Ballydoolough

Baile Dubhloch

Maggi Nic Shíomóin, Tomás O’Flatharta

Ballydoolough

Ballydoolough, Baile Dubhloch (as Gaeilge), meaning Town of the Black Lake.

Authors: Maggi Nic Shíomóin, Tomás O’Flatharta

Names:

There were many forms of this name when O’Donovan Survey of Field Names Books was published in 1838: Ballydoolough (Surveyors Sketch Map); Ballydoolough (County Cess Collector and Mearsman); Ballydoolagh (County Map); Balladoola (Rev. Michael Heraghty, P.P.) and Ballydulough (Tithes Ledger). Other placenames in or near this townland were Bally Doolough (village); Bally New (village) Ballydoolough Lough (lake); Benlevy (mountain) Corthon Beg (village) and, Dasruffaun (village).

Situation:

Baile Dubhloch was and is in the south side of the Parish of Ross and bounded on the north by the townlands of Coolin (where there is a lake and which is the current (2016) source of water for the local scheme). On the north side it is also bounded by Thoonleghee or Tornanal (which is now called Tóin le Ghaoth and is the townland of the Co-operative of Joyce Country, CDS Teo.) and by Cloghbrack Upper, bounded also on the North by Tieranee (Tír an Fhia). This townland/village is bounded on the south by the parish of Cong and on the east by the parish of Cong and Coolin, in the Barony of Ross and County of Galway.

According to O’Donovan (1838) the list of townlands which share a border with Baile Dubhloch are Carrick East, Carrick Middle, Carrick West, Cloghbrack Upper, Coolin, Teeranea, and Tonlegee.

Description

The Down Survey: “The Down Survey was a cadastral survey carried out by William Petty, an English scientist in 1655 and 1656. Cadastral Surveying is the sub-field of surveying that specialises in the establishment and re-establishment of real property boundaries. It is an important component of the legal creation of properties. A cadastral surveyor must apply both the spatial-measurement principles of general surveying and legal principles such as respect of neighbouring titles. The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps; ‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will”. (Wikipedia)

This Survey reveals interesting information about this townland. Firstly, in 1641, the owner was Sir Thomas Blake (Protestant) and in 1670 the owner was John Brown also Protestant. John Brown was the Provost of Trinity College in Dublin at the time, which was simply called University College Dublin. The townland contained Ballynonagh, Ballyvian, Ballindullagh and Clochbrack. According to the Down Survey, there were 1,012 plantation acres of unprofitable land. A plantation acre is the equivalent of an Irish Acre, which is 1.62 greater than the statute (English) acre. There were 553 acres of profitable land and 553 acres were forfeited.

O’Donovan’s Field Names Books:

The Proprietor was Sir Valentine Blake, Esq., Minlow (sic) near Galway. Agent Mr. Michael Higgins, Fairhil (sic). There were 719acres, 0 roods and 32 perches. All was held under lease and the rent was £67.0s. 0d. bulked per year. We are told that the lands comprised of soil, some steep mountain in the greatest part spent arable mountain, having some bog and swamps, crops of oats and potatoes near the houses were middling but in general were not good and part totally failed in 1838. The County Assessment was 11¼d. paid per acre half yearly for 135 acres. The mountain was Binlavy (sic), modern day Binn Shléibhe, and there were no antiquities in the townland, though many have been discovered in the Binn Shléibhe area since. The mountain is called Mount Gable in English.

The Griffiths Valuation(1855):

According to Griffiths Valuation 1855, the townland of Baile Dhubhloch , which can be found on Ordnance Survey Sheets   XXVI, 11 , had a total acreage in excess of 719 acres. The lessor at the time, for the entire townland was Sir Thomas E. Blake. There was only the one plot divided between 19 occupiers and their families:

Maurice Lowry had a house, office and land for a valuation of £10.10.0 for the land and £0.15s. for the house.

James Lowry also had a house, office and land for the exact same valuations, totalling £11.5.0s.

Peter Lowry held a lesser acreage and paid £6.12.0s for the rent on the land and office and £0.8.0s for the house, bringing a grand total of £7.0.0 annual rent.

Michael Donohoe, Junior paid £3.6.0s for his land and office, and £0.6.0s for his house, which totalled £3.12.0s.

