Claggan

An Cloigeann

Tomas O Flatharta, Barbara Conroy

Claggan, An Cloigeann, meaning a skull or a round rocky hill

Author:Tomas O Flatharta                                                                                                                                                                    Barbara Conroy

Names:image001

According to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books, 1838, the standard name given to the town land was Claggan and Cloigean was its official Irish form. The town land was also spelt as Claggin (Boundary Surveyor’s Sketch Map), Claggeen (Meresman), Cloggum (Tithe Ledgar, Rev.Michael Waldron P.P., County Cess Collector), Castr de Claygin (Inquis. Temp. Jac. I), Knockfyin in le claggin (Inquis. Temp. Jac. I), Shanganagh in the Claggin (Inquis. Temp. Jac. I) and Cleggan (National Archives of Ireland)

On Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie), there are two scanned records. One record gives information about how Claggan is pronounced, the different names for Claggan and a description of the village. An image of this record is below,  which is found on the website http://www.logainm.ie/en/20662.

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The other village also gives information about how Claggan was pronounced and the different names Claggan was given and the sources they came from. An image of that record is below, which can also be found on http://www.logainm.ie/en/20662.

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Situation:

Claggan is located in the civil parish of Cong and in the barony of Ross, in the County of Galway. It is a central townland. It is bounded on the North by the townland of Dooghta, on the West by Carhogorriv (sic.), and Lough Corrib, bounded on the South by Drinsnaw and on the East by Lough Corrib, Farnaght and Glanlusk.

Description:

Down Survey:

‘‘The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps; ‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will”. (Wikipedia). The Down Survey gives no information about Claggan at the moment but we know the neighboring town land of Drumsnauv in 1641 was owned by Sir Thomas Blake and he was a Protestant and in 1670 the townland of Drumsnauv was owned by John Brown and he was also a Protestant. Drumsnauv had 164 acres of unprofitable land, 104 acres of profitable land and 104 acres of forfeited land.

O’ Donovans Field Name Books (1838):

In 1838, the proprietor for Claggan was Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont, Dublin and the agent was Mr. James Fair, Fairhill, Ross Parish. The townland of Claggan is composed of 412 acres, 0 roods and 25 perches according to O Donovan’s Field name Books (1838) The townland is located in the civil parish of Cong, in the Barony of Ross and in the County of Galway. O’ Donovan tells us that the townland was under lease, with a bulked rent of £28.5s.1d yearly. O’ Donovan states that Claggan was a mountain farm, the soil was a ridge of steep mountain running East and West, with the village and tillage on the western side of the mountain at the foot and had mixed arable and healthy pasture. It had crops of oats and potatoes, the oats were middling but some of the potatoes were bad. There is a stream which divides Claggan from Drimsnav. The Co. Cess. paid 11 and a quarter d. per acre half yearly for 68 acres. There is also a road from Glanlusk that runs here to Carroogorrive (as per transcribed information of www.galwaylibrary.ie).

Griffith’s Valuation (1855):

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Claggan had a total acreage of 412 acres, 3 roods and 13 perches. The total annual valuation for the lands in Claggan was £31.1s.0d. The Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont was the immediate lessor for plot 1 in Claggan. Plot -m belonged to Patrick Joyce. Claggan had two plots of land. Plot 1 was subdivided into 12 sub-plots.

Plot 1 was a clochán (cluster settlement) and was divided into 12 subplots labeled a to l. The plot was composed of 413 acres, 3 rood and 13 perches with a total valuation of rateable property at £30.11s.0d.

Plot 1 (a) Walter Butler had land, office and a house. The land was valued at £3.10s.0d. and the house at £0.15s.0d.

Plot 1 (b) Patrick Conroy had land, office and a house. The land was valued at £2.2s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 1 (c) Patrick Spellman had land, office and a house. The land was valued at £2.2s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 1 (d) Patrick Kane had land, office and a house. The land was valued at £4.15s.0d. and the house at £0.15s.0d.

