Teernakill North

Tír na Cille Thuaidh

Tomas O Flatharta

Children's Graveyard
Tomas O Flatharta
Children’s graveyard commemorative plaque
Tomas O Flatharta
Ruins of Tobarfeheen holy well
Tomas O Flatharta
Tiernakill Bridge
Tomas O Flatharta
Tiernakill R.I.C Barracks
Tomas O Flatharta
Tiernakill school 1972
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Tiernakill North
Tomas O Flatharta

Teernakill North/Tír na Cille meaning land of the church

Author: Tomas O Flatharta

Names: According to O Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Teernakill North and Tir na Cille was its official Irish name. This townland was also known as Tiernakill North (By. Suveyors Sketch Map, Rev. Michl. Heraty P.P (also spelled Heraghty), Tithe Ledger), Tirnakille in Ireconnaght (Inquis. Temp. Car I.), Togherquill (Inquis. Temp. Eliz.), Ternakilne (Leases 1837), Teernakilla North (Local), Ternakill (Map of property 1760, Map of property 1815).

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie), Teernakill North had two rivers, two bridges, two minor features, one mountain and one well. These rivers were Bealanabrack River (Abhainn Bhéal Átha na mBreac) and Failmore River (Abhainn Thír na Cille). The two bridges were Maum Bridge (Droichead an Mháma) and Teernakill Bridge (Droichead Thír na Cille). The two minor features were Deerreennabreena (sic.) (Doirín na Bruíne) and Luggaun (An Logán). The mountain was Corcogemore or Leckavrea Mountain (Corcóg). The well was Toberfeheen Holy Well (Tobar Feichín). There was also a children’s graveyard in this village. A Tiernakill North local, John Lydon, owned the land the graveyard and holy well was located. He showed us the graveyard and Toberfeheen Holy Well and gave us permission to take photos. These photos are shown above.

According to witness statement of John Feehan found on the Bureau of Militarily History website, Tiernakill Bridge was blown up by the Irish Republican Army in May 1921. Eamon Ó Máille, B.E (Bachelor of Engineering) and other volunteers destroyed this bridge. This was done to stop British troops coming from Galway City into this area. Afterwards they were also told to blow up the bridge at Corr na Mona to stop troops coming from Tuam or Headford. This was done by the West Connemara Brigade.

Situation:

This townland was bounded on the south side of the Parish. It was bounded on the North by the townlands of Maum East, Maum West, Breenaan and Cur. Bounded west by Cur and Tiernakill South. Bounded south by Tiernakill South. Bounded east by the Parish of Cong.

Description

Down Survey:

The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656. The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps; ‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will”. (Wikipedia). The name used by the Down Survey for this village was Turikillogh in Crumlyn. In 1641, the owner for this townland was James Darcy who was a Catholic. In 1670 the owner for this townland was the College of Dublin (Protestant).

O’ Donovans (1838): The proprietor for this village was the Provost of Trinity College, Dublin. The agent for Teernakill North was Allexander Nesbitt, Esq., Junr. No. 96 Stephen’s Green South, Dublin. This village was held under lease. The rent was £42.0s.0d. per year. The soil was all on a mountain. Some of the soil was steep, heathy pasture and parts were coarse, heathy and mixed pasture with some tillage and arable mountain. The crops of oats were middling but potatoes were not good. Co. Cess paid 11¼ d. paid per acre for 155 acres at Derreen na breena, Tubberfeheen.

 

Griffiths Valuation

According to Griffiths Valuation, Tiernakill North had 1255 acres, 0 rood and 20 perches. Total valuation for this village was £54.10s.0d. The immediate lessors for this townland were the Provost and Fellows of T.C.D. (Trinity College Dublin) for plot 1 a and Anthony Coyne for plot 1 b. This village had one plot.

Plot 1 was composed of 1125 acres, 0 roods and 20 perches. This plot was divided into plots labelled a and b. a was owned by Anthony Coyne and b was owned by Tobias Joyce. Total valuation for this plot was £54.10s.0d.