William Casey also paid £3.6.0s for his land and office, and £0.6s for his house.

Stephen Casey paid £3.6.0 for his land and office and a further £0.6s for his house.

Pete Lowry paid £2.10s for the land and office, and £.0.5s for his house.

Peter Walsh also paid £2.10s for his land and office and £0.5s for his house.

Mary Lowry paid £2.10s for her land and office and £0.5s for her house.

Sally Millett paid the same for her land, offices and house, respectively.

John Coyne’ s rent was £3.13s for the offices and land, and £0.12s for his house, for a total of £4.5.0s

John Carney paid £2.9.0s. for his land and offices and £0.6.0s for his house.

Michael Carney’s rent for the land and outhouses was £3.13.0 and he paid a further £0.7s for his house.

William Corcoran paid £3.8.0 for the land and offices and £0.12s. for the house.

Peter Casey paid £3.7.0 for the land and offices, plus £0.5s for the house.

Michael Donohoe held a larger piece of land at a valuation of £6.12.0 and a further £0.8s. for his house.

Patrick Joyce paid £3.7s. for the land and offices and just £0.5s for his house, for a total rent of £3.12s.

William Carney paid £3.0.0 for the land and offices and a further £.0.8s. for his house.

Anthony Walsh paid just £2.5s. for the land and offices and £0.5s for his house, for a total of £2.10s.

The remaining 21 acres, 1 rood and 26 perches is simply “Water”, likely the lake, for which no monies were due.

Census 1901:

The census of 1901 indicated that there were 25 dwellings in this village, all of which were occupied. Of the 133 residents of this village there were 62 males and 71 females. Out-Offices and Farm Steadings were not recorded for houses 16-25. Unless otherwise stated, all members of the familes were born in County Galway and were Roman Catholic. The roofs were of perishable material unless stated otherwise.

William (46) and Mary (38) Coyne resided in house 1 with their 7 children and William’s mother, Kate Coyne (70), (After William’s surname he wrote in brackets ‘Tom’ possibly to distinguish himself from the other William Coyne in the village). Their children were Patt (10), Thomas (9), Mary (8), John (6), William (5), Michael (3) and James (4 months).William (Snr.) was a farmer. Patt and Thomas were scholars and the only family members who could read. Patt could also write. They all spoke English and Irish expect Michael, Kate and James. Kate spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house.

William (36) and Mary (26) Coyne resided in house numbered 2 with their 3 children (After William’s surname he wrote in brackets ‘Patt’ possibly to distinguish himself from the other William Coyne in house 1). Their children were Patt (4), Bridget (2) and Winnifred (sic) (4 months). William was a farmer. Mary Coyne was the only family member who could read. William and Mary were bilingual. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a barn.

Patt (50) and Bridget (36)Kearney lived in house 3 with their 5 children. (After Patts surname he wrote ‘Wm’ in brackets, possibly to distinguish himself from the other Kearneys living in the village). Their 5 children were Kate (14), Bridget (13), John (10), Patrick (5) and Mary (2). Patt was a farmer. Bridget (Jnr.) and John were scholars and the only family members who could both read and write. Bridget (Snr.) and Kate could read and the rest of the family could not. They all were bilingual except for Patrick and Mary who were too young to speak. They lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house.

Patt (40) and Catherine (36) Kearney lived in house 4 with their 6 children and Patt’s mother, Bridget Kearney (65). Their children were Mary (11), Bridget (10), Catherine (7), Michael (5), William (2) and Anne (6 months). Patt was a farmer. Mary, Bridget (Jnr.) and Catherine (Jnr.) were scholars and they were the only family members who could read, Mary and Bridget (Jnr.) could write as well as read. These 3 family members were also the only family members who were bilingual. Patt, Catherine (Snr.) and Bridget (Snr.) spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a piggery.

Bridget Carney (52) lived in house numbered 5 with her 3 children. Her 3 children were Catherine (20), William (17) and Bridget (15). Bridget (Snr.) was a farmer. Bridget (Snr.) was married but her husband was not mentioned in this census. Bridget (Jnr.) was the only family member who could read and write. Everyone in the family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house.

