Petersburgh

Cappaghnagapple

Teresa Philbin

Teresa Philbin

Translation: Plot of the horses.

 

Down Survey:  The Down Survey of Ireland is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world.  The survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details all laid down by admeasurements on maps.  It was carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656.   The survey sought to measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish, in order to facilitate it’s redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

The Down Survey name for the townland was Cappanahoylte.  In 1641 (pre-Cromwell) it was in catholic ownership of Richard Bourke. 1670 (post – Cromwell) it was then in protestant ownership of College of Dublin.  It is in the half barony of Rosse (sic), in the parish of Rosse in County Galway.  There were 128 plantation acres of unprofitable land; 15 plantation acres of profitable land and this amount was forfeited.

O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:  According to John O’Donovan the standard name for the townland was Cappaghnagapple or Petersburgh.

Other forms of the name: Cappaghnagapple / Petersburgh, Ceapach na gCapall, Cappaghnagoppul (Boundary Surveyors Sketch Map), Cappaghnagoppul (Local), Cappaghnagoppul (Mearsman), Petersbourgh (Proprietor), Cappaghnagoppul, (Rev. Michael Heraghty, P.P.).

Description:  The proprietor was Charles Lynch, Esq. of Petersbourgh(sic) and he had no agent.  He held a large amount of land as a Demesne.  The soil was good pasture though the soil attached to Ballynoonagh village was not good.    Light crops of oats and potatoes were produced. He let some land to tenants; no lease. The rent was bulked for £ – yearly (it does not specify amount).  The County Assessment of 14¼ d was paid per acre for 235 acres.  Petersbourgh (sic) House, a police barrack and an old castle were situated in Cappanagapple.A small river, a steep mountain and the village of Clodthagh (Claddagh that translates as a shore or strand) are in this townland.

Situation:  Cappaghnagapple / Petersburgh is situated on the east side of the parish and bounded on the north by Lough Mask.  To the west lies Cloughbrack Lower; to the south, Bookaun, Cahergal and Kilbeg Upper and to the east, Kilbeg Lower and Lough Mask.  Cappaghnagapple / Petersburgh is situated in the barony of Ross in County Galway.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855:  Cappanagapple / Petersburgh (Ordinance Survey Sheet 26 & 27), had an area of six hundred and fifty-five acres and thirty-six perches.  The land value at the time was £173 and19 shillings and the building value was £67 and 2 shillings.

Charles J Lynch owned the entire townland.  The land was divided into plots and the occupiers paid an annual rent according to the size and quality of their holdings.  Charles J. Lynch had a house, offices and 169 acres, 3 roods and 1 perch of land, and a further 72 acres, 3 roods and 34 perches of bog land in fee. (Lands that were held in fee were freehold tenures, derived from a grant from the Crown, and constituted absolute ownership).

Plot 1: Charles J. Lynch had eleven tenants on plot 1

a: Anthony O’Brien had a house and land.  He paid an annual sum of £1 and 17 shillings for his piece of land and 8 shillings for the house.  His total annual rent was £2 and five shillings.

b:  Thomas Joyce had a house and land.  He too paid £1 and 17 shillings for his piece of land and 8 shillings for the house; his annual rent was £2 and five shillings.

(c) Patrick O’Brien had a house, office and land.  His piece of land was valued at £2 and ten shillings and the buildings were valued at 8 shillings; his total annual rent was £2 and eighteen shillings.

