Carrick East

An Charraig Thoir

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Translation: Carraig is a rock

 

Down Survey:

The Down Survey of Ireland is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world.  The survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details all laid down by admeasurements on maps.  It was carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656.   The survey sought to measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish, in order to facilitate its redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

The Down Survey name for Carrick East was Carownacarga.  The survey revealed that in 1641 (pre Cromwell) Teige O’Flaharty (sic) a catholic was the owner.  In 1670 (post Cromwell) the land was in protestant ownership of John Brown, and College of Dublin.  Carrick East is in the half barony of Ross, in the parish of Conge (sic) in County Galway.

 

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:

John O’Donovan tells us the standard name for the townland was Carrick East and An Charraig Thoir was the official Irish form of the name.  Other variations of the name are Carraig, Corrig East (County Surveyors Sketch Map), Carrickmore (County Map), Corrick East (Meresman), Carrick East (Tithe Ledger), Carrick East (Rev. Michael Waldron), Carrick East (Local), Carrick East (County Cess Collector).

Situation:  Carrick East is a central townland, bounded on the north by the parish of Ross; on the west by the townland of Carrick Middle, to the south by Lough Corrib, and on the east by Ballard.  It is in the barony of Ross and is in County Galway.

Description:  Carrick East was the property of Trinity College, Dublin.  The agent was Alexander Nesbitt, Jnr. Esq., No. 96 Stephens Green South, Dublin.  The land was all held under lease for a bulked rent of £25 yearly.  The soil was poor spent mountain; very rocky and there was some steep mountain.  Poor crops of oats and potatoes were produced.  The County Cess of 11¼ d. was paid per acre for 222 acres.  A mountain stream divides this townland from Ballard, and runs by the bridge into Lough Corrib.  The bridge that separates Carrig (sic) is called Kellglosh.  Two rocks called Corrigeenea, two islands; Illaun a chnuck.  There are no antiquities.

 

Griffith’s Valuation:

According to Griffith’s Valuation 1849, Carrick East (Ordnance Survey Sheet 26 & 27) had a total acreage of 600 acres 1 rood and 9 perches.  Rev. Ralph Sadleir (sic) was the sole occupier.

Plot 1:  Rev. Ralph Sadleir had a house, office and land.  The land area was 600 acres, 1 rood and 9 perches and it had an annual valuation of £76; the buildings were valued at £4.  His total annual valuation of rateable property was £80 and this was paid to Trinity College Dublin. (T.C.D)

 

Census 1901:  

The census for Carrick East was collected on the 6th of April 1901 by the enumerator Constable William Ruane (sic) (56508) of the Clonbur Constabulary District.  According to the census there were twenty-two private dwellings in the townland and twenty-one were occupied; one had a slate roof, the remainder had perishable roofs that were most likely made of thatch. Ninety-one people resided in the townland; fifty females and forty-one males; eighty-eight were Roman Catholic and three were Wesleyan Methodist.  Two were born in County Mayo and the remainder were born in Co. Galway.  Farming was the predominant way of life.

House 1:  Michael Holloran (60) a farmer and a tailor, his wife Ellen (50) and their six children lived in this house.  John (18) was a farmer’s son; Margaret (20) and Mary (16) were farmer’s daughters, Edward (14) a tailor, Bridget (10) a scholar and Ellen was (5) years old.  Michael and his wife could not read or write; Margaret and Bridget could read and John, Mary and Edward could read and write.  The family spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of eight occupied three rooms. They had a cow house on the holding.

House 2:  Stephen Joyce (30) a farmer was married to Catherine (27) and they had four children; William (8), Mary (6) and Margaret (4) were scholars and the infant Thomas was (1) year old.  William could read only, Mary and little Margaret were scholars too but they could not read.  Stephen’s widowed mother Kate (60), and his nephew John Mulroe (11) a scholar were also documented.  Stephen, Catherine and John could read and write; William could read, and Kate, Mary and Margaret could not read.  The family were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front and eight family members occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house, a stable and a piggery on the property.

House 3:  Richard Mellet (sic) (99) a widower was a farmer.  His daughter in law Bridget (50) a farmer’s wife, and her children; Mary (23), John (21), Thomas (19), Richard (17), Ellen (15) and Martin (12) were living in this house.  Richard senior and Bridget could not read; the children could read and write; Richard senior spoke Irish only and the rest of the family were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of eight occupied five rooms.  There was a stable and a cow house on the holding.

