Carrowgarriff

Ceathramhadh garbh

Tomas O’Flahartha, Bairbre Ní Chonaíre

Carrowgarriff, Ceathramhadh garbh, meaning rough quarter

Names:

According to O’Donovan’s Field name books (1838) the standard name given to the townland was Carrowgarriff and Ceathramhadh garbh was its official Irish form. The other forms of the name were Carhowgaruffe (Inquis. Temp. Gul.) Carhoogorriv (Boundary Surveyors Sketch, Rev. Michael Waldron, P.P, Local, County Cess Collector) Carrowgarrive (County Map) Carhoogorrive (Meresman), Carragarriff (Tithe Ledger).

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (www.logainm.ie), the townland contains 3 islands. These islands were Illaunnawullagh Islands (Oileán an Mhullaigh), Illaunbaun (An tOileán Ban) and Illaunnaheltia (Oileán ha hEilte).According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha the townland also had a castle called Castlekirk (Caisleán na Circe). Carrowgarriff also had two rocks called White Rock (An Charraig Bhán) and Fogarty’s Rock (Carraig na Muineál).

Situation:

Carrowgarriff is in the civil parish of Cong and in the barony of Ross in the County of Galway. It is in the West side of the parish. It is bounded on the North by the townlands of Dooghta, bounded on the West by Moneenmore, South by Lough Corrib and on the East by Claggin.

Description:

Down Survey: ‘‘The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps; ‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will”. (Wikipedia).The Down Survey name given to Carrowgarriff is Carrowgarue. The owner in 1641 was the Earl of Clanrickard who was Protestant and in 1670 the owners were John Brown(Protestant), Earl of Canrickard (Protestant) and John Browne (Catholic). There were 577 acres of unprofitable land and 122 acres of profitable land. 122 acres were forfeited.

O’Donovan’s (1838): In 1838 the proprietors were the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont and the Agents was James Fair of Fairhill. According to O Donovan the townland of Carrowgarriff is composed of 659 acres, 0 roods and 12 perches. The townland is located in the civil parish of Cong, in the barony of Ross and in the County of Galway. O’ Donovan tells us that all the townland was held yearly for a bulked rent of £55.9s.0d. yearly. Co. Cess paid 11¼ d. per acre for 91 and a half acres half yearly. This townland contains 352 acres and a public road runs from Cloggum through this village ,between the mountain and Lough Corrib, to Moneenmore. The soil is part steep mountain which has coarse, heathy and mixed pasture with some mixed arable and on the foot of the mountain towards the Lough Corrib with bog and mixed pasture , the north end has the most arable soil (as per transcribed from O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books). According to O’Donovan’s Field Name Books there were 2 islands called Illaunawoollugh.

Griffith’s Valuation (1855) The area of the village was 659, 0 roods, and 12 perches according to Griffiths Valuation 1855. The annual valuation for lands in Carowgariff were £52.12s.0d.   Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont were the immediate lessors for all the plots, except for the second part of house 2 and house 3 whose immediate lessor was Michael Higgins. This village was divided into 10 plots.

Plot 1 was composed of 102 acres, 3 roods and 17 perches. Total valuation for this plot was £18.15s.0d.

Micheal Higgins had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £18.5s.0d and the house at £0.10s.0d.

Plot 2 was composed of 173 acres, 1 rood and 36 perches. This plot was subdivided into 2 sub-plots. The immediate lessor for the second sub-plot was Michael Higgins. Total valuation for this plot was valued at £2.2s.0d.

Plot 2 Michael Higgins had land (mountain). The land was valued at £1.15s.0d.

Plot 2 Thaddeus Walsh had land (mountain). The land was valued at £0.7s.0d.

Plot 3 was composed of 16 acres, 3 roods and 33 perches. The immediate lessor for this plot was Michael Higgins. Total valuation for this plot was valued at £4.3s.0d.

Thaddeus Walsh had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.13s.0d. and the house at £0.10s.0d.

Plot 4 was composed of 22 acres, 0 roods and 20 perches. Total valuation for this plot was £3.8s.0d.

John Thornton had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.0s.0d and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 5 was composed of 22 acres,2 roods and 32 perches. Total valuation for this plot was £3.8s.0d.

James Thornton had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.0s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 6 AB was composed of 83 acres, 0 roods and 20 perches. This plot was subdivided into plots Aa and b.   Total valuation for this plot was £6.16s.0d.

Plot 6 (Aa) Martin McCue had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.0s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 6 (b) Stephen Ford had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.0.0d and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 7 composed of 41 acres, 2 roods and 0 perches. This plot was divided into 4 plots. Total valuation for plot 7 was £0.8s.0d.