Plot 1 (e) Patrick Butler had land, office and a house. The land was valued at £1.12s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 1 (f) Michael Halloran had land and a house. The land was valued at £1.10s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 1 (g) Thaddeus Berry had land and a house. The land was valued at £1.10s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 1 (h) Martin Berry had land and a house. The land was valued at £1.10s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 1 (i) Joesph Berry had land and a house. The land was valued at £1.10s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 1 (j) Joseph Halloran had land, office and a house. The land was valued at £3.12s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 1 (k) Stephen Joyce had land and a house. The land was valued at £1.1s.0d. and the house at £0.7s.0d.

Plot 1 (l) Patrick Joyce had land and a house. The land was valued at £1.1s.0d. and the house at £0.7s.0d.

Plot – had a house

John Millett had a house. The house was valued at £0.10s.0d.      

Census 1901

The Census of 1901 indicated that there were 10 houses in this village, two of which were unoccupied. One of these houses belonged to Thomas Treacy and the other belonged to Martin Lydon. Everyone in this Census was born in Galway and everyone in this village, except the household in house 2 with the ‘Reynolds’ family, was Roman Catholic. Of the 59 residents in this village there were 8 families with 33 males and 26 females. Form B- Return of Out-Offices and Farm Steadings indicates that there were 4 stables, 8 cow houses, 1 calf house, 7 piggeries, 1 fowl house and 1 barn in this village.

House 1-Patrick Conroy

Patrick Conroy (80) lived in house numbered 1 with his son, Michael (40), daughter in law, Bridget (36), and his six grandchildren. His grandchildren are Martin (15), Michael (13), John (11), Pat (7), Peter (3) and Mary (11 months). Patrick was a farmer and a widower. Martin, Michael (Jnr.), John and Pat were scholars. Patrick and Martin were the only occupants of the house who could read and write. Michael(Jnr.), John and Pat could read only and the rest of the household could not read or write. Patrick, Michael (Snr.), Martin, Michael and John spoke Irish and English. Bridget spoke Irish only. Pat and Peter spoke English only and Mary was too young to speak. They lived a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 2- John and Honnor Reynolds

John (64) and Honnor (45) Reynolds resided in house numbered 2 with their seven children. These seven children were Michael (19), Ambrose (18), Maggi (16), Hugh (14), Thomas (8), Bridget (6) and Honnor (2). John was a farmer. Hugh, Thomas, Bridget and Honnor (Jnr.) were scholars. John, Michael, Ambrose, Maggie and Hugh could read and write. Honnor, Thomas and Bridget could read only. Honnor (Jnr.) was too young to read or write. Everyone in this household, except Honnor, spoke Irish and English. Honnor spoke English only. Everyone in this household was Church of Ireland. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 3-Patrick and Ellen Keane

Patrick (50) was called Patt in Form B.1 and Ellen (45) Keane lived in house 3 with their four children and Patrick’s mother, Bridget Keane (75). Their children were Michael (14), Catherine (16), Joseph (9) and Patrick (7). The 1901 census states that Patrick was a farmer and C.B.D (as per transcribed from the 1901 Census). Joseph and Patrick were scholars. Bridget was listed as a housekeeper. Everyone in this household, except Bridget, could read and write. Everyone in this household also spoke Irish and English except Bridget who spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

House 4-Thomas and Mary Thornton

Thomas (age not recorded in the 1901 census) and Mary (30) Thornton lived in house 4 with their three children. Their children were Bridget (8), Mary (6) and Michael (1). Thomas was a farmer. Bridget and Mary were scholars. Mary (Snr.) was the only member of this family who could read and write. Mary (Snr.), Bridget and Mary spoke Irish and English while Thomas spoke Irish only. They resided in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They also had a stable, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery.

