Dooroy

Dubh Raith

Teresa Philbin

door

Translation: Black Fort.

Down Survey 1641:

The Down Survey name for the townland of Dooroy (sic) was Dooraigh (sic).   In 1641 (Pre Cromwell), the owner was Sir Thomas Blake a protestant. In 1670 (Post Cromwell), the owner was a catholic by the name of John Brown. Dooroy was situated in the half barony of Ross and in the parish of Conge (sic). There was 207 acres of profitable land and the same amount was forfeited.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:

O’Donovan’s field name books reveal that the standard name for this townland was Dooroy. There were many forms of the name; Recte. Doo – ráwéé, Dooroy, Dubh Raith, Dooray, Boundary Surveyors Sketch Map, Duroy, County Cess Collection, Dooray, County Map, Dowray, Inquis. Temp. Jac.2, Durahy, Inquis. Temp. Jac.2. Duroy, Local, Doohray, Meresman, Duroy, Rev. Michael Waldron, P.P., Dooroy Tithe Ledger, logainm, Dúraithe.

Description:

The proprietors of the townland of Dooroy were the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont (sic) Dublin and their agent was Mr. James Fair of Fairhill. The rent ranged from 17½ shillings to 21 shillings. The soil was not so good, producing light crops of wheat, oats, potatoes and flax. The farms were middling and ranged in size from three to twenty eight acres. The county cess was 11¾d paid per acre half yearly for sixty two and a half acres. Antiquity; a fort called liss a’ yooray was on a hill containing about twenty perches. Dooray was a scattered village; a slated house called a store and Earl’s quay or coal quay castle, a village.

Situation:

Dooroy is a central townland; bounded on the north by the parish of Ross and the townland of Carrowkeel (sic); on the west by Carrowkeel and Tumneenaun; to the south by Lough Corrib and on the east by Ardaun West and Carrowhekeen (sic). Dooroy is in the barony of Ross and is in County Galway.

Translation according to P.W. Joyce; Dooroy in Galway; Dubh – Raith, black rath.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855:

According to Griffith’s valuation, Dooroy (sic) (which can be found on Ordinance Sheet 27) had an area of four hundred and nine acres, one rood and twenty one perches. The Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont (sic) were the immediate lessors of this townland. The land was valued at £170.18.0., buildings were valued at £12.5.0. The total annual valuation of rateable property was £183.3.0. All the rents were paid to the Earls.

Plot 1: Patrick Mangan (sic) had a house, offices and land on fifty two acres, three roods and twenty perches. The land was valued at £21 and the buildings at £1. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £22.

Plot 2: Michael Higgins had a herd’s house and land. The acreage was sixty three acres, three roods and twelve perches. The land was valued at £26.10.0 and the building valued at 5 shillings making his total annual valuation of rateable property £26.15.0.

Plot 3: had an acreage of twenty acres, two roods and twenty seven perches that had two subdivisions

(a) Peter Flanagan had a house and land. He paid £3.2.0 for his parcel of land and 8 shillings for the house. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £3.10.0.

(b) John Corbett had a house and land. He paid £3.2.0 for his parcel of land and 8 shillings for the house. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £3.10.0.

Plot 4: Peter Flanagan had four acres two roods and fifteen perches with an annual valuation of £1.

Plot 5: Patrick Walsh had five acres and twenty perches with an annual valuation of £2.5.0.

Plot 6: Alexander Kerr had a house, office and land. The land amount was seven acres and two roods that had an annual valuation of £2.10.0. The buildings were valued at £4. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £6.10.0.

Plot 7: Patrick Loftus had nine acres, three roods and twenty five perches that had an annual valuation of £5.15.0.

Plot 8: Michael Holleran had seven acres, three roods and fifteen perches that had an annual valuation of £4.15.0.

Plot 9: was comprised of twenty acres, three roods and twenty perches.

Anthony Sarsfield (sic) had a portion of land for which he paid £2 annually.

