Roman Catholics. John was a farm labourer. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house and Mitchel Henry was the landholder.

 

Joyce                           (additional surnames: Lyden)

The head of the Joyce family was Pat (88) and his wife Honoria (72). Also in living in the house were there children Mary (40) and Martin (33) and also a son / elder son ?[v] Walter (18), along with a servant, Michael Lyden (23). All could speak Irish and English but only Mary, Martin, Walter and Michael could read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholics. Pat was a farmer and Mary was a farmer’s daughter. Martin was a butcher with Walter and Michael being apprentice butchers. The house they shared was a 2 roomed, 3rd class dwelling and Mitchel Henry was the landholder.

 

Cassidy                                   (additional surname: Gibbons)

Head of the Cassidy family was John (54) and his wife Kate (50). Also in the house with them at that time were 2 relatives Agnes Gibbons (17) and Elizabeth Gibbons (7). All were Roman Catholic and were born in Co. Galway. Elizabeth could speak only English but the rest had both Irish and English as languages. John and Elizabeth could read and Kate and Agnes could read and write. John is listed as being a farmer, Kate was a farmer’s wife, Agnes was an assistant and Elizabeth was a scholar. The house they lived in was a 2 roomed, 2nd class dwelling with a cow house and a calf house. John Cassidy was the landholder.

 

Mannion                                  (additional surnames: Hynes)

Martin (50) was the head of the family in house 30. He lived there with his wife Mary (45) and their daughter Mary (9) along with a boarder Honor Hynes (65). All could speak both Irish and English and also read and write. All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. Martin was a labourer with Mary (45) listed as a labourer’s wife. Mary (9) was a scholar and Honor was a general servant. Their house was a 2 roomed, 3rd class house with a cow house and Martin Mannion was the landholder.

 

McCarthy

The last house in Letterfrack was that of the McCarthy family. The head of the family was Carthage (sic) (40) and his wife Annie Mary (36). Their children also lived in the house and they were Kathleen A. (8), Norah C. (6), John P. (5) and Ernest P. (2). All were Roman Catholic, except Annie Mary who was listed as Protestant Church of England. Carthage (sic) was born in Wales and the rest of the family were born in England. Carthage (sic), Annie Mary, Kathleen A. and Norah C. could read and write. Carthage was listed as being a basket (?)[vi] and all the children were scholars. Their house was a 3 roomed, 2nd class with a cow house. Carthage McCarthy was the landholder.

 

Old Pension Census (1841-1851) for Letterfrack

Anne Jennings – Application No. C17 1322. Anne’s application was received on 09/02/1917 and was 70 at that time. Her address at that time was Mrs C. Crehan, Renvyle, Galway. Her parent’s names are given as Edward and Celia Jennings (Diamond). The returned search was dated 12/02/1917 and a pension of 2s was awarded.

 

Elizabeth Lavelle – Application No. C21 1044. Elizabeth’s application was received on 07/02/1921 and her address at the time of her application was given as Mrs Elizabeth Vallely (sic), Tully, Renvyle, Clifden Co. Galway. He parents names were given as Peter and Anne Lavelle (Ruane). The search was returned on 11/02/1921 and marked “not found”.

 

Joseph McNab – Application No. C21 927. Joseph’s application was received on 02/02/1921. His address at the time of his application was given as Mr J. E. McNab, 6 Ida Crescent, Leeds. His parent’s names were given as George and Bridget McNab (Wallace). The search was returned on 09/02/21 with the note “Not found”.

 

Bridget Burke – Application No. C17 5346. The application was received on 19/07/1917. Bridget’s address at the time of her application was Cawrosmore, Letterfrack, Co. Galway. Her parent’s names are given as Ambrose and Bridget Burke (Coyne). The returned search was dated 21/07/1917 with hand written notes saying:

 

Amby and Bridy Burke Married 1835

No return of Bridget.

