Glenlusk

Gleann Loisgthe

Tomas O Flatharta, Bairbre Ní Chonaíre

Glenlusk, Gleann Loisgthe, meaning Burned Valley

Names:

According to O ’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Glenlusk and Gleann Loisgthe was it’s official Irish form. The village is also known as Glanlusk (Boundary surveyors Sketch Map, County Cess Collector, Meresman, Rev. Mich. Waldron P.P, Tithe Ledger).

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (www.logainm.ie), the townland contains 3 islands, Wood Island (Oileán an Adhmaid), Bilberry Island (Oileán na bhFraochóg) and Bush Island (Oileán na Sceach). According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha the townland also had 4 rocks, these rocks are Long Rock (An Charraig Fhada), Bilberry Rock (Carraig na bhFroachóg), Medery Rock (Carraig na Meidre) and Carrigeenabunny (Carraigín na Buinní). This townland also has two minor features these are Roeillaun (Rua-oileáin) and Roeillaun South (Rua-oileáin Theas).

Situation :

This townland is a central townland. It is bounded on the north by the townland of Dooghta, on the west by Claggan, on the south by Farnaght and on the east by Lough Corrib.

Description:

Down Survey: “The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps; ‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will”. (Wikipedia). At the moment there is no Down Survey information about Glenlusk but we know that its neighbouring village of Dooghta had a lardlord of the name Sir Robert Cressey in 1641 and he was a Protestant and in 1670 the landlord was Cressey Taseborough. There was 689 acres of unprofitable land and 175 acres of profitable land and 175 acres were forfeited in Dooghta.

O Donovan’s (1838): In 1838, the proprietors of this village were the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont and the Agent was James Fair of Fairhill, Parish of Ross. According to O Donovan the townland of Glenlusk is composed of 401 acres, 0 roods and 17 perches. The townland is located in the civil parish of Cong, in the barony of Ross and in the County of Galway.O’ Donovan tells us that all the townland was held by the tenants for a bulked rent of £18.16s.7d. yearly. Co. Cess paid 11¼ d. per acre for 34 acres of steep mountain north and west of Glenlusk and the tillage south of steep mountain. There was some bog and pasturable mountain near road and in 1838 their crops of oats and potatoes were not good. Co. Cess paid 11¼ d. per acre for 34 acres. There are no antiquities in Glenlusk.

Griffith’s Valuation (1855) The area of the village was 401 acres, 0 roods, and 17 perches according to Griffiths Valuation 1855. The annual valuation for lands in Glenlusk are £18.14s.0d. There was only 1 plot of land which was divided into 8 partsa, b, c, d, e, f, g and -. Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont were the immediate lessors for this plot.

Plot number 1 was composed of 401 acres, 0 roods and 17 perches. Total valuation for this plot was £18.14s.0d.

Plot 1 (a) Thomas Coyne owned a house and land. The house was valued at £0.8s.0d. and the land was valued at £2.0s.0d.

Plot 1 (b) Stephen Coyne owned a house and land. The house was valued at £0.4s.0d. and the land was valued at £1.0s.0d.

Plot 1 (c) John Hilleran owned a house and land. The house was valued at £0.4s.0d and the land at £1.0s.0d.

Plot 1 (d) Patrick Lyden owned a house, office and land. The buildings were valued at £0.12s.0d. and the land at £4.0s.0d.

Plot 1 (e) Denis Lyden owned a house, office and land. The buildings were valued at £0.8s.0d. and the land at £2.0s.0d.

Plot 1 (f) John Lyden owned a house, office and land. The buildings were valued at £0.8s.0d and the land at £2.0s.0d.

Plot 1 (g) John Toorusk owned a house, office and land. The buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d. and the land at £3.0s.0d.

Plot 1 (-) Martin Lyden owned land. The land was valued at £1.0s.0d.

Census 1901:

There were 14 buildings in this village, one of which was a shop and was inhabited. There are 13 houses with families in this village but there are 3 other families without a house and classed as ‘houseless’ on the Household return form (Form A). Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic. Everyone in this village, except house 3 and the the three ‘houseless’ families, were born in Galway. House 3 and the ‘houseless’ households were born in different parts of Ireland. Form B2 (Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings) indicate there were 2 stables, 10 cow houses, 7 piggeries, 1 fowl house and 4 barns.

Patrick (48) and Mary (45) Coyne resided in house numbered 1 with their four daughters, two sons and Patrick’s mother. Their daughters were Mary (19), Bridget (14), Julie (10) and Catherine (4). Their sons were Thomas (16) and Patt (12). Patrick’s mother was Julia Coyne (86). Patrick was a farmer. Patt and Julie were scholars. The parents with Catherine and Julia could not read, the rest of the family could read and write.Julia spoke Irish. Catherine was too young to speak and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Martin (80) and Bridget (75) Conroy resided in house numbered 2. Martin in the ‘Rank, Profession or Occupation’ section of the Census form wrote ‘no occupation’. Martin and Bridget could not read and spoke Irish only. They lived in a 3rd class house with 1 room. They did not have any out-offices or Farm- Steadings. Their landlord was Patrick Coyne who also lived in the village of Glenlusk in house 1.

Barbara Holloran (60) resided in house numbered 3 with her son, daughter and daughter in law. Her son was Michael (23). Barbara’s daughter was Julia (24) and Barbara’s daughter in law was Mary Holloran (22). Barbara was a farmer and a widow.Michael could read and write, while the rest of the household could not. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Patt (64) and Mary (50) Leydon resided in house numbered 4 with their three daughters and two sons. Their daughters were Maggie (18), Sarah (16) and Barbara (14) and their sons were Thomas (20) and Martin (12). Patt was a farmer and his son Martin was a scholar. The parents could not read or write but the children could. Everyone in the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

Martin (72) and Mary (60) Leydon resided in house numbered 5 with their son, daughter in law, granddaughter and grandson. Martin’s son was John (35), his daughter in law was Catherine (26), and his grandchildren were Mollie (4) and Thomas (2). Martin was a farmer.Catherine was the only person in this household who could read and write. Martin and Mary spoke Irish only. John, Catherine and Mollie spoke Irish and English. Thomas spoke English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

Stephen (42) and Mary (42) Hyland resided in house numbered 6 with their four daughters and their five sons. Their daughters were Mary (18), Sarah (11), Bridget (7) and Anne (6) and his sons were John (16), Martin (13), Thomas (9), Stephen (4) and Edward (8 months). Stephen (Snr.) was a farmer and a shopkeeper. Martin, Sarah, Thomas, Bridget and Anne were scholars. The parents with Stephen (Jnr.) and Edward could not read the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone , except Stephen and Edward who were too young to talk, spoke Irish and English.They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

House 7 was a shop and was unoccupied. The school’s landholder was Stephen Hyland who lived in Glenlusk in house numbered 5.

Thomas (40) and Catherine (34) Leydon resided in house 8 with their four sons and three daughters. Their sons were Michael (10), Joseph (8), John (6) and Denis (6 months). Their daughters were Mary (15), Bridget (13) and Catherine (3).   Thomas was a farmer. Bridget, Michael and Joseph were scholars. Catherine (Snr.), Mary, Bridget and Michael could read and write. Thomas and Joseph could read. The rest of the family could not read or write. Thomas, Catherine (Snr.), Mary, Bridget, Michael and Joseph spoke Irish and English. John, Catherine and Denis spoke neither Irish nor English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

Mary Coyne(50) resided in house 9 with her two sons and three daughters. Her sons were Thomas (23) and John (18).   Her daughters were Barbara (15), Catherine (12) and Julia (8). Mary was a farmer. Barbara, Catherine and Julia were scholars. Mary and Thomas could not read. John, Barbara, Catherine and Julia could read and write.   Everyone in the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a piggery.

