Ballymaglancy

Baile Meg Fhlannchadha

Barbara Conroy

Barbara Conroy
Barbara Conroy

Ballymaglancy, Baile Meg Fhlannchadha meaning Mac Clancy’s town

Names:

According to O’Donovan’s field name books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Ballymaglancy and Baile Meg Fhlannchadha was its official Irish form. Other names for this townland were Ballimaglanchy (O Donovan’s Field Name Books), Ballymaghanchy (Inquis. Temp. Car. I), and Baile Mhic Fhlannchaidh (Logainm.ie).

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie), Ballymaglancy had a minor feature called Pollwalter (Linn an Mhuilinn).

Situation:

The townland is located on the north side of the Parish, bounded on the north by the parishes of Cong and Ross, Co Galway, bounded on the west by Carrowhekeen, bounded south by Arduan East, Arduan West and Carrowbaun and on the bounded east by Carrowbaun.

Description:

Down Survey:

The Down Survey name given to Ballymaglancy was Ballymaglanhy. The owner of Ballymaglancy in 1641 was Ionuck Lynch (Catholic) and in 1670 the owner was Thomas Deane (Protestant). It was in County Galway in the half Barony of Ross in the parish of Cong. There was 95 plantation acres of profitable land and 95 plantation acres were forfeited.

O’Donovan‘s Field Name Books 1838

O’Donovan tells us that this townland was under lease and was sublet to tenants for a rent of 28 to 40 shillings per acre. The proprietor was Sir Valentine Blake, Esq, Minlow. The agent was a Mr Patrick Reilly, Hollimount, Co Mayo.  All held under lease. Francis Burke and Toby Butler partly sublet this village to the tenants. The average farm size ranged from 4 to 6 acres but there was also a farm which was 54½ acres, the soil was in some parts middling and some other parts not good.  This village produced middling crops of wheat, potatoes, oats and flax. The Co. Cess paid 11 ¼ d. per acre for 109 acres.  Antiquities include a fort with a cave, and a children’s burial ground called Lisheenaplaya (sic).  The picture below shows the entrance to the cave.  The townland of Ballymaglancy is comprised of 50 acres, 0 roods and 33 perches according to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Ballymaglancy had a total acreage of 50 acres, 3 roods and 21 perches. The total valuation for this plot was £24.0s.0d.  The immediate lessors for this townland were Patrick Ryan and Richard Moran.  Patrick Ryan was the immediate lessor for plot 1a and plot 2.  Richard Moran was the immediate lessor for plot 1b.  This townland was divided into 2 plots.

Plot 1a Richard Moran

This plot was leased by Richard Moran from Patrick Ryan. Richard Moran had a house, office, and land. The total area of land was 37 acres 1 rood and 7 perches. The rateable annual valuation of the land was £18.0s.0d. and the rateable annual valuation of the buildings was £2.0s.0d.  The total annual valuation of rateable property was £20.0s.0d.

Plot 1b Peter Cowan

This plot was leased by Peter Moran from Richard Moran.  Peter Cowan had a house valued at £0.5s.0d.  The total annual valuation of rateable property was £0.5s.0d.

Plot 2 a Thomas Gauley  

Thomas Gauley was one of five people who leased property from Patrick Ryan.  The four occupiers jointly held 13 acres 2 roods and 14 perches of land, of this Thomas Gauley held land that had a rateable annual Valuation of £0.10s.0d. and a house with a rateable annual Valuation of £0.5s.0d.   Thomas Gauley had a total annual Valuation of Rateable property of £0.15s.0d.

Plot 2 b William Casey

William Casey’s lessor was Patrick Ryan.  William Casey had a house and land.  The land was valued at £1.0s.0d. and house was valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £1.5s.0d.

Plot 2 – John Morrin

John Morrin’s lessor was Patrick Ryan. John Morrin had land valued at £1.0s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £1.0s.0d.

Plot 2 -Bridget Collins

Bridget Collins was under the lessor Patrick Ryan.  The land was valued at £0.15s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £0.15s.0d.