Plot 7 John Thornton had land (bog pasture). The land was valued at £0.2s.0d.

Plot 7 James Thornton had land (bog pasture). The land was valued at £0.2s.0d.

Plot 7 Martin McCue had land (bog pasture). The land was valued at £0.2s.0d.

Plot 7 Stephen Ford had land (bog pasture). The land was valued at £0.2s.0d.

Plot 8 was composed of 30 acres, 3 roods and 22 perches. This plot was subdivided into 2 sub plots a and b. Total valuation for this plot was £3.10s.0d.

Plot 8 (a) Thomas Coyne had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1.8s.0d. and the house at £0.7s.0d.

Plot 8 (b) Michael Joyce had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1.8s.0d. and the house at £0.7s.0d.

Plot 9 was composed of 38 acres, 3 roods and 20 perches. This plot was divided into 2 sub plots a and b. Total valuation for this plot was £3.10s.0d.

Plot 9 (a) Thomas Flynn had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £0.10s.0d and the house at £0.6s.0d.

Plot 9 (b) Thomas Flynn, jun. Had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1.18s.0d. and the house at £0.7s.0d.

Plot 10 was composed of 117 acres, 2 roods and 12 perches. Total valuation for this plot was £6.12s.0d.

Patrick Thornton had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £6.0s.0d. and the house at £0.12s.0d.

 

Census 1901

This census indicates that there were 14 buildings in this village, including the National school which was numbered 14 and unoccupied. There were 13 families in this village. Form B.2. (Return of Out-offices and Farm-Steadings) indicates that there were 7 stables, 11 cow houses, 1 calf house and 9 piggeries. Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic. Everyone in this village, expect for 3 households, were born in Galway. These three households were 2, 8 and 9.

Michael Thornton (50) resided in House No 1, and was head of the family. He was married to Noria (37) He was a farmer and she was a housekeeper. They had six sons and one daughter. John (15) was a Farmer Servant. James (13) was a scholar. Bridget (10) was a scholar. Michael (7) was a scholar. Patrick (5) was a scholar. Peter was (3) and Martin was (1). All the children could read and write except the youngest, Peter and Martin. The parents could not read or write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English expect Martin who was too young to talk. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Thomas Thornton (53) resided in House No 2, and was head of the family. He was married to Mary (46). He was a Farmer. They had four daughters and two sons, there was also a Boarder staying with them, his name was James Bannon. Mary was 17 and Kathleen was 15. Thomas (13) was a scholar. Pat (11) was a Scholar. Maggie (8) was a scholar and Julia (5) was also a scholar. All the children could read and write and spoke Irish and English. The father could read only and spoke Irish and English. The mother could not read but spoke Irish and English. James Bannon (30) was from Co Westmeath and was a Wood Contractor he could read and write and spoke English. The rest of the household was born in Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

Martin McHugh (50) resided in House No 3. He was head of the family and a farmer. He was married to Bridget (40) and they had two daughters, Bridget (17) and Honoria (15).They could both read and write and spoke Irish and English. The parents could not read or write and spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Michael Coyne (52) resided in House No 4. He was head of the family and a farmer. He was married to Sarah (41). They had two sons and three daughters. Thomas (15) was a Farmer’s Servant. Peter (13) was a scholar. Bridget (9) was a scholar, Sarah (5) and Honorah (4) were also scholars. All the children could read and write except for Honorah who could only read. They all spoke Irish and English. The parents could not read, the father spoke Irish and English, the mother only spoke Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

John Kinavey (50) resided in House No 5; he was head of the family and a Farmer. He was married to Julia (38); they had four daughters and two sons. Bridget was 16. Julia was 14. Their two sons were scholars, Michael (12) and Thomas (10). the youngest two daughters, Catherine (8) and Barbra (sic.) (5), were also scholars. Everyone in this household could read and write. The parents spoke Irish only and the children spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable and a cow house.

Bartley O’Malley (sic) (62) resided in House No 6. He was a Farmer. He was married to Mary O’ Malley (52) they had two sons and a daughter. Also living in the house at the time was Bartley’s mother, Mary O’Malley (85) and also the mother- in –law, Sarah Forde. Bartly (sic.) (17) was a Farm Assistant. July (14) was Bartley’s daughter, Michael (10) was a scholar, and also Margaret (7) was a scholar. Bartley, Mary (85) and Sarah could not read or write, the rest of the household could. Everyone in this household, expect Mary (85) and Sarah who spoke Irish only, spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a calf house.

