Dooghta

Dubhachta

Maggi Nic Shíomóinm, Tomás O’Flatharta, Teresa Philbin

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 Dubhachta, meaning Black Land.

http://www.logainm.ie/20666.aspx

Names:

According to O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Dooghta and Dubhachta was its official Irish form. The townland name was spelled ‘Dooghty’ according to O’Donovan. He further gives village names, such as Dooghta, Aughayoughta, Gorreenmore, Ballintubber and Kaunwaum, Dooghta Browne, Uggool, Parkaurilling and Illaunnagcorp. Dooghta mountain, in 1838 was called locally Crickyooghtha. (Cnoc Dhubhachta). Illaunnagorp – called Oileáin na gCorp locally, was apparently a village near the holy well. Parkawillin – “Páirc a Mhullin” or locally known as Millpark was also known as Paurk a Willing.

According to O’Donovan’s letters there are two holy wells in Dooghta, one dedicated to the Virgin Mary and the other to St. Feichín, the Patron of Cong, and near the latter a flag stone called leac-feichin, by which men were put to the ordeal! For a full account see Otway’s publication – A Tour in Ireland, Ask about Connaught. http://www.askaboutireland – this was written by the Reverend Cesar Otway, an historian/anthropologist (1780 – 1842). Caesar Otway  was born at Castle Otway near Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Ireland in 1780. He was an Irish author and clergyman who wanted to study and improve the condition of the poor. Wikipedia.

Situation:

The townland is located on the north side of the civil parish of Cong. It is bounded on the north by the parish of Ross and the townland of Cairhoogorriv (sic) known locally as An Cheathrú Garbh, south by Carhoogorriv, Claggin, and Glanlusk. It is bounded on the eastern side by Lough Corrib, Curnamona (sic) and Corrig (sic) West.

This townland contains two sub-divisions, namely Allintober (Baile an Tobair) and Dooghtaknockbaun (An Cnoc Bán). Accoring to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie), the townland contains a well called Tobar Murry (Tobar Muirí). The townland contains Gortna killa Graveyard (Gort na Cille), Maumcloghaloon (Mám Chloch an Leamhain) mountain/ mountain range, also Toberfeheen (Tobar Feichín), as well as the Dooghta River (Abhainn Dhubhachta).

Description:

The Down Survey 1654/ 6:

This survey indicates a “Doughtie” near Cornamona in the half Barony of Ross. At present (2016) there is no further information available.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:

According to O’Donovan the townland of Dooghta was comprised of 1567 acres, 0 roods and 40 perches. The townland is located in the civil parish of Cong, in the Barony of Ross and in the County of Galway.

In 1838, the landlord for this townland was Sir Richard O’Donnell of Newport, while the Agent was Alexander Clandenning, Esq. of Westport.

O’Donovan tells us that all the townland was under lease, with a bulked rent of £155.00 yearly. He further states that the soil was comprised of a large tract of flat bog, mixed and healthy pasture, along a ridge of steep mountain, which was pasturable. Some arable mountain was contained on the mountain side and at the foot of the mountain. In 1838, crops were not good and were comparatively worse that year than usual. O’Donovan says that there were 2 holy wells, namely Tubberchuan and Tubbermurra, joining each other.

Griffiths Valuation (1855):

According to Griffiths Valuation 1855, the townland of Dooghta which can be found on Ordnance Survey Sheets 20 & 39, had a total acreage in excess of 1,500 acres. Unless otherwise stated the Immediate Lessor was Benjamin L. Guinness.

Plot 1 was subdivided between 4 occupiers, and totalled 61 acres, 2 roods and 32 perches:

Andrew Walsh had a house, office and land. The annual rateable valuation of this parcel of land was £2.15s.0d. and the valuation on the house was £0.7s.0d.

Patrick Walsh had a house, office and land. The valuation of his land was £1.7s.0d. and the valuation on his house was £0.5s.0d.

David Walsh also had a house, office and land. The valuation of his land was £1.7s.0d. and the valuation on his house was £0.5s.0d.

John Mullery leased only land at an annual valuation of £2.15s.0d.

Plot 2 was subdivided between 14 occupiers, and totalled 414 acres and 1 rood:

Mark Kearney rented house, office and land for a valuation of £1.0s.0d. on the land and outhouses and £0.4s.0d. on the house.

Martin Duffy paid £2.0s.0d. annually for his land and outhouses, and a further £0.6s.0d. for the house.

Martin Walsh rented a larger chunk of land as his annual rent was £2.14s.0d. for the land and outhouses, and £0.6s.0d. for the house.

John Hopkins rent was £2.17s.0d for the land and outhouses and £0.8s.0d. for the house.

Martin Walsh (Smith) paid £1.17s.0d. annually for his land and outhouses, and £0.8s.0d. for the house.

John Joyce had the largest plot in this subdivision and paid £3.15s.0d for the land and outhouses, and £0.10s.0d. for the house.

Michael Sullivan paid £2.0s.0d. for his land and outhouses and £0.10s.0d. for the house.

John Sullivan paid £2.5s.0d. for the land and outhouses together with £0.10s.0d. for his house.

Thomas Sullivan rented only land and a house. His rent was £1.0s.0d. and £0.5s.0d. respectively

Edward Cassidy paid £1.0s.0d. for his land and outhouses and £0.5s.0d. for the house.

Patrick Tomask (sic) paid £1.10s.0d. for the land and outhouses and £0.6s.0d. for his house.

Judith Coyne also paid £1.10s.0d. for her land and outhouses and £0.6s.0d. for her house.

Patrick Coyne’s valuation was £3.0s.0d. for the land and outhouses and £0.15s.0d. for the house

The Valuation of Tenements suggests that this subdivision was not actually part of the above mentioned Plot 2, as it was held in lease by John Walsh, who paid his annual rent to Martin Walsh for a house and forge.

Plot 3 consisted of 5 subdivisions. The acreage was 311 Acres, 2 Roods and 14 Perches:

Patrick Murphy paid £5.15s.0d. for his land and a further £0.10s.0d. for his house.

John Kane rented house, office (outhouse) and land at a rate of £2.10s.0d. for the land and £0.5s.0d. for the house.

Jeremiah Duffy paid £5.0s.0d. for his land and outhouses and a further £0.10s.0d. for the house.

Michael Duffy had the largest holding in this plot and his rent for land and outbuildings was £6.10s.0d. and £0.12s.0d. for the house.

There was no house on this piece of land, which does not have an alphabetical letter identifying it and the land is listed under Benjamin L. Guinness, In Fee. It was valued at £2.10s.0d.

Plot 4 had 13 subdivisions and a total acreage of 483 Acres, 3 Roods and 5 Perches:

Thomas Duffy paid £3.0s.0d. for his parcel of land and outhouses, plus 10s. for the house.

Patrick Murphy also paid £3.0s.0d. for his parcel of land and outhouses, plus 10s. for the house.

Martin Duffy paid £6.0s.0d. for land and outhouses, plus £10. for his house.

Michael Herwood paid £2.10s.0d. for land and outhouses and £0.8s.0d. for the house.

Patrick Herwood paid £1.5s.0d. for the rent of the land and outhouses and £0.5s.0d. for the house.

Peter Herwood also paid £1.5s.0d. for the rent of the land and outhouses and £0.5s.0d. for the house

Thomas Joyce paid £2.10s.0d. for renting his land and outbuildings and £0.8s.0d. for the house.

James Herwood paid £2.10s.0d. for the land and outbuildings and £0.6s.0d. for the house.

Patrick Coyne’s annual valuation was £4.5s.0d. for his land and outbuildings and £0.10s.0d. for the house.

Thaddeus Coyne paid £4.5s.0d. for his land and £0.5s.0d. for his house.

John Duffy paid £3.5s.0d. for his land and outbuildings and £0.10s.0d. for the house.

Patrick Sullivan paid £3.15s.0d. for the land and outbuildings and£0.10s.0d. for his house.

There was no house on this piece of land which was rented by John Joyce for £3.15s.0d.

Plot 5 had 7 subdivisions and a total acreage of 293 Acres, 0 Roods and 31 Perches:

Catherine Philivan (sic) paid £5.5s.0d. for office and land and a further £0.10s.0d. for the house.

John Fitzhenry paid £4.5s.0d. for the land and a further £0.10s.0d. for the house.

Patrick Cuban paid £3.10s.0d. for the land and £0.10s.0d. for the house.

Patrick Cuban, jun. paid £3.10s.0d. for the land and also £0.10s.0d. for the house.

Catherine Fitzhenry paid £5.0s.0d. for her land and £0.12s.0d. for the house.

John Brien paid £4.2s.0d. for his land and £0.10s.0d. for the house.

Sarah Brien paid £6.6s.0d. for her land and £0.12s.0d. for the house.

Additional Information on places:

Dooghta mountain, in 1838 was called locally Crickyooghtha.

Illaunnagorp – called Oileáin na gCorp locally, was apparently a village near the holy well. Parkawillin –“ Páirc a Mhuillin, Millpark, locally known as Paurk a Willing.”

 Census 1901:

This census indicates there were 57 buildings in this village, one of these buildings was unoccupied. Of the 342 person’s resident in Dooghta, there were 169 males and 173 females according to the FORM N-Enumerator’s Abstract for a town land. FORM B2 – Out-offices and Farm Steadings Return is incomplete (stops at house 45). Unless otherwise stated everyone in this village was born in County Galway and was Roman Catholic.

Thomas (35) and Mary (34) Walsh resided in house numbered 1 with their three children and Thomas’ sister. Their children were Mary (3), Margret (2) and Patrick (6 months). Thomas’ sister was Ellen Walsh (38). Thomas was a farmer. The parents could read and write. The children and Ellen could not read or write. Thomas, Mary (Snr.), Mary and Margret spoke Irish and English. Ellen spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Patrick (45) and Bridget (44) Walsh resided in house 2 with their five children and Patrick’s niece. Their children were Patrick (20), Martin (17), Mary (15), Thomas (13) and Michael (11). Patrick’s niece was Maggie Walsh (8). Patrick (Snr.) was a farmer. Thomas, Michael and Maggie were scholars. Patrick (Jnr.), Martin, Mary, Thomas, Michael and Maggie could read and write. Patrick (Snr.) and Bridget could not read or write. Everyone in the family except Bridget spoke Irish and English. Bridget spoke only Irish. They were born in Galway expect for their niece Maggie who was born in England. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Patrick (54) and Mary (44) Molloy resided in house numbered three with their seven children. They also had a visitor on the night of the census. Their children were John (23), Bridget (20), Kate (18), Ellen (15), Patrick (12), Willie (10) and Margaret (3). The visitor was Bridget Butler (42). Patrick (Snr.) was a farmer. John was a National School teacher. Ellen, Patrick and Willie were scholars. They all could read and write expect Margaret who could not read. Everyone in this household spoke both, Irish and English. They lived a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Patt(80) and Mary(70) Walsh resided in house numbered 4 with their daughter, Barbara Coyne (30), son-in-law, Patt Coyne (30) and their four grandchildren. Their grandchildren were Mary Coyne (6), Bridget Coyne (5), Michael Coyne (3) and Nappy J. Coyne (6 months). Patt (Snr.) was a farmer. The grandparents and grandchildren could not read or write. Patt (Jnr.) and Barbara could read and write. Patt (30), Barbara, Mary and Bridget spoke Irish and English. Patt (Snr.) and Mary spoke Irish only and the rest of the household was bilingual. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Michael (42) and Bridget (41) Joyce resided in house 5 with their eight children. Their children were Patrick (15), Martin (13), Thomas (12), John (10), Catherine (8), Michael (6), William (4) and Bridget (2). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. All but the eldest and two youngest were scholars. The parents could not read or write and all but the youngest children could do so. While the parents spoke only Irish, the rest of the family were bilingual. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a piggery.

Patt (45) and Mary (40) Duffy lived in house 6 with their three children. Their children were Honor (18), Catherine (15) and William (8). Patt was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write, and they all spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a piggery.

Thomas Duffy (54) resided in house 7 with his son, daughter-in-law and his two grandchildren. His son was Thomas (35), his daughter-in-law was Mary (33), and his grandchildren were Mary (3) and Sarah (11 months). Thomas (Snr.) was a farmer. Only Mary (Snr.) could read and write in this household. Thomas (Snr.) spoke Irish. Thomas (Jnr.) and Mary spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

John (40) and Mary (30) Walsh lived in house 8 with their three children. Their children were Bridget (9), Mary (6) and Thomas (2). John was a farmer. Bridget and Mary (Jnr.) were scholars. John and Mary (Snr.) could not read or write. Bridget and Mary could read and write. John spoke Irish. Mary (Snr.), Bridget and Mary spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Barbara Hopkins (74), a widow, resided in house numbered 9 with her two children. They were Martin (18) and Catherine (16). Barbara was 56 when Martin was born, or so it seems from the census return. She was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write and they spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a piggery.

Bridget Hopkins (60), a widow lived in house 10 with her three children. They were John (23), Martin (20) and Mary (25). Bridget was a farmer. No one in this household could read and write and spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

James (60) and Sarah (50) Duffy resided in house 11 with their four children. The children were Mary (20), Thomas (17), Bridget (13) and Catherine (7). James was a farmer and Bridget was a scholar. James, Sarah, Mary and Thomas could not read but Catherine could. Bridget was the only family member who could read and write. They all spoke Irish and English expect Sarah who spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

James (40) and Honor (35) Sullivan lived in house 12 with their seven children. Their children were Mary (10), Bridget (8), Michael (7), Patrick (6), James (5), John (4) and Ellen (3). Honor and Mary were the only family members who could read and write. Everyone in this family spoke Irish and English except John and Ellen the youngest child. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Michael (80) and Ellen (75) Sullivan resided in house 13 with their son, daughter, daughter-in-law, Mary Sullivan (30) and their five grandchildren. Their son was Patt (35), their daughter was Honor (20), their daughter-in-law was Mary and their grandchildren were Mary (8), Michael (6), Patt (5), Ellen (3) and Thomas (1). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer and Mary (Jnr.) was a scholar. Michael (Snr.), Ellen (Snr.) could neither read nor write and spoke only Irish. Honor, Michael, Patt, Ellen and Thomas could not read. Patt, Mary (Snr.) and Mary could read and write. All members of the family outside of the baby and grandparents spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Peter (40) and Sarah (39) Sullivan resided in house 14 with their seven children: Patrick (13), Bridget (9), Catherine (7), Thomas (6), Mary (4), John (2) and Michael (6 months). Peter was a farmer. Bridget and Catherine were scholars and the only members of the family who could read and write and the only family members to speak English and Irish. They resided in a 2nd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Thomas (62) and Bridget (55) Walsh resided in house 15 with their son, Michael (15) and grand-daughter, Bridget Walsh (7). Thomas and Michael were blacksmiths. Both of them could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Bridget (Snr.) and Bridget could not read. Bridget (Jnr.) also spoke Irish and English. Bridget spoke only Irish. They were all born in Co. Galway expect for the granddaughter, Bridget, who was born in America. They lived in a 2nd class house with one room. They had a forge.

James (50) and Mary (41) Sullivan lived in house 16 with their four children. Their children were Thomas (16), Ellen (13), Sarah (10) and Maggie (4). James was a farmer. Ellen and Sarah were scholars and the only family members who could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. They resided in a 3rd class house with two rooms. (Out offices are not recorded for houses 16-30.)

Michael (64) and Hannah (68) Thornton resided in house numbered 17 with their son, Peter (40), daughter-in-law, Mary Thornton (36), and their six grandchildren. The grandchildren were Mary (10), John (8), Hannah (6), Thomas (4), Kate Ellen (2) and Michael (8 months). Michael (Snr.) was a Mason, Hannah (Snr.) was a House Keeper, Peter was a farmer, Mary (Snr.) was an assistant housekeeper and Mary and John were scholars. Hannah (Snr.), Hannah, and Thomas could not read. Michael (Snr.), Peter, Mary (Snr.), Mary and John could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

Patt (63) and Bridget (58) Kane lived in house 18 with their three children. Their children were Bridget (22), Michael (18) and Catheran (sic.) (16). Patt was a farmer, Bridget (Snr.) was a housekeeper, Bridget was an assistant housekeeper, Michael was a farmer and Catheran was an assistant house keeper. Patt, Bridget (Snr.) and Michael could not read. Bridget and Catheran could read and write. Bridget (Snr.), Bridget, Michael and Catheran spoke English and Irish. Patt spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms.

John (41) and Bridget (40) Keane lived in house numbered 19 with their five children. Their children were Patt (7), Mary (5), Michael (4), Thomas (3) and John (4 months). John (Snr.) was a farmer and shopkeeper. Patt was a scholar. John (Snr.) could neither nor write and neither could his 4 youngest children who hadn’t started school yet. Bridget and Patt could read and write. The family spoke English and Irish. They resided in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

John (60) and Catherine (55) Corbett resided in house numbered 20 with their two children: Honor (22) and James (19). Honor’s occupation was a ‘Servant, now unemployed’. James was a Labourer. John, Catherine and Honor could not read however James could read and write. Honor and James spoke Irish and English. The parents spoke Irish only. They lived in a 4th class house with one room.

Darby (58) and Ellen (48) Duffy resided in house 21 with their five children; Patt (16), Catheran (14), Stephen (12), Hannah (10) and William (5). Darby was a farmer, Ellen was a housekeeper and Patt’s occupation was listed as ‘assistant’ possibly assisting his father on the farm. Catheran, Stephen and Hannah were scholars. In the occupation or profession part of the form William was listed as ‘School inconvenient for this age’, Ellen and William could not read, the other family members could read. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Mary Duffy (62) lived in house numbered 22. She was a widow. She could not read. She spoke Irish. She lived in a 4th class house with one room.

Michael (29) and Bridget (27) Duffy resided in house 23 with their two daughters, Mary (2) and Anne (1) and Michael’s sister-in-law, Honor Duffy (19). Their daughters were Mary (2) and Anne (1). Michael was a Farmer. Bridget, Mary and Anne could not read. Michael and Honor could read and write. Michael, Bridget and Honor spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Martin (40) and Mary (39) Duffy lived in house numbered 24 with their six children. Their children were Thomas (18), Michael (16), Mary (14), Bridget (12), Honour (10), and Maria (8). Martin was a farmer. Bridget, Honour and Maria were scholars. The parents could not read. The children could read and write. The parents spoke Irish and the children spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Bridget Duffy (60) resided in house 25 with her three children. Her 3 children were John (22), William (19) and Bridget (16). Bridget (Snr.) was a farmer. Bridget (Snr.), John and William could not read. Bridget could read and write. Bridget (Snr.), John and William spoke Irish. Bridget spoke Irish as well as English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

James (44) and Mary (41) Murphy lived in house numbered 26 with their seven children. Their children were Patt (20), Catherine (18), James (15), John (12), Thomas (9), Michael (5) and Peter (1). James (Snr.) was a farmer. James, John and Thomas were scholars. James (Snr.), Michael and Peter could not read. Mary, Patt, Catherine, James, John and Thomas could read. Mary, Patt, Catherine, James (Jnr.), John, Thomas, Michael spoke Irish and English. James spoke Irish. Peter spoke neither Irish nor English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

Nappy Murphy (78) lived in house numbered 27. She was a widow. She could not read. She spoke Irish. She lived in a 4th class house with one room.

Michael (60) and Catherine (40) Duffy occupied house numbered 28 with their nine children. These were Mary (21), Patt (19), Bridget (16), Honor (13), Sarah (11), Catherine (10), Martin (8), John (7) and Michael (4). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. Sarah, Catherine, Martin and John were scholars. The parents with Mary, Patt and Michael could not read. Bridget, Honor, Sarah, Catherine, Martin and John could read and write. Mary, Bridget, Honor, Sarah, Catherine, Martin, John and Michael (Jnr.) spoke Irish and English. Michael, Catherine and Patt spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Michael (60) and Julia (50) Duffy occupied house 29 with their four children, Bridget (7), Thomas (5), Martin (3) and James (1). Michael was a farmer and Bridget was a scholar. Michael, Julia, Thomas, Martin and James could not read. Bridget could read and write. Bridget spoke Irish and English. Michael, Julia, Martin and James spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Patt (78) and Bridget (48) Duffy lived in house 30 with their three sons. Their sons were Thomas (13), Martin (11) and Patt (8). Patt (Snr.) was a farmer. No one in this household could read. They all spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Thomas (60) and Bridget (55) Herwood lived in house 31 with their two sons, daughter-in-law and two daughters. Their sons were James (25) and Michael (18). Their daughter-in-law was Bridget (20). Their daughters were Sarah (11) and Bridget (14). Thomas was a farmer. Sarah and Bridget were scholars. Thomas, Bridget (55) and James could not read. Michael, Bridget (20), Sarah and Bridget (14) could read and write. Thomas, James, Michael, Bridget (20), Sarah and Bridget (14) spoke Irish and English. Bridget (55) spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Michael (24) and Mary (20) Murphy resided in house 32 with their daughter, Michaels’s mother and Michael’s brother. Their daughter was Mary (6 months), Michael’s mother was Mary (60) and his brother was Thomas (15). Michael and Thomas were Agricultural labourers. Michael, Mary (6 months), Mary (60) and Thomas could not read. Mary (20) could read and write. Mary (20) spoke Irish and English. Michael, Mary (6 months) and Thomas spoke Irish. Mary (6 months) spoke neither Irish nor English. They lived in a 4th class house with one room. They had no out-houses or Farm Steadings.

Mary Herwood (50) resided in house 33 with her two sisters Sarah Herwood (48) and Ellen Joyce (54). Mary was a farmer. Nobody in this household could read, they all spoke Irish. She lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a piggery

Maria Joyce (65) resided in house numbered 34. Maria was a widow. Maria could not read and spoke Irish. She lived in a 4th class house with one room.

Michael (50) and Bridget (40) Melia resided in house 35 with their son, Michael (7 months). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. No one in this household could read and write. Michael (Snr.) and Bridget spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Bridget Herwood (50), a widow, lived in house numbered 36 with her two sons, daughter, daughter-in-law and her four grandchildren. Her sons were John (28) and Thomas (14). Her daughter was Margaret (12). Her daughter-in-law was Honor (26). Her grandchildren were Mary (5), Bridget (4), Maggie (3) and Sarah (9). Bridget (Snr.) was a farmer. Bridget (Snr.), John, Honor, Mary, Bridget, Maggie and Sarah could not read. Thomas and Margaret could read and write. John, Honor, Mary, Bridget, Thomas and Margaret spoke Irish and English. Bridget spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

UNINHABITED BUILDING AT HOUSE 37.

William (73) and Mary (60) Philbin resided in house 38 with their two sons, their two daughters, daughter-in-law and grandchild. Their sons were Thomas (27) and William (22); their daughters were Norah (19) and Mary (18). Their daughter-in-law was Sarah (25) and their grandchild was Mary (1 month). William (Snr.) was a farmer. William (Snr.), Mary (60), Thomas and Sarah could not read. William, Norah and Mary could read and write. Thomas, Sarah, William (Jnr.), Norah and Mary (18) spoke Irish and English. William and Mary (18) spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

Mark (45) and Annie (29) Philbin lived in house 39 with their five sons, their daughter and their servant. Their sons were James (10), Micheal (9), Pat (7), William (5) and Mark (3). Their daughter was Bridget (1). Their servant was Martin Murphy (17). Mark (Snr.) was a farmer. James, Micheal and Pat were scholars. Martin was a farm servant. William, Mark (Jnr.) and Bridget could not read. Mark (Snr.), Annie, James, Micheal, Pat and Martin could read and write. Mark (Snr.), Annie, James, Micheal and Pat spoke Irish and English. William and Mark spoke English. Martin spoke Irish. Bridget was too young to speak. They lived in a 2nd class house with five rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

Martin (61) and Julia (40) Corbett resided in house 40 with their three sons and their two daughters. Their sons were James (16), Patrick (7) and William (4). Their daughters were Margaret (11) and Sarah (2). Martin was a farmer. Margaret, Patrick and William were scholars. Martin, Julia, James and Sarah could not read. William could read. Margaret and Patrick could read and write. Margaret and Patrick spoke Irish and English. Martin, Julia and James spoke Irish. William and Sarah spoke neither Irish nor English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a piggery.