Patrick Sarsfield had a house, office and land. He paid £8 for the land and 10 shillings for the buildings. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £8.10.0.

Plot 10 A B: Patrick Sarsfield had one acre, three roods and twenty one perches of land for which he paid 16 shillings annually.

Plot 11 A (a): Thaddeus Halloran had a house, offices and land. He had fifty four acres, three roods and eighteen perches for which he paid £25. The buildings were valued at £1.

B: He had another parcel of land that consisted of four acres and thirty one perches for which he paid £1. His total annual valuation of rateable property for A and B was £27.

Plot 12: Michael Feenick (sic) had a house, office and land. His land amount was fifteen acres and four perches that had an annual valuation of £6.5.0. The buildings were valued at 10 shillings. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £6.15.0

Plot 13: Mary Varley (sic) had a house and land. She had three roods and thirty perches of land for which she paid 8 shillings, and she paid 4 shillings for the house. Her total annual valuation of rateable property was 12 shillings.

Plot 14 A (a): Michael Morrin (sic) had four acres, two roods and two perches for which he paid 15 shillings.

Plot 14 B: Michael Morrin and a house, office and another portion of land that measured three acres and twenty six perches for which he paid £1.10.0. He paid 12 shillings for the building.

Plot 14 C: Michael Morrin had another parcel of land measuring three acres, three roods and twenty two perches for which he paid£1.13.0. Michael’s total annual valuation of rateable amounted to £5.10.0.

Plot 15: Thomas Walsh had a house and land; the land amount was six acres, one rood and thirty four perches for which he paid £3. He paid 6 shillings for the house making his total annual valuation of rateable property £3.6.0.

Plot 16 A: John Barrett had ten acres, three roods and twenty five perches of land for which he paid £4.15.0.

Plot 16 B: John Barrett had a house office and another portion of land that measured five acres, one rood and six perches. He paid £3 for the land and 10 shillings for the buildings. His total valuation of rateable property was £8.5.0.

Plot 17 A (a): Mark Harte had a house and land. The land amount was two acres, one rood and eleven perches for which he paid an annual sum of £1.10.0. He paid 5 shillings for the house.

Plot 17 B: Mark Harte had another parcel of land that measured two acres and fourteen perches for which he paid 15 shillings. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £2.10.0.

Plot 18: William Higgins had a house and land. The land amount was five acres and three perches for which he paid £3. , he paid 5 shillings for the house. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £3.5.0.

Plot 19: Thomas Morrin (sic) had a house, office and land. He had seven acres, one rood and twenty perches for which he paid £2.17.0., he paid 8 shillings for the buildings. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £3.5.0.

Plot 20: Michael Halloran had a house, offices and land. He had seventeen acres and eighteen perches for which he paid £8., he paid 10 shillings for the buildings. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £8.10.0.

Plot 21: Mary Walsh had a house and land. She had a parcel of land that amounted to three roods with an annual value of 5 shillings and she paid 5 shillings for the house. Her total annual valuation of rateable property was 10 shillings.

Plot 22: Michael Burke had a house, office and land. He had sixteen acres, one rood and three perches for which he paid £5. he paid 10 shillings for the buildings. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £5.10.0.

Plot 23: Anthony Coyne had fifty one acres, three roods and thirty two perches of land that had a total annual valuation of £20.

Plot 24: The Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont (sic) were in fee for a store and land. The land amount was one acre, three roods and thirty six perches and had an annual valuation of 10 shillings, the building was valued at 10 shillings. Their total annual valuation of rateable property was £1.

Census 1901:

Constable Hugh Daly collected the census for Dooroy on April 11th 1901. There was twenty three houses recorded, twenty two were occupied. Twenty two houses had perishable roofs that were probably thatch roofs. Part 1 of Form N records twenty one males and twenty seven females inhabiting eleven houses. Part 2 of Form N is missing. Five of the dwellings were 2nd class; fifteen were 3rd class and two were 4th class. The record of out buildings and offices are missing also.