Michael (50) and Bridget (40) Coyne resided in house 6 with their 8 children. Their children were Mary (19), Ellen (16), Michael (14), Thomas (12), Bridget (6), Sarah (4), Kate (2) and Martin (1). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. Michael and Thomas were scholars and the only members of this family who could both read and write. Ellen could read. Everyone in this family was bilingual apart from Kate and Martin. They had a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Patt (36) and Kate (26) Casey lived in house 7 with their daughter, Mary (1). Patt’s father, Peter Casey (81), and Patt’s sister, Maria Casey (40) also resided with the family. Patt was a farmer. No one in this family could read or write. Everyone spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house.

Peter Casey (65) resided in house 8 with his son, Patt (40), his daughter-in-law, Margaret Casey (25), and his grand-son,Patrick Casey (1). Peter was a farmer. No one in this family could read or write. Peter and Pat spoke Irish only, while Margaret spoke both Irish and English.They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Michael (66) and Catherine (64) Walsh resided in house numbered 9 with their daughter Catherine (20). Michael was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write. They all spoke only Irish. They had a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a piggery.

Bridget Corcoran (40) lived in house 10 with her 3 children. Her children were Mary (15), Martin (7) and William (3). Bridget was a farmer and a widow. Martin was a scholar and the only one in the household who could read and was bilingual. The rest of the household could not read and spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a piggery.

Catherine Kearney (64) resided in house numbered 11. Her occupation was not recorded. She could not read and she spoke Irish only. She had a 4th class house with 1 room. She had no out-houses or farm steadings. Her landlord was Bridget Corcoran who lived in Ballydoolough in house 10.

Michael (50) and Mary (30) Donohoe lived in house 12 with their daughter Mary (6 months). Michael was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write. Michael and Mary (Snr.) spoke Irish. They had a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a stable.

John (20) and Mary (29) Coyne resided in house 13 with their 4 children. Their children are Mary (7), Patrick (5), Michael (3) and Bridget (9 months). There must be an error in this transcription as it would have implied that John was 13 when his eldest daughter was born. The 1911 census indicates he was 23 in 1901 instead of 20. John was a farmer. No one in this family could read or write.   Everyone in the family, expect Michael and Bridget, spoke Irish only. They had a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house.

Patrick (60) and Mary (54) Walsh lived in house 14 with their daughter, Sarah (19). Patrick was an Agricultural labourer. Sarah was a ‘general servant’ who was at the time of the census ‘unemployed’. Sarah was also the only person in the family who could read and who could speak English and Irish. Patrick and Mary spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had no out-offices or farm steadings. Their landlord was John Coyne who in Ballydoolough in house 13.

John Lowery (58) resided in house numbered 15 with his 2 children and his servant. The children were John (20) and Margaret (18). His servant was Michael Kearney (17). John (Snr.) was a farmer and widower. Margaret was the only family member who could read. John (Jnr.) and Margaret spoke Irish and English. John spoke only Irish. Michael was classified in the census as ‘dumb’. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house.

Sarah Walsh (84) lived in house numbered 16 with her 3 children. Her 3 children were Thomas (50), John (40) and Bridget (24). Sarah was a farmer and a widow. No one in this household could read or write. Bridget was the only person in this household who spoke Irish and English, the rest of the family spoke only Irish. They resided in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. (Out-offices and farm steadings are not recorded for houses 16-25.).

Michael Lowery (50) lived in house 17 with his 2 daughters, Bridget (19) and Mary (14). Michael was a farmer and a widower. Mary was a scholar. All members of this bilingual family could read but only Bridget and Mary could write. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms.

Stephen (46) and Mary (40) Casey resided in house 18 with their 5 children and Stephen’s brother, Patt Casey (40) and sister, Kate Casey (30). Their 5 children were Patt (13), Thomas (12), William (8), Mary (6) and Bridget (2). Stephen was a farmer. Patt, Thomas and Williams were scholars. These scholars were the only people in this household who could read and write and who spoke Irish and English. They had a 3rd class house with 2 rooms.

Bridget Casey (50) lived in house numbered 19 with their 3 sons. Her 3 sons were William (19), Patrick (16) and John (13). Bridget was a farmer and a widow. John was a scholar and the only family member who could read and write. The family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms.