Patrick Corbett (65) resided in house 41 with his seven children. His children were Michael (18), Margaret (16), James (15), Julia (12), Catherine (10), Kathleen (8) and Sarah (6). Patrick was a farmer. Julia, Catherine, Kathleen and Sarah were scholars. Margaret, Julia, Catherine, Kathleen and Sarah could read and write. James could read. Patrick and Michael could not read. Margaret, James, Julia, Catherine, Kathleen and Sarah spoke Irish and English. Patrick and Michael spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Mark (65) and Anne (56) Philbin lived in house numbered 42 with their three children. Their children were James (25), Catherine (24) and Anne (20). Mark was a farmer. The parents could not read. James could read. Catherine and Anne could read and write. The children spoke Irish and English and the parents spoke Irish. They had a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable and a cow house.

Thomas (54) and Norah (47) Fitzhenry resided in house 43 with their four children. Their children were Catherine (18), John (17), William (15) and Pat (13). Thomas was a farmer. Thomas, Catherine, John, William and Pat could read and write. Norah could not read.   Thomas, Catherine, John, William and Pat spoke Irish and English. Norah spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Michael (40) and Catherine (42) Brown lived in house 44 with their five children and Michael’s nephew. Their five children were Patt (13), Mary (9), John (7), Julia (4) and Michael (12 months). Michael’s nephew was Petter Heggins (sic) (7). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. Michael and Petter were scholars. Michael (Snr.), Catherine, Julia and Michael (Jnr.) could not read. Patt, Mary, John and Petter could read and write. Patt, Mary, John, Julia and Petter spoke Irish and English. Michael (Snr.) and Catherine spoke Irish. Michael spoke neither English nor Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a stable and a cow house.

James (34) and Sarah (30) Coyne resided in house 45 with their three children and James’s mother.   Their children were John (4), William (3) and Mary (1). James’s mother was Bridget Coyne (80). James was a farmer. No one in this household could read. They all spoke Irish expect Mary who spoke neither English nor Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable and a cow house.

John (70) and Sarah (50) Conroy lived in house 46 with their son and two grandchildren. Their son was Patt (28) and their 2 grandchildren were Mary Finnerty (5) and Patt Finnerty (3). John was a farmer. Mary and Patt (Jnr.) were scholars. Mary and Patt (Jnr.) could read, which was extraordinary given their ages. John, Sarah and Patt could not read. Patt (Snr.), Mary and Patt spoke Irish and English. John and Sarah spoke Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

OUT OFFICES ARE NOT RECORDED FOR HOUSES 46-57.

Martin Fitzhenry (40) lived in house 47 with his five children. His children were Catherine (18), Mary (15), Bridget (13), Patrick (11), and John (8). Martin was a widower farmer. Bridget, Patrick and John were scholars. Catherine and Patrick could read and write. Mary, Bridget and John could read. Martin could not read. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Patt (60) and Catherine (50) Corbett resided in house 48 with their four children. Their children were John (18), Richard (16), Catherine (14) and Mary (7). Patt was a farmer and Mary was a scholar. Mary could read and write. Catherine (Jnr.) could read. Patt, Catherine, John and Richard could not read. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Michael (60) and Bridget (50) Duffy lived in house 49 with their three sons. Their children were Martin (20), John (14) and Michael (9). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. Michael (Jnr.) was a scholar. Michael (Jnr.) could read. The parents with Martin and John could not read. John and Michael (Jnr.) spoke Irish and English. Michael (Jnr.), Bridget and Martin spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Bridget Duffy (54) lived in house 50 with her three daughters.   Her daughters were Mary (14), Bridget (12) and Catherine (10). Bridget (Snr.) was a married farmer. Catherine was a scholar. Catherine could read and write. Bridget (Snr.), Mary and Bridget could not read. Bridget (Jnr.) and Catherine spoke Irish and English. Bridget (Snr.) and Mary spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Peter (40) and Mary (38) Sullivan resided in house 51 with their four daughters and their son. Their daughters were Mary (17), Bridget (15), Annie (13), Catherine (11); and Michael (9). Peter was a farmer. Catherine and Michael were scholars. The children could read and write and the parents could not. Everyone in this household was bilingual. This family resided in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Michael Joyce (55) resided in house 52 with his three children. His children were Patt (14), Catherine (12) and Anne (8). Michael was a farmer. Catherine and Anne were scholars. Everyone in this household could read and write and was bilingual. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Richard (50) and Margaret (35) Corbett lived in house 53 with their five children. Their children were Mary (15), John (13), William (11), Margaret (6) and Michael (4). Richard was a farmer. John, William and Margaret (Jnr.) were scholars. All the children except Michael could read and write. Michael and the parents could not read. Everyone except Richard was bilingual in this household. Richard spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms.

Patt Watters (80) lived in house 54 with his son, daughter-in-law and his four grandchildren. His son was Thomas (20), his daughter-in-law was Bridget (27) and his grandchildren were John Watters (3), Thomas Watters (1), and Patt Higgins (14) and John Higgins (12). Patt (Snr.) was a farmer. John (Snr.), John and Thomas were scholars. Thomas, Bridget and John (Snr.) could read and write. Patt (Snr.) and Patt could not read. Everyone in this family was bilingual except for Patt (Snr.). Patt (Snr.) only spoke Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

Rodger (80) and Bridget (70) Coyne lived in house 55 with their son Martin (17). Note the large age gap between parents and son. Rodger was a farmer. Martin could read and write while his parents could not. Martin was bilingual. Rodger and Bridget spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms.

John (48) and Mary (31) Coyne resided in house 56 with their six children. The six children were Mary (12), Patt (10), Bridget (8), Catherine (6), Sarah (4) and Maggie (2). John was a farmer. Patt, Bridget and Catherine were scholars. All the children expect Sarah and Maggie could read and write. Sarah, Maggie and the parents could not read. John and all his children were bilingual; Mary (Snr.) spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

John (65) and Mary (50) Herwood resided in house 57 with their two sons. Their two sons were Patt (16) and Martin (15). John was a farmer. No one in this household could read. The parents and Patt spoke Irish. Martin was classified in this census as ‘dumb’ and spoke neither English nor Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms.

Census 1911:

This Census indicated that Dooghta had 53 buildings, all of which were occupied. Of the 305 person’s resident in Dooghty, 158 were male and 147 were Female. One person only was listed born in Co. Mayo the rest were born in Co. Galway. All were Roman Catholic.   The 1911 Census were expanded to include particulars of marriage, how long the present marriage had lasted, how many children born alive, and how many were still living.

House No 1: Darby Duffy (68) a farmer was listed as the head of the family. He and his wife Ellen (68) had been married for 39 years. Nine children were born to them and eight children were still living. Darby and his sons Patrick (28), Stephen (24), and William (17) spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. The occupations were not listed for his sons. Darby’s wife spoke Irish only and could not read or write. Their 4 year old grandson Thomas Joyce was present in the household. He could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the six people who lived there. It was a private dwelling. They had four out offices, a stable, a cow house a piggery and a fowl house. Darby Duffy was the landholder.

House No 2: Thomas Duffy (48) a farmer was head of the family. He and his wife Mary (36) had been married for sixteen years and had seven children. The parents could not read but could speak both Irish and English.   Mary the eldest was 14, Martin (13), Sarah (11) and Michael was (10). They were scholars and could read and write. Catherine was (8) and spoke Irish only. Patrick was 6 and baby Kate was 2 months old. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the nine people who lived there. It was a private dwelling. They had four out offices, a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Thomas Duffy was the landholder.

House no 3: Michael Thornton (74) a farmer was listed as head of the family. He had been married to Honor (78) for 54 years and they had eight children. Michael could read and write and his wife could not read. Their son Peter (45) a farmer resided with them and was also listed as the head of his family. He and his wife Mary (51) had been married for 21 years and had seven children. They could all read and write. The families could speak both Irish and English. Mary (20) was a dressmaker. The occupation of Hannah (16) was not listed. Thomas (15) Kate (13) Michael (10) and Bridget (8) were scholars. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the ten family members. It was a private dwelling. They had five out offices; a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a store. Michael Thornton was the landholder.

House No 4: Pat Keane (73) a farmer was listed as head of the family. He and his wife Bridget (76) had been married for 50 years and had eight children. Their son Michael (31) and his wife Ellen (27) also resided in the house. They had been married 7 years and had one child, Michael (6) a scholar. Ellen and her son Michael could read and spoke both English and Irish. Pat and his wife Bridget and their son Michael could not read and they spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the families. It was a private dwelling. They had three out offices; a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Patrick Keane was the landholder.

House No 5: Michael Duffy (68) a farmer was head of the family.   He had been married to Catherine (65) for 36 years. They had nine children.   Their sons Martin (20) and John (18) had no occupation listed. Their son Michael (13) was a scholar. The sons could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. The parents could not read and they spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the family. It was a private dwelling. They had three out offices; a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Michael Duffy was the landholder.

House No 6: Patrick Joyce (40) a farmer was listed as head of the family. He had been married to Sarah (30) for 9 years. Eight children were born to them and four were still living. Their daughter Ellen (9) was not recorded as a scholar. They had three sons, David (5) and their twin sons Michael and Patrick (2). Patricks mother Ellen (71), a widow lived with the family. Patrick and David (5) spoke Irish only while his wife, mother and daughter Ellen (9) spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the family. It was a private dwelling. They had two out offices, a cow house and a piggery. Patrick Joyce was the landholder.

House No 7: James Herwood (40) a farmer was head of the family. He had been married to Bridget (30) for 11 years. Five children were born to them and four were still living. Michael (10) and Mary (7) were scholars. They had a daughter Bridget (5) and an infant Sarah (1). James’ mother Bridget (69) a widow, and his unmarried brother Michael (25) an assistant on the farm were also in the house. James and his mother spoke Irish only. His wife and children and his brother spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the family. It was a private dwelling. They had two out offices, a cow house and a piggery.

House No 8: Margaret Jennings (69) a widow was listed as head of the family. Her daughter Bridget (27) was single and resided with her. Both mother and daughter had “stocking knitter” recorded as their occupation. Margaret spoke Irish only and could not read. Bridget spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. They occupied two rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had 1 cow house. Margaret Jennings was the landholder.

House No 9: Nora Herwood (40) a farmer was listed as head of the family. Her marriage had lasted 17 years and she bore eight children, seven were still living. Bridget Herwood (71) her mother – in – law resided with the family. She spoke Irish only and could not read. Nora’s daughters Mary (16) and Bridget (15) had no occupation listed. Margaret (13), Sarah (12) and Patrick (8) were scholars and they could read and write. Nora and her children, even 5 year old Michael spoke both languages and Martin (3) spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the family. It was a private dwelling. They had two out offices, a cow house and a piggery. Nora Herwood was the landholder.

House No 10: Catherine Corbett (69) a widowed farmer was head of the family. She spoke Irish only and could not read. Her son Richard (26) and daughter Mary (21) lived with her. They could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They were both single. Catherine’s grandson Joseph (7) was present also. He could not read but could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. The family occupied two rooms and the house was a private dwelling. They had two out offices, a cow house and a piggery. Catherine Corbett was the landholder.

House No 11: Michael Duffy (74) a widower was head of the family. His son Martin (30) lived with him. Martin was single and no occupation was listed for him. He could not read and he spoke both Irish and English. Michael could not read and spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the family and it was a private dwelling. They had two out offices, a cow house and a piggery. Michael Duffy was the landholder.

House No 12: Peter Sullivan (61) was head of the family. He was married to Mary (63) for thirty years. Eleven children were born to them, seven were still living. Their son Michael (19) and their daughter Katie (21) lived with them. No occupations are listed for these offspring. Peter and his children could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Mary could not read and spoke Irish only. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the four family members. They had two out buildings; a cow house and a piggery. Peter Sullivan was the landholder.

House No 13: Michael Joyce (68) a widower was head of the family. He could not read. Irish was his spoken language. His son Patrick (23) and his daughter Anne (19) lived with him. Michael worked as a farmer, no occupation was listed for his family. Patrick could read, Anne could read and write. They spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the family members. It was a private dwelling. They had three out offices, a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Michael Joyce was the landholder.

House No 14: Bridget Duffy (70) a widow was head of the family. Bridget’s occupation was listed as farmer. She could not read and spoke Irish. Her son Thomas (21) lived with her and no occupation was listed for him. He could not read and he spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the two family members. It was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery. Bridget Duffy was the landholder.

House No 15: Michael O’ Maille (67) a farmer was married to Bridget (58) for twelve years. They had one son Michael (11). The family spoke both Irish and English and could not read. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the three family members and it was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery. Michael O’ Maille was the landholder.

House No 16: John Herward (74) a farmer was married to Mary (73) for thirty seven years. Five children were born to them, three were still living. Irish was their spoken language and they could not read. Their home was a 2nd class built slate roof house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the two family members and it was a private dwelling. They had three out offices, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. John Herwood was the landholder.

House No 17: James Murphy (57) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (56) for thirty three years. Thirteen children were born to them, nine were still living. Resident in the house was Nappie Murphy (78); she was the mother of James Murphy. His sons John (21) and Thomas (19) had no occupations listed for them. Michael (14) and Peter (11) were scholars. The sons could read and write and spoke Irish and English. James, his wife and his mother could not read. Mary could speak Irish and English while James and his mother spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Seven family members occupied three rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had three out offices, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. James Murphy was the landholder.

House No 18: Bridget Duffy (66) a widowed farmer was head of the family. Her sons Martin (19) and Patrick (17) lived with her. No occupation was listed for them. The family could not read and Irish was their spoken language. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Three family members occupied two rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery. Bridget Duffy was the landholder.

House No 19: Michael Duffy (38) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Bridget (38) for eleven years. They had five children. Mary (10), Catherine (9) and twins Michael (8) and Margaret (8) were scholars. They could read and write and could speak both Irish and English. They also had an infant, Patrick (1). Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Seven family members occupied two rooms. It was a private dwelling and they had a cow house and a piggery. Michael Duffy was the landholder.

House No 20: Michael Duffy (70) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Julia (69) for thirty three years. Nine children were born to them, eight were still living. The parents could not read and spoke Irish only. Bridget (19), Thomas (17), Martin (14), James (12) and Julia (10) could all read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Seven members occupied three rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had three out offices, a stable, a cow house and a piggery. Michael Duffy was the landholder.

House No 21: Martin Duffy (33) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Margaret (30) for two years. They had a one month old baby daughter Mary. Martin’s brother James (36) was also in the house. They could not read, they spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and the family occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery and Martin Duffy was the landholder.

House No 22: Michael Browne (60) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Catherine (52) for twenty five years. Nine children were born to them, five were still living. Mary (20), John (19), and Julia (14) had no occupations listed for them. Michael (12) was a scholar. The family could all read and write and could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class, slate roofed house with five windows to the front. Six family members occupied five rooms and the house was a private dwelling. They had three out offices, a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Michael Browne was the landholder.

House No 23: Julia Corbett (51) a widowed farmer was listed as head of the family. Nora (16) had no occupation listed. She could read and write. William (14), Sarah (9) were scholars and could read and write. Stephen (8) and Mark (6) and their mother Julia could not read. All the family spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Six family members occupied three rooms. The house was a private dwelling and they had a cow house and a piggery. Julia Corbett was the landholder.

House No 24: Patrick Corbett (80) a widower and a farmer was head of the family. He could not read and spoke only Irish. His son Michael (30) was single and no occupation was listed for him. He could not read and spoke both Irish and English. His daughters Kathleen (18) and Sarah (16) could read and write and spoke both languages. Their home was a 3rd class, house with two windows to the front. Four family members occupied two rooms. The house was a private dwelling and they had a cow house and a piggery. Patrick Corbett was the landholder.

House No 25: Bridget Hopkins (73) a widowed farmer was listed as head of the household. Her son John (35) was married to Mary (30) for five years and they had two children. Bridget (4) could speak Irish and English and Thomas (2) could speak English only. Mary could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. John and his mother spoke Irish only. No occupation was listed for the married son. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. The house was a private dwelling and five family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a fowl house. Bridget Hopkins was the landholder.

House No 26: James Sullivan (70) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (62) for thirty five years. Eight children were born to them and seven were still living. Thomas (26) was single, and like his parents he could not read or write. Sarah (19) could read and write as could Margarita (14), a scholar. The parents spoke Irish only while their children could speak both languages. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and five members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. James Sullivan was the landholder.

House No 27: Thomas Walsh, a farmer and blacksmith was head of the family. He was a widower. His son Michael (25) was a blacksmith also. They could not read and they spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two family members occupied two rooms. It was a private dwelling and they had a cow house and a piggery. Thomas Walsh was the landholder.

House No 28: Peter Sullivan (59) a farmer was married to Sarah (56) for twenty eight years. They had five children. Kate (19) had no occupation listed. Thomas (18) was a post boy, Mary (14), John (13) and Michael (10) were scholars. The children could all read and write and spoke both Irish and English. The parents could not read and spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Seven family members occupied three rooms. It was a private dwelling and they had a stable and a cow house. Peter Sullivan was the landholder.

House No 29: Ellen Sullivan (82) a widowed farmer was listed as the head of the household and spoke Irish only. Her son Patrick (47) and his wife Mary (42) were married twenty years. Ten children were born to them and nine were still living. Mary (19), Michael (17), Patrick (15) had no profession listed. Ellen (14), Thomas (12) and Nora (9) were scholars. All these children could read and write.   Bridget was (7), John (4) and Peter was (2). The grandmother, her son and daughter – in –law could not read. The children and their parents could all speak both Irish and English. Their home was 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and twelve family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. Ellen Sullivan was the landholder.

House No 30: James Sullivan (52) a farmer and water bailiff was head of the family. He was married to Nora (51) for twenty two years. Twelve children were born to them and ten were still living. Bridget (20), Michael (18), Patrick (17), James (16), John (15) had no occupations listed. Ellen (11) and Nora (9) were scholars. Kate was (7) and Margaret (5). The parents could not read but the children over seven could read and write. All the family spoke both Irish and English. The family home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and eleven family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. James Sullivan was the landholder.

House No 31: James Duffy (73) a farmer was listed as head of the household. He was married to Sarah (78) for forty nine years. Nine children were born to them and eight were still living. Nora Duffy (33) his daughter – in – law was married three years and had two children who resided with them. She spoke Irish and English. His daughter Catherine (18) was also in the house and she could read and write.   Her parents could not read and spoke Irish only. James’ two grandsons were Patrick (2) and John (1). Their home was a 3rd class, house. It was a private dwelling and six family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. James Duffy was the landholder.

House No 32: Barbara Hopkins (74) a widowed farmer was head of the family. Her son Martin (52) and daughter Catherine (30) were both single and no occupation was listed for them. The family could not read and spoke Irish only. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and they had a cow house and a piggery. Barbara Hopkins was the landholder.

House No 33: John Walsh (60) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (46) for twenty years, eight children were born to them and six were still living. Bridget (18) and Mollie (17) had no occupations listed. They could read and write as could Tommy (14) and Katie (9) who were scholars. Maggie was (4) and John (1). John (Senior) could not read and spoke only Irish.   Bridget his wife could read and she, like the older children could speak both Irish and English. Maggie (4) spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and eight family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery and John Walsh was the landholder.

House No 34: Patrick Duffy (75) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (68) for thirty five years. They had one son William (30) who was single and had no occupation listed. Patrick was deaf and like his wife he could not read. They spoke Irish only. William could not read but could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house and it was a private dwelling. Three family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery and Patrick Duffy was the landholder.

House No 35: Michael Joyce (55) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Bridget (55) for twenty seven years. Nine children were born to them, six were still living. John (20), Catherine (17) and Michael (15) could read and write but had no occupations listed. William (13), Bridget (11) and Stephen (10) were scholars and they could read and write. The parents spoke only Irish while the children could speak Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and eight family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery and Michael Joyce was the landholder.

House No 36: Patrick Coyne (40) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Barbara (40) for seventeen years and they had eight children. Bridget (15), Michael (13), Nappy J (11) and Norah (9) were scholars and they could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Maggie was (7), Patrick (4) and the Infant Thomas was 6 months old. The parents could read and write and the family spoke both Irish and English except the youngest children who spoke English only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and nine family members occupied three rooms. They had three out offices; a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Patrick Coyne was the landholder.

House No 37: Mary Molloy a widowed farmer was head of the family. Her daughter Mary (33) was a national school teacher. Patrick (22) and William (20) were listed farmers sons and Margaret (13) was a scholar. All were single. All the family spoke both Irish and English and could all read and write. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and five family members occupied three rooms. They had three out offices, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Mary Molloy was the landholder.

House No 38: Patrick Walsh (65) a farmer was head of the family. He was married but it does not state how long the marriage had lasted. His daughter Mary (24) was single and her occupation was not listed. His son Michael (21) was head miner. The family spoke both Irish and English and the children could read and write. The father could not read. Their home was 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three family members shared three rooms. It was a private dwelling and they had three out offices,   a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Patrick Walsh was the landholder.

House No 39: Thomas Walsh (47) was head of the family. A farmer and head miner, he was married to Mary (45) for fourteen years. Ten children were born to them and nine were still living. His sister Ellen Walsh (55) was single and resided with them, she could not read. Thomas could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their children Mary (13), Margaret (12), Patrick (10) and Helena (9) were scholars and could read and write. Andrew (8) could not read. Julia was (5), Martin (4), John (3) and the infant Thomas Francis was 5 months. The family could speak both Irish and English except for the 3 year old who spoke English only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and twelve family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. Thomas Walsh was the landholder.

House No 40: John Keane (49) a shop keeper and farmer was head of the family and was born in Doughty Co. Galway. He was married to Bridget (49) for twenty years and they had six children. Their son Patrick (20) did not have an occupation listed. Mary (17), Michael (15), Thomas (13) and John (11) were all scholars and daughter Bridget was (3). John (Senior) could not read though his wife and school going children could read and write. The family all spoke both Irish and English. Their residence was a shop listed as a 2nd class property with three windows to the front. Eight family members shared four rooms. They had four out offices, a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. John Keane was the landholder.

House No 41: Martin Duffy (53) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (64) for thirty years and they had six children. Nora (20) and Maria (18) lived with them. No occupation was listed for the girls. They could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Martin spoke Irish and English and his wife spoke Irish only. They could not read. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling with four family members occupying three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.   Martin Duffy was the landholder.

