Culleenalena

Coillín a’ Léana

Tomas O Flatharta

Tomas O Flatharta

Coillín a’ Léana meaning little wood of the meadow

Names:

According to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Culleenalena and Coillín a’ Léana was its official Irish name.  Other names given to this townland were Culleenaleana (Boundary Surveyors Sketch, Meresman), Kelleenalena (County Cess Collector), Culleenalean (County Map),  Killeenalena (Local, Tithe Ledger).

Situation:

This townland is a central townland.  It was bounded on the north and east by Tubberrogue.  Bounded on the south by Ballinamona and bounded on the west by Carrowbaune.

Description:

Down Survey:

The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.  The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps ‘‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will.’ (Wikipedia).  The name used by the Down Survey for this village was Toberbroge, Killinlena, Ardnegee (as per transcribed from the Down Survey). In 1641, the owner for this townland was Sir Thomas Blake who was a Protestant.  In 1670, the owner was still Sir Thomas Blake (Protestant).  There was no information on how much profitable or forfeited land they had.

O Donovan’s (1838):

The proprietor for this village was Lord Oranmore of Castlemontgarett (sic.).  The agent was Jerrard Strickland, Loughglynn, Co. Roscommon.  The townland was composed of  97 acres, 0 roods and 7 perches according to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838).  The village was held under lease by Robert Brown, Esq. Portarlington and Richard Walsh and Co. of Kelleenalena.  The farms were from 50 to 100 acres.  The soil was pretty good.  This village produced middling crops of wheat, oats and potatoes.  The farm was bulked at £159 yearly and is about 22s. and 6d. per acre.  Co. Cess paid 13½ d. per acre for 150 acres.  This village has an antiquity of a fort with a cave called Lisschelleenalena or Killeenalena fort.  There is also Killeenalena Lough.

Griffiths Valuation

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Culleenalena had a total acreage of 97 acres, 0 roods and 7 perches. The total valuation for this village was £97.0s.7d.  The immediate lessor for this townland was Benjamin L. Guinness.  This townland was divided into 6 plots.  Apart from the plots there was also 2 acres, 0 roods and 0 perches of water which was unvalued, unoccupied and with no lessors.

Plot 1 was composed of 51 acres, 1 rood and 9 perches. This plot belonged to Catherine Walsh.  Total valuation for this plot was £33.0s.0d.

Plot 1 Catherine Walsh had land valued at £33.0s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £33.0s.0d.

 

Plot 2a was comprised of 11 acres, 0 roods and 12 perches.  This plot belonged to Martin Thornton. Total valuation for this plot was £4.5s.0d.

Plot 2a Martin Thorntonhad a house, office and land.  The land valued at £3.15s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d. Total valuation of this plot was £4.5s.0d.

 

Plot – (sic.) was composed of 6 acres, 3 roods and 28 perches. Plot – was divided into two plots labelled b and 3.  Both plots were owned by Michael Moran.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.0s.0d.

Plot – b Michael Moranhad a house and office valued at £0.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £0.10s.0d.

Plot – 3 Michael Moranhad land valued at £3.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £3.10s.0d.

 

Plot 4 was comprised of 7 acres, 3 roods and 24 perches.  This plot belonged to Patrick Thornton.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.0s.0d.

Plot 4 Patrick Thorntonhad a house and land.  The land was valued at £3.13s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.7s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.0s.0d.

 

Plot 5 was composed of 7 acres, 3 roods and 1 perch.  This plot belonged to John Kearney.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.0s.0d.

Plot 5 John Kearneyhad a house and land.  The land was valued at £3.12s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.8s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.0s.0d.

 

Plot 6 was comprised of 10 acres, 0 roods and 13 perches.  This plot belonged to John Janson.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.5s.0d.

Plot 6 John Jansonhad a house and land.  The land was valued at £4.0s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.5s.0d.

Census 1901

There were six houses in this village and all six of them were inhabited.  There were 26 males and 25 females in this village.  Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic according to the Enumerators Abstract (Form N).  There were seventeen Out-Offices or Farm Steadings in this village.  There were two stables, five cow houses, five piggeries, two barns, one turf house and two sheds according to the Return of Out-Offices and Farm Steadings (Form B.2.).