Martin (45) and Bridget (40) Lowery resided in house 20 with their 7 children, Martin’s mother, Mary Lowery (76) and their servant, John Lowery(16). Their children were James (7), Mary Kate (9), Leena(5), Catherine (3), Teresa (2), Sarah (1) and Patrick (1 month). Martin was a farmer. James and Mary-Kate were scholars and John was a farm servant. Only the head of the family and Mary, his mother, could read. Everyone over the age of 3 in this household spoke Irish and English. They had a 2nd class house with 4 rooms.

Mary Walsh (60) lived in house 21 with her son, Michael Lowry (30). Mary was married but her husband isn’t mentioned in this census. Mary was a farmer. Mary and Michael could not read. They spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms.

John (40) and Kate (36) Donohoe lived in house 22 with their 7 children; Bridget (17), Mary (14), John (12), Michael (10), Patrick (7), Kate (4) and Ellen (2). John (Snr.) was a farmer. John, Michael and Patrick were scholars. Only Bridget, Mary, John (Jnr.) and Michael were able to read and write. All were bilingual except for the two youngest children. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms.

Peter Lowry (80) resided in house 23 with his son, Martin (31), and his daughter, Kate (29). Peter was a farmer and a widower. The children, Martin and Kate, could read and write, the father, Peter, could not. The family was bilingual. They lived in 3rd class house with 3 rooms.

Kate Lowery (74) lived in house 24 with her son, Patt (40), her daughter-in-law, Mary (30), and her 4 grandchildren. Her 4 grandchildren were James (10), Mary (4), Kate (2) and Bridget (6 months). Kate (Snr.) was a farmer and a widow and James was a scholar. Kate (Snr.) and Patt could read and write. Mary and James could read. The grandparent and both parents spoke Irish and English and the 3 oldest grandchildren spoke English only. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms.

John Lowery (50) resided in house 25 with his daughter, Sarah (18), and his son, John (12). John was a farmer and a widower. Sarah could read and write, John (Jnr.) could read and John (Snr.) could not read or write. This family was bilingual. They had a 3rd class house with 3 rooms.

Census 1911:

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage had lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living); if Deaf and Dumb, Dumb only, Blind, Imbecile or Idiot, Lunatic. In the previous census they were 25 occupied dwellings and in this census 24 dwellings are listed. House numbers differ from those of 1901. There are also inconsistent age gaps between 1901 to 1911 census. In the previous census they claimed they were born County Galway and in this census they claim they are were born in Galway WR expect for one person who was born in Mayo in house 6.

John Lowry (sic.) (was called Lowery in 1901) aged 64, resided in house 1 in 1911 (lived in house numbered 25 in 1901) with his 2 children; Ellen (20) and John (18). There is no mention of Sarah Lowery in this census and there is no Ellen mentioned in the previous census. John (Snr.) was a widow. John was still a farmer. Everyone in this family spoke Irish and English and could read and write. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They had a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Patrick (51) (was called Patt in 1901) and Mary (43) Lowry now resided in house 2. They previously resided in house 24. They lived with 5 of their children; Mary (14), Kate (11), Margaret (5), Patrick (3) and Martin (6 months). There is no mention of James or Bridget. Patrick and Mary (Snr.) were married for 15 years, had 8 children and 5 were still living in 1911. Patrick was a farmer and all his children expect Mary (Jnr.) were scholars. Patrick (Jnr.) could not read, the earlier census contradicts this information. Mary (Senior) could read. Mary (Jnr.) could read and write and the rest of the children could not read or write. Everyone in the family spoke Irish and English, expect Patrick (Jnr.) who spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms in 1911; they did live in a 3rd class with 2 rooms in the previous census. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Martin Lowry (40) lived in house 3 in 1911, (they did live in house 23 in the 1901 Census), with his sister Kate Lowry (30). They were both unmarried. Martin was a farmer. They were both bilingual. Martin could not read, though this contradicts the census conducted in 1901. Kate could read and write. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms; they had lived in a 3rd class house. They had a cow house and a piggery.