House No 42: Sarah Conroy (73) a widowed farmer was listed as head of the family. She could not read and spoke Irish only. Her son Patrick (36) was single and lived with her.   He had no occupation listed and could not read. Her grandchildren Mary Finnerty (14) and Patrick Finnerty (12) were scholars. Martin Connelly (15) and Sarah Connelly (5) were also her grandchildren and were in the house. The Finnerty children and Martin Connelly were born in the U.S. America. Martin could read and was listed as assisting on the farm. Sarah’s family could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. The six family members occupied two rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery and Sarah Conroy was the landholder.

House No 43: Sarah Coyne (42) a farmer is listed as head of the family. She was married for nineteen years and bore eleven children, seven were still living. Her son John (15) had no occupation listed and like his mother could not read.   William (13) and Mary (12) were scholars and could read and write while Patrick (8) could not read. James was (6), Martin (4) Thady was one year old. The family could all speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class, house with three windows to the front and eight members of the family occupied three rooms.   It was a private dwelling. They also had a cow house and a piggery and Sarah Coyne was the landholder.

House No 44: Martin Coyne (26) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Margaret (25) for three years and they had two children. Mary was two years old and the infant John was eleven months. Martin and his wife could read and write and they spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front and four family members occupied three rooms. It was a private dwelling. They had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house and Martin Coyne was the landholder.

House No 45: Thomas Waters (43) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Bridget (39) for fifteen years. Seven children were born to them and six were still living. John (13), Tommy (11), Mary (9), and Bridgie (6) were scholars. Maggie was (1) year old. Lillie Walsh (23) was a dressmaker and she was a relative of the family. The family spoke both Irish and English and they could all read and write. Their home was a 2nd class, slate roof house with five windows to the front and eight family members occupied five rooms. It was a private dwelling. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery and Thomas Waters was the landholder.

 House No 46: John Coyne (52) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (44) for twenty three years and they had ten children. John and Mary could not read. She and her youngest daughter Annie spoke Irish only. The rest of the family spoke both Irish and English. Pat (20) was a farmer and he could read and write. Catherine (17) and Sarah (15) could read and write, they had no occupations listed for them. Maggie (13), Martin (11) and Norah (9) were scholars. Annie was (3) and infant Thomas was 9 months. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Ten members of the family occupied three rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery and John Coyne was the landholder.

House No 47: Thomas Philbin (40) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Sarah (36) for eleven years and they had six children. Mary (10) was a scholar and she could read and write. James was (8), Patrick (6), Anne (4), Thomas (2) and infant William was 4 months. Present also was Thomas’s brother, Patrick Philbin (44) a cattle and sheep dealer, he could read and spoke both Irish and English. Four year old Anne spoke English only, while the rest of the family could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and nine family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Thomas Philbin was the landholder.

House No 48: Martin Fitzhenry (62) a widower was head of the family. He was a farmer and his son John (18) lived with him. While they could not read, they could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front and it was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and Martin Fitzhenry was the landholder.

House No 49: Mark Philbin (55) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Catherine (50) for six years. No children were born of this union. Catherine was born in Co. Mayo. The children from his first marriage were Pat (19), Willie (16), Mark (14), Bridget (12) and Sarah (11). The family could all read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class, slate roof house with five windows to the front. Seven members of the family occupied five rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had seven out houses, a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn, a shed and a store. Mark Philbin was the landholder.

House No 50: Mark Philban (sic) (79) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Anne (73) for forty eight years. Nine children were born to them and eight were still living. They could not read and spoke Irish only. His son James (38) was single and was listed as ‘Farmers son’. Bridget (35) was single and had no occupation assigned to her. The children could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front and four family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Mark Philbin was the landholder.

House No 51: Richard Corbett (73) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Maggie (60) for thirty three years. Nine children were born to them and eight were still living. Their daughters Mary (26), Julia (25), and Maggie (17) could read and write, and spoke both Irish and English. No occupations were listed for them. Their sons Willie ((19) and Michael (15) could read and write and also spoke Irish and English. No occupation was listed for them. The parents did not read and spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front and seven family members occupied three rooms. It was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery and Richard Corbett was the landholder.

House No 52: Thomas Fitzhenry (69) a farmer was head of the family. He was a widower and his son Patrick (23) lived with him. Patrick was single and no occupation was listed for him. They could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front and it was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery and Thomas Fitzhenry was the landholder.

House No 53: Mary Murphy (71) a widowed farmer was head of the family. Her son Thomas (22) was single and he lived with her. His occupation was not listed. They could not read and Irish was their spoken language. Their home was a 3rd class house with one window to the front and the family shared one room. It was a private dwelling and they also had a cow house. Mary Murphy was the landholder.

Names:

According to O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Dooghta and Dubhachta was its official Irish form. The townland name was spelled ‘Dooghty’ according to O’Donovan. He further gives village names, such as Dooghta, Aughayoughta, Gorreenmore, Ballintubber and Kaunwaum, Dooghta Browne, Uggool, Parkaurilling and Illaunnagcorp. Dooghta mountain, in 1838 was called locally Crickyooghtha. (Cnoc Dhubhachta). Illaunnagorp – called Oileáin na gCorp locally, was apparently a village near the holy well. Parkawillin – “Páirc a Mhullin” or locally known as Millpark was also known as Paurk a Willing.

According to O’Donovan’s letters there are two holy wells in Dooghta, one dedicated to the Virgin Mary and the other to St. Feichín, the Patron of Cong, and near the latter a flag stone called leac-feichin, by which men were put to the ordeal! For a full account see Otway’s publication – A Tour in Ireland, Ask about Connaught. http://www.askaboutireland – this was written by the Reverend Cesar Otway, an historian/anthropologist (1780 – 1842). Caesar Otway  was born at Castle Otway near Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, Ireland in 1780. He was an Irish author and clergyman who wanted to study and improve the condition of the poor. Wikipedia.

 

 Patrick (54) and Mary (44) Molloy resided in house numbered three with their seven children. They also had a visitor on the night of the census. Their children were John (23), Bridget (20), Kate (18), Ellen (15), Patrick (12), Willie (10) and Margaret (3). The visitor was Bridget Butler (42). Patrick (Snr.) was a farmer. John was a National School teacher. Ellen, Patrick and Willie were scholars. They all could read and write expect Margaret who could not read. Everyone in this household spoke both, Irish and English. They lived a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Patt(80) and Mary(70) Walsh resided in house numbered 4 with their daughter, Barbara Coyne (30), son-in-law, Patt Coyne (30) and their four grandchildren. Their grandchildren were Mary Coyne (6), Bridget Coyne (5), Michael Coyne (3) and Nappy J. Coyne (6 months). Patt (Snr.) was a farmer. The grandparents and grandchildren could not read or write. Patt (Jnr.) and Barbara could read and write. Patt (30), Barbara, Mary and Bridget spoke Irish and English. Patt (Snr.) and Mary spoke Irish only and the rest of the household was bilingual. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Michael (42) and Bridget (41) Joyce resided in house 5 with their eight children. Their children were Patrick (15), Martin (13), Thomas (12), John (10), Catherine (8), Michael (6), William (4) and Bridget (2). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. All but the eldest and two youngest were scholars. The parents could not read or write and all but the youngest children could do so. While the parents spoke only Irish, the rest of the family were bilingual. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a piggery.

Patt (45) and Mary (40) Duffy lived in house 6 with their three children. Their children were Honor (18), Catherine (15) and William (8). Patt was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write, and they all spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a piggery.

Thomas Duffy (54) resided in house 7 with his son, daughter-in-law and his two grandchildren. His son was Thomas (35), his daughter-in-law was Mary (33), and his grandchildren were Mary (3) and Sarah (11 months). Thomas (Snr.) was a farmer. Only Mary (Snr.) could read and write in this household. Thomas (Snr.) spoke Irish. Thomas (Jnr.) and Mary spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

John (40) and Mary (30) Walsh lived in house 8 with their three children. Their children were Bridget (9), Mary (6) and Thomas (2). John was a farmer. Bridget and Mary (Jnr.) were scholars. John and Mary (Snr.) could not read or write. Bridget and Mary could read and write. John spoke Irish. Mary (Snr.), Bridget and Mary spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Barbara Hopkins (74), a widow, resided in house numbered 9 with her two children. They were Martin (18) and Catherine (16). Barbara was 56 when Martin was born, or so it seems from the census return. She was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write and they spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a piggery.

Bridget Hopkins (60), a widow lived in house 10 with her three children. They were John (23), Martin (20) and Mary (25). Bridget was a farmer. No one in this household could read and write and spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

James (60) and Sarah (50) Duffy resided in house 11 with their four children. The children were Mary (20), Thomas (17), Bridget (13) and Catherine (7). James was a farmer and Bridget was a scholar. James, Sarah, Mary and Thomas could not read but Catherine could. Bridget was the only family member who could read and write. They all spoke Irish and English expect Sarah who spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

James (40) and Honor (35) Sullivan lived in house 12 with their seven children. Their children were Mary (10), Bridget (8), Michael (7), Patrick (6), James (5), John (4) and Ellen (3). Honor and Mary were the only family members who could read and write. Everyone in this family spoke Irish and English except John and Ellen the youngest child. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Michael (80) and Ellen (75) Sullivan resided in house 13 with their son, daughter, daughter-in-law, Mary Sullivan (30) and their five grandchildren. Their son was Patt (35), their daughter was Honor (20), their daughter-in-law was Mary and their grandchildren were Mary (8), Michael (6), Patt (5), Ellen (3) and Thomas (1). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer and Mary (Jnr.) was a scholar. Michael (Snr.), Ellen (Snr.) could neither read nor write and spoke only Irish. Honor, Michael, Patt, Ellen and Thomas could not read. Patt, Mary (Snr.) and Mary could read and write. All members of the family outside of the baby and grandparents spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Peter (40) and Sarah (39) Sullivan resided in house 14 with their seven children: Patrick (13), Bridget (9), Catherine (7), Thomas (6), Mary (4), John (2) and Michael (6 months). Peter was a farmer. Bridget and Catherine were scholars and the only members of the family who could read and write and the only family members to speak English and Irish. They resided in a 2nd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Thomas (62) and Bridget (55) Walsh resided in house 15 with their son, Michael (15) and grand-daughter, Bridget Walsh (7). Thomas and Michael were blacksmiths. Both of them could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Bridget (Snr.) and Bridget could not read. Bridget (Jnr.) also spoke Irish and English. Bridget spoke only Irish. They were all born in Co. Galway expect for the granddaughter, Bridget, who was born in America. They lived in a 2nd class house with one room. They had a forge.

James (50) and Mary (41) Sullivan lived in house 16 with their four children. Their children were Thomas (16), Ellen (13), Sarah (10) and Maggie (4). James was a farmer. Ellen and Sarah were scholars and the only family members who could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. They resided in a 3rd class house with two rooms. (Out offices are not recorded for houses 16-30.)

Michael (64) and Hannah (68) Thornton resided in house numbered 17 with their son, Peter (40), daughter-in-law, Mary Thornton (36), and their six grandchildren. The grandchildren were Mary (10), John (8), Hannah (6), Thomas (4), Kate Ellen (2) and Michael (8 months). Michael (Snr.) was a Mason, Hannah (Snr.) was a House Keeper, Peter was a farmer, Mary (Snr.) was an assistant housekeeper and Mary and John were scholars. Hannah (Snr.), Hannah, and Thomas could not read. Michael (Snr.), Peter, Mary (Snr.), Mary and John could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

Patt (63) and Bridget (58) Kane lived in house 18 with their three children. Their children were Bridget (22), Michael (18) and Catheran (sic.) (16). Patt was a farmer, Bridget (Snr.) was a housekeeper, Bridget was an assistant housekeeper, Michael was a farmer and Catheran was an assistant house keeper. Patt, Bridget (Snr.) and Michael could not read. Bridget and Catheran could read and write. Bridget (Snr.), Bridget, Michael and Catheran spoke English and Irish. Patt spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms.

John (41) and Bridget (40) Keane lived in house numbered 19 with their five children. Their children were Patt (7), Mary (5), Michael (4), Thomas (3) and John (4 months). John (Snr.) was a farmer and shopkeeper. Patt was a scholar. John (Snr.) could neither nor write and neither could his 4 youngest children who hadn’t started school yet. Bridget and Patt could read and write. The family spoke English and Irish. They resided in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

John (60) and Catherine (55) Corbett resided in house numbered 20 with their two children: Honor (22) and James (19). Honor’s occupation was a ‘Servant, now unemployed’. James was a Labourer. John, Catherine and Honor could not read however James could read and write. Honor and James spoke Irish and English. The parents spoke Irish only. They lived in a 4th class house with one room.

Darby (58) and Ellen (48) Duffy resided in house 21 with their five children; Patt (16), Catheran (14), Stephen (12), Hannah (10) and William (5). Darby was a farmer, Ellen was a housekeeper and Patt’s occupation was listed as ‘assistant’ possibly assisting his father on the farm. Catheran, Stephen and Hannah were scholars. In the occupation or profession part of the form William was listed as ‘School inconvenient for this age’, Ellen and William could not read, the other family members could read. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Mary Duffy (62) lived in house numbered 22. She was a widow. She could not read. She spoke Irish. She lived in a 4th class house with one room.

Michael (29) and Bridget (27) Duffy resided in house 23 with their two daughters, Mary (2) and Anne (1) and Michael’s sister-in-law, Honor Duffy (19). Their daughters were Mary (2) and Anne (1). Michael was a Farmer. Bridget, Mary and Anne could not read. Michael and Honor could read and write. Michael, Bridget and Honor spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Martin (40) and Mary (39) Duffy lived in house numbered 24 with their six children. Their children were Thomas (18), Michael (16), Mary (14), Bridget (12), Honour (10), and Maria (8). Martin was a farmer. Bridget, Honour and Maria were scholars. The parents could not read. The children could read and write. The parents spoke Irish and the children spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Bridget Duffy (60) resided in house 25 with her three children. Her 3 children were John (22), William (19) and Bridget (16). Bridget (Snr.) was a farmer. Bridget (Snr.), John and William could not read. Bridget could read and write. Bridget (Snr.), John and William spoke Irish. Bridget spoke Irish as well as English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

James (44) and Mary (41) Murphy lived in house numbered 26 with their seven children. Their children were Patt (20), Catherine (18), James (15), John (12), Thomas (9), Michael (5) and Peter (1). James (Snr.) was a farmer. James, John and Thomas were scholars. James (Snr.), Michael and Peter could not read. Mary, Patt, Catherine, James, John and Thomas could read. Mary, Patt, Catherine, James (Jnr.), John, Thomas, Michael spoke Irish and English. James spoke Irish. Peter spoke neither Irish nor English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

Nappy Murphy (78) lived in house numbered 27. She was a widow. She could not read. She spoke Irish. She lived in a 4th class house with one room.

Michael (60) and Catherine (40) Duffy occupied house numbered 28 with their nine children. These were Mary (21), Patt (19), Bridget (16), Honor (13), Sarah (11), Catherine (10), Martin (8), John (7) and Michael (4). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. Sarah, Catherine, Martin and John were scholars. The parents with Mary, Patt and Michael could not read. Bridget, Honor, Sarah, Catherine, Martin and John could read and write. Mary, Bridget, Honor, Sarah, Catherine, Martin, John and Michael (Jnr.) spoke Irish and English. Michael, Catherine and Patt spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Michael (60) and Julia (50) Duffy occupied house 29 with their four children, Bridget (7), Thomas (5), Martin (3) and James (1). Michael was a farmer and Bridget was a scholar. Michael, Julia, Thomas, Martin and James could not read. Bridget could read and write. Bridget spoke Irish and English. Michael, Julia, Martin and James spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Patt (78) and Bridget (48) Duffy lived in house 30 with their three sons. Their sons were Thomas (13), Martin (11) and Patt (8). Patt (Snr.) was a farmer. No one in this household could read. They all spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Thomas (60) and Bridget (55) Herwood lived in house 31 with their two sons, daughter-in-law and two daughters. Their sons were James (25) and Michael (18). Their daughter-in-law was Bridget (20). Their daughters were Sarah (11) and Bridget (14). Thomas was a farmer. Sarah and Bridget were scholars. Thomas, Bridget (55) and James could not read. Michael, Bridget (20), Sarah and Bridget (14) could read and write. Thomas, James, Michael, Bridget (20), Sarah and Bridget (14) spoke Irish and English. Bridget (55) spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Michael (24) and Mary (20) Murphy resided in house 32 with their daughter, Michaels’s mother and Michael’s brother. Their daughter was Mary (6 months), Michael’s mother was Mary (60) and his brother was Thomas (15). Michael and Thomas were Agricultural labourers. Michael, Mary (6 months), Mary (60) and Thomas could not read. Mary (20) could read and write. Mary (20) spoke Irish and English. Michael, Mary (6 months) and Thomas spoke Irish. Mary (6 months) spoke neither Irish nor English. They lived in a 4th class house with one room. They had no out-houses or Farm Steadings.

Mary Herwood (50) resided in house 33 with her two sisters Sarah Herwood (48) and Ellen Joyce (54). Mary was a farmer. Nobody in this household could read, they all spoke Irish. She lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a piggery

Maria Joyce (65) resided in house numbered 34. Maria was a widow. Maria could not read and spoke Irish. She lived in a 4th class house with one room.

Michael (50) and Bridget (40) Melia resided in house 35 with their son, Michael (7 months). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. No one in this household could read and write. Michael (Snr.) and Bridget spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Bridget Herwood (50), a widow, lived in house numbered 36 with her two sons, daughter, daughter-in-law and her four grandchildren. Her sons were John (28) and Thomas (14). Her daughter was Margaret (12). Her daughter-in-law was Honor (26). Her grandchildren were Mary (5), Bridget (4), Maggie (3) and Sarah (9). Bridget (Snr.) was a farmer. Bridget (Snr.), John, Honor, Mary, Bridget, Maggie and Sarah could not read. Thomas and Margaret could read and write. John, Honor, Mary, Bridget, Thomas and Margaret spoke Irish and English. Bridget spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

UNINHABITED BUILDING AT HOUSE 37.

William (73) and Mary (60) Philbin resided in house 38 with their two sons, their two daughters, daughter-in-law and grandchild. Their sons were Thomas (27) and William (22); their daughters were Norah (19) and Mary (18). Their daughter-in-law was Sarah (25) and their grandchild was Mary (1 month). William (Snr.) was a farmer. William (Snr.), Mary (60), Thomas and Sarah could not read. William, Norah and Mary could read and write. Thomas, Sarah, William (Jnr.), Norah and Mary (18) spoke Irish and English. William and Mary (18) spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

Mark (45) and Annie (29) Philbin lived in house 39 with their five sons, their daughter and their servant. Their sons were James (10), Micheal (9), Pat (7), William (5) and Mark (3). Their daughter was Bridget (1). Their servant was Martin Murphy (17). Mark (Snr.) was a farmer. James, Micheal and Pat were scholars. Martin was a farm servant. William, Mark (Jnr.) and Bridget could not read. Mark (Snr.), Annie, James, Micheal, Pat and Martin could read and write. Mark (Snr.), Annie, James, Micheal and Pat spoke Irish and English. William and Mark spoke English. Martin spoke Irish. Bridget was too young to speak. They lived in a 2nd class house with five rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

Martin (61) and Julia (40) Corbett resided in house 40 with their three sons and their two daughters. Their sons were James (16), Patrick (7) and William (4). Their daughters were Margaret (11) and Sarah (2). Martin was a farmer. Margaret, Patrick and William were scholars. Martin, Julia, James and Sarah could not read. William could read. Margaret and Patrick could read and write. Margaret and Patrick spoke Irish and English. Martin, Julia and James spoke Irish. William and Sarah spoke neither Irish nor English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a piggery.

Patrick Corbett (65) resided in house 41 with his seven children. His children were Michael (18), Margaret (16), James (15), Julia (12), Catherine (10), Kathleen (8) and Sarah (6). Patrick was a farmer. Julia, Catherine, Kathleen and Sarah were scholars. Margaret, Julia, Catherine, Kathleen and Sarah could read and write. James could read. Patrick and Michael could not read. Margaret, James, Julia, Catherine, Kathleen and Sarah spoke Irish and English. Patrick and Michael spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Mark (65) and Anne (56) Philbin lived in house numbered 42 with their three children. Their children were James (25), Catherine (24) and Anne (20). Mark was a farmer. The parents could not read. James could read. Catherine and Anne could read and write. The children spoke Irish and English and the parents spoke Irish. They had a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable and a cow house.

Thomas (54) and Norah (47) Fitzhenry resided in house 43 with their four children. Their children were Catherine (18), John (17), William (15) and Pat (13). Thomas was a farmer. Thomas, Catherine, John, William and Pat could read and write. Norah could not read.   Thomas, Catherine, John, William and Pat spoke Irish and English. Norah spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

Michael (40) and Catherine (42) Brown lived in house 44 with their five children and Michael’s nephew. Their five children were Patt (13), Mary (9), John (7), Julia (4) and Michael (12 months). Michael’s nephew was Petter Heggins (sic) (7). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. Michael and Petter were scholars. Michael (Snr.), Catherine, Julia and Michael (Jnr.) could not read. Patt, Mary, John and Petter could read and write. Patt, Mary, John, Julia and Petter spoke Irish and English. Michael (Snr.) and Catherine spoke Irish. Michael spoke neither English nor Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a stable and a cow house.

James (34) and Sarah (30) Coyne resided in house 45 with their three children and James’s mother.   Their children were John (4), William (3) and Mary (1). James’s mother was Bridget Coyne (80). James was a farmer. No one in this household could read. They all spoke Irish expect Mary who spoke neither English nor Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable and a cow house.

John (70) and Sarah (50) Conroy lived in house 46 with their son and two grandchildren. Their son was Patt (28) and their 2 grandchildren were Mary Finnerty (5) and Patt Finnerty (3). John was a farmer. Mary and Patt (Jnr.) were scholars. Mary and Patt (Jnr.) could read, which was extraordinary given their ages. John, Sarah and Patt could not read. Patt (Snr.), Mary and Patt spoke Irish and English. John and Sarah spoke Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

OUT OFFICES ARE NOT RECORDED FOR HOUSES 46-57.

Martin Fitzhenry (40) lived in house 47 with his five children. His children were Catherine (18), Mary (15), Bridget (13), Patrick (11), and John (8). Martin was a widower farmer. Bridget, Patrick and John were scholars. Catherine and Patrick could read and write. Mary, Bridget and John could read. Martin could not read. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Patt (60) and Catherine (50) Corbett resided in house 48 with their four children. Their children were John (18), Richard (16), Catherine (14) and Mary (7). Patt was a farmer and Mary was a scholar. Mary could read and write. Catherine (Jnr.) could read. Patt, Catherine, John and Richard could not read. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Michael (60) and Bridget (50) Duffy lived in house 49 with their three sons. Their children were Martin (20), John (14) and Michael (9). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. Michael (Jnr.) was a scholar. Michael (Jnr.) could read. The parents with Martin and John could not read. John and Michael (Jnr.) spoke Irish and English. Michael (Jnr.), Bridget and Martin spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Bridget Duffy (54) lived in house 50 with her three daughters.   Her daughters were Mary (14), Bridget (12) and Catherine (10). Bridget (Snr.) was a married farmer. Catherine was a scholar. Catherine could read and write. Bridget (Snr.), Mary and Bridget could not read. Bridget (Jnr.) and Catherine spoke Irish and English. Bridget (Snr.) and Mary spoke Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Peter (40) and Mary (38) Sullivan resided in house 51 with their four daughters and their son. Their daughters were Mary (17), Bridget (15), Annie (13), Catherine (11); and Michael (9). Peter was a farmer. Catherine and Michael were scholars. The children could read and write and the parents could not. Everyone in this household was bilingual. This family resided in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Michael Joyce (55) resided in house 52 with his three children. His children were Patt (14), Catherine (12) and Anne (8). Michael was a farmer. Catherine and Anne were scholars. Everyone in this household could read and write and was bilingual. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

Richard (50) and Margaret (35) Corbett lived in house 53 with their five children. Their children were Mary (15), John (13), William (11), Margaret (6) and Michael (4). Richard was a farmer. John, William and Margaret (Jnr.) were scholars. All the children except Michael could read and write. Michael and the parents could not read. Everyone except Richard was bilingual in this household. Richard spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms.