 

House 1-Michael and Catherine Moran   

Michael(49) and Catherine (40) Moran resided in house 1 with their six children and Michael’s sister, Mary A. (50).  Their children were Norah(16), Annie(15), Ellen(13), Bridget(9), William(18) and Thomas(11).  Michael was a farmer.  Annie, Ellen, Bridget, William and Thomas were scholars.  Everyone in this household was able to read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.   They lived in a 3rdclass house with three rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 2-William Thornton

William Thornton(45) lived in house 2 with their six children.  Their children were Patrick (19), Martin(18), Honora(17), Annie(14), Margaret(11) and Ellie (9).  William was a scholar.  Patrick and Martin were labourers.  Annie, Margaret and Ellie were scholars.  William could read only, the rest of the household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a shed.

 

House 3-Patrick and Catherine Melia

Patrick(60) and Catherine (50) Meliaresided in house 3 with their five children.  Their children were John (27), Patrick (24), Mary (18),Martin (15) and Catherine (9).  Patrick (Snr.) was a farmer.  John and Patrick were labourers.  Martin and Catherine (Jnr.) were scholars.  Patrick (Snr.) could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Patrick (Snr.) was born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 4-James and Penelope Walsh

James (74) and Penelope (61) Walsh lived in house numbered 4 with their two children,  James’s niece and their grandson.  Their children were James (39) and Fergus (25).  James’s niece was Elaine Moneley(sic.) (16).  Their grandson was Michael Kynes (6).  James (Snr.), James and Fergus were farmers. Elaine was a housemaid.  Michael was a scholar.  Michael could read only , the rest of the household could read and write.   Michael spoke English only; the rest of the household spoke Irish and English.  Penelope and Elaine were born in Mayo, the rest of the household was from Galway. They lived in a 2ndclass house with six rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a shed.

 

House 5-John and Mary Mullin

John (40) and Mary (35) Mullin lived in house numbered 5 with their ten children and one visitor.  Their visitor was Margaret Haire(60).  Their children were Michael(14), Marcus(sic.) (13), Patrick(12), John(10),Kate (9), Mary(8), Norah(7), Deliah(6), William(5) and Thomas(6 months).  John (Snr.) was a Ploughman.  Mary (Snr.) was a gatekeeper.  Michael, Marcus, Patrick, John, Kate and Mary were scholars. Margaret was a farmer.  Norah, Deliah, William and Thomas could not read or write.  John (Snr.), Mary (Jnr.) and Margaret could read only.  The rest of the household could read and write.  John (Snr.), Mary (Snr.), Michael, Marcus and Margaret spoke Irish and English.  The rest of the household spoke English only or were too young to talk.  John (Snr.), Mary (Snr.) and Margaret were born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  They lived in  a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a turf house.  The landlord for this house was Lord Ardilaun.

 

House 6-John and Bridget Kearney

John(45) and Bridget (40) Kearney lived in house 6 with their seven children.  Their children were Thomas (18), Michael(16), Catherine(14), John(12), Patrick(9), Bridget(9) and Margaret(7).  John (Snr.) was a farmer.  Michael was a labourer.  John, Patrick, Bridget (Jnr.) and Margaret were scholars.  The parents could not read or write, the children could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway. They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

Census 1911

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living).   There were five houses in this village and all five were inhabited.  There was no mention of household that was numbered 4 in 1901 in this village.  This household was the Walsh household.  Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.  There were 16 outhouses in this village.  There were five cow houses, five piggeries, two fowl houses and four barns.

 

House 1- Michael Moran

Michael Moran (60) lived in house 1, previously numbered house 1, with his two children and his sister.  Michael’s sister was Mary Ann(called Mary A. in 1901) Moran(63).  His children were Thomas (20) and Bridget(18).  There was no mention of Catherine, Norah, Annie, Ellen or William in this 1911 census.  Michael was a widower and a farmer.  Everyone in this household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

 

House 2-William Thornton

William Thornton (75) resided in house 2, previously numbered house 2, with his two children.  His children were Patt (called Patrick in 1901) (29) and Ellen (called Ellie in 1901) (21).  There was no mention of Martin, Honora, Annie or Margaret in this 1911 census.  William was a widower and a farmer.  Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Mayo.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 3-Kate Malley (was called Melia in 1901)

Kate (called Catherine in 1901)Malley (62) lived in house 3, previously numbered house 3, with her three children.  Her children were Kate (called Catherine in 1901)(20), Martin (25) and Mary(27).  There was no mention of Patrick (Snr.), John or Patrick (Jnr.) in this 1911 census. They were present in this household in the 1901 census.   Kate (Snr.) was a widow and a farmer.  Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 4-John and Bridget Carney (called Kearney in 1901)

John (59) and Bridget (60) Carney resided in house 4, previously numbered house 6, with their four children. Their children were Thomas (29),Bridget(19), Margaret(18) and Patrick(19).  There was no mention of Michael, Catherine or John in this 1911 census. John and Bridget (Snr.) were married for 33 years, had eight children and eight of them survived until 1911. John was a farmer.  Thomas was an agricultural labourer.  Bridget (Jnr.) was a dressmaker.  Bridget (Snr.) could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was from Galway. They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms. They had a cow house, piggery, a fowl house and a barn.   

 

House 5- John and Mary Mullin

John (62) and Mary (50) Mullin resided in house 5, previously numbered house 5, with their eight children. Their children were Pat (called Patrick in 1901)(23), John(20), Kate(17), Mary(15), Norah(14), William(12), Thomas(9) and James(4).  There was no mention of Michael Mullin, Marcus Mullin, Deliah Mullin and Margaret Haire in this 1911 census.  John (Snr.) and Mary (Snr.) were married for 28 years, had thirteen children and ten of them survived until 1911.  John (Snr.) was a ploughman.  Pat was a farm labourer.  John was a gate keeper.  William and Thomas were scholars.  Mary (Snr.), Norah and James could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Thomas and James spoke English only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. John (Snr.), Mary (Snr.) and Pat were born in Galway, the rest of the household was born in Mayo.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with four rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

/ Coillín a’ Léana meaning little wood of the meadow

Author:Tomas O Flatharta

Names:

According to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Culleenalena and Coillín a’ Léana was its official Irish name.  Other names given to this townland were Culleenaleana (Boundary Surveyors Sketch, Meresman), Kelleenalena (County Cess Collector), Culleenalean (County Map),  Killeenalena (Local, Tithe Ledger).

 

Situation:

This townland is a central townland.  It was bounded on the north and east by Tubberrogue.  Bounded on the south by Ballinamona and bounded on the west by Carrowbaune.

 

Description:

Down Survey: The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.  The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps ‘‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will.’ (Wikipedia).  The name used by the Down Survey for this village was Toberbroge, Killinlena, Ardnegee (as per transcribed from the Down Survey). In 1641, the owner for this townland was Sir Thomas Blake who was a Protestant.  In 1670, the owner was still Sir Thomas Blake (Protestant).  There was no information on how much profitable or forfeited land they had.

 

O Donovan’s (1838): The proprietor for this village was Lord Oranmore of Castlemontgarett (sic.).  The agent was Jerrard Strickland, Loughglynn, Co. Roscommon.  The townland was composed of  97 acres, 0 roods and 7 perches according to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838).  The village was held under lease by Robert Brown, Esq. Portarlington and Richard Walsh and Co. of Kelleenalena.  The farms were from 50 to 100 acres.  The soil was pretty good.  This village produced middling crops of wheat, oats and potatoes.  The farm was bulked at £159 yearly and is about 22s. and 6d. per acre.  Co. Cess paid 13½ d. per acre for 150 acres.  This village has an antiquity of a fort with a cave called Lisschelleenalena or Killeenalena fort.  There is also Killeenalena Lough.

 

Griffiths Valuation      

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Culleenalena had a total acreage of 97 acres, 0 roods and 7 perches. The total valuation for this village was £97.0s.7d.  The immediate lessor for this townland was Benjamin L. Guinness.  This townland was divided into 6 plots.  Apart from the plots there was also 2 acres, 0 roods and 0 perches of water which was unvalued, unoccupied and with no lessors.

Plot 1 was composed of 51 acres, 1 rood and 9 perches. This plot belonged to Catherine Walsh.  Total valuation for this plot was £33.0s.0d.

Plot 1 Catherine Walsh had land valued at £33.0s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £33.0s.0d.

 

Plot 2a was comprised of 11 acres, 0 roods and 12 perches.  This plot belonged to Martin Thornton. Total valuation for this plot was £4.5s.0d.

Plot 2a Martin Thorntonhad a house, office and land.  The land valued at £3.15s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d. Total valuation of this plot was £4.5s.0d.

 

Plot – (sic.) was composed of 6 acres, 3 roods and 28 perches. Plot – was divided into two plots labelled b and 3.  Both plots were owned by Michael Moran.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.0s.0d.

Plot – b Michael Moranhad a house and office valued at £0.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £0.10s.0d.

Plot – 3 Michael Moranhad land valued at £3.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £3.10s.0d.

 

Plot 4 was comprised of 7 acres, 3 roods and 24 perches.  This plot belonged to Patrick Thornton.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.0s.0d.

Plot 4 Patrick Thorntonhad a house and land.  The land was valued at £3.13s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.7s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.0s.0d.

 

Plot 5 was composed of 7 acres, 3 roods and 1 perch.  This plot belonged to John Kearney.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.0s.0d.

Plot 5 John Kearneyhad a house and land.  The land was valued at £3.12s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.8s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.0s.0d.

 

Plot 6 was comprised of 10 acres, 0 roods and 13 perches.  This plot belonged to John Janson.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.5s.0d.

Plot 6 John Jansonhad a house and land.  The land was valued at £4.0s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.5s.0d.

 

Census 1901

There were six houses in this village and all six of them were inhabited.  There were 26 males and 25 females in this village.  Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic according to the Enumerators Abstract (Form N).  There were seventeen Out-Offices or Farm Steadings in this village.  There were two stables, five cow houses, five piggeries, two barns, one turf house and two sheds according to the Return of Out-Offices and Farm Steadings (Form B.2.).

 

House 1-Michael and Catherine Moran   

Michael(49) and Catherine (40) Moran resided in house 1 with their six children and Michael’s sister, Mary A. (50).  Their children were Norah(16), Annie(15), Ellen(13), Bridget(9), William(18) and Thomas(11).  Michael was a farmer.  Annie, Ellen, Bridget, William and Thomas were scholars.  Everyone in this household was able to read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.   They lived in a 3rdclass house with three rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 2-William Thornton

William Thornton(45) lived in house 2 with their six children.  Their children were Patrick (19), Martin(18), Honora(17), Annie(14), Margaret(11) and Ellie (9).  William was a scholar.  Patrick and Martin were labourers.  Annie, Margaret and Ellie were scholars.  William could read only, the rest of the household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a shed.

 

House 3-Patrick and Catherine Melia

Patrick(60) and Catherine (50) Meliaresided in house 3 with their five children.  Their children were John (27), Patrick (24), Mary (18),Martin (15) and Catherine (9).  Patrick (Snr.) was a farmer.  John and Patrick were labourers.  Martin and Catherine (Jnr.) were scholars.  Patrick (Snr.) could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Patrick (Snr.) was born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 4-James and Penelope Walsh

James (74) and Penelope (61) Walsh lived in house numbered 4 with their two children,  James’s niece and their grandson.  Their children were James (39) and Fergus (25).  James’s niece was Elaine Moneley(sic.) (16).  Their grandson was Michael Kynes (6).  James (Snr.), James and Fergus were farmers. Elaine was a housemaid.  Michael was a scholar.  Michael could read only , the rest of the household could read and write.   Michael spoke English only; the rest of the household spoke Irish and English.  Penelope and Elaine were born in Mayo, the rest of the household was from Galway. They lived in a 2ndclass house with six rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a shed.

