Kilbride

Cill Bhríde

Teresa Philbin

Kilbride
Teresa Philbin

Kilbride

Kilbride / Cill Bhrighde

Translation:  St. Bridget’s Church

The Down Survey 1641: The Down Survey of Ireland is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world.  The survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details all laid down by admeasurements on maps.  It was carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656.   The survey sought to measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish, in order to facilitate its redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

Down Survey information is not available for this townland.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:  According to John O’Donovan the standard name for the townland is Kilbride, and the Irish form of the name is Cill Brighde that translates as St. Bridget’s Church.

Other forms of the name:  Kilbride, CillBhrighde, Kilbride (Boundary Surveyor’s Sketch Map), Kilbride (County Cess Collector), Kilbride (County Map), Kilbridy (Inquis. Temp Jac.1), Kilbride (Leases 1837), Kilbride (Local), Killbride (Map of Property 1760), Kilbride (Map of Property 1815), Kilbride (Mearsman), Kilbride (Rev. Michael Heraghty P.P.) Kilbride (Tithe Ledger)

Description:  O’Donovan describes it as Provost land held by Richard Lerracy, Esq.Cuslough near Ballinrobe, for rent of (the rent amount is not specified).  The soil part mountainous; part steep heath and pasturable, part mixed heath pasture with some arable mountain.  There were also some pieces of good arable land here producing good crops of oats and potatoes.  The County Cess of 11¼d was paid per acre half yearly, for 561 acres.  Crow Breedha, Tubber Murra, old abbey of Kilbride, Swift Island, Doon, Baurnarinna are all located in the townland.

Cro Bríghde (Bridget’s Enclosure is described as a holy well), Tuber Muire (Mary’s well), Kilbride Old Church/ Cruckaunatampul means Hillock of the Church; it is described as an Abbey with burial grounds attached about which there is a tract of good arable land.  Swift’s Island/ OileánFuadaigh is an island in Lough Mask; Doon is described as a remarkably large oval rock situated in Kibride.  Barr narinne (top of the point) part of the townland having a wood and a shepherd’s house, some arable land, coarse pasture and bog.

Situation:  Kilbride is situated in the northeast corner of the parish.  It is bounded on the north, east and south by Lough Mask; bounded on the west by the townlands Kilmore, Glanbeg West and Glanbeg East.  It is in the barony of Ross in County Galway.

Griffith’s Valuation 1849:  According to Griffith’s Valuation, Kilbride (Ordnance Survey Sheet 13 &26) had an area of 1,963 acres and 20 perches.   The land value at the time was £202.6.5.

1:  Charles J. Lynch was the occupier of 868 acres, 3 roods and 4 perches of land and a herd’s house that he leased from the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College Dublin (T.C.D.).  The land had an annual valuation of £100 and the herd’s house was valued at £1 and 10 shillings.  His total annual rent of £101 and 10 shillings was payable to T.C.D.

Charles J. Lynch leased to the following tenants, who paid rent according to the size and value of their respective holdings.

2:  Thomas Egan had a house, office and 63 acres and 2 perches of land.  The land had an annual valuation of £6 and 10 shillings; the buildings were valued at 10 shillings.

3: Contained 25 acres, 2 roods and 36 perches of land that had two equal divisions (a) and (b)

3 (a):  Michael Lynch had a house and land.  His portion of land had an annual valuation of £1 and the house was valued at 3 shillings.  His total annual rent was £1 and 3 shillings.

3 (b):  Thomas Somerville had a house and land.  His portion of land also had an annual valuation of £1 and the house was valued at 3 shillings.  He too had an annual rent of £1 and 3 shillings.

4:  Contained 49 acres, 1 rood and 33 perches that had divisions (a), (b) and (-)

4 (a):  Patrick McGee had a house and land.  His portion of land had an annual valuation of £1 and 10 shillings and the house was valued at 5 shillings.  Patrick’s total annual rent was £1 and 15 shillings.

4 (b):  Simon Somerville had a house and land; the land had an annual valuation of £3 and the house was valued at 10 shillings.  His annual rent for the house and land was £3 and 10 shillings.

4 (-):  Simon Somerville also had an annual rent of 10 shillings on Kilbride Ferry (Kilbride side).

5:  Contained 31 acres, 3 roods and 16 perches of land that had two equal divisions (a) and (b)

5 (a):  Patrick Connolly had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £1 and 15 shillings; the house was valued at 7 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 2 shillings.

5 (b):  Michael Higgins had a house and land, and he too had an annual valuation of £1 and 15 shillings on the land and 7 shillings on the house.  His total annual rent was £2 and 2 shillings.

6:  Contained 99 acres, 3 roods and 10 perches of land that had three divisions (a), (b) and (c)

6 (a):  John Dowd had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £5 and 15 shillings; the buildings were valued at 10 shillings.  John’s total annual rent was £6 and 5 shillings.

6 (b):  Patrick Malia (sic) had a house and land; the land had an annual valuation of £2 and 5 shillings and the house was valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 10 shillings.

6 (c):  Mary Lydon had a house and land; her portion of land had an annual valuation of £1 and 2 shillings and the house was valued at 3 shillings.  Mary’s total annual rent was £1 and 5 shillings.

7:  Contained 168 acres, 3 roods and 35 perches that had three divisions (a), (b) and (c)

7 (a):  Patrick Cumusk (sic) had a house and land.  His piece of land had an annual valuation of £5; the house was valued at 10 shillings.  His total annual rent was £5 and 10 shillings.

7 (b):  William Coonan had a house and land.  His portion of land had an annual valuation of £3 and the house was valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £3 and 5 shillings.