John (65) and Kate (52) Donahoe lived in house 4 in 1911 (previously they lived in house 22), with their 5 children; Mary (24), Michael (19), Patrick (18), Kate (14) and Helena (12) (was named as Ellen in 1901). There is no mention of Bridget or John (Jnr.) in this census. John and Kate were married for 30 years, had 8 children of whom 5 were still living in 1911. John was still a farmer and Helena was a scholar in 1911. Everyone in the household was bilingual. In 1911 everyone in the family, except Kate, could read and write. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms; they had lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms in 1901. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Michael (50) and Mary (35) Lowry lived in house 5 in 1911 with their 4 children; Mary (9), Bridget (9), Kate (7) and Sarah (2). Michael and Mary (Snr.) had been married for 10 years, had 4 children, all of whom were still living by 1911. Michael was a farmer. Mary (Snr.), Mary and Bridget spoke Irish and English, the rest of the family spoke Irish only. Mary (Snr.) was the only family member who could read and write. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a barn.

Martin (55) and Bridget (48) Lowry (was spelled Lowery in 1901) lived in house 6 (previously lived in house 20) with their 11 children; James (17), Helena (14) was called Lenna in previous census, Kate aged 13 (was called Catherine in 1901 Census), Teresa (12), Sarah (11), Patrick (10), Anne (9), Margaret (8), John (6), Martin (4) and Michael (2). There is no mention of Martin’s mother, Mary Lowery, their servant, John Lowery, or their other daughter, Mary Kate, (who had probably moved out as none of Martin or Bridget’s children has died). Martin and Bridget had been married for 20 years, had borne 13 children all of whom were still living in 1911. Martin was still a farmer. Every child in this family under the age of 14 and above the age of 4 were scholars. Everyone in the family spoke Irish and English except Martin, who spoke English only. Everyone above the age of 8 in this family could read and write.   The previous census claimed everyone in this household was born in County Galway, but this census claimed Bridget was from Mayo. They lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms. They had have 4 rooms in the previous census. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

John Lowery (58) lived in house 7 (was numbered 15 in 1901) with his son, John (34). There is no mention of John’s (Snr.) daughter, Margaret, or his servant in 1911, Michael Kearney. John (Snr.) was a widower. John (Snr.) was still a farmer in 1911. They both spoke Irish only and could not read. They still lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms.   They still had a cow house and added a piggery.

 Michael Lowry (50) was called Lowery in the previous census, resided in house 8 (was numbered 17 in 1901) with his daughter, Mary (24). There is no mention of Michaels other daughter, Bridget in this 1911 census. Michael was a widower and still a farmer in 1911. Mary spoke Irish and English and Michael spoke only Irish. Mary was the only person in this household who could read and write. They still lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

John Walsh (67) lived in house 9 (was numbered 16 in 1901) with his sister, Bridget Walsh (69). There is no mention of Sarah Walsh in this census, she was 84 in the previous census therefore there is a high possibility she passed away in the past 10 years; there is also no mention of Thomas Walsh in this census. John was a farmer in 1911. John and Bridget both spoke Irish only, this is inconsistent with the 1901 census as Bridget was bilingual in 1901. John and Bridget could not read or write. They still lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a barn.

Bridget Casey (70) resided in house 10 (originally numbered 19) with her son, William (28). There is no mention of Bridget’s’ other sons, Patrick and John, in the 1911 census. Bridget was a farmer. They could not read. Bridget Casey spoke Irish and English and William spoke Irish only (Which is inconsistent as the 1901 census claimed he spoke English and Irish). They still lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house.

Stephen (69) and Mary (42) Casey lived in house 11 which was numbered 18 in the Census of 1901, with Stephen’s brother, Patrick (67). Stephen’s sister, Kate (65) also resided with the family. Stephen and Mary had seven children: Thomas (18), William (15), Mary (13), Bridget (11), Stephen (9), Peter (6) and Michael (3).   There is no mention of their son Patt (Jnr.), he had probably moved out since none of Stephens or Mary’s eight children had died by 1911. Stephen (Snr.) and Mary were married for 20 years. Stephen was still a farmer. Mary (Jnr.), Bridget and Stephen (Jnr.) were scholars. Everyone in the family, expect Stephen (Snr.), spoke English and Irish. Stephen still spoke only Irish. The parents with Peter, Michael and Kate could not read. The rest of the children and Patrick could read and write. They still lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

John (40) and Mary (44) Coyne resided in house 12 (was numbered 13 in 1901) with their 5 children; Mary (16), Patrick (14), Michael (13), Bridget (11) and Honor (8). John and Mary (Snr.) were married for 18 years, had 7 children and 5 of them were alive in 1911. John was still a farmer. Mary (Snr.), Mary (Jnr.), Patrick and Michael were bilingual; the rest of the family spoke Irish. Mary (Jnr.) and Patrick were the only family members who could read and write. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. In 1901 they had lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They still had a cow house.