Plot 1 a Anthony Coyne had herd’s houses and land. The land was valued at £51.0s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.15s.0d. Total valuation of this sub-plot was £51.15s.0d.

Plot 1 b Tobias Joyce had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.10s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.5s.0d. Total valuation for this sub-plot was £2.15s.0d.

 

1901 Census

The 1901 Census states there was 16 buildings in this village, 15 of these buildings were occupied. House numbered 16 was unoccupied and was a national school. The National school’s landlord was Lord Ardilaun (sic.). A picture of this school is shown above which was taken in 1972. House numbered 3 was a R.I.C. Barracks but also housed the Connell household. A picture of these barracks is shown above. There were 46 males and 48 females in this village. The Enumerator’s Abstract was incomplete for this village, it stopped on house 11. Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic according to the Enumerator’s Abstract and census forms (Form N). Everyone in this village, except household numbered 2, was born in Galway. Household numbered 2 was born in Cavan. There were 29 outhouses or farm steadings in this village. There was one stable, one coach house, twelve cow houses, one calf house, eleven piggeries, one barn, one turf house and one store according to the Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings Return (Form B2). Unless otherwise stated, the landlord for each house was the head of the household.

House 1-Eneas Higgins

Eneas Higgins (63) lived in house numbered 1 with his three children. His children were James (32), Norah (27) and Thomas (18). Eneas was a farmer. Norah was a housekeeper. Everyone in this household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with five rooms. They had a cow house and a calf house. It was not stated who was the landlord for this household in 1901.

House 2-John Maguire

John Maguire (27) lived in house numbered 2 with his brother, Michael Maguire (17). John was a national school teacher who taught 1st class. Michael was a scholar. Both John and Michael could read and write. John and Michael spoke English only. John and Michael were born in Cavan. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had no out-houses or farm-steadings. Their landlord was Lord Ardilaun (sic.).

House 3-Bridget Connell

Bridget Connell (39) resided in house 3 with her seven children. Her children were Maryanne (17), Thomas (15), Hannah (14), Catherine (12), Patrick (11), Bridget (9) and John (7). Everyone in this household, except Bridget (Snr.), were scholars. Everyone in this household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke English only. They lived in a 1st class house with three rooms. According to the House and Building Return form (Form B.1) this building was also a R.I.C. Barracks. They had a stable, a coach house, a turf house and a store. Their landlord was Lord Ardilaun (sic.).

House 4- Martin and Mary Wallace

Martin (45) and Mary (40) Wallace lived in house 4 with their seven children. Their children were Michael (14), Patrick (13), John (11), Peter (10), Simon (12), Mary (8) and Sarah (4). Martin was a shepherd. Michael, Patrick, John, Peter, Simon and Mary (Jnr.) were scholars. The parents and Sarah could not read or write. The rest of the household could read and write. Mary (Jnr.) and Sarah spoke English only, the rest of the household spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. Their landlord was Lord Ardilaun (sic.).

House 5-Patrick and Bridget Mulroe

Patrick (80) and Bridget (70) Mulroe resided in house 5 with their son, daughter-in-law and four children. Their son was Patrick (33), their daughter-in-law was Mary (32), their grandchildren were Katherine (10), Mary (8), Maggie (4), and Annie (1). Patrick (Snr.) was a farmer. Katherine, Mary (Jnr.) and Maggie were scholars. Annie was too young to read or write, Bridget could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Maggie and Anne were too young to talk or spoke English only. The rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 6- Patrick and Bridget Joyce

Patrick (60) and Bridget (57) Joyce resided in house 6 with their five children. Their children were Delia (24), Martin (19), Stephen (16), Julia (13), and Sara (10). Patrick was a farmer. Stephen, Julia and Sara were scholars. Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 7-Thos and Mary Shaughnessy