Patr. (sic.) Flynn (50) resided in House No 7; he was a Builder- Slater. He was married to Bridget (40); they had six daughters and two sons. Also living with them was Patr.’s mother Ellen Flynn (80). It was not stated what occupation Mary (18) and Bridget (16) had. John (14) was a Farm Servant; Barbara (12), Ellen (10), Julia (7) and Anne (4) were scholars. The youngest was Martin (2). Martin was too young to read or write. Patr. and Bridget could not read. Anne could read and the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household, except Martin who was too young, spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

Winifred Thornton (37) resided in House no 8; she was a widow and a farmer. She had a son and a daughter, Thomas (19) and Barbara (15) They also had a Boarder called John Bannon (19) who was a forester and from Co. Offaly. The rest of the household was born in Galway. The family could speak English and Irish and John spoke English only. Everyone in this household could read and write. They lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

John A. Coyne (61) resided in House No 9; he was head of the family. He was from Co Mayo. He was a retired National school teacher. He was married to Anne M. (61). They had a daughter and a son, Anne (28) and John (27). John was a National School teacher. The parents and Anne spoke Irish and English. John spoke English only. Everyone in this household could read and write. Everyone in this household was born in Mayo. They resided in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had no outhouses or farm steadings. Their landlord was Honoria O Neil who also lived in Carrowgariff in house 10.

Honoria (sic.) O Neil resided in House No 10, she was a widow. She had one son, Thomas (35) who lived with her and also two grand-children Michael Thornton (18) and Patk (sic) Thornton (16), they were both Farm Servants. Honoria and Thomas were farmers. No one in this household could read or write. Honoria spoke Irish only and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with one room. They had no out houses or farm steadings.

Michael Faherty (70) resided in house numbered 11 with his five children, his daughter in law and his sister in law. His children were Michael (32), Mary (5), Bridget (4), Nora (1½) and Catherine (1). His daughter in law was Bridget Faherty (26) and his sister in law was Bridget Coyne (70). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. Mary and Bridget (4) were scholars. Bridget (70) was a domestic servant. Michael (Snr.), Michael and Bridget (26) could read and write, the rest of this household could not. Catherine was too young to talk. Bridget (70) spoke Irish only. Mary, Bridget (4) and Nora spoke English only; the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household was born in Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

Michael Brennan (60) lived in house numbered 12 with his two sons and a married couple called John (25) and Mary (21) Brennan (unclear on form what relation they have to Michael Brennan). His children were John (3) and Pat (1). Michael was a farmer. Mary could read and write, the rest of the household could not. Michael, John (25) and Mary spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household was born in Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Pat (40) and Honner (45) Walsh resided in house 13 with their six children. On the night of the census they had a visitor called Sarah Walsh (50). Pat and Honner’s six children were Mary (16), John (15), Maggie (13), Bridget (9), Martin (5) and Michael (3). Pat and John were farmers. Mary, Maggie, Bridget, Martin and Michael were scholars. The parents with Michael and Sarah could not read. Martin could read only and the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household was born in Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House numbered 14 was unoccupied and was owned by Patrick Flynn who lived in Carrowgarriff in house 7.

Census 1911:

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living); if Deaf and Dumb, Dumb only, Blind, Imbecile or Lunatic. In the previous census they were 13 occupied houses. In this census, 15 houses are occupied and the National school was unoccupied.   All those enumerated here were Roman Catholic except for houses 1 and 2 who were Protestant Baptists. Everyone in this village , except for the households in house 1,2,7 and 16, were born in Galway. There are two new households in house 1 and 2.   House numbers differ from those of 1901. There are also inconsistent age gaps between 1901 to 1911 census.

Thomas (59) and Emily (59) Simcot (sic.) resided in house 1, this was a new household in Carrowgariff. Thomas and Emily were married for 39 years, had six children and five of them had survived until 1911. Thomas was a blacksmith and according to the Household return (Form A) Emily was a Lead Mines (sic.). Everyone in this household could read and write. They did not fill in the section about the Irish Language. Both of them were born in England and both of them, were Protestant Baptists. They lived in a 2nd class house with four rooms. Their house was no listed in the Return of Out-offices and Farm-Steadings form (Form B2). Their landlord was Col Clemuts (sic.) of Co. Kildare.