(-) Anthony O’Brien had a piece of land that had annual rent of £2 and ten shillings.

d:  Michael O’Brien had a house and land.  The land was valued at £1 and five shillings and the house valued at 5 shillings. Michael’s total annual rent was £1 and ten shillings.

e:  William Mulroe (sic) had a house, office and land.  He paid an annual sum of £3 and five shillings for the land and 10 shillings for the buildings.  His total annual rent was £3 and fifteen shillings.

f:  Francis Burke had a house and land.  The land was valued at 19 shillings and the house valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £1 and four shillings.

g:  Richard Burke had a house and land.  The land was valued at 19 shillings and the house valued at 3 shillings.  His total annual rent was £1 and two shillings.

h:  Thomas Burke had a house and land.  The land was also valued at 19 shillings and the house valued at three shillings.  He too paid an annual rent of £1 and two shillings.

i:  Terence O’Brien had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £1 and seventeen shillings; the house was valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 2 shillings.

j:  George Hopkins had a house, office and land.  The land was valued at £3 and fifteen shillings and the buildings were valued at 10 shillings; his total annual rent was £4 and five shillings.

Plot 2:  Charles J. Lynch had the following tenants on this plot:

a:  Thaddeus Halloran had a house and land.  The land had an annual of £3 and sixteen shillings; the house was valued at 6 shillings.  His total annual rent £4 and two shillings.

b:  Rep. Charles Blake had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £3 and sixteen shillings and the house was valued at six shillings.  The total annual rent was £4 and two shillings.

c:  Pat Flanagan (Mark) had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of land £3 and fifteen shillings; the house was valued at ten shillings.  Pat’s total annual rent was £4 and five shillings.

d:  Richard Burke (John) had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £1 and 16 shillings and the house was valued at 6 shillings.  His total rent was £2 and 2shillings.

(-): Richard Burke had a portion of land with an annual rent of 18 shillings.

(-): Thomas Burke had a portion of land with an annual rent of 18 shillings.

e:  William Mulroe had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £1 and 16 shillings; the house was valued at 6 shillings.  William’s total annual rent was £2 and 2 shillings.

f:  Thomas O’Brien had a house and land.  The land was also valued at £1 and 16 shillings and the house valued at 6 shillings.  He too had a total annual rent of £2 and 2 shillings.

g:  Patrick Flanagan had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £1 and 16 shillings and the house was valued at 4 shillings.  Patrick’s total annual rent was £2.

h:   Patrick Burke had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £1 and 16 shillings; the buildings had an annual valuation of 6 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 2 shillings.

Plot 3:  contained 47 acres and 18 perches that was divided between six tenants:

a:  Henry O’Brien had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £5 and the house was valued at 10 shillings; his total annual rent was £5 and 10 shillings.

b:  Martin O’Brien had a house and land.  His parcel of land was valued at 15 shillings and the house valued at 5 shillings.  Martin had an annual rent of £1.

c:  Patrick Jennings had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £2 and 5 shillings; the buildings were valued at 10 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 15 shillings.

d:  Patrick Kenny had a house and land. The land was valued at £1 and 19 shillings and the house valued at 6 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 5 shillings.

e:  Anthony O’Brien had a house and land.  The land was also valued at £1 and 19 shillings and the house valued at 6 shillings.  Anthony’s total annual rent was £2 and 5 shillings.

f:  Bridget O’Brien had a house and land.  Bridget’s portion of land had an annual valuation of 10 shillings and the house was valued at 2 shillings.  Her total annual rent was 12 shillings.

Plot 4: contained 19 acres and 27 perches of land; ‘Sommerville’ (sic) was the surname of each tenant.

a:  Bridget Sommerville had a house and land. Her portion of land was valued at 10 shillings and the house valued at 6 shillings.  Her total annual rent was 12 shillings.

b:  Thomas Sommerville’s land had an annual valuation of £2 and 7 shillings and the house was valued at 8 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 15 shillings.

c:  Nicholas Sommerville had a house, office and land.  The land was valued at £1 and 18 shillings and the buildings were valued at 7 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 5 shillings.

d:  Martin Sommerville had a house and land.  The land was also valued at £1 and 18 shillings and the house valued at 7 shillings.  He too had an annual rent of £2 and 5 shillings.

(-): Bridget Sommerville had an annual rent of 10 shillings on Kilbride Ferry (Petersburg side).