House 5-Anne Berry

Anne Berry (80) lived in house numbered 5 with her three sons, her six grandchildren and her daughter-in-law, Honor Berry (30). Her sons were Thomas (50), Michael (47) Martin (40) and her grandchildren were Mary (10), Bridget (5), Anne (3), Joseph (12), Martin (7) and Michael (6 months). Anne (Snr.) was a widow and Thomas was married to Honor Berry. Anne (Snr.) was a farmer, Martin (Snr.) was a tailor, Honor was a farmer and all the grandchildren were scholars. Honor and Mary could read and write. Bridget, Joseph and Martin could read and everyone else in this household could not read or write. Everyone in this household , except Michael (Jnr.) (who was too young to speak) and Anne, spoke Irish and English. Anne spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 6-Bridget Joyce

Bridget Joyce (50) resided in house numbered 6 with her four children. Her children were Mary (25), Barbara (19), Patrick (30) and Michael (22). Bridget was a farmer. Barbara was the only person in this household who read only, the rest of the family could not read or write. Everyone in this household, except Bridget, spoke Irish and English. Bridget spoke Irish only. They had a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house.

House 7-Martin and Mary Spelman

Martin (54) and Mary (49) Spelman lived in house 7 with their five children and Martin’s mother, Sarah Spelman (85). Their five children were John (19), Ellen (16), Thomas (13), Maggie (8) and Martin (6). Martin (Snr.) was a farmer. Thomas, Maggie and Martin were scholars. Mary, John, Ellen and Thomas could read and write. Maggie and Martin (Jnr.) could read and the rest of the family could not read or write. Maggie and Martin (Jnr.). spoke English only, Sarah spoke Irish only while the rest of the family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 8-Pat and Catherine Waters

Pat (30) and Catherine (25) Waters lived in house 8 with their two children and their farm servant, Michael Higgins (16). Their children were John (2) and Mary (6 months). Pat was a farmer and Michael was a farm servant. The parents and Michael could read and write while the other two children could not. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English, except Mary who was too young to talk. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Census 1911:

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living); if Deaf and Dumb, Dumb only, Blind, Imbecile or Idiot, Lunatic. House numbers differ from those of 1901. There are also inconsistent age gaps between 1901 to 1911 Census.

House 1: Michael and Bridget Conroy

Michael (55) and Bridget (54) Conroy in 1911 resided in house numbered 1 (in 1901 the house was also numbered 1) with their four children. Their children were John (21), Pat (17), Peter (13) and Mary (11). There wasn’t any mention of Patrick (Snr.), Martin or Michael (Jnr.) in this 1911 census. Michael and Bridget had been married for 37 years, had nine children and six of them had survived by 1911. Michael was a farmer. Peter and Mary were scholars. The parents could not read while the children could read and write. Everyone in this household, except Bridget, spoke Irish and English while Bridget spoke Irish only. They still lived in a 2nd class with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and a piggery.

House 2: Patrick and Ellin Keane

Patrick (66) and Ellin (50), was called Ellen in 1901, Keane lived in house numbered 2 (in 1901 the house was numbered 3) with their son, Patrick (16), and their granddaughter, Ellin Faherty (8). There wasn’t any mention of Michael, Catherine or Joseph in this 1911 census. Patrick and Ellin had been married for 34 years, had eleven children and seven of them had survived by 1911. Patrick was a farmer and C.B.D (as per transcribed from 1911 census for house 2). Ellin (Jnr.) was a scholar. Everyone in this household, except Ellin (Snr.), could read and write. Everyone in this household, except Ellin (Snr.) also spoke Irish and English. Ellin (Snr.) spoke Irish only. They still lived in a 2nd class house by 1911 but they added 3 rooms so they had 6 rooms by 1911. They still had a stable, a cow house, a piggery a fowl house, a barn and added a calf house.