Patt Watters (80) lived in house 54 with his son, daughter-in-law and his four grandchildren. His son was Thomas (20), his daughter-in-law was Bridget (27) and his grandchildren were John Watters (3), Thomas Watters (1), and Patt Higgins (14) and John Higgins (12). Patt (Snr.) was a farmer. John (Snr.), John and Thomas were scholars. Thomas, Bridget and John (Snr.) could read and write. Patt (Snr.) and Patt could not read. Everyone in this family was bilingual except for Patt (Snr.). Patt (Snr.) only spoke Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

Rodger (80) and Bridget (70) Coyne lived in house 55 with their son Martin (17). Note the large age gap between parents and son. Rodger was a farmer. Martin could read and write while his parents could not. Martin was bilingual. Rodger and Bridget spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms.

John (48) and Mary (31) Coyne resided in house 56 with their six children. The six children were Mary (12), Patt (10), Bridget (8), Catherine (6), Sarah (4) and Maggie (2). John was a farmer. Patt, Bridget and Catherine were scholars. All the children expect Sarah and Maggie could read and write. Sarah, Maggie and the parents could not read. John and all his children were bilingual; Mary (Snr.) spoke only Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

John (65) and Mary (50) Herwood resided in house 57 with their two sons. Their two sons were Patt (16) and Martin (15). John was a farmer. No one in this household could read. The parents and Patt spoke Irish. Martin was classified in this census as ‘dumb’ and spoke neither English nor Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms.

Census 1911:

This Census indicated that Dooghta had 53 buildings, all of which were occupied. Of the 305 person’s resident in Dooghty, 158 were male and 147 were Female. One person only was listed born in Co. Mayo the rest were born in Co. Galway. All were Roman Catholic.   The 1911 Census were expanded to include particulars of marriage, how long the present marriage had lasted, how many children born alive, and how many were still living.

House No 1: Darby Duffy (68) a farmer was listed as the head of the family. He and his wife Ellen (68) had been married for 39 years. Nine children were born to them and eight children were still living. Darby and his sons Patrick (28), Stephen (24), and William (17) spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. The occupations were not listed for his sons. Darby’s wife spoke Irish only and could not read or write. Their 4 year old grandson Thomas Joyce was present in the household. He could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the six people who lived there. It was a private dwelling. They had four out offices, a stable, a cow house a piggery and a fowl house. Darby Duffy was the landholder.

House No 2: Thomas Duffy (48) a farmer was head of the family. He and his wife Mary (36) had been married for sixteen years and had seven children. The parents could not read but could speak both Irish and English.   Mary the eldest was 14, Martin (13), Sarah (11) and Michael was (10). They were scholars and could read and write. Catherine was (8) and spoke Irish only. Patrick was 6 and baby Kate was 2 months old. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the nine people who lived there. It was a private dwelling. They had four out offices, a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Thomas Duffy was the landholder.

House no 3: Michael Thornton (74) a farmer was listed as head of the family. He had been married to Honor (78) for 54 years and they had eight children. Michael could read and write and his wife could not read. Their son Peter (45) a farmer resided with them and was also listed as the head of his family. He and his wife Mary (51) had been married for 21 years and had seven children. They could all read and write. The families could speak both Irish and English. Mary (20) was a dressmaker. The occupation of Hannah (16) was not listed. Thomas (15) Kate (13) Michael (10) and Bridget (8) were scholars. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the ten family members. It was a private dwelling. They had five out offices; a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a store. Michael Thornton was the landholder.

House No 4: Pat Keane (73) a farmer was listed as head of the family. He and his wife Bridget (76) had been married for 50 years and had eight children. Their son Michael (31) and his wife Ellen (27) also resided in the house. They had been married 7 years and had one child, Michael (6) a scholar. Ellen and her son Michael could read and spoke both English and Irish. Pat and his wife Bridget and their son Michael could not read and they spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the families. It was a private dwelling. They had three out offices; a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Patrick Keane was the landholder.

House No 5: Michael Duffy (68) a farmer was head of the family.   He had been married to Catherine (65) for 36 years. They had nine children.   Their sons Martin (20) and John (18) had no occupation listed. Their son Michael (13) was a scholar. The sons could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. The parents could not read and they spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the family. It was a private dwelling. They had three out offices; a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Michael Duffy was the landholder.

House No 6: Patrick Joyce (40) a farmer was listed as head of the family. He had been married to Sarah (30) for 9 years. Eight children were born to them and four were still living. Their daughter Ellen (9) was not recorded as a scholar. They had three sons, David (5) and their twin sons Michael and Patrick (2). Patricks mother Ellen (71), a widow lived with the family. Patrick and David (5) spoke Irish only while his wife, mother and daughter Ellen (9) spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the family. It was a private dwelling. They had two out offices, a cow house and a piggery. Patrick Joyce was the landholder.

House No 7: James Herwood (40) a farmer was head of the family. He had been married to Bridget (30) for 11 years. Five children were born to them and four were still living. Michael (10) and Mary (7) were scholars. They had a daughter Bridget (5) and an infant Sarah (1). James’ mother Bridget (69) a widow, and his unmarried brother Michael (25) an assistant on the farm were also in the house. James and his mother spoke Irish only. His wife and children and his brother spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the family. It was a private dwelling. They had two out offices, a cow house and a piggery.

House No 8: Margaret Jennings (69) a widow was listed as head of the family. Her daughter Bridget (27) was single and resided with her. Both mother and daughter had “stocking knitter” recorded as their occupation. Margaret spoke Irish only and could not read. Bridget spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. They occupied two rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had 1 cow house. Margaret Jennings was the landholder.

House No 9: Nora Herwood (40) a farmer was listed as head of the family. Her marriage had lasted 17 years and she bore eight children, seven were still living. Bridget Herwood (71) her mother – in – law resided with the family. She spoke Irish only and could not read. Nora’s daughters Mary (16) and Bridget (15) had no occupation listed. Margaret (13), Sarah (12) and Patrick (8) were scholars and they could read and write. Nora and her children, even 5 year old Michael spoke both languages and Martin (3) spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the family. It was a private dwelling. They had two out offices, a cow house and a piggery. Nora Herwood was the landholder.

House No 10: Catherine Corbett (69) a widowed farmer was head of the family. She spoke Irish only and could not read. Her son Richard (26) and daughter Mary (21) lived with her. They could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They were both single. Catherine’s grandson Joseph (7) was present also. He could not read but could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. The family occupied two rooms and the house was a private dwelling. They had two out offices, a cow house and a piggery. Catherine Corbett was the landholder.

House No 11: Michael Duffy (74) a widower was head of the family. His son Martin (30) lived with him. Martin was single and no occupation was listed for him. He could not read and he spoke both Irish and English. Michael could not read and spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the family and it was a private dwelling. They had two out offices, a cow house and a piggery. Michael Duffy was the landholder.

House No 12: Peter Sullivan (61) was head of the family. He was married to Mary (63) for thirty years. Eleven children were born to them, seven were still living. Their son Michael (19) and their daughter Katie (21) lived with them. No occupations are listed for these offspring. Peter and his children could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Mary could not read and spoke Irish only. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the four family members. They had two out buildings; a cow house and a piggery. Peter Sullivan was the landholder.

House No 13: Michael Joyce (68) a widower was head of the family. He could not read. Irish was his spoken language. His son Patrick (23) and his daughter Anne (19) lived with him. Michael worked as a farmer, no occupation was listed for his family. Patrick could read, Anne could read and write. They spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the family members. It was a private dwelling. They had three out offices, a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Michael Joyce was the landholder.

House No 14: Bridget Duffy (70) a widow was head of the family. Bridget’s occupation was listed as farmer. She could not read and spoke Irish. Her son Thomas (21) lived with her and no occupation was listed for him. He could not read and he spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the two family members. It was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery. Bridget Duffy was the landholder.

House No 15: Michael O’ Maille (67) a farmer was married to Bridget (58) for twelve years. They had one son Michael (11). The family spoke both Irish and English and could not read. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two rooms were occupied by the three family members and it was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery. Michael O’ Maille was the landholder.

House No 16: John Herward (74) a farmer was married to Mary (73) for thirty seven years. Five children were born to them, three were still living. Irish was their spoken language and they could not read. Their home was a 2nd class built slate roof house with three windows to the front. Three rooms were occupied by the two family members and it was a private dwelling. They had three out offices, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. John Herwood was the landholder.

House No 17: James Murphy (57) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (56) for thirty three years. Thirteen children were born to them, nine were still living. Resident in the house was Nappie Murphy (78); she was the mother of James Murphy. His sons John (21) and Thomas (19) had no occupations listed for them. Michael (14) and Peter (11) were scholars. The sons could read and write and spoke Irish and English. James, his wife and his mother could not read. Mary could speak Irish and English while James and his mother spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Seven family members occupied three rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had three out offices, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. James Murphy was the landholder.

House No 18: Bridget Duffy (66) a widowed farmer was head of the family. Her sons Martin (19) and Patrick (17) lived with her. No occupation was listed for them. The family could not read and Irish was their spoken language. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Three family members occupied two rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery. Bridget Duffy was the landholder.

House No 19: Michael Duffy (38) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Bridget (38) for eleven years. They had five children. Mary (10), Catherine (9) and twins Michael (8) and Margaret (8) were scholars. They could read and write and could speak both Irish and English. They also had an infant, Patrick (1). Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Seven family members occupied two rooms. It was a private dwelling and they had a cow house and a piggery. Michael Duffy was the landholder.

House No 20: Michael Duffy (70) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Julia (69) for thirty three years. Nine children were born to them, eight were still living. The parents could not read and spoke Irish only. Bridget (19), Thomas (17), Martin (14), James (12) and Julia (10) could all read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Seven members occupied three rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had three out offices, a stable, a cow house and a piggery. Michael Duffy was the landholder.

House No 21: Martin Duffy (33) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Margaret (30) for two years. They had a one month old baby daughter Mary. Martin’s brother James (36) was also in the house. They could not read, they spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and the family occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery and Martin Duffy was the landholder.

House No 22: Michael Browne (60) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Catherine (52) for twenty five years. Nine children were born to them, five were still living. Mary (20), John (19), and Julia (14) had no occupations listed for them. Michael (12) was a scholar. The family could all read and write and could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class, slate roofed house with five windows to the front. Six family members occupied five rooms and the house was a private dwelling. They had three out offices, a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Michael Browne was the landholder.

House No 23: Julia Corbett (51) a widowed farmer was listed as head of the family. Nora (16) had no occupation listed. She could read and write. William (14), Sarah (9) were scholars and could read and write. Stephen (8) and Mark (6) and their mother Julia could not read. All the family spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Six family members occupied three rooms. The house was a private dwelling and they had a cow house and a piggery. Julia Corbett was the landholder.

House No 24: Patrick Corbett (80) a widower and a farmer was head of the family. He could not read and spoke only Irish. His son Michael (30) was single and no occupation was listed for him. He could not read and spoke both Irish and English. His daughters Kathleen (18) and Sarah (16) could read and write and spoke both languages. Their home was a 3rd class, house with two windows to the front. Four family members occupied two rooms. The house was a private dwelling and they had a cow house and a piggery. Patrick Corbett was the landholder.