House 4:  Bridget Walsh (46) a married woman was head of this household, and she lived here with her son Michael (20).  Farming was the family occupation.  Bridget and Michael could not read; both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the mother and son occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house on the property.

House 5:  Patrick Connelly (66) a farmer, his wife Catherine (60) lived here with their children Patrick (19) and Norah (18).  Patrick and his wife could not read; their son and their daughter could read and write.  Patrick senior spoke Irish only; his wife and children were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of four occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house on the premises.

House 6:  Margaret Cavanagh (sic) (40) a married woman and her daughters Catherine (6) and Julia (3) were the occupants of this house.  Farming was their way of life.  Margaret and her children could not read and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the mother and her daughters shared two rooms.  They had a cow house on the property.

House 7:  John Browne (48) and his wife Mary (50) were farmers. Their son John (19) was a farmer’s son, Bridget (16) a farmer’s daughter and Thomas (10) was a scholar.  John’s niece Maria Mulrow (sic) (15), (erroneously listed as a farmer’s son) was also in the house.  John and his wife could not read; his three children and his niece could read and write.  The family were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of six occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house and a barn on the farm.

House 8:  Bridget Laffey (sic) (38) a widow and her daughters Bridget (15) and Kate (14) were the occupants of this house.  Farming was the family occupation and Bridget and Kate were listed as farmer’s daughters.  Bridget could not read while her daughters could read and write; all spoke both Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the mother and her daughters shared three rooms.  They had a piggery on the holding.

House 9:  Martin Walsh (30) an agricultural labourer, and his wife Mary (29) had three children in 1901.  Mary (4), Patt (sic) (2) and baby Bridget (3) months old.  Martin and his wife could not read but were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front and the family of five occupied one room.  There were no out buildings on this plot.  Bridget Laffey (sic) was the name of the landholder.

House 10:  Pat Walsh (60) a farmer and his wife Mary (55) a farmer’s wife were resident here.  The couple could not read; Pat was bilingual and Mary spoke Irish only. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front, and they had two rooms. There was a cow house on the holding.

House 11:  John Laffey (sic) (76), a farmer was a widower.  His daughter Bridget (35) was not married and she was listed as a farmer’s daughter.  John’s granddaughter Bridget Holloran (sic) (10) was also recorded.  John and his daughter spoke Irish only and they could not read; his granddaughter Bridget a scholar; could read and write and she was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and three people occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the farm.

House 12:  Thomas Connelly (74) a farmer was born in County Mayo.  He lived in this house with his wife Margaret (68), their daughter Catherine (30) a farmer’s daughter, and Pat (24) a farmer’s son were both single. Thomas, Margaret and Catherine and could not read; Pat could read and write and all spoke Irish and English. The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of four occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

House13:  Mary Heffernan (60) a widow was head of this household and farming was the family occupation.  Her son Martin (24) a farmer’s son was married to Margaret (21).  Mary spoke Irish only; her son and daughter in law were bilingual and none could read. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and three people occupied two rooms. They had a cow house on the premises.

House 14:  Martin Heffernan (56) a farmer was a widower.  He could not read and he spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and he had two rooms.  He had a cow house on the holding.

House 15:  Michael Laffey (sic) (32) a farmer, his wife Mary (30) and their children; Bridget (8), Mary (4), John (2) and Kate (1) lived in this house. Michael’s widowed mother Mary (60) and his sister Kate (40) a farmer, were part of the household. Bridget, Mary and John are documented as scholars (perhaps this is an error as John is but two years old), Bridget could read and write and Mary and John could read.  The young couple, his mother and his sister could not read.  The family were bi lingual. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and eight people occupied two rooms.  They had a piggery on the property.

House 16:  Michael Cassidy (53) a farmer was married to Julia (52) and they lived with their sons Ned (18), Miles (14) and their daughter Nora (15).  The boys were listed as farmer’s sons and Nora was a farmer’s daughter.  Michael, his wife and his daughter could not read; his sons could read and write.  Julia and Nora spoke Irish only; the father and sons were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.

B.2. – Return of Out Offices and Farm Steadings (Part 2 is not available for houses 16 to 22.

House 17:  Mary Fynne (sic) (60) a farmer was a widow.  Her son Thomas (26) was not married and was listed as a farmer’s son.  Mary spoke Irish only; Thomas spoke Irish and English; neither could read. The house was 3rd class with one window in front and two people occupied one room.

House 18:  Martin Laffey (sic) (35) a farmer and his wife Bridget (30) had two children in 1901; John (3) and Mary (1) year old.  Martin and Bridget could not read; both were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the couple and their children occupied one room.