7 (c):  Patrick Joyce had a house and land.  He too had an annual valuation of £3 on the land and 5 shillings on the house.  Patrick also had a total annual rent of £3 and 5 shillings.

8:  Contained 277 acres and 3 roods and this had eight divisions (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), (g), (h).

8 (a):  Denis O’Brien had a house, offices and land.  Denis had a large piece of land that had a rateable annual valuation of £15 and 10 shillings.  The buildings had an annual valuation of 15 shillings.  His total annual rent was £16 and 5 shillings.

8 (b):  Michael Joyce had a house, office and land.  His piece of land had an annual valuation of £2 and 13 shillings; the buildings were valued at 7 shillings.  Michael’s total annual rent was £3.

8 (c):  Michael Joyce (Junior) had a house, office and land.  His portion of land had an annual valuation of £1 and 17 shillings; the buildings were valued at 5 shillings.   His total annual rent was £2 and 2 shillings.

8 (d): Peter Sweeny (sic) had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £3 and 8 shillings; the buildings were valued at 7 shillings.  Peter’s total annual rent was £3 and 15 shillings.

8 (e):  Michael Kane had a house and land.  His portion of land had an annual valuation of £1 and 14 shillings and the house was valued at 6 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2.

8 (f): John Cumusk (sic) had a house and land.  His portion of land had an annual valuation of £1 and 5 shillings; the house was valued at 5 shillings.  John’s total annual rent was £1 and 10 shillings.

8 (g):  John Mc Ging had a house and land.  His portion of land also had an annual valuation of £1 and 5 shillings and the house was valued at 5 shillings.  He too had an annual rent of £1 and 5 shillings.

8 (h):  William Lally had a house and land.  His piece of land had an annual valuation of £2 and 10 shillings and the house was valued at 7 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 17 shillings.

9:  Contained 374 acres, 3 roods and 26 perches of land that was held in equal lots by Patrick Loftus, John O’Brien, Stephen Joyce and William O’Brien.  Each tenant’s share had a rateable annual valuation of £6 and 5 shillings and rents were payable to Charles J. Lynch.

1901 Census:  Constable Martin Higgins enumerated the census for the townland of Kilbride; in the electoral district of Owenbrinn, in the Constabulary district of Ballinrobe Co. Mayo on 9th April 1901.  Of the fifty-two houses, sixteen were 2nd class, thirty-five were 3rd class and one was a 4th class dwelling.  The houses had perishable roofs that were most likely thatch and were all inhabited.  Farming was the main occupation and the farmers generally kept cow, calves and pigs.  The families were Roman Catholic, and Irish was the principal language of the home.

No 1:  John Cummiskey (sic) (50) a farmer was head of this household.  He lived here with his wife Kate (40), their sons Patrick (8) and John (5) and their (2) year old daughter Mary.  John’s mother May Cummiskey a widow was (100) years old.  They were all born in Co. Mayo; all spoke Irish only and none could read.  The house was 4th class and the family of six occupied one room.  There were no outbuildings on the holding. Mrs. C. Levasey (sic) was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 2:  Patrick O’Brien (40) a widower and his four children were the occupants of this house; John (15), Mary (13), Michael (11) and Patrick (10) were scholars.  Patrick senior and the two eldest children could read and write; the two youngest could read only.  All spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 3:  John Lynch (60) and his wife Anne (60) were farmers and their son Martin (17) a farmer’s son. Their grandson John Coyne (4) was also recorded in this census return.  Father and son could read and write; the mother could not read.  All were bilingual and were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and four people occupied two rooms.  The out houses contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 4:  Barbara McNally (80) a widow was head of this household.  Her son James (42) a farmer’s son and his wife Bridget (35) had four children at this time: Sarah (7), Thomas (5), Mary (3) and Pat (1).  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Barbara spoke Irish only; the rest of her family were bilingual; none could read.  The house was 3rd class with three windows in front and the family of seven occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 5:  William O’Brien (45), his wife Julia (35) and their six children were the occupants of this house and farming was their livelihood.  Mary (18), Sarah (14) and Julia (8) were farmer’s daughters and Patrick (13) a farmer’s son, John was (5) and Kate (7) months old.  William spoke Irish only; his wife and children spoke Irish and English.  William and his wife could not read; their three eldest children could read and write.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of eight occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 6:  Thomas Cummiskey (50) a farmer and his brother Edward (48) a farm labourer lived here.  The brothers were born in Co. Mayo; they spoke Irish only and they could not read.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and they had two rooms.  The outbuilding contained a piggery.

No 7:  Winnifred Morrin (60) a widow was a farmer.  Her granddaughter Mary Cummiskey (5) was listed here.  Winnifred and Mary were born in Co. Mayo; they spoke Irish only and could not read.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and they occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

No 8:  Mary Cummiskey (45) was head of this household.  Her sons Michael (18) and John (15) were farmer’s sons.  Mary and Michael could not read; John could read and write; all were bilingual and were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and three people occupied one room.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 9:  Michael Higgins (40) and his wife Bridget (35) and their six children were resident here.  Farming was their livelihood.  Mary (16) was a farmer’s daughter, Bridget (14) and Michael (9) were scholars, Pat was (6), Martin (3) and infant John (6) months old.  Michael and his wife could not read, and they spoke Irish only; their three eldest children could read and write and were bilingual; the youngest spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of eight occupied two rooms.  The outbuilding contained a cow house.

No 10:  Thomas Cummiskey (80) a farmer and his wife Winnifred (78) were born in Co. Mayo.  Neither could read; Thomas spoke Irish only while Winnifred was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the couple had two rooms.  There was a piggery on the property.

