Tonlegee

Tóin le gaoith

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Tóin le gaoith, meaning hill to the wind.

Names:

According to O’Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838) the standard name given to the townland was Tonlegee and Tóin le Gaoith was its official Irish form. The townland name was spelt as Tonlegee. The other forms of the name were Tóin le Gaoith (Podex ad Ventum)Tonleghee or Townanal (By.Surveyors sketch map) Thonelegee (Rev Michael Heraty, P.P)

Thoneleguee (Local) Thonleguee or Townanal (Mearsman) Thonelegee (County Cess Collector) and Thoneleguee (Tithe Ledger)

Situation:

Tonlegee is in the civil parish of Cong and in the barony of Ross in the County of Galway. It is a central townland. It is bounded on the north by the townland of Shannadullaun, on the west by Cloghbrack Upper. On the south by Ballydoolough and on the east by Coolin.

Description:

The townland of Tonlegee is comprised of 343 acres, o roods and 33 perches. The townland is located in the civil parish of Cong, in the Barony of Ross and in the county of Galway.

Down Survey:

The Down Survey Name given to Tonlegee was Slewpartry. The owners of Tonlegee in 1641 were Linch and Morish whom were Catholic. In 1670 the owners were Lynch and Marcus who were also Catholic.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:

O’Donovan tells us that the townland was under lease by the Earls of Leitrim and Charelmont, Dublin. The agent was Mr James Fair, Fairhill, in the Ross parish. According to Griffith’s Evaluation, (1855) the village was made up of 343 acres, 0 roods and 33 perches. All the land was held under lease and sublet to the tenants for a bulked rent of £15 yearly.

The soil, consisted of some steep mountain, heathy and mixed pasture with some level mountain west of the steep on which the village stands, part of which is arable having part bog also some rough mixed pasture. The soil produced crops of oats and potatoes notconsidered to be good and thus part totally failed by constant rain. The steep mountain is part of Binlavey. O’Donovan describes Tonlegee as a compact village. The County Cess was 11¼d.per acre that was paid for 19 acres. O’Donovan also states that there are no antiquities in the townland.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855:

The Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont leased land to the following tenants. Martin Caherlan, Michael Joyce, Margaret Burke, Martin Walsh, Thomas Curran and Michael Sarsfield. There was 343 acres 0, roods and 33 perches altogether.

Martin Caherlan paid £3.20 for land, he paid £080 for Buildings and he paid £3.10 for annual rent. Michael Joyce paid £2.12 for land £0. 80 for buildings and he paid an annual rate of £3.00.

Margaret Burke paid £1.11 for land, £0.60 for land and an annual rate of £1.17.

Martin Walsh paid£1.11 for house and land, he paid £040 for buildings and he paid for land an annual rate of £1.15.

Thomas Curran paid for House and land £3 20. He paid £0 6 0 for buildings and a total annual rate of £3 80

Michael Sarsfield paid £2 2 0 for land, he paid £0 30 for Buildings and £ 2 5 0 for total annual rate.

Census 1901:

This census indicates that there were 6 dwelling houses in this village. There were 17 males and 14 females, so 33 altogether. They were all private dwellings, and second and third class houses. All the six houses had a cow barn, houses 3, 4, 5, and 6 had a piggery and all six houses had a barn.

Catherine Joyce resided in House No 1, she was 78, she was a widow, and head of the family. She was was born in Co Galway. Her occupation was a farmer, she could not read, but she spoke Irish. Her one daughter Bridget lived with her. She was 45. She was a farmer’s daughter. She could not read, but she spoke Irish. They were both Roman Catholic unless otherwise stated.

Anne Sarsfield resided in House No 2. She was 58. She was a widow and head of the family. She could not read, but she spoke Irish and English. John Joyce was 35, he was her son-in -law. His occupation was a wool weaver. He could not read, but he spoke Irish and English. Mary Joyce was the daughter, she was married to John. She was 29. She had no occupation. She could not read, but she spoke Irish and English. They had five children. Three boys and two girls. John was 9, he was a scholar, he could not read, but he spoke Irish and English. Thomas was 8, he was a scholar, he could not read, but he spoke Irish and English. Michael was 6, he could not read, he spoke English and Irish. Mary was 4, she could not read, she spoke Irish. Catherine was 2 years old. They were all Roman Catholic.

Martin Walsh resided in House No 3. He was 73, and he was a widower and head of the family. He was born in Co Galway. His occupation was a farmer. He could not read, but he spoke Irish. Thomas Herwood was his son in law. He was 32, He had no occupation. He could read, but he spoke Irish and English. Bridget Herwood was the daughter and she was married to Thomas Herwood. She was 32 year old. She had no occupation, and she could not read, but she spoke Irish. They were all Roman Catholic.

Patrick Joyce resided in House No 4. He was 28, he was head of the family, he was a farmer, and he was married. He could not read, he spoke Irish and English. Julia was 30, she was married to Patrick. She could not read, she spoke Irish and English. They had two sons. Patrick was 2 and Michael, but there was no age given for him.

Patrick Murphy resided in House No 5. He was 70; he was head of the family, and a widower. He was born in Co Galway. He was a farmer. He could not read, but he spoke Irish. Andrew Murphy was 40, he was his son, and he was married. He could not read, he has Irish and English. His wife Ellen was 40, she could not read, but she had Irish and English. They had five children, one daughter, and four sons. Margaret was the eldest, she was 14. She was a scholar, and she could read and write, and had Irish and English. John was 12, he was a scholar. He could read and write, and he spoke English and Irish. Patrick was 10, he was a scholar. He could read and write, and he spoke Irish and English. James was 8, he could not read. He spoke Irish and English. Thomas was 6, he could not read. He spoke Irish and English. They were all Roman Catholic.

Michael Joyce resided in House No 6. He was 35, was head of the family, and he was married. His occupation was a farmer. He could read and write, and he spoke Irish and English. His wife was Mary. There was no occupation given. She could read and write, and she had Irish and English. They had three daughters and one son. Bridget was 8, she could not read. She spoke English and Irish. Mary was 6, she could not read. She spoke English and Irish. John was 3, He cannot read, and there was Julia, but there was no age given for her. They were all Roman Catholic.

 Census 1911

The 1911census indicates that there were six houses inhabited. They were all private dwellings. There were 17 males and 13 female, so 33 persons altogether. Most were 2nd and 3rd class houses with one being 4th class belonging to a Kate Joyce. The biggest family was belonging to John Joyce where there were 10 living in one room. House no 1 had a stable and a cow house. House no 2 had no out buildings. House no 3 had a cow house and a barn, house no 4 had a cow house and the same for houses 5 and 6. Unless otherwise stated, there were all Roman Catholics.

John Joyce resided in House No 1. He was 50; he was married, and head of the family. His occupation was a farmer. He could not read. He spoke Irish and English. He was married to Mary. She could not read. She spoke Irish and English. They were married for 21 years. They had four sons and three daughters. Michael the eldest, is 18 years of age, his occupation is a farmer’s son. He could read and write, he spoke Irish. He was single. Catherine was 16 years of age. Her occupation was a farmer’s daughter. She could read, and spoke Irish. Mary was 14 years of age. She was a farmer’s daughter. She could read and spoke Irish. Pat was 12 years of age; he was a farmer’s son. He could read and spoke Irish and English. Stephen was 10 years of age. He was a scholar, he could not read. He spoke Irish. Anthony was 8 years of age. He was a scholar, he could not read. He spoke Irish. Anne was 6 years of age, she was a scholar. She could not read, but she spoke Irish. Anne Sarsfield was 73 years of age, not married. She was a Boarder born in Galway. She could not read, but she spoke Irish. They were all Roman Catholic

Catherine Joyce resided in House No 2 in this census. She was now 94 years old. She was a widow and her occupation was a farmer. She could not read, but she spoke Irish. She had one daughter Bridget who still lived with her. She did not marry and was 60 years old. Her occupation was a Farmer’s daughter. She could not read but she spoke Irish and English. They were both Roman Catholic.

Thomas Herwood (sic) resided in House No 3.There was no mention of Martin Walsh, his father in law in the 1911 census. He was 50 years old, married, and was head of the family. His occupation was a farmer. He could not read. He spoke Irish. His wife was Bridget Herwood, who was 51 years old. She could not read, but she spoke Irish. They were married for 17 years, they had no children. They were both Roman Catholic.

Pat Joyce resided in House No 4. He was now 37 years old, married, and was Head of the Family. His occupation was a Farmer. He could read and write, and spoke Irish and English. His wife Julia Joyce was 50 years old. She could read and she spoke Irish. They were married 14 years and they had three children. Pat was 12 years old. His occupation was a Farmer’s son. He could read and write, and spoke Irish and English. Michael was 10 years old. He was a scholar. He could read and write, and he spoke English and Irish. They also had a daughter Mary after the two boys. She was 8 years old. She was a scholar, she could read and write, and she spoke Irish and English.

Ellin (sic) Murphy resided in House No 5. She was 48 years old, a widow, having being married to Patrick Murphy. She was head of the family. Her occupation was a Farmer. She had four sons. John was 23 years old. His occupation was a Farmer’s son. He spoke Irish and English. Pat was 20 years old. His occupation was a Farmer’s son. He spoke Irish and English. As Murphy was 18 years old. His occupation was listed as a Farmer’s son. He could read and write, and he spoke Irish and English.Thos (sic) Murphy was 16 years old. His occupation was a Farmer’s son. He spoke Irish and English. They were all Roman Catholic.

Michael Joyce resided in House No 6. He was 50 years of age, married and Head of the Family. He was a Farmer. He could not read, he spoke Irish and English. His wife Mary Joyce was 45 years old. She could read and write and she spoke Irish and English. They were married 20 years and had six children. Bridget was 18 years old, and single. Her occupation was a farmer’s daughter. She could read and write, and she spoke Irish and English. Mary was 16 years old. Her occupation was a farmer’s daughter. She could read and write and she spoke Irish and English. John was 14 years old. He was a scholar. He spoke Irish and English. Michael was 8 years old. He was a Scholar. He spoke Irish and English. Kate was 6 years old, she was a Scholar. She spoke Irish. Maggie Joyce was 2 years old. They were all Roman Catholic.

 

This page was added on 21/02/2017.

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