 Census 1901

There were four households in Ballymaglancy in 1901 and unless otherwise stated they were all Roman Catholic.  All houses were inhabited.  Three houses were 3rdclass and one was 2ndclass. There were nine males and seven females in this village according to the Enumerators Abstract (Form N).  There were three stables, four cow houses, one calf house, four piggeries, one barn and three sheds according to return of out-offices and farm steadings (Form B.2.).

Thomas Killeenresided in house numbered 1. He was 30 years old and was head of the family.  His occupation was a farmer. He could read and write and could speak Irish and English. He was born in Galway. Mary Killeenwas married to Thomas, she was 22 and her occupation was a housekeeper.  She was born in Co Mayo. She could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  The Mother of Thomas Killeen, Mary Killeenwas also living in the house, she was 80, and a widow, and she could not read or write and spoke Irish only.  She was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with three rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

Hanora Murry resided in house numbered 2. She was the head of the family, and a widow. She was 40 years old and her occupation was a Farmer. She could not read or write but she spoke Irish and English. She had two sons and three daughters. Thomas(19) could read and write and spoke Irish and English. John(17) could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Jane(15) could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Margaret(10) was a scholar and she could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Maria(8) was a scholar. She could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with six rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a barn and a shed.

Thomas Moranresided in house numbered 3, he was 55. His occupation was a farmer. He was married; he could not read or write and spoke Irish and English. His wife Mary Moranwas also 55.  She could not read and spoke Irish only. They had three sons Michael was 25, Thomaswas 23, and Martinwas 20, they were all labourers. Michaeland Thomascould read only and spoke Irish and English. Martincould not read or write but spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with two rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a shed.

Peter Coen (40) resided in house numbered 4. He was head of the family and his occupation was a farmer. He could read and write and spoke Irish and English. He was not married. Also living in the house with him was his nephew, JohnMannion. (20) He could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Both Peter and John were born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with four rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a shed.

Census 1911

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living).  There were three houses in Ballymaglancy in the 1911 census and unless otherwise stated they were all Roman Catholic.  They were all inhabited.  Household numbered 3 in 1901 (the Coen and Mannion household) is not mentioned in this 1911 census.  There was two 3rdclass houses and one 2ndclass house according to the House and Building return (Form B.1.).  There was a stable, three cow houses, three piggeries, two fowl houses, one barn and one shed in this village according to the Out-offices and Farm-Steadings Return (Form B.2.).  There were inconsistent age gaps between the 1901 Census and the 1911 Census.

 Thomas Killeen still resided in house numbered 1.  He was now 45, he was a farmer. His wife Marywas 40.  Thomas (Snr.) and Mary (Snr.) were married for ten years, had five children and four of them survived until 1911.  Their sons Patrick(9) and Thomas(7) were scholars and could read and write. Thomas (Snr.) daughters were Mary(4) and Norah(3).  Mary and Norah could not read or write.  There was no mention of Mary (80) in this 1911 census. Mary (Snr.) was born in Mayo; the rest of the family was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house.

Thomas Moranresided in house numbered 2 (previously numbered house 3 in 1901). He was 80 and head of the family.  His occupation was an Agricultural Labourer. He could not read but he spoke Irish and English. He was a Widower. His two sons and a daughter also lived with him. Thomas(28) was an Agricultural Labourer, he could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Martin (26) was also an Agricultural Labourer; he could also read and write and spoke Irish and English. Bridget was 39 and was able to read and write and spoke Irish and English.  There was no mention of Mary or Michael in this 1911 census. Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

Hanorah Murray (called Hanora Murry in 1901) resided in house numbered 3 (previously numbered house 2 in 1901). She was the head of the family and a widow. She could not read.  Her occupation was a farmer. Also living with her were her two sons and a daughter.Thomaswas 27. He could read and write and spoke Irish and English. John was 26.  He could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Margret (21) could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  There was no mention of Jane or Maria in this 1911 census.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with eight rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn and a shed.

This page was added on 20/08/2018.

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