Carrowkeel

Ceathramhadh Chaol

Teresa Philbin

Teresa Philbin

Carrowkeel

Down Survey:   The Down Survey of Ireland is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world.  The survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details all laid down by admeasurements on maps.  It was carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656.   The survey sought to measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish, in order to facilitate its redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

The Down Survey name for this townland was Carrowkille.  It is in the half barony of Ross, in the parish of Conge (sic). In 1641 Sir Thomas Blake a protestant was the owner.  In 1670 it remained in protestant ownership of College of Dublin.  There were 137 plantation acres of profitable land; 45 plantation acres of unprofitable land and the profitable land was forfeited.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Book 1838:  John O’Donovan says that the standard name for the townland was Carrowkeel. The Irish form of the name was Ceathramhadh Chaol meaning the narrow quarter.

Other Forms of the Name:  Carrowkeel, Ceathramhadh Chaol, Kearowkile, Carrowkeel (Boundary Surveyor Sketch Map), Carrowkeel (County Cess Collector), Carowkeyle (Inquis. Temp. Jac 1), Carhookel (Local), Carrowkeel (Rev. Michael Waldron P.P), Carrakeel (Tithe Ledger.

Situation:  It is described in O’Donovan’s Field Name Books, as a central townland in the north side of the parish. It is bounded on the north by the parish of Ross, on the west by the townland of Gurtnarup. It is bounded on the south by Dooroy and on the east by Dooroy. Carrowkeel is in the Civil Parish of Cong, in the Barony of Ross in Co. Galway.

Description:  The proprietor was Sir Valentine Blake, Esquire, Minlow near Galway. His agent was Mr. Michael Higgins of Fairhill, parish of Ross.  The land was all held under lease for a bulked rent of £40 yearly. The soil was described as part good and some not good. The rent was about 12 shillings per acre and the farms ranged in size from 6 to 12 acres.  Pretty good crops of oats, flax, wheat and potatoes were produced. The Co. Cess of 11¼d was paid per acre half yearly for 68 ½ acres. The village is in two clusters under one name.  There is a fort named Caherathoother and a National School.

According to research undertaken by Tom and Anne McGuigen of Carrowkeel, Sir Valentine Blake, Esquire owned the national school in this townland. The school was established in 1821.  Sir Valentine taught the boys, and his wife Lady Blake taught the girls.  Many children were in attendance, and a committee applied to the Kildare Society for a grant to expand the school.  There was a list of signatories; eleven were Church of Ireland and eight were Roman Catholic.  In 1832 their application to expand the school was granted funds to build an extension. It still stands on land that is in the Mulroe family for many generations, it can be seen on the right-hand side as you go up the Carrowkeel / Dooroy road.

Griffith’s Valuation 1850:   According to Griffith’s Valuation (Ordnance Survey Sheet 27) Carrowkeel had an area of 129 acres and 2 roods and 27 perches.  The land value at the time was £45. 2. 6.

Plot 1:  John Blake (Rep. of Sir Valentine Blake) had a house on 2 acres, 2 roods and 30 perches of land.  The land had a rateable annual valuation of £1; the house was valued at 10 shillings.  His total annual valuation was £1 and 10 shillings.

Plot 2: contained 126 acres, 3 roods and 37 perches that had eight tenants; 2 (a), 2 (b), 2 (c), 2 (d), 2 (e), 2 (f), 2 (g), 2(h) each paid rent according to the size and quality of their holding.

2 (a):   Thomas Mulroe had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £3 and the house was valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £3 and 5 shillings.

2 (b):  John Coyne had a house and land.  His portion of land had an annual valuation of 16 shillings and the house was valued at 4 shillings.  His total annual rent was £1.

2 (c):  John Coyne (Junior) had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £4 and 4 shillings; the buildings were valued at 6 shillings.  His total annual rent was £4 and 10 shillings.

2 (d):  Anthony Mulroe had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £5 and 15 shillings and the buildings were valued at 10 shillings.  His total annual rent was £6 and 5 shillings.

2 (e):  John Mulroe had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £6 and 5 shillings; the buildings were valued at 10 shillings.  His total annual rent was £6 and 15 shillings.

2 (f):  William Mulroe had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £3 and 10 shillings; the house was valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £3 and 15 shillings.

2 (g):  Thomas Halloran had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £6 and 5 shillings; the buildings were valued at 10 shillings.  His total annual rent was £6 and 15 shillings.

2 (h):  Andrew Halloran had a house, office and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £6 and 5 shillings; the buildings were valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £6 and 10 shillings.

2 – John Blake had a piece of land with a rateable annual valuation of £2.

The above rents were payable to Sir Valentine Blake.

1901 Census:  Constable Hugh Daly enumerated the census return for Carrowkeel, Ross, in the parish of Cong between the 11th and 12th of April 1901.  There were sixteen houses; two were 2nd class, ten were 3rd class, three were 4th class and one was vacant.  All had perishable roofs that were most likely thatch.  Fifty-two people resided in the townland; twenty-eight were male and twenty-nine were female.  All were Roman Catholic. Farming was the principal livelihood and most farmers kept cattle and pigs.

No 1:  Andrew McHugh (50) a shoemaker, his wife Bridget (40) and their three children lived in this house.  Anne (15) had no occupation listed; Thomas (13) and Bridget (8) were scholars.  All were born in County Mayo.  Bridget senior could not read; Andrew and the children could read and write; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There were no out buildings.  Martin Mulroe was the name of the land holder where the house was situated.

No 2:  Thomas McCormack (73) and his wife Mary (60) were the occupants of this house.  Thomas a shoemaker was born in County Galway, Mary was born in County Mayo.  Thomas could not read; Mary could read and write; both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the couple occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the holding.  Martin Mulroe was the name of the land holder where the house was situated.

No 3:  William Hamilton (70) a widower was born in County Galway.  He could read and write and was bilingual.  The house was 4th class and William occupied one room.  There was a piggery on the holding.  Martin Mulroe was the name of the land holder where the house was situated.

No 4:  Thomas Spelman (60) a farmer was a widower.  His daughter Margaret (18) and his son John (15) did not have an occupation listed.  All were born in County Galway.  Thomas and John could not read; Margaret could read and write; all were bilingual.  The house was 4th class and three people occupied one room.  There were no outbuildings.

No 5:  Martin Mulroe (40) a farmer, his wife Sarah (30) and their eight children lived in this house.  Patrick (14), Mary (12), Thomas (10), Bridget (8) and Kate (6) were scholars; Margaret was (3), Martin (2) and infant James (1) month old.  Sarah was born in County Mayo; her husband and children were born in County Galway.  Martin could not read, Sarah and the scholars from age eight upwards could read and write and Kate could read.  All spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of ten occupied three rooms.  Three outhouses comprised of a piggery, a cow house and a barn.

No 6:  John Kyne (70) and his wife Catherine (58) were born in County Galway.  Farming was their occupation.  Neither could read; both spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the couple occupied two rooms.  There were no outbuildings.

No 7:  Martin Kyne (37) a farmer and his wife Mary (27) lived here with their four children.  Patrick (8) was a scholar, Bridget was (5), John (3) and little Mary (6) months old.  All were born in County Galway.  None of the family could read at this time; Mary and the young children spoke Irish only; Martin and Patrick were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class and the family of six occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 8:  John Kyne (31), his wife Anne (28) their children Kate (4), Michael (2) and infant John (5) months, were resident here.  Farming was their occupation.  All were born in County Galway.  Martin and Anne could not read; they and Kate and Michael were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the couple and their three children occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 9:  Julia Halloran (63) a widow, was a farmer.  Her son Patrick (43), his wife Margaret (43) and their eight children were living here with her.  Julia (15) had no occupation listed; Kate (14), Bridget (12), Thomas (9) and Margaret (7) were scholars, John was (6), Winifred (3) and Honoria (1) year old.  All were born in County Galway.  Patrick and the scholars from age nine upwards could read and write.  The two youngest children spoke Irish only, the rest were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of eleven occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 10:  Andrew Halloran (75) and his wife Mary (70) were farmers.  William (27) a farmer’s son, and his wife Mary (26) and their three young children lived with the couple.  Tomy (sic) was (4), Mary (3) and infant John (8) months old.  All were born in County Galway.  William and his wife could read and write, Andrew and Mary could not read or write.  The family spoke English and Irish; with English first, it was probably the language of the home.  The house was 3rd class and seven people occupied three rooms.  Three outbuildings contained a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

No 11:  Patrick Halloran (60) and his wife Kate (40) and their three children were the occupants of this house.  They were born in County Galway and farming was their livelihood.  Thomas (20) and Pat (15) were farmer’s sons and Bridget (13) a farmer’s daughter.  The parents could not read or write; the children could read and write; all spoke English and Irish.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 12:  Anthony Mulroe (83) a farmer and his wife Mary (62) and their son Anthony (21) were born in County Galway.  Anthony junior could read and write; his parents could not read, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the couple and their son occupied two rooms.  There was a barn on the property.

No 13:  James Joyce (70) and his wife (62) and their son Thomas (30) were farmers.  They were born in County Galway.  James could not read, and he spoke Irish only, Mary and Thomas could read and write, and they spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and three people occupied two rooms.  There was a barn on the premises.

No 14:  Sabina Mulroe (61) a widow was a farmer, and she was born in County Mayo.  Her son William (30) born in County Galway had no occupation listed.  Her grandson William Mulroe (12) a scholar was born in England.  Sabina could not read; her son and grandson could read and write, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and three people occupied three rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 15:  Mary Mulroe (65) a widow, and her brother Michael Kyne (68) a widower were farmers.  They were born in County Galway.  Mary spoke Irish only; Michael was bilingual, neither could read.  The house was 4th class and two people occupied one room.  There was a piggery on the property.

No 16:  A private dwelling was uninhabited.  Ellen O’Dea was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

1911 Census:  Constable Thomas Walsh enumerated the census return for Carrowkeel on the 21st of April.  There were eighteen dwellings; sixteen were occupied and two were vacant.  Eight of the houses were 2nd class, six were 3rd class and two were 4th class dwellings.  One had a non-perishable roof; the rest were perishable roofs that were probably thatch.  Sixty-two people resided here: thirty-four males and twenty-eight females.  Farming was their way of life. One was born in County Mayo; the remainder were born in County Galway.  All were Roman Catholic.

No 1:  William Mulroe (48) a farmer, and his wife Mary (41) were married for six years, and they had three children; Patrick (4), John (2) and Martin (1) year old.  William could not read; Mary could read and write; all spoke Irish and English. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of five occupied three rooms.  There was a cow house and a fowl house on the premises.

No 2:  Thomas Joyce (40) a single man was a farmer.  His mother Mary (72) a nurse and general servant was a widow.  Mary and Thomas could not read, both were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and mother and son occupied three rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 3:  Patrick Halloran (54) a farmer, was married to Margaret (53) for twenty-nine years and they had ten children; nine were still living and six were documented in this census return.  Thomas (20) was a farmer’s son and Margaret (18) a farmer’s daughter, John (15), Winnie (13), Norah (11) and Patrick (9) were scholars.  Margaret could not read; Patrick and the children could read and write; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and eight people occupied three rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 4:  Julia Halloran (74) a widow was a farmer.  She could not read; she spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front and Julia occupied one room.  There was a fowl house on the premises.

No 5:  Katherine Halloran (65) a widow, her son and her daughter were resident in this house.  Farming was their livelihood.  Thomas (30) was a farmer’s son and Bridget (23) had no occupation listed.  All were born in County Galway.  Katherine could not read; Thomas and Bridget could read and write; all were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and three people occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 6:  William Halleron (sic) (38) a farmer, and his wife Mary (37) were married for sixteen years and they had seven children; Thomas (15), Mary (13), John (11), Patrick (9) and Andrew (7) were scholars, Michael was (4) and the infant William (2) months old.  William’s mother Mary (80) a widow, was a nurse and domestic servant; she could not read.  The parents and school going children could read and write, and from age four upwards were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of ten occupied three rooms.  Three outbuildings contained a cow house a piggery and a fowl house.

No 7:  Thomas Spelman (69) a farmer was a widower.  His daughter Catherine (22) did not have an occupation listed.  Thomas could not read or write; Catherine could read and write, both were bilingual.  The house was 4th class and two people occupied one room.  There was a piggery on the property.

No 8:  Martin Mulroe (52) a farmer, was married to Sarah (44) for twenty-five years and they had twelve children; eleven were still living and nine were documented in the 1911 census return.  Thomas (19) was a farmer’s son, Bridget (17) and Katie (16) had no occupation listed, Maggie (13), Martin (12), James (9) and Ellie (6) were scholars, Sarah was (5) and Michael (3) years old.  The parents and children fromage six upwards could read and write and they spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of eleven occupied three rooms.  Four outbuildings contained a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

No 9:  John Kyne Senior (79) and his wife Catherine (73) were married for thirty-four years.  Farming was their occupation.  They spoke Irish and English; neither could read.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front and the couple occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the property.

No 10:  Martin Coyne (45) was married to Mary (45) for twenty years and they had seven children; six were recorded in this census return.  Farming was their livelihood; Bridget (16) was a farmer’s daughter, John (12), Mary (10) and Thomas (8) were scholars, Martin was (6) and Winnie (2) years old.  The parents could not read; their children from age eight upwards could read and write, the family were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and eight people occupied three rooms.  There was a piggery and a stable on the premises.

No 11:  John Kyne (Junior) (45) a farmer, and his wife Anne (40) were married for fifteen years, and they had eight children; Catherine (14), Michael (13), John (12) and Patrick (8) were scholars; Ellen was (6), Thomas (4), Norah (3) and Martin (1) year old.  The parents were bilingual; they could not read; the scholars could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of ten occupied three rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 12:  Mary Mulroe (80) a widow was a farmer.  She could not read and spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front and Mary occupied one room.  There was a piggery and a stable on the premises.

No 13:  Mary Kyne (80) was a widow, and farming was her occupation.  Mary could not read, and she spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and she occupied one room.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 14:  Bridget Glynn (74) was born in County Mayo.  Bridget a general domestic servant, was a widow.  She could not read; she was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and she occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the holding.  Martin Mulroe was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 15:   John Hamilton (40) and his brother William (30) were agricultural labourers.  They were single when this census was taken.  John and William spoke Irish and English; neither could not read.  The house was 4th class and the brothers occupied one room.  There was a piggery on the holding.  John Kyne (Junior) was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 16:  A Royal Irish Constabulary Barrack had five occupants; one sergeant and four constables.  All were Roman Catholic.

No 1:  Sergeant Michael Murphy (37) was single in 1911.  He was born in County Clare and was the son of a farmer.

No 2:  Constable T. W. (38) a married man was a Draper’s Assistant.  He was born in County Kerry, and he spoke Irish and English.

No 3:  Constable T. G. (31) a farmer’s son born in County Galway (E.R.) was single.

No 4:  Constable M. T. (26) a farmer’s son born in County Mayo was single.

No 5:  Constable J. H. (25) a farmer’s son born in County Clare was single.

The R. I. C. barrack was 2nd class with a non-perishable roof that was most likely slate.  It had five windows in front and five people occupied four rooms.  There was a turf shed on the premises.  Martin Mulroe was the name of the landholder where the barrack was situated.

No 17:  A private dwelling was vacant.  Ellen O’ Dea of Rusheen West was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 18:  A private dwelling was vacant.  Martin Mulroe was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

This page was added on 25/10/2021.

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