Thomas (58) and Mary (40) Coyne resided in house 10 with their two sons, four daughters and Mary’s mother. Their sons were Michael (14) and Martin (2). Their daughters were Bridget (13), Mary (11), Nappy (9) and Catherine (7) and Mary’s mother was Anne Holloran (80). Thomas was a farmer. Mary (Jnr.) and Nappy were scholars. Mary (Jnr.) could read and write. Nappy could read. The rest of the family could not read or write. Anne spoke Irish only. Thomas, Mary (Snr.), Michael, Bridget, Mary (Jnr.) and Nappy spoke Irish and English. Catherine and Martin spoke neither English nor Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house.

Thomas (62) and Catherine (58) Holloran resided in house 11 with their daughter, Julia (20). Thomas was a farmer. Julia was the only person in this household who could read and write. Everyone in the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a barn.

Martin (60) and Catherine (58) Coyne resided in house 12 with their two sons. Their two sons were Martin (21) and Michael (19). Martin (Snr.) was a farmer. Everyone in the household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a barn. Everyone in the household was Church of Ireland.

Mary Kelly(34) resided in house numbered 13 with her three sons, her daughter and her mother. Her sons were Michael (4), Thomas (3) and James (1). Her daughter is Maggie (6) and her mother was Mary Glynn(80). Mary (Junior) was a farmer and was married. No one in this household could read or write.Mary (34) and Maggie spoke Irish and English. Mary (80) spoke Irish only. Michael and Thomas spoke English. James was too young to talk. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house.

Michael‘O Malley(31) resided in house 14 with his sister, Sarah (29), and his domestic servant ,Mary Laffey (60),. Michael and Sarah were National School teachers and Mary Laffey was a domestic servant. Michael and Sarah could read and write. Mary could not read or write. Michael and Sarah spoke Irish and English. Mary spoke Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms. They had no out-buildings or farm steadings.Michael and Sarah were born in Galway and Mary was born in Mayo. Their landlord was Col. H. Clements.

The next 3 families do not have houses and are declared as ‘houseless’, therefore they have no houses or out houses, farm steadings etc.

Mary McDonagh (24) was the next family. She lived with her two sons and daughter. Her sons were Thomas (5) and Martin (5 months) and their daughter was Mary (3). Mary (Snr.) was married. No one in this household could read. Mary spoke English. The children were too young to talk. Everyone in this household wasborn in Mayo.

Patt(sic.) (45) and Maggie (40) Mohan was the next family. They lived with their four sons, their four daughters and their daughter in law. Their sons were Martin (9), Thomas (5), Terence (4) and Owen (3). Their daughters were Mary (18), Catherine (11), Winnifred (7) and Bridget (1). Their daughter in law was Anne Mohan(19) and she was married. Patt was a tinsmith. No one in this household could read or write. Patt, Maggie, Mary, Catherine, Martin, Winnifred, Thomas and Anne spoke Irish and English.   Terence, Owen and Bridget were too young to talk. Everyone in this household ,except Terence and Anne, were born in Mayo. Terence was born in Galway and Anne was born in Sligo.

Anne Mohan (24) was the third ‘houseless’ family. She lived with her two sons and her daughter. Her two sons were John (4) and James (4 months) and her daughter was Anne (7). No one in this household could read or write. Anne (Snr.) spoke Irish and English and the rest of the household spoke neither Irish nor English.Anne (Snr.) was born in Roscommon. John was born in Leitrim. Anne (Jnr.) and James was born in Mayo.

Census 1911:

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living); if Deaf and Dumb, Dumb only, Blind, imbecile or Idiot, Lunatic. In 1911, there were no more houseless people living in the area therefore there are no more McDonagh or Mohan households residing in Glenlusk. There are also 11 households in 1911 instead of 14 in 1901. There is no mention of one of the Coynehouseholdsor Conroy household. There is also one household with a new head of the family, Stephen Coyne for the Kelly household. There were 2 shops in the village. These buildings were house 3 which is occupied by the Mary Coyne household and the other building which is not numbered as a building, was unoccupied, had a turf house and belonged to Stephen Hyland. There are also inconsistencies with the age gaps between 1901 to 1911 with some of the families. Everyone in this village was born in Galway.

Martin Coyne(74) in 1911 resided in house numbered 1, (previously numbered house 12), with his two sons Martin (35) and Michael (28). Martin (Snr.) was still a farmer in 1911, Martin (Junior) and Michael were labourers. Martin (Snr.) was a widower in 1911 and did not give details of his previous marriage.In 1911 they lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms, in 1901 it was a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They still had a cow house and barn and added a fowl house and piggery by 1911.Martin (Snr.) and Martin (Jnr.) were Church of Ireland and Michael was Roman Catholic.

Stephen (52) and Mary (50) Coyne(called Mary Kelly in 1901) resided in house 2, in 1901 resided in house numbered 13. They live with Mary’s daughter her three sons and a boarder. Mary’s daughter is Maggie Kelly (16); her sons are Michael Kelly (14), Thomas Kelly (13) and James Kelly (11). Their boarder was Barbara Hefferan (82). Stephen was a farmer, Thomas and James were scholars and Barbara was an old age pensioner. Stephen and Mary had been married for 7 years, had one child together which did not survive until 1911. Maggie, Michael, Thomas and James can read and write. Stephen and Mary can read. Barbara could not read. Everyone in this household,except Barbara who spoke Irish only,spoke Irish and English, . In 1911 they still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and added a piggery and a fowl house by 1911. Everyone in the household was Roman Catholic.

Mary Coyne(55) in 1911 resided in house 3 (in 1901 she resided in house numbered 1) with her son and two daughters. Her son was Thomas (25).   Her daughters were Julia (20) and Katie (14) (called Catherine in 1901). There is no mention of Patrick, Mary, Bridget, Patt or Julia in 1901.She was a widow by 1911. She did not fill in details about her previous marriage. Mary could not read or write, her children could read and write. Mary spoke Irish only and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English.   In 1911 they lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms; in 1901 they were living in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and a piggery and in 1911 they had added a Barn. Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.

Barbara Halloran(70) resided in house 4 in 1911 (previously house numbered 3 in 1901) .She lived with her son, her daughter, her two grandsons and her two granddaughters. Her son was Michael (34). Her daughter was Julia (40). Her grandsons were Martin (9) and Patrick (5) and her granddaughters were Mary (10) and Bridget (7). Michael was a widower and did not give details of his previous marriage in ‘Particulars as to Marriage’ section of the census form. Barbara was a widow and also did not fill in details of her previous marriage in ‘Particulars as to Marriage’. Barbara was a farmer and Mary was a scholar. Barbara, Julia, Martin, Bridget and Patrick could not read. Michael and Mary could read. Barbara spoke Irish only, the rest of the family spoke Irish and English. In 1911 they lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms, while in 1901 they had lived in 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They still had a cow house and a piggery but added a fowl house by 1911. Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.

Stephen (68) and Mary (60) Hyland resided in house 5, in 1901 they had resided in house 6. They lived with their four sons, their two daughters and their grandson. Their sons were Thomas (22), Stephen (15), Eddie (13) (named Edward in 1901 census), James (10). Their daughters were Bridget (19) and Annie (17) (named Anne in 1901 census). Their grandson was Stephen (10). There is no mention of Mary (Jnr.), John, Martin or Sarah. Stephen (68) was a farmer and Eddie was a scholar. Stephen (68) and Mary was married for 42 years, had fourteen children and thirteen of them were still living in 1911.   Stephen (68), Mary, Stephen (15), James and Stephen (10) could not read or write, the rest of the household could. Stephen (68) and Mary spoke Irish only, James and Stephen (10) spoke English and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house but no longer had a barn in 1911. Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.Stephen (10) was born in England, the rest of the family was born in Galway. Stephen (10) was also classified

Thomas (65) and Mary (60) Coyne resided in house 6, formerly house 10. They lived with their three daughters, their son and Thomas’s brother in law. Their daughters were Mary Ann (20) (named Mary in the 1901 census), Nappie (18) ( called Nappy in 1901 census) and Catherine (15). Their son was Martin (11) and Mary’s brother was Patrick Holloran (58). No mention of Michael Coyne, Bridget Coyne or Anne Holloran in this census. Thomas wasa farmer. Thomas and Mary had been married for 33 years, had nine children and nine were still living in 1911. Thomas, Mary and Patrick could not read, the rest of the household could read and write. This household did not fill in the form properly as under the ‘Irish Language’ section they wrote down Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms, in 1901 they lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They still had a cow house but added a piggery and a barn by 1911. Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.