House 3: Patrick and Catherine Waters

Patrick (50), called Pat in 1901, and Catherine (40) Waters lived in house numbered 3 (in 1901 this house was numbered 8) with their five children. Their five children were John (11), Mary (9), Bridget (8), Patrick (5) and Thomas (1). There wasn’t any mention of Michael Higgins in this 1911 census. Patrick and Catherine had been married for 12 years, had five children and five of them had survived by 1911. Patrick was still a farmer. John, Mary and Bridget were scholars. Patrick (Snr.), Patrick and Thomas could not read and write, the rest of the family could read and write. Everyone in the family, except Patrick and Thomas who were too young, spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms, in 1901 they lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They still had a cow house and piggery and added a stable, a calf house and a fowl house.

House 4-Martin and Mary Spelman

Martin (66) and Mary (60) Spelman lived in house 4 (previously numbered 7) with their two children and their grandchild, Catherine (10). Their two children were Margaret (19), called Maggie in 1901 and Martin (17). There was no mention of Sarah, John, Ellen or Thomas in this 1911 census. Martin (Snr.) and Mary had been married for 41 years, had eleven children and seven of them had survived by 1911. Martin (Snr.) was a farmer. Martin (Jnr.) and Catherine were scholars. Everyone in this family, except Martin (Snr.) could read and write. Martin (Snr.) could not read or write. Everyone, except Catherine, spoke Irish and English. Catherine spoke English only. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house, a piggery and added a barn but no longer had a stable.

House 5-Bridget Joyce

Bridget Joyce (70) lived in house 5 (previously numbered 6) with their two children. Their children were Mary (40) and Thomas (34). There is no mention of Barbara, Patrick and Michael. Bridget was a widow but had been married for 40 years, had eight children and three had survived by 1911. Mary had been married for 12 years and had no children. Thomas was the only person in this family who could read and write. Bridget spoke Irish only while her children spoke Irish and English. They still lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms and they still had a cow house.

House 6-Anne Berry

Anne Berry (95) lived in house 6 (previously numbered 5) with her three children, her seven grandchildren and her daughter-in-law, Honor Berry (54). Her children were Thomas (67), Michael (65) and Martin (61). Her grandchildren were Joseph (24), Mary (21), Martin (19), Bridget (16), Annie (14), Michael (13) and James (5). Anne was a widow but she had been married for 38 years, had eight children and eight of them had survived by 1911. Thomas and Honor had been married for 28 years had nine children and seven had survived by 1911. Thomas and Michael (Snr.) were farmers. Martin was a tailor. Bridget, Annie, Michael and James were scholars. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and a piggery.

House 7-Thomas and Mary Thornton

Thomas (57) and Mary (39) Thornton lived in house 7 (this house was previously numbered 6) with their five children. Their children were Bridget (17), Mary (15), Michael (11), Patrick (4) and John (1). Thomas and Mary had been married for 18 years, had five children and five of them had survived by 1911. Thomas was a farmer. Mary, Michael and Patrick were scholars. Mary (Snr.), Bridget, Mary and Michael could read and write, the rest of the family could not. Everyone in family, except John and Thomas, spoke Irish and English. Thomas spoke Irish only and John was too young to talk. They still lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a stable, a cow house and a piggery but no longer had a calf house.

House 8- John and Honnor Reynolds

John (77) and Honnor (55) Reynolds lived in house 8 with their four children. Their children were Hugh (23), Bridget Teresa (17), Honnor Jr. (14) and John R. (9). There was no mention of Michael, Ambrose, Maggie and Thomas in this census. John and Honnor had been married for 34 years, had nine children and nine had survived until 1911. John was a farmer. Hugh was a ‘farmer’s helper’. Bridget, Honnor and John R. were scholars. John in 1911 was a Protestant and the rest of the family were Church of Ireland. Everyone in this household, except Honnor, could read and write. Honnor could read only. Everyone in this family spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms. In 1901 they lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house, a piggery and added a fowl house.

 

This page was added on 16/11/2016.

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