No 11:  Bridget Higgins (60) a farmer and her daughter Mary (30) a farmer’s daughter were the occupants of this house.  Both were born in Co. Mayo; neither could read; Bridget spoke Irish only, Mary was bilingual. The house was 3rd class with one window in front and mother and daughter occupied two rooms.  The outhouse contained a piggery.

No 12:  Mary Bourke (60) a farmer was head of this household.  Her sons Thomas (30) and John (19) were farmer’s sons, and her sister Bridget Joyce (80) was also recorded here.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Mary and her sons could read and write, and they spoke Irish and English.  Bridget could not read, and she spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and four people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 13:  Thomas Joyce (60) and his wife Catherine (35) were farmers.  Thomas could not read; Catherine could read and write; both were bilingual and were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the couple occupied two rooms.  One outbuilding contained a cow house.

No 14:  Anne Byrne (60) a widow was a farmer.  Her son Pat (40) a single man was a farmer’s son and Kate (28) a farmer’s daughter.  Anne’s daughter Bridget Duffey [sic] (30), her son in law Michael Duffey [sic] (30) a farm labourer, and their children Mary (2) and Margaret (1) were recorded here.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Anne, Pat and Kate spoke Irish only; Bridget, Michael and two-year-old Mary were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class and the family of seven occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

No 15:  Pat Morrin (78) his wife Mary (76), their daughter in law Mary (30) their grandchildren: John (4), Mary (2) and (6) month old infant Kate lived in this house.  All were born in Co. Mayo and farming was the family occupation.  The adults could not read; Pat, his daughter in law and her children were bilingual; his wife spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of six occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 16: Honor Conroy (60) a widow, lived here with her daughter Mary (30) and her sons Thomas (25) and Timothy (22) who were single in 1901.  They were born in Co. Mayo; none could read, all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.

Out- Offices and Farm Steadings Return (Form B2):  no 16 – 29 lists twenty cow houses, thirteen piggeries and one barn; it does not indicate which house number the out offices belong to.

No 17:  Mary Joyce (40) a farmer and her four daughters were the occupants of this house; Ellen (9) and Mary (7) were scholars; Bridget was (4) and Kate (3) years old.  Only Ellen could read and write at this time.  Mary and her two youngest children spoke Irish only; the other girls were bilingual.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the mother and her daughters occupied two rooms.

No 18:  Michael Joyce (56) his wife Ellen (50), and seven children were listed here. Farming was the family occupation.  Thomas (20) and Michael (13) were farmer’s sons; Bridget (18), Ellen (16) and Sarah (10) were farmer’s daughters; John Morrin (4) was listed as a son (perhaps grandson was intended?).  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Ellen could read and write; the others could not read; all were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of eight occupied two rooms.

No 19:  Pat Lynch (30) and his wife Julia (30) were farmers and they lived here with their children Michael (11) and Mary (8) who were scholars; John was (6), Margaret (2) and Martin (6) months old.  Kate Lydon (15) was a general domestic servant.  Pat and his family were born in Co. Mayo; Kate was born in Co. Galway.  Pat and the scholars could read and write; the others could not; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and eight people occupied two rooms.

No 20: Honor Lally (55) a widow was a farmer.  Her son William (20) was a farmer’s son and her married daughter Mary Lally (26) a farmer’s daughter.  Her son in law William Duffey [sic] (28) was a farm labourer (was William Mary’s husband?)  All were born in Co. Mayo; Honor could not read, and she spoke Irish only; the others could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.

No 21: Pat Joyce (30) a farmer, his wife Bridget (25) and their children Pat (6), Stephen (3) and (6) month old infant Mary lived here.  Winnifred O’Brien at the tender age of (8) years was listed as a domestic servant.  All were born in Co. Mayo; none could read, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and six people occupied two rooms.

No 22:  Michael Joyce (30, his wife Bridget (29) were farmers and they had three children in 1901; Mary (5), Bridget (2) and Thomas (1) month old.  Michael’s mother Mary (65) a widow was listed here.  Michael and Mary were born in Co. Galway; Bridget and her children were born in Co. Mayo. The adults were bilingual but could not read.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of six occupied two rooms.

No 23: Pat Joyce (30) and his wife Nappy (30) farmed for a living.  Their sons Michael (18) and John (14) were farmer’s sons; Mary (12), Thomas (11) and Pat (7) were scholars and Stephen was (1) year old.  All were born in Co. Mayo and were bilingual.  The parents could not read; the children from seven upwards could read and write.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front and the family of eight occupied two rooms.

No 24:  John O’Brien (30) and his wife Sarah (25) had two children in 1901; Mary was (5) and John (3). Farming was their occupation.  Kate Higgins (60) (mother) presumably Sarah’s mother was recorded here.  All were born in Co. Mayo; none could read, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and five people occupied two rooms.

No 25:  Margaret Joyce (60) a widow was a farmer.  Kate (20) was a farmer’s daughter and Michael (15) a farmer’s son.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Margaret could not read, and she spoke Irish only; her children could read and write, and they spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and three people occupied two rooms.

No 26:  Martin Joyce (32) a farmer, his wife Margaret (25) and their son Michael (5) a scholar.  were born in Co. Mayo.  The couple could not read, and they spoke Irish only; young Michael was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the parents and child occupied two rooms.

No 27:  Bridget Joyce (61) a widow was head of this household and farming was the family occupation.  She lived with her son John (30) a farmer’s son, her daughter in law Mary (23) and granddaughter Mary (2). Bridget was born in Co. Galway; the others were born in Co. Mayo.  Bridget, her son and little Mary spoke Irish only; Mary was bilingual, none could read. Peter Joyce (11) a scholar was listed as servant.  Peter could read and write and was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.

No 28:  Pat Cummiskey (40) a farmer, his wife Catherine (30) their children Mary (6), Pat (4) and John (6) months old, were all born in Co. Mayo.  Pat and Catherine could not read, and the family spoke Irish only. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the parents and children occupied two rooms.