Martin             14

Mary               10

Michael         11        Died 1847

Bridget           6             “

Margret          3             “

 

Sheet 10X

 

A copy was dispatched to applicant on 25/07/1917.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) for Letterfrack

According to Griffith’s Valuation (1847-1864) Robert Graham leased tenements to a number of people in the townland of Letterfrack. James Ellis leased 915 Acres and 9 Perches from Robert Graham for an annual ratable valuation of £47 for the land and £20 for houses and offices and £1 for a herd’s house. James Ellis then leased a house each to John Diamond for 5s and Charles Kelly for 15s. James Ellis also leased a meeting house and a school house for £2 10s annually. James also leased a petty sessions house for a half annual rent of £2 10s. William Noon leased a house from James Ellis for £2 15s. Mrs Hawkshaw leased 2 Roods of land containing house, offices and garden for 7s for the land and £1 8s for the buildings. Guardians of the Poor of the Clifden Union leased a dispensary from James Ellis for £3 annualy. The constabulary force leased a police barracks and garden from Robert Graham. This consisted of 1 Rood and 20 Perches of land for which they paid 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Robert Graham paid a half annual rent of £10. James Feeney, Michael Leddy, Stephen Keady, Michael Joyce and Bridget Carey jointly leased 23 Acres, 2 Roods and 3 Perches of land which 2 houses included. Each of them paid 5s for the land and James Feeney paid 15s for a house and Bridget Cary paid 5s for her house. Patrick Walsh leased 10 Acres of land from James Ellis that included a house and office. He paid £3 5s for the land and 15s for the buildings. Charles Evens leased 8 Acres and 7 Perches from Robert Graham that included a house and offices. He paid £1 10s for the land and £13 10s for the buildings. William and John Lyden jointly leased an area of land of 10 Acres and 35 Perches from James Ellis for an annual rate of 10s each and William also paid 10s for a house and John paid 5s for a house on that land. Michael Cowan and Mary McDonald jointly leased 5 Acres, 2 Roods and 25 Perches of land including houses from James Ellis for which they paid 5s each for their share of the land and £1 5s each for their houses. Martin O’Flaherty leased 195 Acres, 2 Roods and 11 Perches from Robert Graham that included a house and office. He paid £13 for the land and £5 for the buildings. Patrick Powell leased 4 Acres, 2 Roods and 3 Perches of land that contained a house from James Ellis for which he paid £1 for the land and 10s for the house. Honoria Conry, Loftus Dancer, Anthony King, Thomas Eastwood and Robert Graham had 30 Acres, 1 Rood and 30 Perches of land. Honoria’s part of the land had a house and offices and she paid £1 for the land and 15s for the buildings to Robert Graham. Loftus Dancer had a house and land for which he paid Robert Graham 15s each for the land and house. Anthony King paid 5s each for land and house to Thomas Eastwood. Thomas Eastwood paid Robert Graham 1s for his area of land that was an area of bog. Robert Graham had an area of bog on this land that he paid 4s annually. Stephen Keady and Anthony Joyce jointly leased and area of 2 Acres and 7 Perches from James Ellis that included a house and office for Stephen and a house for Anthony. Stephen paid 7s for his part of the land and 8s for the buildings and Anthony paid 8s for his part of the land and 5s for the house. Patrick Lyden leased 10 Acres and 24 Perches of land from James Ellis for 15s for the land and 5s for a house on that land. Thomas Keady leased 12 Acres and 1 Rood from James Ellis for which he paid £1 for the land and 5s for a house on that land. Michael Joyce leased 7 Acres and2 Roods on which there was a house and offices. He paid James Ellis £1 for the land and 5s for the buildings. There was also an area of 18 Acres and 15 Perches of water in this townland. There were also some exemptions of payment, and they were the £2 10s for the meeting house and school house, £ 2 10s for the petty sessions house, £3 for the dispensary and the total of £6 for the police barracks and garden.

 

 

1670 Down Survey for Letterfrack

The name for this area in the 1670 Down Survey was Litterfrack. The 1640 owner was the Catholic Teige Kittagh and the in 1670 the owner was Richard, Earl of Westmeath, also a Catholic. There were 270 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 49 plantation acres of profitable land. 49 plantation acres of land were forfeited.

 

[iii] Difficult to decipher from the house and building return

[iv] Possibly Dalery

[v] Very hard to decipher in the household return.

[vi] Very difficult to decipher on the household return.

This page was added on 17/07/2018.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *