Leenaun

Lionán

Teresa Philbin

leenane old village
The National Library of Ireland, Lawrence Collection
Presbyterian Church Leenane
The National Library of Ireland - Lawrence Collection
Leenaun
Teresa Philbin

Translation:  where the tide fills

The ancient name for Leenane was ‘Lionan Cinn Mhara’ that is Lionan at the head of the tide.

Down Survey 1641: The Down Survey of Ireland is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world.  The survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details all laid down by admeasurements on maps.  It was carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656.   The survey sought to measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish, in order to facilitate its redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

The Down Survey name for this townland is Lenane (sic).  In 1641 (pre – Cromwell) the owners were Teige O Flahartye (sic) and Rory óge O’Fflahartye (sic) and they were Catholic.  In 1670 (post – Cromwell) it was in protestant ownership of College of Dublin.  Leenane is in the half barony of Ross, in the parish of Rosse (sic) in County Galway.  There were 1,863 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 153 plantation acres of profitable land and the profitable land was forfeited.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:  John O’Donovan reveals that the standard name for the townland is Leenaun.  The Irish form of the name Lionán means ‘where the tide fills.

Other forms of the name:  Leenaun (Iomaire an Lionain), Lionan, Leanaan (Boundary Surveyors Sketch Map), Leenaun (County Cess Collector), Leanaun (County Map), Lynane (Leases 1837), Leenaan (Local), Leenane (Map of Property 1760), Leenane (Map of Property 1815), Leenaun (Mearsman), Lenane (Rev. Michael Heraghty P.P.) and Leenane (Tithe Ledger).

Description:  Leenane was in the proprietorship of the Provost of Trinity College Dublin.  The agent was Alexander Nesbitt, Esq. Junior with an address at No 96 Stephen’s Green South, Dublin.  The lands were all held under lease by James Kilkelly, Esq. Oughterard for rent of £173 and 18 shillings per year.  The soil all mountainous; part steep heath rough pasture and part mixed pasture, with some arable mountain.  The County Cess of 1¼d was paid per acre half yearly for 102 acres.  Meetings or patterns were held here on the 8th September, the 15th August and the first Sunday of Autumn (remainder is crossed out).

Situation:  Leenane is situated in the northwest corner of the parish.  It is bounded on the north by Killery (sic) harbour; to the west by the parish of Ballinakil (sic), to the south by the townlands Bunaviskaun and Muntierowen, to the west and to the east by Cullagh and Letterbrickaun.  Leenane is in the civil parish of Ross, in the barony of Ross and is in County Galway.

Griffith’s Valuation 1849:  Leenane (Ordnance Sheet No 11 & 12).  According to Griffith’s valuation Leenane had an area of 1,845 acres and 22 perches.  The land value at the time was £89 and the building value was £9.16.8.

James Kilkelly leased 1,844 acres, 3 roods and 2 perches of land and the rents were paid to him unless otherwise stated.  The land and buildings were valued according to the size and quality of property.

The land was held in plots.  Plot 3 had many divisions.

Plot 1:  Thomas O’Neill had a house, offices and land.  The land area was 483 acres and 26 perches.  The rateable annual valuation of the land was £23 and 10 shillings, and the buildings had an annual valuation of £12.  His total annual rent was £35 and 10 shillings.

Plot 1 (b):  Constabulary Force occupied a police barrack and garden.  The garden measured 1 rood and 20 perches, and it had a rateable annual valuation of 5 shillings; the buildings were valued at £4 and 15 shillings.  The total annual rent on the property was £5.

Plot 2:  John King had a herd’s house and land.  There were 869 acres, 2 roods and 20 perches of land with a rateable annual valuation of £51; the herd’s house had an annual valuation of £1.  His total annual rent was £52.

Plot 3:  Had an area of 491 acres, 3 roods and 27 perches that was held between the following tenants:

3(a) – Anthony Coyne (Anth) had a house, office and land.  He paid an annual sum of £3 for his portion of land and the buildings were valued at 15 shillings.  His total annual rent was 3 and 15 shillings.

3(b) – John Gibbons leased a house and land from Anthony Coyne (Anth).  The parcel of land had an annual valuation of £1 and 10 shillings and the house was valued at 10 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2, and this was payable to Anthony Coyne.

3(c) – Sarah Mannion had a house and land.  Her parcel of land had an annual valuation of £1 and 10 shillings and the house was valued at 10 shillings.  Sarah’s total annual rent was £2.

3(d) – Michael Coyne had a house and land; there was an annual valuation of £2 and 5 shillings for his portion of land and 15 shillings for the house.  His total annual rent was £3.

3(e) – Michael Holland had a house, office and land; his piece of land had an annual valuation of £6 and 15 shillings and the buildings were valued at £1.  His total annual rent was £7 and 15 shillings.

3(f) – William Lyden (sic) had a house and land; his portion of land was valued at 13 shillings and the house was valued at 7 shillings.  William’s total annual rent was £1.

3(g) – Peter Laffey had a house and land; the land had an annual valuation of £2 and 5 shillings and the house was valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 10 shillings.

3(h) – John Wallace had a house, offices and land.  There was an annual valuation of £2 and 5 shillings on the land and 7 shillings on the buildings.  John’s total annual rent was £2 and 12 shillings.

3(i) – Thomas Davis had a house and land; the land had an annual valuation of £2 and 5 shillings and the house was valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 10 shillings.

3(j) – John McDonald had a house, office and land; his piece of land had an annual valuation of £3 and the buildings were valued at 10 shillings.  His total annual rent was £3 and 10 shillings.

3(k) – Anthony Coyne (Peter) had a house and land; his portion of land had an annual valuation of £1 and 10 shillings and the house was valued at 5 shillings.  His total annual rent was £1 and 15 shillings.

3(l) – Michael Cribben (sic) had a house and land; his piece of land had an annual valuation of £2 and 5 shillings and the house was valued at 7 shillings.  His total annual rent was £2 and 12 shillings.

3(m) – Martin Joyce had a house and land; the portion of land was valued at £1and the house was valued at 5 shillings.  Martin’s total annual rent was £1 and 5 shillings.

3(m-) – John Kerrigan rented a parcel of land that had an annual valuation of £1 and 2 shillings.

Exemptions:  Police barrack and garden and the national schoolhouse were exempt.

1901Census: The census returns for Leenane in the electoral division of Letterbrickane, in the barony and parish of Ross was collected on 1st April 1901 by the enumerator Constable Thomas Parkinson.  According to Form B.1- House and Building Return there were thirty-two dwellings; twenty-five were inhabited and seven were unoccupied. Three of the houses were documented as 1st class, ten 2nd class, eight 3rd class and three were 4th class dwellings; fourteen of the houses had perishable roofs that were presumably thatch. Eighty-two males and eighty females were resident here at the time. The majority were Roman Catholic; two were Presbyterian, four Methodist, five Church of England and nine were Church of Ireland.  There was a Presbyterian Church, a National School and a Royal Irish Constabulary (R.I.C.) Barrack in Leenane.

No 1.1:  Mary Jane Hoban (19) and Maggie Kilun (sic) (19) born in Co. Mayo were domestic servants.  R. Henry McKeown was the name of the landholder where they were accommodated.

No 1.2:  A hotel and public house.  R. Henry MacKeown (28) a single man born in Co. Galway was a hotel proprietor and a farmer. His sisters Anna McKeown (27) born in Leenane, Co. Galway, and Isabella Clesham (44) a widow born in Co. Armagh were assistants.  R. Henry’s nephews: Thomas H. Clesham (19) a student, scholars R. J Clesham (12) and Claude Clesham (10) were born in Co. Mayo.  R. Henry and Anna were Presbyterian; Isabella and the Clesham boys were Church of Ireland.  Sarah Joyce (21) born in Co. Tipperary was a shop assistant.  Sophia V Jennings (19) born in Co. Cavan was a post office assistant, Lizzie G Fair (21) born in Co. Cork was a bookkeeper.  Sophia and Lizzie were Church of Ireland.  Michael J. Hynes (36) a single man was a medical doctor, Michael Nee (19) a waiter, Honor Feeney (19), Bridget Joyce (18) and Molly Kerrigan (23) were domestic servants, all were born in Co. Galway.  Michael Kerrigan (21) a herd was born in Co. Mayo; all were Roman Catholic. Michael and Molly were both married (perhaps they were husband and wife?) The servants employed by R. Henry McKeown were bilingual and Honor, Mary Jane and Maggie could read and write.  The hotel was 1st class with twenty-six windows to the front, and seventeen people occupied twelve rooms.  There were seventeen out offices that contained two stables, two coach houses, a harness room, a cow house, two piggeries, a fowl house, a boiling house, a barn, a store, a laundry, two dog houses, a fish house and a bottle house.

No 1.3:  Lyonel (sic) P. Tollemache (40) (Hon. L. P. Tollemache (sic)) was born in England.  His wife Sybil (39) (Lady Sybil Tollemache) was born in Co. Roscommon.  Granville Findlay (26) a Physician (Economics) was born in Natal South Africa.  Alfred Fletcher (23) a footman, William Ravenhill (34) a butler and his wife Sarah (36) a cook and housekeeper, were born in England; their daughter Margaret (10) a scholar was born in Co. Wicklow.  All could read and write.  William Ravenhill and his daughter were Roman Catholic, his wife Sarah and the other members of the household were Church of England. Seven people occupied ten rooms in this building.

No 2:  A vacant dwelling.

No 3:  A Presbyterian Church

No 4:  James Joyce (42) a car driver, and his wife Mary (40) and their seven children lived in this house.  Their son John (15) was a postman, Michael (14) a telegraph messenger, Mary (12), Pat (10), Bridger (8) and Margaret (7) were scholars and James was (5) years old.  The parents and John were born in Co. Mayo and the others were born in Co. Galway. Mary and her children from seven upwards could read and write; James could not read; the couple were bilingual. The house was 2nd class with two windows in front and the family of nine occupied two rooms.  There were no outbuildings on the premises.

No 5:  Thomas Feeney (50) was a servant and a car driver.  He and his wife Mary (48), their three children and his mother-in-law were the occupants of this house; Michael (16) was a wool weaver, Patrick (10) a scholar and Sarah (14) did not have an occupation listed.  Thomas’s mother-in-law Julia Wallace (76) a widow, was a midwife. The children could read and write; their parents and Julia could not read. All were bilingual and were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and six people occupied three rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

No 6:  John Connelly (28) a farm servant, his wife Ann (26) and their son Martin (2) lived here.  John a farm servant could read only; Ann could read and write; both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the couple and their child occupied two rooms. There were no out houses on the holding.

  1. Henry was the name of the landholder of properties 1 to 6

No 7:  A Royal Irish Constabulary Barrack (R.I.C) was the quarters of an acting sergeant and three constables. Acting sergeant T.L (Thomas Lowe) (38) a widower, was born in Co. West Meath. Constable T.P (38) born in Co. Kerry was a single man, (Constable T.P most likely Thomas Parkinson the census enumerator) both were farmer’s sons and were Church of Ireland.    Constable P.F (26) born in Co. Sligo was a farmer’s son and Constable C. M born in Co. Roscommon was the son of a carpenter, both were single men and were Roman Catholic. The barrack was a 2nd class dwelling with six windows to the front.  Four constables occupied four rooms. There was a turf house on the premises.

Charles Kilkelly was the name of the landholder where the barrack was situated.

No 8:  A hotel and public house.  Thomas King (60) a farmer was a widower and he lived here with his daughters Margaret (29) and Anne (26) who had no occupations listed; his sons Peter (31), Michael (24), Thomas Edward (22) and Patrick Joseph (20) were farmer’s sons, all were single at the time.  Margaret Burke (17) was a domestic servant; Peter Coyne (15) a farm servant and Thomas’s niece Sabina Wallace (20) a visitor.  All in this household could read and write; the daughters spoke English; the others were bilingual.  All were born in Co. Galway and were Roman Catholic. The building was 2nd class with five windows in front and ten people occupied eight rooms.  Four outbuildings contained a stable, a coach house, a cow house and a calf house.

No 9:   A vacant dwelling.  Thomas King was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 10: John Burke (65) his wife Bridget (50) and their sons Patrick (30) and James (12) were shepherds.  Their other son John (32) was a car driver.  John’s granddaughter Mary Mannion (4) a scholar was listed here.  John and his wife could not read; their sons could read and write.  The Burke family was bilingual and young Mary spoke English only.   The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of six occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

Thomas King was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 11:  A vacant dwelling.  Thomas King Esq. was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 12:  John Holland (70) and his wife Ann (50) were farmers.  John (27) and Patrick (23) were farmer’s sons and Ellen (25) a farmer’s daughter.  The parents could not read; the children could read and write; all spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 2nd class with five windows in front and five people occupied four rooms. Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 13:  Nicholas Darcy (53) and his wife Ellen (45) farmed for a living; their daughters Kate (13) and Ellen (10) were scholars.  Margaret Gibbons (50) a widow and domestic servant was a boarder.  Nicholas, his wife and Margaret could not read; Kate and Ellen could read and write.  All in this household spoke Irish and English and were born in County Galway.  The house was 2nd class with four windows in front and five people occupied three rooms.  There were no outhouses on the property.

No 14:  Elizabeth Tynan (71) a widow was born in Dublin.  Her son Dacre (32) and daughters Alicia (30) and Henrietta M (29) were born in Co. Galway. The Tynan family were merchants, and they were Methodist.  Sarah Frazer (36) an assistant born in Co. Armagh was Church of Ireland.  Mary Darcy (24) and Michael Coyne (19) were domestic servants.  Michael could not read; the others could read and write; Mary and Michael were bilingual.  The house was 1st class with eight windows in front and seven people occupied ten rooms. Nineteen outhouses contained two stables, two coach houses, one harness room, four cow houses, a calf house, a fowl house, three barns, a turf house, a potato house, a workshop and two stores.

No 15:  A vacant dwelling.  Elizabeth Tynan was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

Form B.2- Return of Out- Offices and Farm- Steadings; number 16 to 29 are not included on the form.

No 16:  Joseph McDonnell (45) a carpenter was born in Tully, Co. Galway.  His wife Mary (42) and their children; Delia (14), Mary (12), Peter (9), Annie (7), Julia A (5) and Maggie (3) were born in Leenane, Co. Galway. The children except for little Maggie were scholars.  Daughter in law Maria Coyne (21) a domestic servant (was Maria their daughter?), and son in law John Coyne (20) a carpenter were born in Leenane.  John Joyce (18) a farm servant was born in Maam, Co. Galway.  Maria Hamrogue (18) a national schoolteacher born in Roundfort Co. Mayo was a boarder with the family.  Delia, Peter, Annie and Julia A spoke English; the others were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with six windows to the front and twelve people occupied six rooms.

No 17:  Mary Ribbon (45) a married woman was a housekeeper.  Her sons Pat (27) and Michael (20) were farm labourers and her daughter Mary A (23), a domestic servant.  All were born in Leenane.  Mary A could read and write; Pat could read, Mary senior and Michael could not read, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of four occupied one room.

No 18:   Pat Gibbons (35) was a farmer and carpenter.  He lived here with his wife Julia (27), their four children and his mother.  Bridget (4) and John (3) were scholars, Patrick was (2) and Andrew (1) year old.  Pat’s mother Bridget (70) was a farmer’s widow.  All were born in Co. Galway.  Pat and his wife could read and write; his mother could not read; the three adults spoke Irish and English. The house was 2nd class with four windows in front and seven people occupied four rooms.

No 19:  Michael Gaynor (32) a single man was a licensed publican and farmer.  His sister Jane McGoldrick (34) was a married woman.  James Conneely (20) and Bridget Joyce (15) were domestic servants.  All were born in Co. Galway; they could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 1st class with eight windows in front and four people occupied ten rooms.

No 20:  Martin Joyce (49) his wife Mary (45) and their children; Michael (18), Catherine (20) and Mary (13) were the occupants of this house.  Martin and his son were farm labourers, Catherine a labourer’s daughter and young Mary had no occupation listed. The parents and their son could not read; their daughters could read and write; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front.  Martin and his family occupied one room.

No 21:  Rev. Peter Curran (26) a Roman Catholic clergyman, was born in Co. Mayo and Mary Malia (23) a general domestic servant was born in Co. Galway.  They spoke Irish and English; Mary could not read. The house was 2nd class with four windows in front, and two people occupied five rooms.

No 22:  Thomas Gallagher (59), his wife Mary Anne (50), their four sons and three daughters were resident here.  Thomas was a national schoolteacher.  Thomas and Mary Anne and their three eldest children were born in Co. Fermanagh; the other four were born in Co. Galway.  Kate (20) was a telegraphist, Thomas (19) a national schoolteacher and Bernard James (14) a monitor.   Mary (15), Maggie (12), Michael (10) and Edward P (5) were scholars.  Edward P could read, the rest of the family could read and write.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of nine occupied three rooms.

Rev. Peter Curran was the name of the landholder where the Gallagher residence was.

No 23:  A national school. Rev. Peter Curran was the landholder where the school was situated.

No 24:  A teacher’s residence was vacant.  Rev. Peter Curran was the name of the land holder where the house was situated.

No 25:  Michael Gallagher (48), his wife Mary (40) and their daughter Anne (20) were born in Co. Mayo.  Michael was a car man and farm labourer and Anne a labourer’s daughter.  They were bilingual but could not read.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of three occupied four rooms.

Elizabeth Tynan was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 26:  Michael Coyne (64), his wife Norah (56) and their son Michael (17) were farmers.  They were born in Co. Galway.  Michael and his son could read and write and were bilingual; Norah could not read, and she spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and three people occupied one room.

No 27:  Mary Cribbons (sic) (50) was a farmer’s widow, her daughter Bridget (27) a farmer’s daughter and Michael (25), and Peter (16) were farmer’s sons.  Mary could not read; her children could read and write; all spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and Mary and her children occupied two rooms.

No 28: John Cribbin (38) a tenant farmer was born in Leenane, Co. Galway.  He lived here with his wife Kate (32), their five children and his mother; Thomas (11), Bridget (9), Mary (7), Patrick (5) were scholars and Ellin (sic) was (3) years old.  John’s mother Sarah (70) was a farmer’s widow.  All were born in Co. Galway.  The parents and school going children could read and write.   John, Kate and Sarah were bilingual; the children spoke English, and this may indicate it was the language of the home.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and eight people occupied two rooms.

No 29:  John Laffey (35) a farmer, his wife Bridget (40) and their two children were born in Co. Galway.  Mary (9) and Kate (8) were scholars.  John and his daughters could read and write; Bridget could not read; the couple were bilingual.    The house was 4th class and the family of four occupied one room.

No 30:  Bridget Laffey (55) a widow was a farmer.  Her son Michael (30), his wife Bridget (30) and their three children lived with her.  Mary (6) was a scholar, Bridget was (3) and the infant John (1) year old.  Six-year-old Mary was the only member of the family that could read and write at this time.  Bridget, her son and her daughter in law were bilingual, all were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 4th class and the family of six occupied one room.  They had a cow house on the property.

No 31:  Mary Joyce (60) was a stocking maker and her son James Meehan (30) a postman.  James could read and write; Mary could not read. They were born in Co. Galway, and they spoke Irish and English.  The house was 4th class and mother and son occupied one room.  There were no out buildings on the premises.

No 32:  Michael Lydon (56) a farmer born in Co. Galway, was not married.  Michael could not read or write, he was bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and he had two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

1911 Census:  Ten years on, the census was expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage / completed years the present marriage has lasted / children born alive to present marriage and children still living.  It reveals that many families experienced the loss of one or more children.  Overcrowding and lack of facilities must have presented huge struggles.

Constable Joseph Carlos collected the census for the Leenane between the 6th and the 8th of April 1911.  There were twenty-seven private houses, two hotels, two public houses, one shop and a national school in this townland.  One hundred and sixty-one people lived here a; eighty-three males and seventy-eight females. Irish was still the language of many homes, though English was frequently used by younger family members.

No 1:  Michael Gallagher (78) an agricultural labourer and his wife Mary (74) were married for fifty-five years, and they had three children.  Their daughter Mary Anne (35) a single girl was recorded here.  None could read; all were bilingual and were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the parents and daughter occupied three rooms. They had a cow house on the holding.

Dacre Tynan (sic) was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 2:  Michael Coyne (76) and his wife Nora (73) were married for thirty years, and they had a son Michael (29) who was single.  Farming was their occupation. The parents could not read; Michael could read and write; all spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and three people occupied one room.  There were no outbuildings on the property.

No 3:  John Cribben (sic) (55) a farmer was married to Kate (50) for twenty-three years and they had six children, four were still living.  Thomas (21) was a farm servant, Mary (17) did not have an occupation listed, Patrick (15) was a telegraph messenger and Ellen (13) a scholar.  All the family could read and write, were bilingual and were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 2nd class with two windows in front and the family of six occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house on the property.

No 4:  Mary Ribbin (sic) (69) a widow born in Co. Galway had been married for forty-eight years and she had four children; three were still living.  Her son Michael (29) a single man and her granddaughter Grace Moore (17) were documented in the 1911 census.  Michael a car driver was born in Co. Galway.  Grace was born in America.  Michael and Grace could read and write; Mary could not read; mother and son spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and three people occupied one room.  There were no outbuildings on the holding.

Dacre Tynan (sic) was the name of the landholder where house No 4 was situated.

No 5:  Michael McLoughlin (36) a shoemaker born in Co. Galway was head of this household. James Murray (28) a wool weaver born in Co. Mayo was a boarder.  The men could read and write and were bilingual neither were married.  The house was 2nd class with two windows in front and the men occupied four rooms. There was a cow house on the premises.

Michael Laffey was the name of the landholder where house the house was situated.

No 6:  Thomas Glynn (38) born in Co. Mayo was a blacksmith.  Thomas and his wife Julia (38) were married for thirteen years, and they had seven children; four were still living.  Michael (12) and Mary (8) were scholars, Bridget was (4) and Thomas (1) year old.  Julia and her children were born in Co. Galway.  Thomas and the scholars could read and write; Julia could not read, all but the two youngest were bilingual and this may indicate that English was the language of the home.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of six occupied three rooms.  There were no outbuildings on the holding.

Dacre Tynan was the name of the land holder where the house was situated.

No 7:  Michael Laffey (47) and his wife Bridget (40) were married for eighteen years, and they had eight children; five were still living.  Dilia (sic) (12), John (11) Michael (9) and Maria (5) were scholars and Patrick was (3) years old.  All were born in Co. Galway.  The parents could not read; the three eldest scholars could read and write, and Maria could read.  All but the youngest were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of seven occupied one room.  They had a cow house on the property.

No 8:  John Laffey (48) a farmer was married to Bridget (59) for twenty-one years and they had two daughters; Bridget (19) and Kate (18) had no occupation listed.  John and his daughters could read and write, Bridget could not read.  The parents spoke Irish and English; the girls spoke English, and all were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 4th class and four people occupied one room.  They had a cow house on the holding.

Michael Cribben was the name of the land holder where the house was situated.

No 9:  Mary Cribbin (sic) (74) a widow, was married for forty-three years, and she had seven children; five were still living and three were recorded here; all were born in Co. Galway.   Mary was a farmer, Julia (33) had no occupation listed, Michael (36) was a plasterer and Peter (26) an agricultural labourer.  None were married at this time.  Mary could not read; her family could read and write; all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

Michael Cribben was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 10:   Thomas Gallagher (70) a retired national schoolteacher, was married to Mary Anne (61) for thirty-seven years and they had eleven children; ten were still living and three were documented.  Thomas (29) and Margaret (22) were national schoolteachers and Michael (20) was a scholar.  The parents and Thomas were born in Co. Fermanagh, Michael and Margaret were born in Co. Galway.  Thomas junior spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with four windows in front and the family of five occupied eight rooms.  They had a turf house on the property.

No 11:  Rev Pat Forde (51) born in Co. Galway was a Parish Priest.  Ellen Halligan (41) a single woman born in Co. Mayo was a domestic servant.  They could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with four windows in front and two people occupied four rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

Rev. Pat Forde was the name of the land holder where the house was situated.

No (12):  A public house.  Michael Gaynor (43) and his wife Maria (34) were shopkeepers.  They were married for seven years and had three children; two were still living.  Peter (6) was a scholar and Michael was (4) years old.  Mary Greevy (23) was a cook and domestic servant.  Michael, Maria and Mary could read and write, and Michael senior was bilingual. Maria and Mary were born in Co. Mayo; Michael and his children were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 1st class with eight windows to the front and five people occupied eight rooms.  There was a variety of out offices on the property; a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a calf house, a fowl house and a store.

No 13:  John Coyne (29) a carpenter was married to Jane (23) for four years and they had two children.  The children were not documented.  The couple could read and write; they spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 1st class with five windows to the front and John and Jane occupied six rooms.  There were no outhouses on the holding.

Pat Gibbons was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 14: Bridget Gibbons (80) a widow had been married for forty years, and of the seven children born to her, four were still living.  Her son Pat (45) a carpenter and his wife Julia (40) were married for sixteen years, and they had ten children, nine were still living; Bridget (15) had no occupation listed, John (13), Patrick (12), Andrew (10), Kathleen (9), Mary (7), and Michael (6) were scholars, Martin was (4) and Thomas (3) years old.  Bridget, Pat and the children were born in Co. Galway; Julia was born in Co. Mayo.  The couple and their six eldest children could read and write, and Michael could read. Bridget, her son and daughter in law were bilingual.    The house was 2nd class with four windows in front and the family of twelve occupied four rooms. There were no outbuildings on the property.

No 15:  Martin Joyce (66) an agricultural labourer was married to Mary (65) for forty-two years and they had seven children, six were still living and one was recorded.  Michael (28) a car driver could read and write.  Martin and Mary could not read; all spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the couple and their son occupied one room.

Pat Gibbons was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 16:  A public house.  Delia McDonnell (25) a single woman was head of this household, and she was a publican.  Delia lived here with her three sisters; Annie (18) had no occupation listed, Julia Agnes (16) and Margaret Maria (13) were scholars.  Mary Walsh (16) was a cook and domestic servant.  John Joyce (32) a stone mason was bilingual, and he was a boarder.  All could read and write and were born in Co. Galway.    The house was 1st class with seven windows in front and the six people occupied nine rooms. Three outbuildings contained a coach house, a cow house and a fowl house.

Delia McDonnell was the name of the landholder where the public house was situated.

No 17:  Dacre Tynan (42) a general merchant and his wife Hannah E. (29) were married for one year and their infant son Dacre Allman (sic) was under (2) months old.  Dacre and his son were born in Co. Galway and Hannah was born in Co. Wicklow and were Methodist.  May Simms (19) born in Co. Monaghan was Presbyterian, Kathleen Hall (21) born in Co. Roscommon was of the Episcopal Church.  Both girls were listed as assistants and were boarders in this house.  Kate Coyne (18) and Annie Coyne (16) were born in Co. Galway and were domestic servants.  All the occupants could read and write; Kate and Annie were bilingual.  The house was 1st class with ten widows in front and seven people occupied sixteen rooms.  There was a selection of out buildings: two stables, a coach house, two harness rooms, four cow houses, two fowl houses, one barn, two turf houses, a workshop, a store and a forge.

No 18:  Nicholas Darcy (72) an agricultural labourer and his wife Ellen (62) were born in Co. Galway.  They were married for forty-two years, and they had eight children, six were still living, one was documented.  Kate (23) had no occupation listed.  Two granddaughters were recorded; Kate Darcy (8) born in Glasgow and Maria McNamara (1) born in Co. Galway.  None of the family could read at this time, Nicholas and Ellen were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with four windows in front and the family of five occupied three rooms.  There were no out buildings on the property.

No 19:  Anne Holland (72) a widow was married for forty years, and she had five children, three were still living.  Her son Michael (38) a farmer, was single.  Her son in law Pat Kerrigan (37) and her daughter Maria (34) a farm servant, were married for twelve years and they had six children; five sons were documented.  John (11), Michael (8) and Patrick (6) were scholars; Frances was (4) and James (2) years old.  Michael, Pat and the school going children could read and write; Maria could read, and Anne could not read, the adults spoke Irish and English.  All were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 2nd class with five windows in front and the family of nine occupied five rooms. There was a cow house on the premises.

No 20:  A hotel.  Michael King (34) a farmer and hotel keeper was married to Mary (33) for four years; they had no children in 1911. Edward T (32) was a farmer’s brother, and Michael’s sister Maggie (31) had no occupation listed.  Maggie Carter (24) was a domestic servant.  All could read and write were born in Co. Galway; Michael spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with five windows in front and five people occupied nine rooms.  There was a stable, a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 21:  Patrick Cribbin (33) and his wife Mary (31) were married for seven years, and they had four children; Mary (6) was a scholar, Bridget was (5), Julia (2) and infant Thomas (6) months old.  All were born in Co. Galway.  Mary could read and write; Mary junior could read; Patrick could not read.  Patrick and his wife were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of six occupied two rooms.  There were two cow houses on the holding.

Michael B King was the name of the land holder where the house was situated.

No 22:  A hotel.  R. Henry McKeown (48) was a magistrate and hotel keeper etc. (sic). His sister Charlotte (30) and his niece Mary Clesham (24) had no occupation listed; his nephew Claude Clesham (20) was a scholar.  David Meek (43) born in Co. Armagh was a qualified accountant FFAA, Lily Gilfoyle (23) was a bookkeeper; Amy Powel (20) and Sadie McAlister (20) were post office clerks and May Riley (24) a saleswoman.  Michael Kane (24) was a stable man, Michael Killen (46) a smith and Thomas Killen (18) a smith (improver) both were born in Co. Mayo.  John O’Connor (26) born in Co. Meath was a motor driver and all were boarders.  Mary Joyce (23) was a waitress; Bridget Joyce (20) a housemaid, Bridget Joyce (24) a cook and Annie Kilcoyne (19) a kitchen maid.  David Meek was a married man, Michael Killen a widower and all other members of the household were single. Michael Kane, Annie Kilcoyne and Michael Killen could not read or write. Michael Kane, Bridget the housemaid and Bridget the cook and Annie Kilcoyne were bilingual. R. Henry and Charlotte McKeown, and David Meek were Presbyterian; Mary and Claude Clesham, Lily Gilfoyle, Amy Powel and Sadie McAlister were Church of Ireland, and the remainder of staff were Roman Catholic. The hotel was 1st class with twenty-five windows in front and seventeen people occupied fifty-four rooms.  There were nineteen out offices on the premises that consisted of: two stables, five coach houses, two harness rooms, one cow house, four piggeries, a fowl house, a boiling house, a store, a forge and a laundry.