No 29:  Bridget Cummiskey (60) a widow was a farmer.  Honor (27) and Julia (18) were farmer’s daughters.  Her granddaughter Sarah Eggie [sic] (7) was born in America; the rest of the family were born in Co. Mayo.  Bridget could not read, and she spoke Irish only; Honor and Julia could read and write and were bilingual; Sarah too was bilingual but could not read at this time.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.

No 30:  Catherine O’Brien (50) a widow was born in Co. Galway.  Farming was the family occupation.  Martin (20), Pat (18) and Michael (12) were farmer’s sons; Mary (25) and Bridget (10) were farmers daughters and were born in Co. Mayo.  Bridget could not read at this time; the others could read and write; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 31: William O’Brien (40) a farmer, his wife Rose (30) and their four children were born in Co. Mayo. Mary (8) and Thomas (6) were scholars; Winefred [sic] was (5) and John (2) years old. Mary could read and write; the others could not read.  The parents and two youngest children spoke Irish only; the scholars were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of six occupied two rooms. Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 32:  Denis O’Brien (40) a farmer, his wife Margaret (28) their children Kate (6), John (4), Bridget (3) and (6) month old infant Martin were resident here.  The couple could not read. Theirs was an Irish only speaking household. Margaret was born in Co. Galway; Denis and the children were born in Co. Mayo. The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 33:  Thomas O’Brien (50) and his wife Bridget (40) were farmers.  John (13) was a farmer’s son; Mary (14) a farmer’s daughter, Michael (12) and Bridget (10) were scholars; Martin was (1) and Bridget (1) (probably an error as Bridget was already listed).  Mary and the scholars could read and write; the others could not read.  Thomas and John spoke Irish only; the others were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of eight occupied two rooms. There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 34:  James Jennings (60) and his wife Margaret (50) were farmers.  Ellen (25) was a farmer’s daughter; Edward (21), Martin (20) and Ulick (18) were farmer’s sons.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  The couple could not read; Margaret spoke Irish only.  Their children could read and write; James and his family were bilingual. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and six people occupied two rooms.  Two out houses contained a stable and a piggery.

No 35:  Michael O’Brien (35) a farmer and his wife Kate (30) did not have children when the 1901 census was recorded.  Michael and Kate could read and write, and they spoke Irish and English.  Kate O’Brien (40) Michaels’s niece could not read, and she spoke Irish only.  All three were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and three people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a barn on the premises.

No 36:  Mary Egan (50) a widow was head of this household.  Farming was her livelihood. Margaret (18) was a farmer’s daughter; Martin (27) and John (23) were boot and shoemakers and Patrick (12) was a scholar.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Mary and John could not read; the others could read and write, and all were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery.

No 37:  Thomas Egan (50) and his wife Bridget (50) were farmers. Michael (19) was a farmer’s son; Bridget (17) a farmer’s daughter; John (14), Kate (10) and Martin (8) were scholars, Margaret was (6) and Patrick (3) years old.  The parents and Michael could not read; Bridget and the scholars could read and write.  All spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of nine occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a barn on the property.

No 38:  Pat Summerville (40) a farmer and his wife Bridget (40) lived in this house with their children Joseph (7), Margaret (5) and Elizabeth (1).  Joseph and Margaret were born in America; the others were born in Co. Mayo.  Pat McMahon (18) a farm servant born in Co. Galway, was the only one listed that could read and write.  All spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and six people occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a piggery and a barn.

No 39:  Ellen Malley (sic) (65) a widow was a farmer.  Michael (25) and Thomas (22) were farmers sons.  Ellen and her sons could not read. Thomas spoke Irish only; Ellen and Michael were bilingual.   The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and three people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No (40):  John Summerville (70), his wife Catherine (65) sons John (40) and Michael (21), were resident here and farming was their way of life.  Catherine was born in Co. Galway; the others were born in Co. Mayo; none could read. The father and son John, who was blind, spoke Irish only; the mother and Michael spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and four people occupied two rooms.  There was a stable on the premises.

No 41:  Simon Summerville (80) and his wife Anne (70) were farmers; Bridget (28) was a farmer’s daughter and Michael (26) a farmer’s son.  Mary Holleran (45) was listed as a general domestic servant.  Michael could read and write; the others could not read. Simon and Mary spoke Irish only; Anne and Michael were bilingual.  Simon, his wife and Mary Holleran were born in Co. Galway and Bridget and Michael were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the property.

No 42:  Thomas Summerville (32) a farmer, his wife Bridget (30) and their five children lived here.   Anne (8) and Martin (7) were scholars; John was (6), Bridget (5) and Kate (2) years old.  At this time Bridget senior was the only one that could read and write; all but little Kate were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of seven occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a barn and a shed.

No 43:  Kate Egan (50) a widow, was a farmer and she was head of this household.  Her niece Kate Joyce (30) and husband Pat Joyce (30) lived here with their children Kate (5), Anne (3) and Mary (1). All were born in Co. Mayo; all but infant Kate spoke Irish and English and the mother only, could read and write.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of six people two rooms.  There was a cow house and a barn on the property.

Return of Out Offices and Farm Steadings (Form B2) is not included for the remainder of the properties in the 1901 census return.

No 44:  Michael Summerville (50), his wife Margaret (50) and their two children were the occupants of this house.   Farming was their occupation.  Patrick (18) was a farmer’s son and Bridget (16) a farmer’s daughter.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Michael and Margaret spoke Irish only and could not read; their children could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.

No 45:  Anne Malley (32) a farmer and her children Mary (5) and John (2) were born in Co. Mayo.  Irish only was spoken in the home, and Anne could not read at this time.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the mother and her children occupied two rooms.

No 46:  Richard Joyce (60) his wife Anne (40) and their four children were resident here. Pat (17) was a farmer’s son; Margaret (12), Anne (10) and Michael (7) were scholars.  All were born in Co. Mayo and were bilingual.  Margaret could read and write; the others could not read when this census was recorded.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of six occupied two rooms.

No 47:  Maria McGuig [sic] (78) was a widow and her son Bryan (33) a widower.  Maria was born in Co. Galway and Bryan was born in Co. Mayo.  Farming was their livelihood.  They spoke Irish only and neither could read.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the mother and her son occupied two rooms.

No 48:  Mary Cummiskey (33) was head of this household and she lived here with her three children; Michael (11) was a farmer’s son, Margaret (9) and Bridget (5) were scholars. Her mother Mary Henahan (89) a widow was also listed here.  Mary and her children were bilingual; her mother spoke Irish only.  Margaret was the only member that could read and write in 1901.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of five occupied two rooms.

No 49:  Bridget Curran (50) a widow and her twin sons were born in Co. Mayo.  Farming was their way of life.  Michael (19) and John (19) were farmer’s sons.  The family were bilingual but could not read.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front and Bridget and her sons occupied two rooms.

No 50:  Pat Malley (60) and his wife Anne (50) were farmers.  Their son Pat (30) a farmer’s son was married to Bridget (21), and they had a son John who was 10 months old.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Pat and his wife and son could not read, and they spoke Irish only; Bridget could read and write and was bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of five occupied two rooms.

No 51:  Michael Flannery (48) a farmer, his wife Mary (46) and their four children were resident here. Pat (15) and John (14) were farmer’s sons, Bridget (12) a farmer’s daughter and Anne (9) a scholar.  Michael and Mary were born in Co. Galway; their children were born in Co. Mayo.  The children could read and write; the parents could not read; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and six people occupied two rooms.  Barbara Mc Nally was the name of the landholder where this house was situated.

No 52:  Catherine Malley (60) a widow was born in Co. Mayo.  She was bilingual but could not read.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and Catherine had one room.

 

1911 Census:  Constable John Reilly enumerated this census return between the 17th and 19th of April 1911.  There was a population of two hundred and sixty-six in Kilbride at the time; one hundred and twenty-nine were male and one hundred and thirty-seven were female.  Fifty-one houses were inhabited, and one was vacant.  Twenty-eight were 2nd class; twenty were 3rd class and two were 4th class dwellings, all with perishable roofs that were presumably thatch.

Ten years on, the census was expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage / completed years the present marriage has lasted / children born alive to present marriage and children still living.  When widows and widowers were documented the number of years the marriage had lasted, or the children born, were often not revealed and this leaves a gap in information.   Sadly, many families experienced the loss of one or more children.  Overcrowding and lack of facilities must have presented huge difficulties for families.

No 1:  Bridget Joyce (36) was head of this household.  She was married for seventeen years, and she had five children; Patrick (16) and Stephen (13) were farmer’s sons, Mary (10) and Michael (8) were scholars and John was (3) years old. Bridget and the children from age (10) upwards could read and write.  All spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and Bridget and her children occupied three rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 2:  Norah Lally (71) a widow was head of this household.  Her daughter Mary (39) and son in law William Duffy (39) were married for eleven years and had no children at this time. All were born in Co. Galway and farming was the family occupation.  Norah spoke Irish only; Mary and William were bilingual; Norah and Mary could not read; William could read and write. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and three people occupied three rooms.  Three outbuildings contained a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

No 3:  Mary Joyce (72) a widow was a retired farmer.  Her son Michael (44) a farmer and his wife Bridget (40) were married for sixteen years, and they had eleven children; seven were still living.  Mary (15) did not have an occupation listed; Bridget (12), Thomas (10) and Patrick (8) were scholars; Martin was (5) John (4) and Maggie (2) years old.  Mary, her son and his wife and their two oldest children were born in Co. Galway; the five youngest were born in Co. Mayo.  Mary senior, Martin, John and Maggie spoke Irish only and the rest of the family were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of ten occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery, a cow house and a calf house on the premises.

No 4:  Patrick Joyce (52) a farmer was married to Nappie (50) for twenty-eight years and they had four children; Stephen (12), William (10), James (5) who were scholars and Martin (4) years old.  Patrick, his wife and their eldest son were born in Co. Galway; the others were born in Co. Mayo.  Patrick and Martin spoke Irish only; the rest of the family were bilingual.  At this time Stephen and William were the only members that could read and write.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and six people occupied three rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 5:  Michael Higgins (51) and his wife Bridget (50) were married for twenty-seven years, and they had twelve children; five were still living.  Michael (20) was a farmer’s son; Martin (13), John (11) and Maria (8) were scholars and Peter was (5) years old.   Michael, Bridget and their son Michael were born in Co. Galway; the rest of the family were born in Co. Mayo.  The parents could not read; their children except the youngest, could read and write. Bridget and young Peter spoke Irish only; the others spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front and the family of seven occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 6:  James Joyce (34) and his wife Bridget (24) were born in Co. Galway.  They were married for five years, and they had two children Mary (4), and Bridget (2) were born in Co. Mayo.    The family spoke Irish and English; none could read at this time.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the parents and children occupied three rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 7:  Mary Flannery (60), a widow, was a farmer.  Patrick (29) a farmer’s son was married to Julia (28) for less than one year.  All were born in Co. Galway. Mary could not read; her son and his wife could read and write, and all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and three people occupied two rooms.  Two outhouses consisted of a piggery and a cow house.

No 8:  Patrick Malley (43) a farmer, and his wife Bridget (32) were married for twelve years, and they had seven children; six were documented in the 1911 census return.  Michael (9) and Mary (8) were scholars; Annie was (6), Catherine (5), Bridget (4) and Nora (1) year old.  Bridget could read and write, and her son Michael could read; Patrick and his two youngest children spoke Irish only, the others were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of eight occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 9:  Michael Summerville (68) a farmer was married to Margaret (74) for forty-six years and they had five children; two were still living.  Patrick (30) a farmer’s son a single man was listed.  Michael and Patrick were born in Co. Mayo; Margaret was born in Co. Galway.  The couple could not read, and they spoke Irish only; their son could read and write and was bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and three people occupied three rooms.  Three outbuildings contained a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

No 10:  Patrick Joyce (46) a farm labourer and his wife Catherine (40) were married for seventeen years, and they had six children. Catherine (16) had no occupation listed; Annie (14), Mary (12) and Michael (9) were scholars; Honor was (5) and Bridget (1) year old.  Patrick’s aunt Catherine Eggan [sic] (70) a farmer a widow.  Patrick, his wife and their first three children were born in Co. Mayo; his two youngest children and his aunt were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and nine people occupied three rooms.  There was a cow house, a piggery and a shed on the premises.

No 11:  Thomas Sommerville (55) a farmer was married to Mary (45) for less than one year and they had no children.  Thomas had four sons and two daughters listed that were most likely from an earlier marriage.  Martin (20) and John (18) were farmers sons; Bridget (16) was a domestic servant, Catherine (14) and Thomas (10) were scholars and Patrick was (8) years old.  The three youngest children were born in Co. Mayo, the others were born in Co. Galway.  Thomas senior, his wife and two eldest sons could not read, the rest could read and write; all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and eight people occupied two rooms. There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 12:  Simon Sommerville (89) and his wife Anne (75) were married for forty-five years, and they had five children; three were still living and two were documented.  Michael (39) a single man was a farmer’s son and Bridget (40) a single woman did not have an occupation listed.  Simon’s cousin Mary Halloran (60) was also in the house.  All were born in Co. Galway.  Michael could read and write and was bilingual; the others could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and five people occupied three rooms.  Three outhouses contained a piggery, a cow house and a barn.

No 13:  John Sommerville (60) a farmer was married to Margaret (60) for two years and they had no children.  The couple could not read; Margaret spoke Irish only John was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and they occupied one room.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.

No 14:  Michael Sommerville (33) was married to Sarah (40) for nine years and they had two children; Patrick (5) and Mary (3).  Farming was their way of life.  The parents were born in Co. Galway and the children were born in Co. Mayo.  Michael and Sarah were bilingual but could not read.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of four occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

No 15:  Patrick J Sommerville (51) and his wife Bridget A (51) were married for twenty years, and they had three children; Joseph P (17) and Margaret (14) had no occupations listed and Elizabeth H (11) was a scholar.  Patrick’s nephew Martin Burke (10) a scholar and Stephen O’Donnell (20) a domestic servant were documented here.  Patrick, Bridget and Stephen were born in Co. Galway; Joseph P and Margaret were born in the United States and Margaret and Martin Burke were born in Co. Mayo.  Bridget and Stephen O’ Donnell could not read; the others could read and write; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and seven people occupied three rooms.  Three outbuildings contained a stable a cow house and a piggery.

No 16:  A private dwelling that was unoccupied.  Patrick J Sommerville was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 17:  Ellen Malley (75) a widow lived in this house with her son Thomas (27) a farmer’s son. Thomas was single at the time.  Both were born in Co. Galway. Ellen and Thomas could not read; both were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and mother and son occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.

No 18:  Thomas Eggan (sic) (63) a farmer was married to Bridget (40) for eight years and they had three children.  Three older children were listed that were most likely from a previous union; Martin (19) and Patrick (15) were farmer’s sons and Margaret (17) a farmer’s daughter.  Peter (8), Julia (5) and Nora (3) were born in Co. Mayo; the rest of the family were born in Co. Galway.  Martin, Margaret and Patrick could read and write; Thomas and Bridget could not read; all but the two youngest were bilingual and this suggest that Irish was the language of the home.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of eight occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 19:  Mary Eggan [sic] (69) a widow and farmer and a shoemaker was head of this family.  Her son Martin (40) a farmer’s son, and his wife Margaret (29) were married for four years, and they had two sons: John (3) and Michael (2) years old.  Mary, her son and his wife were born in Co. Galway; her grandsons were born in Co. Mayo. Martin could read and write; Mary and Bridget could not read; all three were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and five people occupied three rooms.  Two outhouses contained a piggery and a cow house.

No 20:   Patrick O’Brien (54) a farmer and a summons server, was married to Anne (42) for seven years and they had five children; four were still living; Anthony (7), Anne (4), Julia (2) and Sarah (1) year old.  Pat’s two sons; Thomas (17) and Denis (15) were most likely from an earlier marriage.  Pat, his wife and these two sons were born in Co. Galway; his four young children were born in Co. Mayo.  Pat, Anne, Thomas and Denis could read and write; Pat, Anne and Denis were bilingual; the others spoke Irish only.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of eight occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the holding.  Henry E Hudson was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 21:  James Jennings (74) and his wife Margaret (69) were married for forty years, and they had seven children, six were still living. Two sons were documented here; Edward (35) and Ulick (29) were farmer’s sons, and both were single.  James’s granddaughter Winnie O’Brien (13) was a scholar.  James and Margaret could not read; their sons and granddaughter could read and write; Margaret spoke Irish only; the others were bilingual. The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and five people occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.