House 19:  Joseph Holloran (sic) (70) was a widower.  His daughter in law Mary (26) a widow; and her children Joseph (7) and Mary (5) lived here.  Farming was their way of life. None in this household could read; all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.

House 20:  Thomas Keneavey (sic) (65), his wife Margaret (70) and their son Michael (25), a single man, resided here. Farming was the family occupation.  Thomas’s grandsons, Patrick (10) and Thomas Keneavy (sic) (6) were scholars.  Thomas, his wife and his son could not read; it does not say if the grandchildren could read or write. Margaret spoke Irish only; the others were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.

House 21:  Was uninhabited. Thomas Keneavey was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

House 22:  William Walshe (sic) (65) and his wife Maria (59) lived here with their daughter Helena Augusta (20).  Helena was born in County Mayo; her parents were born in Co. Galway. William was a petty session’s clerk for the Clocher and Maam district.   All could read and write. The house was 1st class with six windows to the front and the family of three occupied eight rooms.  Fawcett Blake of Clonbur was the name of the landholder where this house was situated.  (Details of out-offices and Farm – Steadings Return (Form B2) are not available for properties fifteen to twenty-two, leaving the record incomplete).

 

Census 1911:  

Constable Thomas Fallon the enumerator collected the census return for Carrick East on the 11th of April 1911.  There were twenty dwellings in the townland; nineteen were occupied; two had slate roofs, the remainder were perishable, presumably thatch. Ninety-seven people lived here; fifty males and forty-seven females.  Farming was their livelihood.  The majority spoke Irish and English.

Ten years on, the census was expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage / completed years the present marriage has lasted / children born alive to present marriage and children still living.  It reveals that many families experienced the loss of one or more children.  However, in the case of a widow or a widower, this information was not always recorded.

House 1:  Bridget Laffey (50) was head of the family.  Bridget was a widow and she lived with her daughter Katie (27).   Their occupations were not recorded. Katie could read while her mother could not read; both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and mother and daughter shared three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

House 2:  Bridget Mellet (sic) (69) was a widowed farmer. (Bridget was (50) in the previous census).  She lived with her sons Richard (27) and Martin (23).  Her granddaughter Bridget McGovern (7) was also in the house.  Bridget and her granddaughter could not read; her sons could read and write and all were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of four occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

House 3:  Michael O’Halloran (73) was a farmer and a tailor.  He was married to Ellen (67) for forty years.  It does not state the number of children born to this couple but their daughter Ellen (15) was present.  Patrick Hoffarty (sic) (30) a tailor and John Lydon (28) a labourer were born in Co. Mayo and both were listed as servants. Michael, Ellen, Patrick and John could not read; Ellen junior could read and write.  Ellen senior spoke Irish only; the others spoke Irish and English. The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and five people occupied three rooms.  The out buildings comprised of a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 4:  Stephen Joyce (45) a farmer was married to Catherine (36) for twenty years (this would mean Catherine was only sixteen years old when married).  They had seven children; six were still living; William (18) and Mary (16) had no occupations listed, Margaret (14), Thomas (11), John (7) and Patrick (5) were scholars.  Stephen’s mother Kate (82) a widow was with the family.  All but Stephen could read and write and all were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class, had three widows in front and the family of nine occupied five rooms.  They had four out buildings; a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 5:  James Kavanagh (sic) (65) was a farmer and was married to Margaret (56) for twenty years and they had three children; Julia (16), Catherine (13) and James (8) years old.  James and his wife could not read and they spoke Irish only.  Julia and Catherine could read and write; young James could not read; the children were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and five members of the family occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the premises.

House 6:  Thomas Connelly (78) was a widower who farmed for a living.  His son Bartholomew (35) and his daughter Nora (30) were both single and their occupations were not recorded.  The family could not read; Thomas and Bartholomew spoke only Irish while the Nora was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of three shared two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

House 7:  Bridget Walsh (70) a farmer was head of the household and she was a widow.  Her son Michael (39) was single and he lived with her but his occupation was not listed.  Bridget and her son could not read and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and mother and son had two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

House 8:  John Browne (67) was married to Mary (66) for thirty four years.  Of the eight children born to this couple only four survived.  Thomas (20) lived with his parents.  John and his wife could not read; their son could read and write.  Mary spoke Irish only while John and his son were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and three family members occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