No 1: John Keany (sic) (65) was married to Mary (70) and they were farmers. Their son Patrick (36) and his wife Anne (25) and their children John (2) and (1) month old infant Patrick, were in the house with them. John and his wife could not read, and Mary spoke only Irish. Patrick and his wife could read and write. John, his son and his daughter – in – law were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front. The family of seven occupied three rooms.

No 2: Mary Lavin (76) was a farmer and she was a widow. Mary was bilingual but she could not read. Her house was 4th class with no window to the front. Mary had one room.

No 3: Patrick Flynn (60) and his wife Bridget (60) were farmers. They lived with their three children; John (26), William (20), and Mary (18) years old. John, his wife and eldest son could not read. William and Mary could read and write. Bridget spoke only Irish while the rest of her family were bilingual. The house was 3rd class and had two windows in front. Five people occupied two rooms.

No 4: John Hennelly (sic) was (80) and his wife Bridget (78). Farming was their livelihood. They had a son John (29) and a daughter Bridget (26) who were both single. None of the family could read. They all spoke both Irish and English. The house was 3rd class and had two windows to the front. The family of four shared three rooms.

No 5: Sarah Flanagan (39) was head of this household. Her niece Bridget Flynn (20) was also in the house. Sarah could read and write and she signed her census form. Her niece could not read. The house was 3rd class and had two windows in front. Two family members shared three rooms.

No 6: Thomas Conroy (60) a farmer was married to Mary (60) who was born in County Mayo. Their sons were Patrick (26) and John (16). Their daughters were Kate (18), Anne (14), Winifred (12), Margaret (7) and Ellen (4) years old. John, Anne, Winifred and Margaret were scholars. Everyone in this family with the exception of little Ellen could read and write. Thomas signed his census form. The family were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and it had three windows to the front. The family of nine occupied four rooms.

No 7: Nappy Walsh (52) a widow was a housekeeper. Her daughter Kate (21) had no occupation listed for her. Her son John (19) was a farmer’s son. They all could read and write and they spoke both Irish and English. The house was 3rd class and it had one window in front. Three people shared two rooms.

No 8: Patrick Walsh (38) and his wife Mary (48) were farmers. Their sons were John (16), Anthony (14), James (11) and Michael (9) years old. Their daughter Bridget was (13) years of age. Anthony, James and Bridget were scholars. Although Michael was nine years old he was not listed as a scholar. Patrick and his son Michael could not read while his wife and the rest of his family could read and write. All the family were bilingual. The house was 3rd class and had two windows to the front. Seven family members occupied two rooms.

No 9: James McDermott (64) was a widower and he was a house painter by trade. Mary Kyne (sic) (60) a widow was a visitor. James could read only and Mary could not read. Both were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and it had five windows in front. Two people occupied two rooms.

No 10: Bridget Walsh (70) a farmer was a widow. She had a daughter Mary Morrin (sic) who was (40) and another daughter Ellen Walsh (25) in the house with her. Bridget and Mary could not read and they spoke only Irish. Ellen could read and write and she was bilingual. The house was 3rd class and it had two windows in front. The mother and her daughters shared two rooms.

No 11: David Feerick (sic) (58) and his wife Mary (54) were farmers. Their son David was (28). Their daughters were Katie (24) and Bridgie (sic) (20). They could all read and write and they spoke both Irish and English. David filled and signed his census form. The house was 3rd class and it had two windows in front. The family of five occupied three rooms.

No 12: Bridget Walsh (50) a widow was a farmer’s wife. Her son Thomas (21) was listed as a farmer’s son and her daughter Maggie (18) was listed as a farmer’s daughter. Her sons William (13) and John (11) and her daughter Ellen (16) were scholars. All in this family could read and write and Bridget filled and signed her census form. The house was 3rd class and had two windows in front. Six family members shared three rooms.

No 13: Thomas Cannon (85) a farmer was married to Mary who was (62). Thomas was bilingual while Mary spoke only Irish. Neither could read. Their house was 3rd class and it had two windows in front. The couple shared two rooms.

No 14: Michael Varley (sic) (57) was a farmer and his wife Ellen was (57) years old. Their son John was (18) years old and he did not have an occupation entered for him. Michael and his wife could not read while their son could read and write. The family were bilingual. The house was 3rd class and it had one window in front. The family occupied two rooms.

No 15: Bridget Harte (67) a farmer was a widow. She had a son Patrick (24) and a daughter Sarah (20) that had no occupations listed for them. Mother and son could not read whilst Sarah could read and write. All spoke both Irish and English. The house was 4th class and no window in front. The family of three occupied one room.

No 16: James Barrett (67) was married to Mary (66) and farming was their occupation. They had a son Patrick who was (20) years of age. James and his wife could not read and Mary spoke Irish only. James and his son were bilingual and Patrick could read and write. The house was 3rd class and had one window in front. The three family members shared three rooms.

No 17: Michael Holleran (sic) (48) and his wife Mary (48) were farmers. Their children were Mary (17) and Michael (16) who has no occupations listed. John was (14) Patrick (11), Thomas (9) and James (7) were scholars. Bridget was (4) years old. Michael senior could not read or write. His wife and children (except four year old Bridget) could read and write and they were bilingual. The house was 3rd class and had one window in front. The family of nine occupied three rooms.

No 18: Mary Sarsfield (sic) (88) a farmer was a widow. Her son Michael (48) was a farmer’s son and he was married to Bridget who was (46). Their children were Thomas (19) who was a post boy. Patrick (17) and James (15) had no occupation entered for them. Mary (12), Annie (11) and Michael (8) were scholars. John was (2) years old. Mary could not read or write and she spoke Irish only. Her son, his wife and their children were bilingual and they all could read and write. The house was 2nd class and had three windows to the front. Ten family members occupied three rooms.

No 19: Mary Varley (sic) (38) was a single lady and farming was her occupation. She could read and write and she signed her census form. She spoke both Irish and English. John Duffy (16) was born in County Armagh and he was a general domestic servant. He could read and write. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front. Two people occupied four rooms.

No 20: Thomas Morrin (55) was married to Bridget (50) and they were farmers. Their daughters were; Bridget (21), Margaret (18) and Anne (10). Their sons were; Michael (20), James (15) and John (12). John and Anne were scholars while the other children did not have an occupation listed for them. Thomas and his wife could not read while all their children could read and write. The family were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and had two windows to the front. The family of eight occupied two rooms.

No 21: Bridget Murphy (50) was a widow and farming was her livelihood. Her son Martin was (24) and her daughter Bridget (18). No occupation was listed for them. Bridget and her son could not read and she spoke only Irish. Her son and daughter were bilingual, and her daughter could read and write. The house was 3rd class and it had two windows in front. Three members of the family shared two rooms.

No 22: Thomas Flanagan (65) a farmer was married to Mary who was (60). They could not read. They had a son Patrick who was (28) and daughters Kate (24), Julia (22) and Sarah (18). Julia and Sarah were seamstresses. The children could read and write and all family members were bilingual. The house was 3rd class and had two windows in front. The family of six occupied two rooms.

No 23: was uninhabited. Bridget Mc Nally (sic) was the name of the landholder.

Census 1911:

Constable Thomas Walsh collected the census forms between the 12th and the 22nd of April 1911. There were ninety one inhabitants in the townland of Dooroy at this time. Forty seven were male and forty four were female. Of the twenty two dwellings, twenty one were occupied. Fourteen of the houses were 2nd class and seven were third class. Nineteen of the houses had perishable roofs that were probably made from thatch. Two had slate roofs. Farming was the principal occupation of the people and they were all Roman Catholic.

