Breenaun

Bruigheanán

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Translation: a small fairy mound

 

The Down Survey:

The Down Survey of Ireland is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world. The survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details all laid down by admeasurement on maps. It was carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656.   The survey sought to measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish, in order to facilitate it’s redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

Information from Down Survey is not available online for this townland (07/03/19).

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:

John O’Donovan tells us that Breenaun is in the civil parish of Ross. Other forms of name include Bruighneanán (a small fairy mound), Breenaun (County Surveyor’s Sketch Map), Breenaun (County Cess Collector) Brinnaan (County Map), Brenane (Mearsman), Brenane (Rev. Michael Heraghty P.P.), Brenane (Tithe Ledger).

Description:

The proprietor was the Earl of Leitrim and Charlemont, Rosshill or Dublin. The agent was Mr. James Fair of Fairhill, Ross parish. The townland of Breenaun and Kilmilkin are held under one lease and the rent for both is £149. 15. 2., payable yearly. The region is all mountainous, with soil that is green and pasturable. The County Cess of 11½ d is paid yearly per acre for 77 acres.

Antiquities include an old abbey in ruins, a burial ground and the ruins of a small village.

Breenaun Bridge conveying a mountain stream across the public road is situated in the townland of Breenaun.

Situation:

It is a central townland bounded on the north by the townlands of Commanagh and Griggins; west by Griggins and Maumgownagh, to the south by Roy, Cur and Tiernakill South and on the east by Maum West, Maum East and Cummanagh. Breenaun is in the barony of Ross and is in County Galway.

Griffith’s Valuation 1849:

According to Griffith’s Valuation Breenaun (sic) that can be found on Ordnance Survey Sheet 25, had an area of 1069 and 35 perches. The land value at the time was £87 and 7 shillings. The Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont were the immediate lessors and rents were paid to them. Peter Malin and John King sublet a house on their holding to Martin Walsh.

Plot 1: Peter Malin (sic) and John King had an equal division of 36 acres and 24 perches of land that had an annual valuation of £2 and 5 shillings that was paid to the Earls.

Plot 1(a): Martin Walsh had a house leased from John King and Peter Malin that had an annual valuation of 5 shillings and this rent was paid to them.

Plot 2: contained 565 acres and 27 perches of land that was divided among three tenants;

(-): Peter Malin (sic) had a piece of land that had an annual valuation of £12 and 10 shillings

(a): Patrick Conroy had a herd’s house and land. He paid an annual sum of £25 for his piece of land and he paid 5 shillings for the house. Patrick’s total annual valuation of rateable property was £25 and 5 shillings.

(-): Michael Malin had a piece of land that had an annual valuation of £12 and 10 shillings.

Plot 3: John King had a house and land. He had 408 acres and 14 perches of land that had an annual valuation of £55 and 10 shillings. The house had an annual valuation of 10 shillings. John’s total annual valuation of rateable property was £56.

1901 Census:

Constable John Doherty collected the census return on the 2nd April 1901. Breenane was in the electrol district of Curr, in the sub district of Maam, County Galway. There were two dwellings in the townland at the time, one was 2nd class and one 3rd class; both with perishable roofs that were presumably thatch. Fourteen males and eight females were resident here. All were born in County Galway and were Roman Catholic.

No 1: William Lydon (60) a herdsman was married to Teresa (54). Their daughter Teresa (18), son William (16), their married son Thomas (25) and his wife Mary (22) and infant daughter Kathleen (3 months old) lived in house one. Thomas and William were herdsman’s sons and Teresa a herdsman’s daughter. The parents could not read while the adult family could read and write and all were bilingual. The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of seven occupied three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding. Thomas O’Malley was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 2: Philip Kyne (79) his wife Sarah (64), their two sons, two daughters and their granddaughter lived in this house. Philip and his sons James (31) and Martin (17) were shepherds. His daughter Norah (22) was a dressmaker and Bridget (20) was a shepherd’s daughter. Their granddaughter Mary Wallace (5) was a scholar. The parents and eldest son could not read; the rest of the family including five year old Mary could read and write and all spoke Irish and English. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front and the family of seven occupied three rooms. They had four out buildings; a stable, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery. Peter O’Malley was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 3: Was listed as Breenane national school. Peter O’Malley was the name of the landholder where the school was situated.

1911 Census: Constable Patrick Heneghan the enumerator collected the census for Breenane (sic) on the 17th April 1911. Eighteen people lived in the townland; eleven males and seven females, all were born in County Galway.

No 1: Was listed as Kilmeelikin nation school – ordinary.

No 2: Sarah Coyne (75) a widow was married for forty eight years and she had nine children, eight were still living. Her son James (44) a shepherd and his wife Bridget (31) were married for nine years and they had six children; Patrick (8), John (6) and Bridget (4) were scholars, Michael was (2) and Bartley (1) year old. Daughter in law Bridget and Jane Coyne (17) a visitor were the only members of the household who could read and write. Sarah spoke Irish only while her son and his wife and family were bilingual. The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and nine people occupied three rooms. They had a stable and a piggery on the holding. Peter O’Malley was the name of the landholder where the property was situated.

No 3: James Walsh (55) was married to Bridget (45) for twenty five years. The couple had eleven children, ten were still living; Bridget was (19), John (17), Anthony (15), Thomas (10), Martin (8), Peter (6) and Maggie (3) years old. James and his son John were shepherds. Anthony, Thomas and Martin and Peter were scholars. James and his wife could not read and he spoke Irish only. Their children could read and write and were bilingual. The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of nine occupied three rooms. There was a stable on the premises and Thomas O’Malley was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

This page was added on 17/02/2020.

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