Thos (34) and Mary (31) Shaughnessy lived in house 7 with their six children. Their children were Bridget (10), Thomas (8), Barbara (5), Nora (3), Sarah (1) and Mary (1). Thos was a farmer. Bridget and Thomas were scholars. Thos, Mary (Snr.), Bridget and Thomas could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. Thos, Mary (Snr.), Bridget and Thomas spoke Irish and English. Barbara and Nora spoke English only. Sarah and Mary were too young to talk. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 8-Bridget Joyce

Bridget Joyce (60) lived in house 8 with her two children and grandchild. Her children were James (31) and Anne (19). Her grandchild was Mary Toole (4). Bridget was a farmer. Mary was a scholar. Bridget and Mary spoke Irish only. The rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 9-Philip and Kate Coyne

Philip (28) and Kate (29) Coyne resided in house 9 with their four children and Philips mother. Their children were Patrick (8), Michael (6), Mary (5) and Peter (3). Philip’s mother was Julia (80). Philip was a farmer. Kate and Patrick could read and write. Michael could read only. The rest of the household could not read or write. Philip, Kate and Julia spoke Irish and English. The rest of the household spoke English only. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 10-William and Anne Joyce

William (32) and Anne (20) Joyce lived in house 10. William was a farmer. Anne can read and write, William could not read or write. Both William and Anne spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 11- John and Bridget Joyce

John (58) and Bridget (50) Joyce resided in house 11 with their seven children. Their children were Nappie (26), Patrick (23), Ellen (20), Martin (17), Thomas (14), Bridget (9) and Michael (6). John was a farmer. Thomas, Bridget (Jnr.) and Michael were scholars. The parents could not read or write. Michael could read only, the rest of their children could read and write. Bridget (Jnr.) and Michael spoke English only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 12-Anne Coyne

Anne Coyne (46) lived in house 12 with her seven children. Her children were Margaret (17), Ellen (15), Kate (11), Thomas (9), Patrick (6), John (4) and Norah (2). Anne was a farmer. Kate, Thomas and Patrick were scholars. John and Norah could not read or write. Patrick could read only. The rest of the household could not read and write. Anne and Margaret spoke English and Irish. The rest of the household spoke English only. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 13-Theady and Mary Coyne

Theady (sic.) (58) and Mary (40) Coyne resided in house 13 with their seven children. Their children were Martin (17), Thomas (15), Patrick (12), Bridget (9), Anne (6), Maggie (4) and Theady (sic.) (1). Theady was a farmer. Patrick, Bridget and Anne were scholars. Maggie and Theady (Jnr.) could not read or write, Anne could read only, the rest of the household could read and write. Theady (Snr.) and Mary spoke Irish and English. The rest of the household spoke English only. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 14-Martin and Bab Coyne

Martin (60) and Bab (55) Coyne lived in house 14 with their two children and a friend. Their children were Tom (18) and Anne (16). Their friend was Michael Lydon (11). Martin was a farmer and Michael was a scholar. Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 15-Peter and Margaret Coyne

Peter (29) and Margaret (36) Coyne resided in house 15 with their two children. Their children were Mary (4) and Peter (2). Peter (Snr.) was a agricultural labourer. The parents could read and write, their children could not read or write. The parents spoke Irish and English. Their children spoke English only. They lived in a 4th class house with one room. They had no out-offices or farm steadings. Their landlord was Martin Coyne, who lived in house numbered 14 in this village.

 

Census 1911

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living). There were sixteen houses in this village; thirteen of them were occupied in 1911. House numbered 16 was Tiernakill National School and was unoccupied. House numbered 4 was unoccupied and was owned by Pat Coyne of Crumlin (sic.), house numbered 11 was unoccupied and was owned by Thomas Keane of Cur (sic.). House numbered 15 was a R.I.C (Royal Irish Constabulary) barracks but also housed the Mater household. The landlord for the R.I.C Barracks was Lord Ardillaun. There was no mention of households numbered 2, 3, 7 and 12 in 1901 in this 1911 census. These households were the Maguires, the Connells, the Shaughnessy’s and Coynes. There was two new households in this village, these households was the Mateer household numbered 15 (it will be numbered 15(2) below to do Barracks Return separately as 15(1)) and the Thomas and Annie Coyne household numbered house 2 in 1911. Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic. Everyone in this village, except the R.I.C Barracks and household 15(2), was born in Galway. They were 31 out-houses or out-offices in this village. There were seven stables, twelve cow houses, two calf houses, seven piggeries, one fowl house, one turf house and one shed.

