Clogher

Clochán

Teresa Philbin

Teresa Philbin

Translation:  a stony place

The Down Survey:  The Down Survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656 is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world. The Down Survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details being all laid down by admeasurement on maps. The survey sought to define legal property boundaries and measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish in order to facilitate its redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

The Down Survey name for the townland was Clogher.  In 1641 (pre Cromwell) it was in the ownership of a protestant called Sir Robert Cressey.  In 1670 (post Cromwell) it remained in the ownership of Sir Robert.  Clogher is in County Galway; in the half barony of Rosse (sic) and in the parish of Conge (sic).  There were 24 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 74 plantation acres of profitable land and the profitable land was forfeited.

O Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:  The standard name for the townland was Clogher and Clochan was the Irish form of the name.

Other forms of the name:  Clogher, Clochán, Clogher (Boundary Surveyors Sketch Map), Clogher (County Cess Collector), Clogher (Local), Cl?aghan (Meresman), Clogher (Rev. Michael Waldron).

Description:  The proprietor was Sir Richard O’Donnell, Esq., Newport, County Mayo.  The agents were Alexander Clandenning (sic), of Westport and Alexander Lambert, Esq., Ballinrobe.  The rent was 20 shillings per acre and there was no lease.  The farms ranged in size from five to ten acres.  A great part of the soil was rocky, the rest was not good.  Light crops of oats, wheat and potatoes were produced. The County Cess of 12¼ pence was paid per acre half yearly.

Clogher is a small scattered village; O’ Donovan describes it as a village that was not close together.   Clogher has the ruins of a house that was once the residence of the Abbot of Cong. He was of the name Lynch. There are no antiquities.   There is a stream called Pulaclogher that rises and falls in this townland.

Situation:  Clogher is a central townland; bounded on the north by the townlands of Cloonamorru; west by Tubberrogue and Croghum, to the south by Cappaghorkogue, Deerpark and Ashford and bounded on the east by Ashford and Cregs.  It is in the barony of Ross and is in County Galway

Griffith’s Valuation 1849:   According to Griffiths Valuation Clogher had an area of 174 acres and 31 perches.  The land value at the time was £82, 8 shillings and 4 pence.  Alexander Lambert held the majority of the land and he was the recipient of the rents unless otherwise stated.  Patrick Beirne (sic) paid rent to Lambert for his piece of land, and he sublet a house and office to John Beirne.  Benjamin L. Guinness also leased a plot of land to a tenant.

Plot 1:  was held in fee by Alexander Lambert.  He had tenants on 1(b) and 1(c) and they paid him rent according to the size and value of the property

1 (a) – Alexander Lambert had a herd house and land.  He had an acreage of 89 acres, 3 roods and 16 perches that had an annual valuation of £34 and 10 shillings.  The herd’s house had an annual valuation of 10 shillings; his total annual valuation of rateable property was £35.

1 (b) – James Duffy had a house and garden.  The garden measured 1 acre and 1 rood and had an annual valuation of 15 shillings.  The house had an annual valuation of 10 shillings; his total annual rent was £1 and 5 shillings.

1(c) – Matthew Coleman also had a house and garden.  The garden had an area of 2 roods, and it had an annual valuation of 8 shillings; the house was valued at 4 shillings. His total annual rent was 12 shillings.

Plot 2: had two divisions 2(a) and 2(b)

2 (a) – Patrick Beirne had a house, office and land rented from Alexander Lambert.  He had 14 acres, 3 roods and 5 perches of land for which he paid an annual sum of £8; the buildings were valued at 10 shillings.  Patrick’s total annual rent was £8 and 10 shillings.

2 (b) – John Beirne leased a house and office from Patrick Beirne for an annual rent of 8 shillings.

Plot 3:  Stephen Hopkins had a house and land.  He had 11 acres, 1 rood and 33 perches of land that had an annual valuation of £4 and 5 shillings; the house was valued at 10 shillings.  Stephen’s total annual rent was £4 and 15 shillings.

Plot 4:  Contained 15 acres, 3 roods and 2 perches of land.  This was held in two equal divisions by Stephen Hopkins and John Beirne; each paid a total annual rent of £4.

Plot 5:  Consisted of 20 acres and 9 perches and had two divisions; 5(a) and 5(-)

5 (a) – James Duffy had a house and land.  The land had a total valuation of £4 and 15 shillings; the house was valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £5.

5 (-) – John Ansborough (sic) also had part of this division; his piece of land had an annual valuation of £4 and 15 shillings.

Plot 6:  Martin Cunningham had a house and land.  The land had an area of 10 acres 2 roods and 18 perches, that had an annual valuation of £6 and 10 shillings; the house was valued at 8 shillings.  Martin’s total annual rent was £6 and 18 shillings.

Plot 7:  Bridget Laffy (sic) had a house and land.  She had 7 acres and 3 roods of land with an annual valuation of £5 and 10 shillings; the house was valued at 5 shillings.  Bridget’s total annual rent was £5 and 15 shillings.

Plot 8:  William Gallagher had 2 acres, 2 roods and 20 perches of land leased from Benjamin L. Guinness that had an annual valuation of 5 shillings.

1901 Census:  Constable Patrick Quinn collected the census return on the 4th April 1901.  There were three dwellings in Clogher; one was in private ownership; Lord Ardilaun was the name of the landholder where a forester’s house and a steward’s house were situated. All the buildings were 2nd class and the Steward’s house had a perishable roof that was most likely thatch.  There were twenty one inhabitants; twelve were male and nine were female. Three were born in Scotland, two in County Tipperary, one in County Cork, one in County Clare and the others were born in County Galway. Eight were Presbyterian; four were Church of Ireland and the remainder Roman Catholic.    Farmer, contractor, tea agent, wood forester, steward, scholar, and seamstress were the occupations.  All adults could read and write, and the family in house number one were bilingual.

No 1:  Thomas Duffy (55) a farmer and contractor, his wife Bridget (53) and their five children lived in this house.  Bridget (25) had no occupation listed for her; Mark (22) was a contractor, Margaret (17), Michael Thomas (15) and Norah (11) were scholars.  They had two lodgers in the house also; Cornelius J Foley (24) was born in County Cork and Denis Martin (20) was born in County Clare and both were tea agents.  Denis was the only one in this house that was not bilingual; all could read and write.  The house was 2nd class with five windows to the front and nine people occupied ten rooms.  Six outbuildings on the property contained a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a barn and a shed.

No 2:  Robert Couper (sic) (45) a wood forester was born in Farfarshire Scotland; his wife Ann (41) was born in Scone Perthshire, and they had six children. Annie (15), Robert (14), Eleanor (10) and Alex (7) were scholars, George was (2) and infant Archibald (9) months old.  Annie was born in Perthshire and the rest of the children were born in County Galway. The family were of Presbyterian persuasion. The house was 2nd class with five windows in front and the family of eight occupied six rooms.  They had a fowl house on the premises. Lord Ardilaun was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 3:  William Spencer (60) a Steward and his wife Sarah (57) were born in County Tipperary.  Their daughter Susan (17) a seamstress and their son Fredrick (14) a scholar were born in County Galway.  The family was Church of Ireland.  The house was 2nd class with a perishable roof, and it had three windows to the front.  The family of four occupied five rooms.  They had a cow house on the holding. Lord Ardilaun was the name of the landholder where the buildings were situated.

Census 1911:  Constable Thomas Gorman the enumerator collected the census for Clogher on the 12th of April 1911.  There were two dwellings in the townland, and both were occupied.

Ten years on, the census was expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage / completed years the present marriage has lasted / children born alive to present marriage and children still living.

No 1:  Thomas Duffy (66) a farmer and his wife Bridget (64) born in County Mayo, were married of forty-five years.  They had eleven children; seven were still living and three were recorded on this census return.  Mark (28) was a farmer’s son, Maggie (24) and Norah (21) were farmer’s daughters.  Patrick Flynn (16) a servant was an agricultural labourer.  John McMahon (23) a boarder born in County Clare, was a tea agent.  All in this household could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 1st class with five windows to the front and seven people occupied ten rooms.  Nine outbuildings contained: a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn, two sheds and a store.

No 2:  Robert Couper (sic) (56) a forester and his wife Anne Bruce Couper (51) were born in Scotland.   They were married for twenty-seven years, and they had seven children.  Elanor (21) was a mother’s help and Alexander (17) a forester; George (13), Archibald (11) and Margaret (8) were scholars.  Five of the children were born in County Galway and all were of the United Presbyterian faith.  The house was 1st class with six windows in front, and family of seven occupied seven rooms.  There was a turf shed on the premises.  Lord Ardilaun of Ashford was the name of the land holder where the house was situated.

This page was added on 18/05/2022.

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