No 22:  Michael O’Brien (43) a farmer and his wife Catherine (45) were married for fifteen years, and they had three children that were not recorded in the 1911 census return.  Michael Joyce (68) a retired farmer a single man was a boarder.  Mary Conoboy (24) was a general domestic servant.  All were born in Co. Galway.  Michael, Catherine and Mary could read and write; Michael Joyce could not read; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and four people occupied three rooms.  Five outbuildings contained a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a barn.

No 23:  John Lynch (72) was married to Anne (73) for fifty years and they had nine children; six were still living and three were documented here.  Thomas (32) was a bar attendant and John (26) a farm labourer.  Martin (28) a farmer’s son was married to Maria for three years and they had two children: Mary Ellen (2) and infant Catherine (9) months old.  Thomas Coyne (9) was a general domestic servant at this tender age.  Thomas, Mary Ellen and Catherine were born in Co. Mayo; the others were born in Co. Galway.    The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and nine people occupied three rooms.  There was a variety of outbuildings on the property; a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a barn and a shed.

No 24:  James McNally (55) a farmer and his wife Bridget (45) were married for twenty years, and they had ten children; nine were still living.  Sarah (17) was a farmer’s daughter and Thomas (15) a farmer’s son; Mary (13), Patrick (11), Martin (9) and Annie (7) were scholars; Bridget was (5), Julia (3) and infant Margaret (11) months old.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  James could not read; Bridget and her children from age seven upwards could read and write.  The parents and three older children were bilingual; the five youngest were not and this may indicate that English was the language of the home.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of eleven occupied three rooms.  Four outhouses consisted of a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

No 25:  Michael Joyce (72) a farmer was married to Ellen (68) for forty years and they had eight children; seven were still living and two were recorded here.  Sarah (20) did not have an occupation listed.  Michael (24) a farmer’s son was married to Catherine (20) for under one year.  Michael McGloughlin (sic) (8) was a general domestic servant at this tender age.  All were born in Co. Galway.  Sarah and Catherine could read and write; the others could not read; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and six people occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.

No 26:  Patrick Lynch (46) and his wife Julia (47) were married for twenty-three years, and they had eight children; Mary (18) and John (16) had ‘Domestic’ crossed out; Maggie (13), Martin (11) and Thomas (9) were scholars; Patrick was (6) and Julia (2) years old.  The four youngest were born in Co. Mayo, the others were born in Co. Galway.  Patrick and his family from age nine upwards could read and write; all were bilingual. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of nine occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 27:  Thomas Joyce (Tom) (45) a farmer was married to Mary (45) for twenty-three years and they had ten children; seven were still living.  Ellen (19) was a farmer’s daughter, Mary (18) a lacemaker, Bridget (17), Catherine (16) and Margaret (8) were scholars, Michael was (7) and Honor (5) years old.  The parents and their four older girls were born in Co. Galway; the three youngest children were born in Co. Mayo.  Thomas and his wife could not read; the four oldest girls could read and write, Thomas, Michael and Honor spoke Irish only; Mary and her daughters were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of nine occupied three rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 28:  Honor Conroy (72) a farmer was a widow.  Her daughter Mary (40) was single and had no occupation listed; Thimothy (sic) (29) a single man, was a farmer’s son.  All were born in Co. Galway; none could read, all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and three people occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 29:  Mary Morrin (80) a widow was a farmer.  She lived here with her daughter Sarah and two grandchildren.  Sarah O’Brien (36) was married for sixteen years, and she had three children; two were documented in this census return.  Mary (15) and Martin (10) were scholars.  Martin was born in Co. Mayo; the rest of the family were born in Co. Galway.  Mary O’ Brien could read and write; the others could not read, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.  There were no outbuildings on the property.

No 30:    Anne Byrne (90) a widow was head of this family.  Her son Patrick (63) a farm labourer was single; her daughter Catherine (46) had no occupation listed and she too was single.  Anne’s son in law Michael Duffy (50) and his wife Bridget (48) were married for fifteen years and they had five children; four were still living.  Mary (12) and Maggie (11) were scholars; Patrick was (7) and Julia (6) years old.  The three youngest children were born in Co. Mayo, the rest of this family were born in Co. Galway.  Bridget could read, and her daughters could read and write.  Michael Duffy, his wife and the two scholars were bilingual; the rest of the household spoke Irish only.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of nine occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.

No 31:  William O’ Brien (68) and his wife Julia (57) were farmers.  The were married for thirty years and they had eight children; six were still living and three were documented here.  All were born in Co. Galway.  Patrick (27) a farmer’s son was single; John (17) and Catherine (13) were scholars.  William and Julia could not read, their children could read and write; William spoke Irish only; his wife and family spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 32:  Michael Burke (60) was married to Mary (70) for forty-two years and they had four children and two were recorded here. Thomas (40) and John (29) were farmer’s sons, and both were single.  None could read; Mary spoke Irish only and Michael and his sons were bilingual, all were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 33:  Thomas Joyce (67) a farmer, and his wife Catherine (57) were born in Co. Galway.  They were married for thirty-three years and had no children.  Catherine could not read; Thomas could read and write; both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the couple had three rooms.  Three outhouses consisted of a cow house, a calf house and a piggery.

No 34:  Patrick Morrin (36) was married to Mary (35) for fourteen years and they had seven children; four were still living.  John (13) was a scholar; Bridget was (5), Mary (4) and Sarah (1) year old.  Patrick and his wife were born in Co. Galway; John was born in England and the girls were born in Co. Mayo.  Mary senior could not read, Patrick could read, and John could read and write.  Patrick and his wife were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front and the family of six occupied one room.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 35:  Winnie Morrin (73) a widow born in Co. Galway, was a farmer.  Winnie could not read, and she spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front and she had two rooms.  There were no outhouses on the premises.