Edwin (35) and Annie (35) Simcox lived in house 2, this was a new household in Carrowgariff, with their daughter, Doris (5), a relative, John Lewis (5) and a boarder called David Simpson (68). Edwin and Annie were married for nine years, had one child which survived until 1911. Edwin was a Lead Mine manager. Doris and John were scholars and David was a Foreman Lead Miner. Edwin, Annie and David could read and write. It was not stated whatever Doris or James could read or write, they stated them as ‘scholars’ in this section. They did not fill in the section about the Irish Language. The Simcox family and John were born in England and David was born in Scotland. Edwin, Annie, Doris and John were Protestant Baptists. David was part of the Protestant Establishment Church of Scotland. They lived in a 2nd class house with six rooms. They had a stable. Their landlord was Col Clemuts (sic.) of Co. Kildare.

Michael (56) and Honor (called Noria in 1901) (53) Thornton lived in house 3 , previously numbered house 1, with their six children; Michael (19), Patrick (17), Peter (15), Martin (12), Mark (9) and Mary (6). There was no mention of John, James or Bridget in this 1911 census. Michael (Snr.) and Honor were married for 30 years, had ten children and ten of them had survived until 1911. Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. Peter, Martin, Mark and Mary were scholars. Michael (Jnr.), Patrick and Peter could read, the rest of the family could not. Everyone in this family, except Mark and Mary, spoke Irish and English. They still lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They still had a cow house and a piggery and added a fowl house by 1911.

Thomas (65) and Mary (60) Thornton lived in house 4, previously numbered house 2, with their three children. Their children were Patrick (called Pat in 1901) (21), Maggie (18) and Julia (14). Mary, Kathleen, Thomas Thornton and James Bannon were not mentioned in this 1911 census. Thomas and Mary were married for 39 years, had nineteen children and eight of them had survived until 1911. Thomas was a farmer and Julia was a scholar. The parents could not read but their children could read and write. Mary spoke Irish only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They still lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They still had a cow house and a piggery and added a calf house and a fowl house but no longer had a stable by 1911.

Martin (67) and Bridget (58) McHugh lived in house 5, previously numbered house 3, with their son, their daughter in law and their grandson. Their son was Patrick (31), their daughter-in-law was Ellen (28) and their grandson was John (10 months). There was no Bridget or Honoria in this 1911 census. Martin and Bridget were married for 36 years, had four children and all four of them had survived until 1911. Patrick and Ellen were married for one year, had one child which survived until 1911. Martin was a farmer. Martin and John could not read or write, the rest of the household could. Everyone in this household, except John who was too young, spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They still lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They still had a cow house, a piggery and added a fowl house and calf house by 1911.

Micheal (58) and Sarah (57) Coyne lived in house 6, previously house numbered 4, with their three daughters; Bridgie (called Bridget in 1901) (20) (sic.), Sarah (17) and Norah (called Honorah in 1901) (13). There was no mention of Thomas or Peter in this 1911 census. Michael and Sarah (Snr.) were married for 35 years, had eight children and seven of them had survived until 1911. Micheal was a farmer, Norah was a scholar. The parents could not read or write but their children could. Sarah (Jnr.) spoke Irish only and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They still lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery, added a fowl house but by 1911 no longer had a stable.

John Kineavy (called Kinavey in 1901) (65) and Julia Joyce (called Kinavey in 1901) (58) resided in house 7, previously numbered house 5, with their two children and three grandchildren. Their children were Mary (36) and Catherine (18) and their grandchildren were Mark (4), Julia (2) and Patrick (2). There was no mention of Bridget, Julia (14), Michael, Thomas and Barbara in this 1911 census. John and Julia (58) were married for 38 years, had eleven children and seven of them had survived by 1911. Mary was also married. She was married for 5 years, had three children and three of them had survived by 1911. John was a farmer. Mary and Catherine were listed in this 1911 census as ‘Domestic’. Mary and Catherine could read and write. Mark could read only. The rest of the household could not read or write. Mary and Catherine spoke Irish and English. John and Julia (58) spoke Irish only and the rest of the household spoke English only. John, Julia (58), Mary and Catherine were born in Galway; the rest of the household was born in ‘Jersey City’ in America. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They still had a cow house and added a barn but by 1911 they no longer had a stable.

Bartly O Malley (called Mallery in 1901) (73) and Mary Forde (called Mallery in 1901)(70) lived in house 8, previously numbered house 6, with their two children, Michl (called Michael in 1901) (sic.) (21) and Margaret (17). There was no mention of Bartly (Jnr.), July, Mary O Mallery and Sarah Forde in this 1901 census. Bartly and Mary were married for 44 years, had twelve children and eight of them had survived until 1911. Bartly was a farmer. The parents could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 1st class house with eight rooms in 1911, in 1901 they lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms. They still had a cow house, a calf house and added a piggery and a potato house but no longer had a stable by 1911.