House No 25: Bridget Hopkins (73) a widowed farmer was listed as head of the household. Her son John (35) was married to Mary (30) for five years and they had two children. Bridget (4) could speak Irish and English and Thomas (2) could speak English only. Mary could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. John and his mother spoke Irish only. No occupation was listed for the married son. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. The house was a private dwelling and five family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a fowl house. Bridget Hopkins was the landholder.

House No 26: James Sullivan (70) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (62) for thirty five years. Eight children were born to them and seven were still living. Thomas (26) was single, and like his parents he could not read or write. Sarah (19) could read and write as could Margarita (14), a scholar. The parents spoke Irish only while their children could speak both languages. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and five members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. James Sullivan was the landholder.

House No 27: Thomas Walsh, a farmer and blacksmith was head of the family. He was a widower. His son Michael (25) was a blacksmith also. They could not read and they spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. Two family members occupied two rooms. It was a private dwelling and they had a cow house and a piggery. Thomas Walsh was the landholder.

House No 28: Peter Sullivan (59) a farmer was married to Sarah (56) for twenty eight years. They had five children. Kate (19) had no occupation listed. Thomas (18) was a post boy, Mary (14), John (13) and Michael (10) were scholars. The children could all read and write and spoke both Irish and English. The parents could not read and spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Seven family members occupied three rooms. It was a private dwelling and they had a stable and a cow house. Peter Sullivan was the landholder.

House No 29: Ellen Sullivan (82) a widowed farmer was listed as the head of the household and spoke Irish only. Her son Patrick (47) and his wife Mary (42) were married twenty years. Ten children were born to them and nine were still living. Mary (19), Michael (17), Patrick (15) had no profession listed. Ellen (14), Thomas (12) and Nora (9) were scholars. All these children could read and write.   Bridget was (7), John (4) and Peter was (2). The grandmother, her son and daughter – in –law could not read. The children and their parents could all speak both Irish and English. Their home was 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and twelve family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. Ellen Sullivan was the landholder.

House No 30: James Sullivan (52) a farmer and water bailiff was head of the family. He was married to Nora (51) for twenty two years. Twelve children were born to them and ten were still living. Bridget (20), Michael (18), Patrick (17), James (16), John (15) had no occupations listed. Ellen (11) and Nora (9) were scholars. Kate was (7) and Margaret (5). The parents could not read but the children over seven could read and write. All the family spoke both Irish and English. The family home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and eleven family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. James Sullivan was the landholder.

House No 31: James Duffy (73) a farmer was listed as head of the household. He was married to Sarah (78) for forty nine years. Nine children were born to them and eight were still living. Nora Duffy (33) his daughter – in – law was married three years and had two children who resided with them. She spoke Irish and English. His daughter Catherine (18) was also in the house and she could read and write.   Her parents could not read and spoke Irish only. James’ two grandsons were Patrick (2) and John (1). Their home was a 3rd class, house. It was a private dwelling and six family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. James Duffy was the landholder.

House No 32: Barbara Hopkins (74) a widowed farmer was head of the family. Her son Martin (52) and daughter Catherine (30) were both single and no occupation was listed for them. The family could not read and spoke Irish only. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and they had a cow house and a piggery. Barbara Hopkins was the landholder.

House No 33: John Walsh (60) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (46) for twenty years, eight children were born to them and six were still living. Bridget (18) and Mollie (17) had no occupations listed. They could read and write as could Tommy (14) and Katie (9) who were scholars. Maggie was (4) and John (1). John (Senior) could not read and spoke only Irish.   Bridget his wife could read and she, like the older children could speak both Irish and English. Maggie (4) spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and eight family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery and John Walsh was the landholder.

House No 34: Patrick Duffy (75) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (68) for thirty five years. They had one son William (30) who was single and had no occupation listed. Patrick was deaf and like his wife he could not read. They spoke Irish only. William could not read but could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house and it was a private dwelling. Three family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery and Patrick Duffy was the landholder.

House No 35: Michael Joyce (55) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Bridget (55) for twenty seven years. Nine children were born to them, six were still living. John (20), Catherine (17) and Michael (15) could read and write but had no occupations listed. William (13), Bridget (11) and Stephen (10) were scholars and they could read and write. The parents spoke only Irish while the children could speak Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and eight family members occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery and Michael Joyce was the landholder.

 

House No 36: Patrick Coyne (40) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Barbara (40) for seventeen years and they had eight children. Bridget (15), Michael (13), Nappy J (11) and Norah (9) were scholars and they could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Maggie was (7), Patrick (4) and the Infant Thomas was 6 months old. The parents could read and write and the family spoke both Irish and English except the youngest children who spoke English only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and nine family members occupied three rooms. They had three out offices; a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Patrick Coyne was the landholder.

House No 37: Mary Molloy a widowed farmer was head of the family. Her daughter Mary (33) was a national school teacher. Patrick (22) and William (20) were listed farmers sons and Margaret (13) was a scholar. All were single. All the family spoke both Irish and English and could all read and write. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and five family members occupied three rooms. They had three out offices, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Mary Molloy was the landholder.

House No 38: Patrick Walsh (65) a farmer was head of the family. He was married but it does not state how long the marriage had lasted. His daughter Mary (24) was single and her occupation was not listed. His son Michael (21) was head miner. The family spoke both Irish and English and the children could read and write. The father could not read. Their home was 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Three family members shared three rooms. It was a private dwelling and they had three out offices,   a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Patrick Walsh was the landholder.

House No 39: Thomas Walsh (47) was head of the family. A farmer and head miner, he was married to Mary (45) for fourteen years. Ten children were born to them and nine were still living. His sister Ellen Walsh (55) was single and resided with them, she could not read. Thomas could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their children Mary (13), Margaret (12), Patrick (10) and Helena (9) were scholars and could read and write. Andrew (8) could not read. Julia was (5), Martin (4), John (3) and the infant Thomas Francis was 5 months. The family could speak both Irish and English except for the 3 year old who spoke English only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and twelve family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery. Thomas Walsh was the landholder.

House No 40: John Keane (49) a shop keeper and farmer was head of the family and was born in Doughty Co. Galway. He was married to Bridget (49) for twenty years and they had six children. Their son Patrick (20) did not have an occupation listed. Mary (17), Michael (15), Thomas (13) and John (11) were all scholars and daughter Bridget was (3). John (Senior) could not read though his wife and school going children could read and write. The family all spoke both Irish and English. Their residence was a shop listed as a 2nd class property with three windows to the front. Eight family members shared four rooms. They had four out offices, a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn. John Keane was the landholder.

House No 41: Martin Duffy (53) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (64) for thirty years and they had six children. Nora (20) and Maria (18) lived with them. No occupation was listed for the girls. They could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Martin spoke Irish and English and his wife spoke Irish only. They could not read. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. It was a private dwelling with four family members occupying three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.   Martin Duffy was the landholder.

House No 42: Sarah Conroy (73) a widowed farmer was listed as head of the family. She could not read and spoke Irish only. Her son Patrick (36) was single and lived with her.   He had no occupation listed and could not read. Her grandchildren Mary Finnerty (14) and Patrick Finnerty (12) were scholars. Martin Connelly (15) and Sarah Connelly (5) were also her grandchildren and were in the house. The Finnerty children and Martin Connelly were born in the U.S. America. Martin could read and was listed as assisting on the farm. Sarah’s family could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front. The six family members occupied two rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery and Sarah Conroy was the landholder.

House No 43: Sarah Coyne (42) a farmer is listed as head of the family. She was married for nineteen years and bore eleven children, seven were still living. Her son John (15) had no occupation listed and like his mother could not read.   William (13) and Mary (12) were scholars and could read and write while Patrick (8) could not read. James was (6), Martin (4) Thady was one year old. The family could all speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class, house with three windows to the front and eight members of the family occupied three rooms.   It was a private dwelling. They also had a cow house and a piggery and Sarah Coyne was the landholder.

House No 44: Martin Coyne (26) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Margaret (25) for three years and they had two children. Mary was two years old and the infant John was eleven months. Martin and his wife could read and write and they spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front and four family members occupied three rooms. It was a private dwelling. They had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house and Martin Coyne was the landholder.

House No 45: Thomas Waters (43) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Bridget (39) for fifteen years. Seven children were born to them and six were still living. John (13), Tommy (11), Mary (9), and Bridgie (6) were scholars. Maggie was (1) year old. Lillie Walsh (23) was a dressmaker and she was a relative of the family. The family spoke both Irish and English and they could all read and write. Their home was a 2nd class, slate roof house with five windows to the front and eight family members occupied five rooms. It was a private dwelling. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery and Thomas Waters was the landholder.

 House No 46: John Coyne (52) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Mary (44) for twenty three years and they had ten children. John and Mary could not read. She and her youngest daughter Annie spoke Irish only. The rest of the family spoke both Irish and English. Pat (20) was a farmer and he could read and write. Catherine (17) and Sarah (15) could read and write, they had no occupations listed for them. Maggie (13), Martin (11) and Norah (9) were scholars. Annie was (3) and infant Thomas was 9 months. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. Ten members of the family occupied three rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery and John Coyne was the landholder.

House No 47: Thomas Philbin (40) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Sarah (36) for eleven years and they had six children. Mary (10) was a scholar and she could read and write. James was (8), Patrick (6), Anne (4), Thomas (2) and infant William was 4 months. Present also was Thomas’s brother, Patrick Philbin (44) a cattle and sheep dealer, he could read and spoke both Irish and English. Four year old Anne spoke English only, while the rest of the family could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front. It was a private dwelling and nine family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn. Thomas Philbin was the landholder.

House No 48: Martin Fitzhenry (62) a widower was head of the family. He was a farmer and his son John (18) lived with him. While they could not read, they could speak both Irish and English. Their home was a 3rd class house with two windows to the front and it was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and Martin Fitzhenry was the landholder.

House No 49: Mark Philbin (55) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Catherine (50) for six years. No children were born of this union. Catherine was born in Co. Mayo. The children from his first marriage were Pat (19), Willie (16), Mark (14), Bridget (12) and Sarah (11). The family could all read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class, slate roof house with five windows to the front. Seven members of the family occupied five rooms and it was a private dwelling. They had seven out houses, a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn, a shed and a store. Mark Philbin was the landholder.

House No 50: Mark Philban (sic) (79) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Anne (73) for forty eight years. Nine children were born to them and eight were still living. They could not read and spoke Irish only. His son James (38) was single and was listed as ‘Farmers son’. Bridget (35) was single and had no occupation assigned to her. The children could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front and four family members occupied three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Mark Philbin was the landholder.

House No 51: Richard Corbett (73) a farmer was head of the family. He was married to Maggie (60) for thirty three years. Nine children were born to them and eight were still living. Their daughters Mary (26), Julia (25), and Maggie (17) could read and write, and spoke both Irish and English. No occupations were listed for them. Their sons Willie ((19) and Michael (15) could read and write and also spoke Irish and English. No occupation was listed for them. The parents did not read and spoke Irish only. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front and seven family members occupied three rooms. It was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery and Richard Corbett was the landholder.

House No 52: Thomas Fitzhenry (69) a farmer was head of the family. He was a widower and his son Patrick (23) lived with him. Patrick was single and no occupation was listed for him. They could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their home was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front and it was a private dwelling. They had a cow house and a piggery and Thomas Fitzhenry was the landholder.

House No 53: Mary Murphy (71) a widowed farmer was head of the family. Her son Thomas (22) was single and he lived with her. His occupation was not listed. They could not read and Irish was their spoken language. Their home was a 3rd class house with one window to the front and the family shared one room. It was a private dwelling and they also had a cow house. Mary Murphy was the landholder.

 

 

 

This page was added on 27/10/2016.

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