John (33) and Mary (40) Casey lived in house 13 (was numbered 12 in 1901) with their son, Patrick (2 months), Marys mother , Mary Coyne (80), and Marys 3 children from another marriage. Mary’s children were Mary Donahoe (10), Kate Donahoe (7) and Catherine Donahoe (6). There is no mention of Michael Donahoe in this census. John and Mary Casey were married for 1 year, had 1 child which was still living in 1911. John was a farmer. The parents spoke Irish and English and all the children, expect Patrick who was too young to speak, spoke Irish only. No one in this household could read. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They had lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms during the enumeration of the 1901 Census. They had a cow house and a piggery and no longer had a stable.

Patrick (50) and Kate (30) Casey resided in house 14 (they had resided in house 7) with Patricks sister, Maria Casey (60) and their 8 children; Mary (12), Bridget (10), Kate (8), Patrick (7), Ellen (5), Margaret (4), Peter (2) and John (6 months). There is no mention of Peter Casey in this census, he was 81 in the 1901 census, so there is a strong possibility he died in between 1901 to 1911. Patrick (Snr.) and Kate were married for 13 years, had 9 children, 8 of whom were still living in 1911. Patrick (Snr.) was still a farmer. Mary was a scholar and the only family member who could read and write, the rest of the family could not. Patrick (Snr.), Patrick (Jnr.), Ellen, Margaret, Peter and Maria spoke Irish only. The rest of the family spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 2ndclass house with 2 rooms; they had lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms in 1901. They still had a cow house and a barn.

Michael (71) and Catherine (72) Walsh lived in house numbered 15 (they had lived in house 9) with their daughter, Kate (30). Michael and Catherine were married for 40 years, had 3 children, all of whom were still living in 1911. Michael was still a farmer. This family still spoke Irish only and could not read. They still lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They added a cow house but no longer had a piggery, or perhaps the cow house was now called a ‘piggery’.

Patrick (50) and Margaret (30) Casey resided in house 16 (previously resided in house numbered 8) with their 5 children; Patrick (10), Martin (7), Mary (6), Bridget (3) and Peter (6 months). There is no mention of Peter Casey in the 1911 census, he was 65 in 1901 therefore he may have died in the interim. They were married for 11 years, had 6 children, five of whom were still living in 1911. Patrick (Snr.) was a farmer. Patrick (Jnr.) was a scholar. He and Margaret were the only family members who could read and write. Margaret and Patrick spoke Irish and English while the rest of the family spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and had added a barn but no longer had a piggery.

Michael (68) Coyne resided in house 17 (previously numbered 6) with his 4 children; Sarah (18), Kate (14), Martin (12) and Margaret (8). There is no mention of Bridget in this census. Michael was a widow by now with an 8 month old child, therefore Bridget must have died in the previous 8 months (possibly during childbirth), there is also no mention of their other children Mary, Ellen, Michael, Thomas, Bridget and Sarah. He did not fill in the section of the census relating to marriage and children as he was a widow. However, we can deduce from both census’ that he had at least nine children. Michael was still a farmer. Kate and Martin were scholars. Everyone in the family, expect Michael, spoke Irish and English. Michael spoke only Irish, which is different from the 1901 census in which he spoke Irish and English. Sarah, Kate and Martin could read and write, the rest of the family could not. He lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Bridget Kearney (was called Carney in 1901), aged 61 lived alone in house 18 (previously numbered 5 in 1901). There is no mention of her children; Catherine, William and Bridget in this 1911 census. Bridget was a widow. Bridget was still a farmer. She spoke Irish and English and could read and write. She still lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. She still had a cow house.