House 9:  Martin Walsh (41) a farmer was married to Mary (41) for sixteen years and they had seven children; Mary (14), Patrick (12), Bridget (10) Julia (8), twins; Thomas (5), Martin (5) and John (3) years old. It does not state if the children of school going age were scholars but I assume they were, as all could read and write.  The parents could not read.  The family were bilingual with the exception of three-year old, John who spoke English only.  (it may indicate that English was the language of the home). The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of nine occupied three rooms.  The out buildings contained a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 10:  Patrick Walsh (73) a farmer was married to Mary (74) for fifty years.  They had six children; four were still living. Patrick and Mary could not read and spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the couple occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

House 11:  John Laffey (72) was a widower and farming was his occupation.  His daughter Bridget (40) a single woman; and his granddaughter Bridget (18) were also in the house.  No occupation was entered for them.  John and his daughter spoke Irish only and they could not read.  His granddaughter was bilingual and she could read and write.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and three members of the family occupied two rooms.   Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

House 12:  Mary Hefferan (sic) (70) was head of the household (I assume she was a widow but her marital status is not recorded).  Her son Martin (40) and his wife Margaret (40) were married for eleven years and they had five children, four were still living; Patrick (9), Mary (5), Bridget (3) and John (1) year old.  Farming was the family occupation.  Mary spoke Irish only; her son and his family were bilingual and none could read. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of seven occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

House 13:  Mary Laffey (80) a widow was head of the house and she was a farmer.  Michael Laffey a stone mason and was entered as head of family. (I’m not sure if he was Mary’s son) Michael (48) and Mary (42) were married for eighteen years and they had eight children; Bridget (17) Mary (15), John (12), Kate (10), Michael (8), Patrick (6), Maggie (4) and Sarah (1).  Katie Laffey (60) a single woman, was a visitor. Mary senior and Michael senior’s son and the visitor spoke Irish only and they could not read.  Michael’s wife and their children; Bridget, Mary, John and Kate could read and write; eight-year old Michael could read only.  Mother and children were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and twelve people occupied three rooms.  There were three outbuildings; a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 14:  Bridget Laffey (31) was head of the household and farming was the family occupation.  Bridget was listed as being married for twenty years (the enumerator must have made a mistake as she is listed as 31 years).  Bridget had four children; John (10), Mary (9), Patrick (8) and Martin (3).  The mother and her children could not read; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of five occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the holding.

House 15:  Thomas Fynn (sic) (50) a farmer was married to Sarah (49), for nine years.  It states on the census return they had three children, and two were still living, but three children were documented; Nora (8), Patrick (6) and John (4). The family were bilingual: none could read at this time.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of five occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

House 16:  Patrick Connelly (36) and his wife Mary (36) were married for eight years and they had four children; Kate (7), Thomas (5), Bridget (2) and the infant Patrick (3) months old.  Farming was their way of life. Patrick and his wife could read and write and the parents and two oldest children spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the parents and children occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

House 17:  Patrick Walsh (40) a farmer was married to Mary (41) for eight years and they had two children, Michael (6) and John (3).  Patrick’s stepson Joseph Halloran (18) and his step daughter Mary (14) lived with them. Patrick, his wife and step son could not read; his step daughter could read and write. His wife and three-year old son spoke Irish only; the rest of the family were bilingual.   The house was 3rd class with two widows in front and the family of six members occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

House 18:  Thomas Keneavy (sic) (74) a farmer was a widower.  His son Michael (39) was married to Mary (35) for five years and they had two children; Patrick (3) and Bridget (1).  Thomas’s grandson Thomas Keneavy (19) was also in the house, and he was the only member of the family that was bilingual; the others spoke Irish only, and none could read.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and six people occupied three rooms.  They had three out buildings; a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 19:  Godfrey Allen (58) born in Norfolk, England was married for thirty years (the census return does not record any children).  Godfrey was a hotel proprietor and he was Church of England. Maud Macfarland (43) a single woman born in India, was Church of Ireland and she was a housekeeper. Mary Coyne (18) a domestic servant was a housemaid and she was Roman Catholic. All members of this household could read and write and Mary was bilingual. The house was 1st class with six windows in front and three people occupied eleven rooms.  There were ten out buildings on the property that contained; two stables, two coach houses, a harness room, a cow house, a boiling house, a turf house, a shed and a laundry.

House 20:  A 1st class, six room building described as a hotel, with seven windows in front.  It was unoccupied in 1911 when the census was recorded.  Godfrey Allen was the name of the landholder where the hotel was situated. There were no out buildings on the premises.

This page was added on 01/09/2020.

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