No 36:  Thomas Commiskey (69) and his brother Martin (49) born in Co. Galway, were the occupants of this house.  Thomas a farmer was single; Martin a farm labourer was married but the duration of his marriage is not recorded in this census return. The brothers could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class and two people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 37:  John Higgins (54) a farmer was born in Co. Galway.  John was married but the number of years was not documented.  His daughter Mary (10) born in England, had no occupation listed. John and Mary could not read; both were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and father and daughter occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 38:  John Commiskey (65) and his wife Kate (60) were married for twenty-two years, and they had four children, two were still living.  John senior and his son John (15) were farm labourers; Thomas (10) had no occupation listed.  All were born in Co. Galway; none could read, and all spoke Irish only.  The house was 4th class and the family of four occupied one room.  There were no outbuildings.

No 39:  Richard Joyce (80) was married to Anne (60) for thirty-five years and they had eight children; only two were still living; Pat (28) and Michael (18).  Farming was their way of life.  All were born in Co. Galway; none could read, all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and four people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

No 40:  Anne Melia (60) a farmer was head of this household.  She was married for nineteen years and had two children; one was still living.  Her daughter Mary (18) did not have an occupation listed.  Anne and Mary were born in Co. Galway; Anne could not read, and she spoke Irish only, Mary could read and write and was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and mother and daughter occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

No 41:  Thomas O’Brien (69) a farmer, and his wife Bridget (60) were married for forty years, and they had ten children; five were still living and four were recorded here.  John (27) a farmer’s son, Winnie (23) a farmer’s daughter, Martin (11) and Bridget (11) were scholars.  The twins were born in Co. Mayo; the others were born in Co. Galway.  The parents could not read, and they spoke Irish only; their children could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of six occupied two rooms.  Three outhouses contained a cow house, a calf house and a piggery.

No 42:  Margaret O’Brien (46) a widow was a farmer and she lived in this house with her five children.  Catherine (17) was a farmer’s daughter, John (15) a farmer’s son, Bridget (14), Martin (11) and Patrick (10) were scholars.  Margaret could not read; her children could read and write, and all the family spoke Irish and English.  The two youngest boys were born in Co. Mayo, the others were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and six people occupied three rooms.  Three outbuildings consisted of: a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

No 43:  William O’Brien (68) a farmer was married to Bridget (50) for thirty years and they had eight children; seven were still living.  Mary (23) and Winnie (19) were farmer’s daughters, Thomas (20) a farmer’s son, John (17), Michael (15), Bridget (13) and Margaret (11) were scholars.  Margaret was born in Co. Mayo; the rest of the family were born in Co. Galway.  William and Bridget could not read, and they spoke Irish only, their children could read and write and were bilingual.   The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of nine occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.

No 44:  Catherine O’Brien (60) a widow and her four children were resident here.  Farming was their livelihood.  Martin (33), Patrick (32) and Michael (26) were farmer’s sons and Bridget (21) did not have an occupation listed.  Catherine could not read; her children could read and write; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 45:  Nora Commiskey (40) a farmer born in Co. Galway was single.  Her niece Lara Eggie (sic) (17) born in America was recorded here.  Nora and Lara could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and Nora and her niece occupied two rooms.  Two outhouses contained a piggery and a cow house.

No 46:  Pat Cummiskey (sic) (55) and his wife Kate (43) were farmers.  They were married for seventeen years, and they had seven children; six were still living.  Mary (15) and Pat (13) did not have an occupation listed; John (10) and Kate (7) were scholars, Edward was (5) and Michael (3) years old.  Pat and Kate could not read; their three oldest children could read and write.  The parents and three youngest children spoke Irish only; the others were bilingual.  Pat, his wife and their eldest son and daughter were born in Co. Galway; the rest were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of eight occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

No 47:  John Joyce (40) a farmer and his wife Mary (31) born in Co. Galway, were married for twelve years and they had six children; five were still living.  Bridget (10) and Michael (7) were scholars, Catherine was (5), Mary (3) and the infant Maggie (1) month old.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Bridget could read and write; her parents could not read.  John and his two youngest children spoke Irish only; the others were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of seven occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.

No 48:  Martin Joyce (Tom) (51) a farmer and his wife Margaret (44) were married for nineteen years. They had nine children but only two were still living; Michael (16) a farmer’s son, and Mary (7) who had no occupation listed when this census was recorded.  The parents and their son were born in Co. Galway; their daughter was born in Co. Mayo.  Michael was the only one that could read and write at this time.  Martin and Mary spoke Irish only; Margaret and Michael spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.  Three outbuildings contained a cow house, a piggery and a shed.

No 49:  Brian McGing (40) and his wife Winnie (38) born in Co. Galway were farmers.  The couple were married for eight years, and they had four children, two were still living: Michael (5) and Bridget (2) were born in Co. Mayo.  Brian and Winnie could not read; Brian and the children spoke Irish only, Winnie was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of four occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 50:  Mary Commiskey (60) a farmer was head of the household.  She was married for twenty-four years, and she had three children; Michael (21) was a farmer’s son, Margaret (20) did not have an occupation listed and Bridget (15) was a scholar.  All were born in Co. Galway.  Mary could not read; Michael could read, Margaret and Bridget could read and write, all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.  Two outhouses contained a piggery and a cow house.

No 51:  Bridget Curran (65) and her son Michael (28) were the occupants of this house.  Bridget a widow was a farmer, and Michael a single man was a farmer’s son.  Both were born in Co. Galway, neither could read, Bridget spoke Irish only and Michael was bilingual.  The house was 4th class and two people occupied one room.  There were no outbuildings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This page was added on 22/09/2021.

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