Patrick (67) and Bridget (50) Kearney (Kearney was followed by letters ‘Wm’ in 1901) lived in house numbered 19 (was numbered 3 in 1901) with their 5 children; John (20), Mary (18), Patrick (16), William (14) and Julia (7). There is no mention of Kate or Bridget in this census and there is no mention of a 4 year old William in the 1901 census. Patrick and Bridget had been married for 26 years, had 8 children and 7 had survived by 1911. Patrick was still a farmer. Everyone in this household was bilingual. Patrick (Snr.) and Julia could not read, the rest of the family could read and write. They had a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and added a barn.

Patrick (55) and Kate (45) Kearney lived in house 20, numbered 4 in 1901, with their 8 children and Patrick’s mother, Bridget (75) Kearney. Their children were: Mary (19), Bridget (18), Kate (16), Michael (13), William (12), Ellen (7), Patrick (5) and Thomas (2). There is no mention of Anne in this census, there is a strong possibility she died as one of Patrick’s children had died and all the other children are accounted for. Patrick and Kate were married for 21 years, had 9 children and 8 of whom still lived in1911. Patrick (Snr.) was still a farmer. Michael and William were scholars. Patrick and Bridget (Snr.) spoke only Irish while the rest of the family spoke English and Irish. Mary, Bridget (Jnr.), Kate, Michael and William could read and write. The rest of the family could not read. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms; in 1901 they had lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They still had a piggery and had added a cow house.

William (55) and Mary (50) Coyne resided in house 21, previously numbered 1, with their 9 children and William’s mother, Kate Coyne (90). Their children were Patrick (19), Thomas (19), Mary (18), John (17), William (15), Michael (13), James (11), Bridget (8) and Kate (7). William (Snr.) and Mary (Snr.) were married for 22 years, had 9 children all of whom were living in 1911. William (Snr.) was still a farmer and Michael was a scholar. Kate (Snr.) was the only family member who spoke Irish only, the rest of the family spoke Irish and English. Mary (Snr.), James, Bridget, Kate (Jnr.) and Kate could not read, the rest could read. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms; they had lived in a 3rdclass house with the same number of rooms in 1901. They had a cow house and had added a barn.

John (35) and Margaret (35) Walsh lived in house numbered 22 with their 2 children; Mary (1) and Sarah (10 months), and John’s mother Mary Walsh (73). John and Margaret had been married for 4 years, had 4 children and 2 of them had survived by 1911. John was a farmer. Margret was the only family member who could read and write; the rest of the family could not read or write. John was the only family member who spoke Irish only, the rest of the family spoke Irish and English. They were all born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house.

William (50) and Mary (40) Coyne lived in house 23 (previously numbered 2) with their 7 children. Their 7 children were: Patrick (14), Winnifred (sic) aged 11, Thomas (9), Mary (8), Kate (7), John (5) and Bridget (1). There is no mention of a daughter Bridget aged two, in this census. There is a strong possibility she died at some point in the previous 10 years as William and Mary (Snr.) had 8 children and 7 were still living by 1911 and all children, except Bridget, was accounted for. William and Mary (Snr.) were married for 15 years. William was still a farmer. Patrick and Winnifred were scholars. John is the only family member who spoke Irish only, the rest of the family spoke English and Irish. Mary (Snr.), Patrick and Winifred could read and write, the rest of the family could not. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms; in 1901 they had 2 rooms instead of 3. They still had a cow house, added a barn but no longer had a piggery.

Bridget Corcoran (50) lived in house 24 (previously numbered 10 in 1901) with her son, William (20). There was no mention of Mary Corcoran or Martin Corcoran in this 1911 census. Bridget was a widow and farmer. They both spoke Irish and neither could read. They still lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house but no longer had a piggery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This page was added on 05/10/2016.

Comments about this page

  • What a delightful discovery to find the creation of this page which so beautifully summarizes and supplements the archives I had reviewed as I pieced together the path of my great grandfather and tenant Peter Lowry. I feel like Maggi and Tomas are family having collected these documents into what now looks more like a neighborhood journal. While an “e” slips in and out of the spelling over the decades I can’t help but wonder why and how this clump of Low(e)rys ended up together. Did they multiply in that spot or migrate from other places? My 80-year-old Peter of 1901 may or may not have been in the same spot when he was born in 1820+- but that has now become my next quest. Will my DNA test aim me to Scotland? We shall see. But for now I thank you so much for sprucing up this portion of my discovery path in one beautiful web page.

    By Paul Lowry (02/05/2017)

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