Plot 5:  had an area of 25 acres, two roods and two perches and was held in two equal divisions a and b

a:  Catherine Sommerville had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £2 and 15 shillings and the house was valued at 5 shillings.  Her total annual rent was £3.

b:  Michael Graham had a house and land. His annual valuation was £2 and 15 shillings for the land and 5 shillings for the house.  Michael had also an annual rent of £3.

Plot 6:  contained 32 acres, 2 roods and 4 perches that was occupied by three tenants.

a:  Stephen O’Donald (sic) had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £3 and 5 shillings, and the buildings were valued at10 shillings.  Stephen’s total annual rent was £3.

b:  Edmund Lynch had a house, office and land.  He had an annual valuation of £2 and 5 shillings on the land and 7 shillings on the buildings.  Edmund’s total annual rent was £2 and 12 shillings.

c:  Patrick Sommerville had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of 15 shillings and the house was valued at 3 shillings.  Patrick’s total annual rent was 18 shillings.

Plot 7: contained 16 acres, 1 rood and 32 perches of land that was occupied by Rev. E. O’Grady He had a house and offices on the holding.  The land had an annual valuation of £10 and 10 shillings and the buildings were valued at £15.  His total annual rent was £25 and 10 shillings.

Plot 8: had three divisions A, B and C that was held in fee by Charles J. Lynch.

A:   contained 86 acres, three roods and 28 perches of land that had an annual valuation of £35.

B:  had an area of 82 acres, 3 roods and 13 perches that had an annual valuation of £51.  Charles had a house and offices on this part of the land; the buildings had an annual valuation of £23.

C:  Charles J. Lynch held bog land with an area of 72 acres, 3 roods and 34 perches that had an annual valuation of £1.  His total annual valuation of ratable property was £110.

1901 Census for Cappaghnagapple or Petersburgh:  Constable Hugh Daly enumerated the census return on the 1st April 1901.  There were twenty-nine dwellings in Cappaghnagapple and all were occupied.  One was described as 1st class with a slate roof; eleven were 2nd class, sixteen were 3rd class and one was 4th class; all had perishable roofs that were most likely thatch.   One hundred and forty-six people resided in the townland: sixty-eight males and seventy-eight females; all but one was Roman Catholic. Most families were bilingual.  Farming was the principal occupation, there was also a wool weaver, a seamstress’ a tailor and a carpenter in the townland.

Part 2 of Form B.2. Return of Out Offices and Farm – Steadings is not available, therefore only information on the use of the outbuildings for the first fifteen holdings was recorded on this census return.

No 1:  Mary O’Brien (60) a widow, was a farmer.  Her son Anthony (27) a farmer’s son and his wife Bridget (26), her daughter Mary (26), and four young children that were listed as Mary (seniors) nieces and nephews occupied this house.  Winifred O’Brien was (6), Mary O’Brien (4), John O’Brien (3) and Michael O’Brien (1) year old (could they be Mary’s grandchildren?).  Mary, Anthony and Bridget could read and write; her daughter Mary could not read; the adults spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of eight occupied three rooms.  They had a stable and a cow house on the property.

No 2:  Michael Casey a (70) year old farmer lived with his wife Bridget (80).  They spoke Irish only and neither could read.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the couple had two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

No 3:  Patrick Jennings (80) a farmer was married to Bridget (80).  Their son John (28?) a single man, was a farmer’s son.  Patrick and his wife could not read; their son could read and write; all were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front and three people occupied three rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house and a forge on the property.

No 4:  Catherine Kenny (60) a widow was born in County Mayo and lived with her son James (40) who was not married.  Farming was their occupation.  Bridget Higgins (70) a widow born in County Mayo, was a lodger in the house and was listed as a farm servant.  Catherine and Bridget could not read; James could read and write.  All were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and three people occupied two rooms.  They had a fowl house and a barn the holding.