No 23:  Michael Lydon (29) a tailor and his wife Anne (25) were married for four years, and they had two children; one (6) month old infant Michael Joseph was still living; the family were born in Co. Galway.  The couple could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with two windows to the front. The parents and their baby occupied two rooms. There were no out buildings on the property.

No 24:  Thomas Feeney (63) a car driver was married to Mary (64) for thirty-three years and they had nine children, seven were still living; two were documented.  Patrick (20) was an agricultural labourer. Sarah (24) and Stephen Mally (sic) (32) a postman, were married for two years and they had a (1) year old daughter Maria. Thomas and Mary could not read or write; their son and the young couple could read and write, all were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of six occupied four rooms.  They had a cow house on the holding.

No 25:  Peter Feeney (27) a general labourer was born in Co. Galway; his wife Katie (20) was born in Co. Mayo; they were married for two years and had a (1) year old son Thomas.  Peter and Kate could read and write.  The house was 2nd class with two windows to the front and the young couple and their young son occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house on the holding.

No 26:  Michael Kerrigan Senior (60) a road contractor was married to Julia (57) for thirty-six years and they had eight children; John (24) was a car driver, Tom (17) an agricultural labourer and James (10) a scholar.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Michael could not read; Julia could read, and their sons could read and write.  The house was 2nd class with two windows in front and the family of five occupied two rooms.  There were no out buildings on the premises.

No 27: James Joyce (50) a car driver was married to Mary (50) for twenty-six years and they had seven children, six were still living; Michael (24) was a rural postman, Patrick (21) an agricultural labourer, Maggie (18) had no occupation listed and James (15) was a scholar.  Joseph Kilkelly (36) an agricultural labourer was a boarder.  All in this household could read and write; James and Joseph spoke English; the others were bilingual.  Mary Joyce was born in Co. Mayo; the rest were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and seven people occupied six rooms.  They had a cow house on the holding.

  1. Henry McKeown owned many properties in Leenane. He was the landholder where dwellings 23 to 27 were situated.

 

 

No 28:  Michael Kerrigan Junior (33) a shepherd and his wife Mary (35) were married for ten years, and they had five children; Mary (9) and Sarah (7) were scholars, Annie was (5), Ellen (2) and the infant Kathleen (6) months old.  The parents could not read; Mary could read and write, and Sarah could read, Michael and his wife were bilingual. The house was 2nd class with two windows in front and the family of seven occupied four rooms.  They had a cow house on the property.

No 29:  John Connelly (40) an agricultural labourer was married to Anne (35) for thirteen years and they had four children, three were still living; Martin (12) and John (8) were scholars and Michael was (4) years old.  All were born in Co. Galway.  John senior and Anne could not read, Martin and John could read and write, the parents and Martin were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with two windows to the front and five people occupied four rooms.  They had a cow house on the premises.

No 30:  John Hanerty (sic) (35) a wool weaver born in Co. Galway was a single man.  He could read and write, and he spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and John had one room. There were no out buildings on the holding.

  1. H McKeown was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 31:  Julia Wallace (80) a retired nurse was a widow, and she was married for forty years.  Julia had ten children, eight were still living and none were documented in 1911.   Kate Teresa Kerrigan (69) a cook and domestic servant was a boarder, and she was single.  Kate Teresa could read and write; Julia could not read; both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 4th class and two people occupied one room.  There were no out buildings on the holding.

Michael B. King was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 32:  Leenane national school

No 33: The Royal Irish Constabulary (R.I.C) barrack had three occupants; Acting Sergeant P.P (Patrick Phelan) (38) an ordnance survey surveyor was born in Queens County (Laois), Constable J. M (22) and Constable J. C (22) were farmer’s sons, both were born in Co. Roscommon.  (J. C, most likely Constable John Carlos the enumerator).  The house was 2nd class with six windows in front and three people occupied six rooms.  There was a turf shed on the premises.

Charles Kilkelly was the name of the landholder where the barrack was situated.

No 34: A warehouse belonging to R. Henry McKeown.

No 35:  A private dwelling that was vacant.  R. Henry McKeown was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

This page was added on 26/11/2021.

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