House 1-Thomas Higgins

Thomas Higgins (27) resided in house 1, previously numbered house 1, with his sister, Norah (33). There was no mention of Eneas or James in this 1901 census. Thomas was a farmer. Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with four rooms. They had two cow houses, one calf house and a fowl house.

House 2- Thomas and Annie Coyne

Thomas (71) and Annie (55) Coyne lived in hose 2; this was a new household in 1911, with his three children. His children were Thomas (20), Patrick (18) and Nora (12). Thomas and Annie were married for 38 years, had twelve children and eleven of them survived until 1911. Thomas was a farmer. Nora was a scholar. Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 3- Thady Coyne

Thady (called Theady in 1901) (72) and Mary (60) Coyne resided in house 3, previously numbered house 13, with their five children. Their children were Patrick (22), Bridget (19), Anne (16), Maggie (14) and Thady (called Theady in 1901) (11). There was no mention of Martin or Thomas in this 1911 census. Thady (Snr.) and Mary were married for 35 years, had eleven children and seven of them survived until 1911. Thady (Snr.) was a farmer. Maggie and Thady were scholars. Thady (Snr.) could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 4

House numbered 4 was unoccupied in 1911.

House 5 – John Joyce (Toby) and Bridget Joyce

John Joyce (Toby) (was called John Joyce in 1901) (72) and Bridget (62) Joyce lived in house 5, previously numbered house 11, with their four children. Their children were Patrick (33), Ellen (30), Bridget (19) and Michael (16). There was no mention of Nappie, Martin and Thomas in this 1911 census. John and Bridget were married for 41 years, had eleven children and nine of them survived until 1911. John was a farmer. Michael was a scholar. The parents could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable and a cow house.

House 6- Peter and Maggie Coyne

Peter (48) and Maggie (called Margaret in 1901) (55) Coyne resided in house 6, previously numbered house 15, with their two children. Their children were Mary (14) and Peter (13). Peter and Maggie were married for 15 years, had two children and the two of them survived until 1911. Peter (Snr.) was a farmer. Mary and Peter were scholars. Maggie could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with one room. They had a stable. The landlord for this house was Barbara Coyne who lived in Tiernakill North in household numbered 7.

House 7-Barbara Coyne

Barbara (called Bab in 1901) Coyne (70) lived in house 7, previously numbered house 14, with her son, Thomas (called Tom in 1901) (29). There was no mention of Martin, Anne or Michael in this 1911 census. Barbara was a widow, she was married for 49 years, had eight children and five of them survived until 1911. Barbara could read and write, Thomas could not read or write. Both Barbara and Thomas spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 8-Philip and Catherine Coyne

Philip (45) and Catherine (called Kate in 1901) (45) Coyne resided in house 8, previously numbered house 9, with their six children. Their children were Michael (19), Peter (14), Philip (11), Stephen (8), Roger (5) and Kate (2 months). There was no mention of Julia, Patrick or Mary in this 1911 census. Philip (Snr.) and Catherine were married for 20 years, had twelve children and six of them survived until 1911. Philip (Snr.) was a farmer. Peter, Philip, Stephen and Roger were scholars. The parents with Stephen, Roger and Kate could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Stephen, Roger and Kate spoke English only or were too young to talk; the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had two cow houses.