No 5:  Margaret Macken (sic) (60) was a widow.  She lived in this house with her son in law Patrick Macken (32) a farmer’s son, her daughter Margaret (28) and their children; John (5), James (4) Stephen (3) and William (2).  Mary Flynn (29) was a boarder, and her occupation was listed as farm servant.  Margaret Macken (senior) and Patrick could not read.  Her daughter Margaret and Mary Flynn could read and write; the adults spoke Irish and English. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and eight people occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house on the holding.

No 6:  Mary O’Brien (44) a widow was a farmer; her daughters Kate (17), Bridget (15) and Mary (11) were listed as farmer’s daughters; Anne (10), Margaret (7) and Sarah (5) were scholars.  The mother could not read; her four eldest daughters could read and write, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of seven occupied four rooms.  They had a cow house on the property.

No 7:  John Mannion (49) a wool weaver was married to Margaret (47) and they had four daughters and a son; twins Margaret and Bridget were (20) years old, Honora was (17) Anne (15) James (12) years old.  Bridget was a seamstress; Margaret, Honora and Anne did not have any occupation recorded; James was a scholar.   The parents could not read; the children could read and write, and all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of seven occupied three rooms.  The out buildings consisted of a stable, a cow house and a workshop.

No 8:   Margaret Mulroe (sic) (63) a widow was head of this household.  Her daughter Mary Mulroe (30) a farmer’s daughter was a married woman.   Her son John (28) was a farmer’s son, her daughter in law Anne (25) did not have an occupation listed, her other son Stephen (26) a farmer’s son, was a single man.  Scholars, James Mulroe (12) and Margaret Mulroe (10) were listed as boarders and Margaret’s niece Mary was (1) year old. Anne, James and ten-year old Margaret could read and write; the others could not read; all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and eight people occupied two rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 9:  Mark Flanagan (50) a farmer, his wife Margaret (50) their daughter Mary (16) and Mark’s niece Mary Kyne (sic) (14) were the occupants of this house.  Mark and Margaret could not read while the two Mary’s could read and write.  Mark spoke Irish only; the others were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class and with one window in front and four people occupied two rooms.  They had a stable and a cow house on the holding.

No 10:  Mary Flanagan (50) was a widow.  Her daughter Anne (26) was a farmer’s daughter and she was not married.  Mary could not read and she spoke Irish only; Anne could read and write and was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front, and mother and daughter had two rooms.  They had a piggery on the property.

No 11:  Margaret Kerrigan (50) a farmer was a married woman.  Her son Thomas (25) a farmer’s son was not married.  Neither could read; both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and Margaret and her son occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house on the holding.

No 12:  Patrick Sommerville (sic) (50) and his wife Kate (40) were farmers.  They had five sons and one daughter; Thomas (18) and Patrick (14) were farmer’s sons; Michael (12), Simon (10) and Martin (7) were scholars, their daughter May (16) was listed as a farmer’s daughter.  The parents and seven-year old Martin could not read; the others could read and write and all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of eight occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house on the premises.

No 13:  Anne O’Brien (84) a farmer was a widow.  She lived with her son John (35) a farmer’s son and her daughter in law Bridget (24).  Mary O’Brien (3) and Patrick O’Brien (2) were documented as Anne’s niece and nephew (could they have been her grandchildren?).  Anne and John could not read; Bridget could read and write, and the adults spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of five occupied six rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

No 14:  William Mulroe (35) a farmer was married to Mary (31) and they had five children; Patrick (10) and Thomas (7) were scholars, Margaret was (5), John (2) and infant Bridget (3) months old.  William could not read; Mary and Patrick could read and write; the parents and two eldest children were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of seven occupied six rooms.  They had a piggery and a barn on the property.

No 15:  James Lowery (60) a widower was a farmer.  James could read and write and was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and he had two rooms.  There were no out buildings on the premises.

Part 2 of Form B.2. Return of Out Offices and Farm – Steadings is not available, therefore only information on the use of the outbuildings for the first fifteen holdings was recorded on this census return.

 

No 16:  Michael Hopkins (57) a farmer was married to Mary (55) who was born in Co. Mayo.  Their daughter Winifred (19) was born in England.  Michael and Winifred could read and write; Mary could not read. The parents spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and three people occupied two rooms.

 

No 17:  Michael Sommerville (sic) (35) a farmer, and his wife Bridget (33) lived in this house with their children; Patrick (15) a farmer’s son, Mary (13) a farmer’s daughter, Catherine (10), Thomas (9) and Martin (6) who were scholars and Michael (2) years old.  Michael senior could not read; Bridget and the children (except two-year-old Michael), could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of eight occupied three rooms.

No 18:  Thomas Casey (25) and his wife Kate (24) were farmers.  They were bilingual but could not read.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the couple had two rooms.

No 19:  Martin Kerrigan (60) was married to Kate (60) and farming was their occupation.  Their   son Francis (14) was a farmer’s son and daughter Mary (13) a scholar.  Mary Burke (25) a farm servant was a boarder in the house.  Young Mary could read and write; the others could not read; Martin spoke Irish only; the rest spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied three rooms.

No 20:  Catherine Burke (78) a farmer was a widow.   Her daughter Mary Joyce (33) a farmer’s daughter and son in law Thomas Joyce (32) a farmer’s son, their children; Bridget (9), Richard (5) and (8) months old infant Michael were listed in this house.  None of the family could read; Catherine and her daughter spoke Irish only and Thomas was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front and the family of six occupied two rooms.

No 21:  John Somerville (60) a widower was a farmer.  He could not read and spoke Irish only.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and John had three rooms.

No 22:  John Burke (61) was married to Bridget (60) and they were farmers. Their son Patrick (24) was a farmer’s son and daughter Catherine (26) a farmer’s daughter.  John and his wife could not read or write; their daughter could read only and their son could read and write.  John spoke Irish only; his wife and children were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and four people occupied two rooms

No 23:  Thomas Somerville (84) a farmer was a widower.  His daughter Mary (32) a farmer’s daughter was not married.  His grandson Thomas Sommerville (7) a scholar was also in the house.  None of the family could read; Thomas spoke Irish only; his grandson was bilingual.  The house was 4th class and the family of three occupied one room.

No 24:  James Branigan (sic) (60) a tailor was born in Co. Mayo and he was married to Catherine (60).  Neither could read; Catherine spoke Irish only; James spoke Irish and English. The house was 3rd class and James and his wife had two rooms. R C. Lynch was the name of the land holder where the house was situated.

No 25:  Patrick Somerville (44) and his wife Kate (45) were farmers.  They had five daughters and three sons: Bridget (18), Mary (16), Patrick (14), Kate (12), Annie (10) Maggie (8), John (6) and Martin (4) were all scholars. Patrick senior could not read; his wife and six eldest children could read and write; the family spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of ten occupied five rooms.

No 26:  Margaret Somerville (77) was a widow.  Her son John (40) a farmer’s son was not married.  Her grandson Nicholas Sommerville (18) and her granddaughter Kathleen Sommerville (29) a single girl, were listed as farm servants.  Margaret and her son could not read; her grandchildren could read and write; all were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and four people occupied two rooms

No 27: Thomas Mannion (55) and his wife Isabella (55) were farmers.  Their son Thomas (26) was a carpenter and daughter Mary (22), a farmer’s daughter.  Thomas senior could not read; Isabella, Mary and Thomas could read and write; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class and with three windows in front and four people occupied four rooms.

 

No 28:  Stephen O’Donnell (84) a farmer was married to Ellen (80) who was born in Co. Mayo.  Their son John (40) and his wife Kate (35) had four sons: Stephen (8), Patrick (7), John (5) and Michael (3).  John Jennings (21) was born in England and was listed as a farm servant. Stephen senior and his grandsons could not read; his wife, son, daughter in law and John Jennings could read and write.  The adults including John Jennings were bilingual; the grandsons were not, and this may indicate that English was the language of the home.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and nine people occupied four rooms.

No 29:  Richard C Lynch (47) born in Galway was a Local Board Inspector; his wife Helena (44) was born in County Westmeath; their daughter Kathleen Daly (23) born in Galway was a widow, Kathleen’s (1) year old daughter Denise Mary Daly was born in Dublin.   Fawcett Blake (45) a male cousin born in County Mayo was not married and had no occupation listed. Sabina Gavin (24) born in Galway was a cook and domestic servant; Ellen Staples (33) born in London was a nurse and domestic servant, Elizabeth Bradly (41) born in County Meath, was a parlor maid servant, Bridget Duffy (18) born in Co. Galway was a kitchen maid and domestic servant and Michael Canny (30) was a groom and domestic servant.  All the staff were unmarried.  All in this household were Roman Catholic except Ellen Staples who was Church of England. Bridget Duffy and Michael Canny were the only members that could not read or write; both were bilingual.  The house was 1st class and had nine windows in front.  Ten members of the household occupied thirteen rooms.

 

1911 Census for Cappanagapple / Petersburg:  Constable Thomas Walsh enumerated the census for Cappanagapple / Petersburg between the 10th and the 21st of April 1911.  Twenty-nine houses were occupied; two were 1st class with slate roofs; fifteen were 2nd class and twelve were 3rd class with perishable roofs that were presumably thatch. There was a population of one hundred and forty-one in the townland at the time; seventy-three males and sixty-eight females; two were born in Co. Westmeath, one was born in Co. Mayo, the remainder were born in Co. Galway.  Most families were bilingual, and the majority could read and write; all were Roman Catholic.

No 1:  Helena Mary Lynch (56) born in County Westmeath was married for thirty-two years and she had two children; only one survived.  Her daughter Kathleen Mary Daly (30) a widow was in the house with her.  Helena’s cousin Fawcett Joseph Blake (57) born in County Mayo had an income from the land.  Katherine McGuinness (22) born in County Meath, was a parlor maid / domestic servant; Margaret Cooney (19) a kitchen maid / domestic servant and Thomas Mulrow (sic) (22) was a groom and domestic servant.  All in the household could read and write and Thomas was bilingual.  The house was 1st class with nine windows in front and seven people occupied sixteen rooms.  Eighteen outbuildings contained: seven stables, two coach houses, a harness room, a cow house, a calf house, a fowl house, a piggery, a barn, a turf house, a shed and a laundry.

No 2:  Anthony O’Brien (48) a farmer was married to Bridget (46) for seventeen years. They had five children; Winifred (16), Mary (15), John (14), Michael (12) and Isabella (9) were all scholars.  All the family could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of seven occupied three rooms. They had a stable and a piggery on the holding.

No 3:  Michael Casey (74) a farmer and his wife Bridget (75) were married for fifty years and they had two children.  Michael was bilingual and Bridget spoke Irish only; neither could read.    The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the couple occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 4:  John Jennings (40) a farmer and a blacksmith was a single man.  He could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and John had three rooms.  There were four outhouses on the premises; a stable, a cow house, a shed and a forge.

No 5:  James Kenny (52) a single man, farmed for a living.  He could read and write and was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with three windows in front and James had three rooms.  There was a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 6:  John O’Donnell (52) a farmer was head of this household.  His mother Ellen O’Donnell (75) a widow, was a nurse and domestic servant. John and his wife Kate (47) were married for twenty years and had four sons; Stephen (19), Patrick (17), John (16) and Michael (12) were all listed as farmer’s sons. John, his wife and his mother could read and write while none of the boys could read; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and seven people occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

No 7:  Patrick Macken (45) a farmer and his wife Margaret (39) were married for sixteen years and they had eight children: John (15), James (13), Stephen (12), William (11) Anthony (10), Mary (9), Patrick (7) were scholars, and Bridget was (5) years old.  Patrick’s mother Margaret Macken (80) a nurse and domestic servant was a widow.  Margaret could not read, and she spoke Irish only.  Patrick, his wife and school going children could read and write and were bilingual. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of eleven occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 8:  Mary Flanagan (Pat) (71) was a farmer.  Her cousin Anne Flanagan (40) a general domestic was in the house with her; both women were single.  Mary could not read while Anne could read and write; both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and they had three rooms.  There was a piggery on the holding.

No 9:  Mary O’Brien (Pat) (69) a farmer, was a widow with five daughters; Katie (28), Mary (24), Annie (21) and Maggie (18) were listed as farmer’s daughters and Sarah (16) was a scholar.  Mary senior could not read or write; her daughters could read and write, all were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front.  The mother and her daughters occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 10:  John Mannion (65) a farmer was married to Margaret (70) for forty years and they had nine children; five were still living and two were recorded in this census return. Norah (30) had no occupation listed and John (26) was a farmer’s son, both were single.  Their grandson John Comber (11) was also in the house.  John, his wife and his grandson could not read; his son and daughter could read and write, all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and five people occupied three rooms.  They had four out offices that contained a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

No 11:  John Mulroe (45) a farmer and his wife Anne (40) were married for twelve years and they had eight children; seven were still living.  Mary (11), Patrick (9), and Maggie (8) were scholars, Bridget was (4), Willie (3), Barbara (1) and infant Annie (3) months old.   John’s brother Stephen Mulroe (44) a single man, was an agricultural laborer. John and his brother could not read; his wife and the school going children could read and write and from age four upward were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and ten people occupied three rooms.  They had a stable, a piggery and a fowl house on the property.

No 12:  Mary Flanagan (Mark) (37) a farmer and her niece Mary Coyne (24) a general domestic servant were both single.  They could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and they had three rooms. There was a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

No 13:  James Lowery (75) was a widower and farming his occupation.  James was bilingual but could not read.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and he had two rooms.  There was a piggery on the premises.

No 14:  Patrick Kerrigan (69) a farmer was married to Margaret (65) for forty-four years and they had five children; four were still living.  Mark (30) was the only one recorded in this census; he was a farm labourer and was single at the time. James Mulrow (sic) (69) a widower, was an army pensioner and was a lodger in the house.  Patrick and Mark could read and write; Margaret could read, James Mulrow could not read; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the holding.

No 15:  Patrick Summerville (Pat) (63) a farmer and his wife Kate (65) were married for thirty-four years and they had seven children; six were still living and four were recorded. Tom (29) was an agricultural laborer, Michael (21) and Simon (18) were farmer’s sons and Martin (16) was a scholar.  Patrick and his wife could not read while their sons could read and write; the family were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and six people occupied three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

No 16:  John O’Brien (49) was a farmer and he was married to Bridget (34) for fifteen years and they had eight children.  Mary (13), Patrick (12), Bridget (10), John (9) and Anthony (7) were scholars, Annie was (5), Maggie (3) and the infant Katie (4) months old.  John spoke Irish and English but could not read; his wife and school going children could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of ten occupied three rooms.  They had a stable and a cow house on the property.

No 17:  William Mulroe (48) and his wife Mary (44) were married for twenty-two years and they had eight children; Patrick (21) Thomas (18) were farmer’s sons, Margaret (15) did not have an occupation listed, John (13), Bridget (10), and Mary (7) were scholars, Michael was (4) and Annie (2) years old. William could read only; his wife and the scholars could read and write; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of ten occupied three rooms.  Three outbuildings consisted of a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

No 18:  Michael Hopkins (70) a farmer was a married man.  It does not state how long he was married or if he had any children.  Michael could read and write and was bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and he had three rooms.  There was a cow house on the holding.