 

House 5-John and Mary Mullin

John (40) and Mary (35) Mullin lived in house numbered 5 with their ten children and one visitor.  Their visitor was Margaret Haire(60).  Their children were Michael(14), Marcus(sic.) (13), Patrick(12), John(10),Kate (9), Mary(8), Norah(7), Deliah(6), William(5) and Thomas(6 months).  John (Snr.) was a Ploughman.  Mary (Snr.) was a gatekeeper.  Michael, Marcus, Patrick, John, Kate and Mary were scholars. Margaret was a farmer.  Norah, Deliah, William and Thomas could not read or write.  John (Snr.), Mary (Jnr.) and Margaret could read only.  The rest of the household could read and write.  John (Snr.), Mary (Snr.), Michael, Marcus and Margaret spoke Irish and English.  The rest of the household spoke English only or were too young to talk.  John (Snr.), Mary (Snr.) and Margaret were born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  They lived in  a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a turf house.  The landlord for this house was Lord Ardilaun.

 

House 6-John and Bridget Kearney

John(45) and Bridget (40) Kearney lived in house 6 with their seven children.  Their children were Thomas (18), Michael(16), Catherine(14), John(12), Patrick(9), Bridget(9) and Margaret(7).  John (Snr.) was a farmer.  Michael was a labourer.  John, Patrick, Bridget (Jnr.) and Margaret were scholars.  The parents could not read or write, the children could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway. They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

Census 1911

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living).   There were five houses in this village and all five were inhabited.  There was no mention of household that was numbered 4 in 1901 in this village.  This household was the Walsh household.  Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.  There were 16 outhouses in this village.  There were five cow houses, five piggeries, two fowl houses and four barns.

 

House 1- Michael Moran

Michael Moran (60) lived in house 1, previously numbered house 1, with his two children and his sister.  Michael’s sister was Mary Ann(called Mary A. in 1901) Moran(63).  His children were Thomas (20) and Bridget(18).  There was no mention of Catherine, Norah, Annie, Ellen or William in this 1911 census.  Michael was a widower and a farmer.  Everyone in this household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

 

House 2-William Thornton

William Thornton (75) resided in house 2, previously numbered house 2, with his two children.  His children were Patt (called Patrick in 1901) (29) and Ellen (called Ellie in 1901) (21).  There was no mention of Martin, Honora, Annie or Margaret in this 1911 census.  William was a widower and a farmer.  Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Mayo.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 3-Kate Malley (was called Melia in 1901)

Kate (called Catherine in 1901)Malley (62) lived in house 3, previously numbered house 3, with her three children.  Her children were Kate (called Catherine in 1901)(20), Martin (25) and Mary(27).  There was no mention of Patrick (Snr.), John or Patrick (Jnr.) in this 1911 census. They were present in this household in the 1901 census.   Kate (Snr.) was a widow and a farmer.  Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 4-John and Bridget Carney (called Kearney in 1901)

John (59) and Bridget (60) Carney resided in house 4, previously numbered house 6, with their four children. Their children were Thomas (29),Bridget(19), Margaret(18) and Patrick(19).  There was no mention of Michael, Catherine or John in this 1911 census. John and Bridget (Snr.) were married for 33 years, had eight children and eight of them survived until 1911. John was a farmer.  Thomas was an agricultural labourer.  Bridget (Jnr.) was a dressmaker.  Bridget (Snr.) could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was from Galway. They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms. They had a cow house, piggery, a fowl house and a barn.   

 

House 5- John and Mary Mullin

John (62) and Mary (50) Mullin resided in house 5, previously numbered house 5, with their eight children. Their children were Pat (called Patrick in 1901)(23), John(20), Kate(17), Mary(15), Norah(14), William(12), Thomas(9) and James(4).  There was no mention of Michael Mullin, Marcus Mullin, Deliah Mullin and Margaret Haire in this 1911 census.  John (Snr.) and Mary (Snr.) were married for 28 years, had thirteen children and ten of them survived until 1911.  John (Snr.) was a ploughman.  Pat was a farm labourer.  John was a gate keeper.  William and Thomas were scholars.  Mary (Snr.), Norah and James could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Thomas and James spoke English only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. John (Snr.), Mary (Snr.) and Pat were born in Galway, the rest of the household was born in Mayo.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with four rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

This page was added on 16/10/2018.

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