Fahy

Faithche

Tomas O Flatharta

Tomas O Flatharta

 Faithche meaning a green or plain

According to O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the official and standard name of this townland was Fahy and Faithche was its official Irish name.  This village was also known as Favy? (as per transcribed from O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books, 1838) (County Map), An Fhaiche (Logainm.ie) and na Faiche (Logainm.ie).

The village where Fahy was in 1901 and 1911 is now part of a farm and entry is prohibited.  The photo above shows the entry of the farm and where the village is.

Situation:

This townland is located on the south east side of the parish.  It is bounded on the north by Kilbeg Upper and Mill Park, bounded west by Ballyveean, bounded south by the Cong Parish and bounded east by Rusheen East.

Description:

Down Survey:

The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.The survey was apparently called the ‘‘Down Survey’ by Petty because the results were set down in maps; ‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will”. (Wikipedia).  The name used by the Down Survey wasTawnalin and Foahagh (as per transcribed from the Down Survey website).  In 1641 the owner of this townland was JamesOge Darcy (as per transcribed from the Down Survey website) who was a Catholic.  In 1670, the owner was College of Dublin which was Protestant.  Fahy had 1383 acres of unprofitable land, 82 acres of profitable land and 82 acres of land were forfeited.

 

O Donovan’s (1838):

The proprietors for this village were the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont, Dublin.  The agent was Mr. James Fair, Fairhil.  The townland is composed of 105 acres, 1 rood and 4 perches according to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838). The village was held under lease.  The village was held under lease. The rent was 11 to 21 shillings. The Co. Cess paid 12½ d. per acre half yearly for 60 acres.  The soil had different qualities.  Some of the soil was part heathy and mixed pasture and other parts were rich pasture which was tilled and produced middling crops of wheat and potatoes. A small stream from the hills falls on this townland in a place called Puliska.  This townland has farms ranging from 2 to 25 acres and has no antiques.

Griffiths Valuation

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Fahy had a total acreage of 105 acres, 2 roods and 36 perches.  The total valuation for this plot was £37.5s.0d.  Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont were the immediate lessors for this townland.  This townland was divided into 4 plots.

 

Plot 1 was composed of 34 acres, 1 rood and 35 perches.  This plot belonged to Michael Higgins.  Total valuation for this plot was £18.0s.0d.

Plot 1 Michael Higginshad land valued at £18.0s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £18.0s.0d.

 

Plot 2 consisted of 24 acres, 3 roods and 23 perches.  This plot belonged to Michael Higgins. Total valuation for this plot was £3.10s.0d.

Plot 2 Michael Higginshad land valued at £3.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £3.10s.0d.

 

Plot 3 consisted of 42 acres, 3 rood and 10 perches.  This plot belonged to Rev. Peter Waldron.  Total valuation for this plot was £14.10s.0d.

Plot 3 Rev. Peter Waldron had a house, office and land.  The land was valued at £12.0s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £2.10s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £14.10s.0d.

 

Plot 4 was composed of 3 acres, 2 roods and 8 perches.  This plot belonged to John Varley.  Total valuation for this plot was £1.5s.0d.

Plot 4 John Varleyhad a house and land.  The land was valued at £1.0s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £1.5s.0d.

Census 1901

The 1901 Census states that were two buildings in this village and both were inhabited.  There were six males and seven females in this village and everyone in this village was Roman Catholic according to the Enumerator Abstract (Form N) and census forms.  There was a stable, a cow house and a piggery in this village according to the Return of Out-offices and Farm-Steadings (Form B2).

 

House 1-John and Ellen Cavanagh

John (49) and Ellen (46) Cavanagh lived in house 1 with their seven children.  Their children were Patrick(23), John(19),Kate(17), Ellen(12), Maggie(10),Martin (7) and Annie (5).  John (Snr.) was a shepherd.  Ellen (Snr.), Patrick and John (Jnr.) were farm servants.  Ellen (Jnr.), Maggie, Martin and Annie were scholars. John (Snr.) and Annie could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Martin and Anne spoke English only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house.  Their landlord was John Joyce

 

House 2-Michael Donohoe

Michael Donohoe (55) resided in house 2 with his two children and his sister in law.  His children were Stephen(23) and Margaret(20).  Michael’s sister in law was Margaret Whelan(40).  Both Michael and Stephen were shepherds.  Michael and Margaret (40) could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke English and Irish.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with three rooms.  They had a stable and a piggery.  Their landlord was Patrick Coyne.

 

Census 1911

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living).  There were two inhabited houses in this village.  Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic.  There were two cow houses, two piggeries and one barn in this village in 1911 according to the Return of Out-offices and Farm-Steadings (Form B2). There were inconsistent age gaps between the 1901 Census and the 1911 Census.

 

House 1- John and Ellen Cavanagh

John(63) and Ellen (57) Cavanagh resided in house 1, previously numbered house 1, with their three children and their grandchild. Their children were Maggie(21), Martin(18), Annie (16).  Their grandchild was Ellie Munroe(9).  There was no mention of Patrick, John (19), Kate or Ellen (12) in this 1911 census.  John and Ellen were married for 37 years, had nine children and nine of them survived until 1911.  John was a farmer.  Annie and Ellie were scholars.  John could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 2-Michael Donohue

Michael Donohue (80) resided in house 2, previously numbered house 2, with his son, daughter in law and two grandchildren. His son was Stephen(50).  His daughter in law was Maggie Donohue(40) and his grandchildren were Katie (7) and Martin (6).  There was no mention of Margaret (20) or Margaret (40) in this 1911 census. Michael was a widower.  Stephen and Maggie were married for eight years, had five children and three of them survived until 1911.  Michael was a herd (as per transcribed from 1901 census) and Stephen was an agricultural labourer.  Stephen and Maggie could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.  Their landlord was Patk. Kyne of Clonbur.

This page was added on 24/09/2018.

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