Patrick (64) and Bridget (60) Flynn resided in house 9, previously numbered 7, with their four children Ellen (20), Julia (17), Annie (called Anne in 1901) (14) and Martin (11).   There was no mention of Ellen (Snr.), Mary, Bridget (Jnr.), John and Barbara. Patrick and Bridget had been married for 34 years, had eight children and eight of them had survived until 1911. Patrick has a farmer. Julia, Annie and Martin were scholars. The parents could not read or write but their children could. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. In 1901 they still lived in a 2nd class house but had three rooms instead of the two rooms they had in 1901.   They still had a cow house, a piggery and by 1911 had added a potato house but no longer had a stable.

House numbered 10 was the ‘Carrowgariff National School, Ordinary’ and was unoccupied.

Winifred Thornton (49) lived in house 11, previously numbered 8, with their son, Thomas (27). There was no mention of Barbara Thornton or John Bannon. Winifred was a widow. In his previous marriage he was married for 8 years, had four children and three of them survived until 1911. Thomas was a farmer. Both of them could read and write and they spoke Irish and English. They still lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They still had a cow house, a piggery and added a fowl house but no longer had a stable by 1911.

Michael Thornton (28) resided in house 12, previously numbered house 10. There was no mention of Honoria (sic.) O Neil, Thomas O Neil and Patk (sic.) Thornton. Michael was a farmer. Michael could not read or write and spoke Irish and English. He lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms; in 1901 they lived in a 3rd class house with 1 room. He added a cow house by 1911.

Michael Faherty (78) lived in house 13, was numbered 11 in 1901, with his son, daughter-in-law and his eight grandchildren. His son was Michael (45), his daughter-in-law was Bridget (36) and his eight grandchildren were Mary (15), Bridgie (called Bridget in 1901) (14), Nora (11), Martin (8), Michael (6), Ellen (4), Maggie (3) and Sarah (1). In the 1901 census Mary, Bridgie (Bridget) and Nora was listed as Michael’s (78) children. There was no mention of Catherine Faherty and Bridget Coyne in this 1911 census. Michael (78) was a widower and did not give details of his previous marriage. Michael (36) and Bridget were married for 16 years, had ten children and nine of them had survived until 1911. Michael (78) was a farmer. Mary, Bridgie, Nora, Martin, Michael (6) and Ellen were scholars. Ellen, Maggie and Sarah could not read or write. Michael (78) could read only. The rest of the family could read and write. Michael (78), Michael, Bridget, Mary, Bridgie, Nora and Martin spoke Irish and English. The rest of the household spoke neither English nor Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms; in 1901 they lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They still had a cow house, a piggery and added a fowl house and a barn but no longer had a stable by 1911.

John (39) and Mary (31) Brennan resided in house 14, was numbered 12 in 1901, with their six children and their uncle, Michael (75). Their six children were John (12), Patrick (11), Michael (8), Barbara (6), Thomas (4) and Martin (1). John (Snr.) and Mary were married for 14 years, had eight children and six of them had survived until 1911. John (Snr.) was a farmer. John (Jnr.), Patrick, Michael (8), Barbara and Thomas were scholars. Thomas, Martin and Michael (75) could not read, the rest of the household could. John (Snr.), Mary, John, Patrick, Michael (8) and Barbara spoke Irish and English, the rest of the household spoke neither English nor Irish. They still lived in a 2nd class house but with three rooms instead of the two rooms they had in 1901. They still had a cow house and a piggery and added a fowl house by 1911.

Patrick (50) and Norah (called Honnor in 1901) (55) Walsh occupied house 15, previously numbered 13 in 1901, with their four children; John (25), Bridget (20), Martin (15) and Michael (14). There was no mention of Mary Walsh, Maggie Walsh or Sarah Walsh in this 1911 census. Patrick and Norah were married for 26 years, had eight children and six of them had survived until 1911. Patrick was a farmer. Martin and Michael were scholars. The parents could not read or write, while their children could. Norah spoke Irish only; the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms; in 1901 they lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery and added a fowl house by 1911.

Annie (called Anne in 1901) Coyne (38) lived in house 16, previously numbered house 9 in 1901. There was no mention of John A., Anne M. and John in this 1911 census. Annie could read and write. She did not fill in the Irish language part of the census form. Annie was from Mayo. She still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. Her house is not listed on the Return of Out-offices or Farm-Steadings Form (Form B2). In 1901 she had no out-offices of farm-steadings. Her landlord was Michael Thornton.

 

 

This page was added on 16/02/2017.

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