No 19:  Bridget Summerville (54) a widow lived here with her five children, and farming was her occupation. Catherine (20) and Martin (15) had no occupation listed, Michael (12), John (10) and Simon (8) were scholars.  Bridget and her children could read and write, all spoke Irish and English. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the mother and her children occupied three rooms. They had a fowl house on the property.

No 20:  Thomas Casey (36) a farmer was married to Kate (37) for eleven years and they had six children, five were documented; Nora (10), Kate (8), Michael (6), Thomas (4) and John (1) year old. Nora and Kate were scholars. Nora could read and write; the others could not read; Thomas and the three oldest children were bilingual; his wife spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of seven family occupied three rooms.  Two out houses contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 21:  Martin Kerrigan (75) a farmer and his wife Kate (73) were married for thirty-two years and they had one son.  Frank (24) a single man was a farmer’s son.  Martin spoke Irish only; his wife and son were bilingual; none could read or write.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and three people occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery on the holding.

No 22:  Thomas Joyce (44) was married to Mary (46) for twenty years and farming was their livelihood.  The couple had five children; four were still living and three were documented. Richard (16) had no occupation listed, Michael (12) and Thomas (6) were scholars.  The parents could not read; their sons could read and write, the father and sons were bilingual, and Mary spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of five occupied two rooms.  They had a piggery on the holding.

No 23:  John Summerville (80) was married to Catherine (60) for nine years and they did not have children.  John’s niece Anne Burke (69) was a single woman, and she was a general domestic servant.  All were bilingual; none could read.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and three people occupied three rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 24:  Thomas Summerville (87) a widower was a farmer.  His daughter Mary (58) and his nephew Thomas Summerville (18) were in this house, but had no occupation listed.  Thomas and his daughter spoke Irish only, his nephew was bilingual; none could read. The house was 3rd class and three people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the holding.

No 25:  John Burke (73) a farmer and his wife Bridget (80) were married for forty-five years and they had four children.  John and Bridget spoke Irish and English but could not read.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the couple had two rooms.  They had a barn on the property.

No 26:  Patrick Summerville (Martin) (56) was a farmer.  He was married to Kate (60) for thirty years and they had eight children; five were still living and four were documented. Kate (22), Margaret (20) and John (18) had no occupation listed, and Martin (16) was a scholar.  Patrick could not read, his wife could read, and their children could read and write; all were bilingual.  The house was 1st class with seven windows in front and six people occupied eleven rooms.  There were six outbuildings on the premises; a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

No 27:  John Summerville (Nicholas) (69) a farmer and his sister Catherine (67) a general domestic servant were both single.  His nephew Nicholas Summerville (24) an agricultural labourer and his niece Mary Kate Geraghty (sic) (19) were listed here.  John and his sister could not read; his nephew and niece could read and write; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with three windows in front and four people occupied three rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 28:  Catherine Branigan (75) and her daughter Mary Branigan (58) were both widows.  Mary was a general domestic servant. Catherine spoke Irish only; Mary was bilingual; neither could read.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front. Mother and daughter occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the holding.  John Summerville was the name of the landholder where this house was situated.

No 29:  Thomas Mannion (71) a farmer was married to Isabella (72) for forty-four years and they had four children.  Their son Tom (42) and his wife Anne (31) were married for four years and they had two children; Michael (3) and Bridget (2) years old.  Thomas’s brother James (85), a single man was an agricultural labourer and was listed with this family. Isabella, her son and daughter in law could read and write; Thomas and his brother could not read.  James spoke Irish only; the rest of the adults were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and seven people occupied three rooms. They had four outbuildings on the property; a stable, a coach house, a cow house and a piggery.

 

The Lynch’s of Petersburg

 

This page was added on 03/02/2021.

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