No 1: John Keaney (sic) (77) was an agricultural labourer. His was married to Mary (85) for fifty six years; they had six children, four were still living. Their son Patrick (47) and his wife Anne (40) were in the house also. They were married for fourteen years and they had eight children; seven were still living. Their sons were John (13), Patrick (10), Michael (9) and Richard (5). Their daughters were Mary (12) and Catherine (3) years old. John and his wife could not read. Their son Patrick and his wife and school age children could read and write. The whole family spoke both Irish and English. The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front. Ten family members occupied three rooms. They had a stable and a piggery on the holding.

No 2: Pat Flynn (75) a farmer was a widower. His son William (30) was married to Mary (32) for five years. They had three sons; Patrick was (4), Thomas (3) and John (2) years old. Pat and his son could not read while his daughter in law could read and write. The family were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and it had three windows in front. The family of six shared two rooms. There was a cow house, a piggery and a barn on the premises.

No 3: John Hennelly (sic) (80) was married to Bridget (80) for fifty six years. Of the twelve children born to them, only five were still living. Their daughter Mary (45) was single and she was a general domestic servant. Their son John (38) was also single and he was a butcher. The parents or children could not read. They were all bilingual. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front. The family of four shared three rooms. They had four out buildings; a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a shed.

No 4: Thomas Flanagan (36) was married to Bridget (32) for seven years and they had four children. Sarah was (5), Mary (4), Thomas (3) and John (3 months) old. Aunt Sarah Flanagan (56) was also in the house. Thomas was a farmer and his aunt was a general domestic servant. The adults could read and write and the family were bilingual. Thomas filled and signed his census form. The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front. Seven family members occupied three rooms. They had a stable and a piggery on the property.

No 5: Thomas Conroy (72) a farmer was married to Mary (63) for thirty eight years. They had eight children; seven were still living. Their son John (24) was a farmer’s son, their daughter Maggie (16) had no occupation listed for her and daughter Ellen (13) was a scholar. Thomas and his wife could not read. Their son and daughters could read and write. All the family spoke both Irish and English. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front. Five members of the family shared three rooms. They had three outbuildings; a stable, a fowl house and a barn.

No 6: Nappy Walsh (68) a farmer was a widow. Her son John (29) was a farmer’s son and he was single. Her (4) year old grand – daughter Norah Joyce and her (1) year old grand – son Patrick Conroy were also in the house. Nappy could not read while her son could read and write. Mother and son were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and it had three windows to the front. Four family members occupied three rooms. They had a stable and a piggery on the holding.

No 7: Patrick Joyce (48) and Mary (61) were married for twenty eight years. They had five children. Their daughter Bridget (21) and son Michael (19) lived with them. Patrick was a farmer and Michael a farmer’s son. There was no record of an occupation for Bridget. Patrick could not read while his wife and children could read and write. They were all bilingual. The house was 3rd class and it had one window in front. The family of four shared two rooms. There was a stable and a piggery on the holding.

No 8: Mary Kyne (sic) (79) a widow was a general domestic servant who could not read. She spoke Irish and English. The house was 2nd class and it had three windows in front. Mary had the use of two rooms. There was a piggery on the property.

No 9: Bridget Walsh (80) a farmer was a widow. Her daughter Ellen (40) was single and had no occupation listed for her. Bridget could not read while her daughter could read and write. Both were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and it had three windows in front. The mother and her daughter shared three rooms. They had a piggery on the holding.

No 10: Ellen Varley (70) was a widow and farming was her occupation. Her son John (28) a farmer’s son was single. Ellen could not read and she spoke only Irish. Her son could read and write and he was bilingual. The house was 3rd class and it had two windows in front. Ellen and her son had three rooms. There was a stable and a piggery on the holding.