House 9-William and Anne Joyce

William (42) and Anne (31) Joyce lived in house 9, previously numbered house 10, with their five children. Their children were Mary (9), Bridget (7), Patrick (6), Kate (3) and John (1). William and Anne were married for ten years, had six children and five of them survived until 1911. William was a farmer. The parents with Mary could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. William and Anne spoke Irish and English, the rest of the household spoke English only. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 10-Martin Wallace

Martin Wallace (55) resided in house 10, previously numbered house 4, with his four children. His children were Peter (19), Mary (17), Sarah (14) and Simon (12). There was no mention of Mary (40), Michael, Patrick, John or Simon in this 1911 census. Martin was married but no details were given of his marriage in the 1911 census for this household. Martin was a shepherd. Peter was a agricultural labourer. Sarah and Simon were scholars. Martin could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable and a piggery. The landlord for this household was Lord Ardilaun.

House 11

House numbered 11 was unoccupied in 1911.

House 12-Patrick and Bridget Joyce

Patrick (75) and Bridget (68) Joyce lived in house numbered 12, previously numbered house 6, with their two children. Their children were John (41) and Sarah (40). There was no mention of Delia, Martin, Stephen or Julia in this 1911 census. Patrick and Bridget were married for 45 years, had ten children and eight of them survived in 1911. Patrick was a farmer. The parents could not read or write, their children could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 13-Bridget Mulroe

Bridget Mulroe (86) resided in house numbered 13, previously numbered house 5, with her son, daughter in law and five grandchildren. Her son was Pat (called Patrick in 1901) (46), her daughter in law was Mary (45), her grandchildren were Mary (18), Maggie (14), Annie (11), Ellie (9) and John (2). There was no mention of Patrick (80) and Katherine in this 1911 census. Bridget was a widow, she was married for 55 years, had nine children and six of them survived until 1911. Pat and Mary (Snr.) were married for 21 years, had ten children children and five of them surived until 1911. Pat was a farmer. Maggie, Annie and Ellie were scholars. Bridget and John could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. John was too young to talk or spoke English only; the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house. Their landlord was Patrick Mulroe.

House 14- Bridget Joyce

Bridget Joyce (80) lived in house 14, previously numbered house 8, with her three children and two grandchildren. Her children were James (40), Martin (42) and Anne (25). Her grandchildren were Mary (15) and Peter (3). There was no mention of Mary Toole in this 1911 census. Bridget was a widow, she was married for 40 years, had eight children and five of them survived until 1911. James was a farmer, Martin was a farm labourer and Mary was a scholar. James and Mary could read and write; the rest of the household could read and write. Peter was too young to talk or spoke English only. Bridget spoke Irish only. The rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house, a calf house and a piggery. The landlord for this household was James Joyce.

House 15 (1) – Royal Irish Constabulary Barracks

House numbered 15 was a R.I.C Constabulary Barracks. William Mater (sic.) (37) was the Acting Sergeant. Patrick Henaghan (sic.) (46), J. V (25), P.C. (26) and P.G (23) were constables. William Mater was married. Everyone in this barracks could read and write and spoke English only. William Mater was born in Longford, Patrick Henaghan was born in Mayo, J.V was born in Clare, P.C was born in Monaghan and P.G was born in Cavan. The barracks was a 1st class house with six rooms. They had a stable, a turf house and a shed. The R.I.C barracks also housed the Mater household including the house and out-houses. The landlord for this R.I.C barracks and household 15 (2) was Lord Ardilaun (sic.).

House 15 (2)-Bridget Mater

Bridget Mater (24) resided in house 15, this was a new household in Tiernakill North, with her two children. Her children were Mary M (3) and William John (1). Bridget was married for five years, had two children and the two of them survived by 1911. Bridget could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. Everyone in this household spoke English only. Bridget and Mary M were born in Mayo and William John was born in Galway. They lived in the R.I.C barracks which was a 1st class house with six rooms. They had a stable, a turf house and a shed with the R.I.C barracks. The landlord was Lord Ardilaun (sic.).

This page was added on 26/10/2019.

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