No 11: David Feerick (sic) (80) a farmer was born in County Mayo. He was married to Mary (79) for fifty four years and they had eight children; seven were still living. Their son David (40) was married to Maggie (31) for five years and they had three children. Mary M was (4), John J (2) and Patrick was (1) year old. David senior could read and write and he completed his census form. His wife could not read. His son and his wife could read and write and all the family spoke both Irish and English. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front. The family of seven occupied three rooms. They had four outbuildings; a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

No 12: William Walsh (23) was head of this household. He was a farmer and his brother John (20) was an agricultural labourer. His sister Maggie (26) was single and had no occupation listed for her. Their aunt Catherine Walsh (72) was a widow and she was a general domestic servant. All the family were bilingual. William and his brother and sister could read and write while their aunt Catherine could not read. The house was 2nd class and had three windows to the front. Four members of the family shared three rooms. The out buildings consisted of; a cow house, a piggery, a stable and a barn.

No 13: Martin Hefferan (sic) (75) was a farmer and he was married to Mary (82) for five years. Martin and his wife could not read and they spoke only Irish. The house was 3rd class and had two windows in front. The couple occupied two rooms. They had a stable and a piggery on the property.

No 14: Bridget Harte (73) a farmer was a widow. Her son Patrick (39) was a farmer’s son and he was single. Mother and son could not read. Both were bilingual. The house was 3rd class and it had one window in front. The mother and son had one room. They had a stable on the property.

No 15: James Barrett (77) a farmer was a widower. His son Patrick (34) was a farmer’s son and his daughter Mary (37) had no occupation listed for her. They were both single. James could not read and he spoke only Irish. His children could read and write and they were bilingual. The house was 3rd class and had one window to the front. Three family members shared three rooms. They had a stable, a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 16: Michael Holleran (sic) (56) was married to Mary (52) for thirty years and they were farmers. They had nine children; seven were still living. Their sons Michael (27) and James (18) were farmer’s sons. Their daughter Bridget (16) was a scholar. Michael senior could not read while his wife and family could read and write. The family spoke both Irish and English. The house was 2nd class and it had six windows in front. The family of five occupied five rooms. There were five out offices on the property; a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

No 17: Michael Sarsfield (59) a farmer was married to Bridget (58) for thirty years and they had seven children. Their son Thomas (29) was a postman and he was single. Their other sons Patrick (26) and Michael (19) were farmer’s sons and John (13) was a scholar. Their daughters Mary (23) and Anne (21) were farmer’s daughters. Everyone in this family could read and write and they were all bilingual. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front. Eight members of the family occupied three rooms. The five out buildings consisted of; a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

No 18: Mary Varley (40) was a farmer and she was single. Mary could read and write and she spoke both Irish and English. The house was 2nd class and it had three windows to the front. Mary had the use of three rooms. There was a stable, a cow house, a fowl house and a barn on the holding.

No 19: Thomas Morrin (69) was married to Bridget (68) for forty years and farming was their livelihood. Of the nine children born to the couple, only five were still living. Their daughter Bridget (28) was a farmer’s daughter and their other daughter Anne (20) was a general domestic servant. Thomas Donoghue (sic) their (4) year old grand – son was also in the house. Thomas and his wife could not read while his daughters could read and write. The parents and daughters were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and it had three windows in front. The family of five occupied three rooms. They had a stable, a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 20: Bridget Murphy (64) a farmer was a widow. Her son Martin (36) was a farmer’s son and he was single. Bridget could not read and she spoke Irish only. Her son could not read and he spoke both Irish and English. The house was 3rd class and it had two windows to the front. Bridget and her son occupied three rooms. There was a stable and a piggery on the property.

No 21: Mary Flanagan (72) was born in County Mayo and she was a widow at this time. She was documented as a ‘nurse domestic servant’. Her son Patrick (43) was married to Mary (31) for six years and they had four children. Mary was (5), John (4), Bridget (2) and the infant Patrick was (2 months) old. Mary could not read, her son could read and her daughter – in – law could read and write. Mary and her son, her daughter – in – law and her five year old grand – daughter were bilingual. The house was 3rd class and it had two windows to the front. Seven family members occupied two rooms. They had a stable, a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 22: was a vacant property. Lord Ardilaun (sic) of Ashford was the name of the land holder that the house stood on.

This page was added on 19/02/2018.

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