Patrick (75) (named Patt in 1901 census) and Mary (71) Lydon (their surname was Leydon in the 1901 census) resided in house numbered 7, previously numbered 4 in the 1901 census, with their son, three daughters and their granddaughter. Their son was Thomas (33), their daughters were Maggie (27), Sara (25) (named Sarah in previous census) and Barbara (23), and their granddaughter was Kathleen Waters (3). No mention of Martin Leydon in the 1911 census. Patrick wasa farmer. Patrick and Mary were married for 42 years, had nine children and nine were still living in 1911. Everyone in this family, expect Kathleen who was too young to read or write, could read and write. Kathleen spoke English only and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in 2nd class house with 3 rooms; it was a 3rd class house with 2 rooms in 1911. They still had a cow house, a piggery and added a stable but no longer had a barn. Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.

Martin (84) and Mary Lydon (73) resided in house numbered 8, formerly their house was numbered 5, with their son, daughter in law, four grandsons and two granddaughters. Their son was John (49). Their daughter in law was Catherine Lydon (34). Their grandsons were Thomas (13), Stephen (9), John (6) and Patrick (3 months). Their granddaughters were Molly ( called Mollie in the 1901 census) (15) and Bridget (2). Martin wasa farmer.Thomas and Stephen were scholars. Martin and Mary were married for 50 years, had four children and three of them were still living in 1911. John and Catherine were also married. They were married for 16 years had six children all of whom were still living in 1911. Martin, Mary, John (Snr.), John (Jnr.), Bridget and Patrick could not read, the rest of the household could read and write. Martin and Mary spoke Irish only, Bridget spoke English only ,Patrick spoke neither Irish nor English as he was too young to talk, the rest of the family spoke Irish and English.   They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and a piggery but added a fowl house but no longer had a stable. Everyone in the household was Roman Catholic.

Thomas (55) Lydon (named Leydon in the 1901 census)resided in house numbered 9, formerly resided in house numbered 8, with his three sons and two daughters. His sons are Joseph (17), John (15) and Denis (11). His daughters were Bridget (20) and Catherine (13). There was no mention of Catherine (Snr.),Mary or Michael in this 1911 census. Thomas was still a farmer.Catherine and Denis were scholars. Thomas was a widower and did not give details of his previous marriage in ‘Particulars as to marriage’. Thomas could read only and the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911; they had lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms in 1901. They still had a cow house and a piggery. Everyone in this household wasRoman Catholic.

Thomas Holleran (75) resided in house numbered 10 in 1911 (house numbered 11 in 1901) with his two daughters, his son in law, his three grandsons and his two granddaughters. His two daughters are Julia Holleran (32) and Bridget Mannion (34), his son in law was Michael Mannion (39), his grandsons were Thomas Manion (10), Pat Mannion (6) and Michael Mannion (3), his granddaughters were Mary Manion (8) and Kate Mannion (1 month).There is also no mention of Catherine Holloran or Julia Holloran in the 1911 census. Thomas (Snr.) was a farmer. Thomas (Jnr.) and Mary were scholars.Thomas Holleran was a widower and did not give details of his previous marriage. Bridget and Michael Mannion were married. They were married for 11 years, had four children and four of them were still living by 1911.Thomas (Snr.), Julia, Michael (Snr.), Pat, Michael (Jnr.) and Kate could not read or write. Mary could read. The rest of the family could read and write. Thomas (Snr.), Michael (Snr.), Bridget, Thomas (Jnr.), Mary and Pat spoke Irish and English. Julia spoke Irish and Michael spoke English. Kat was too young to talk. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911; they used to live in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms in 1901. They still had a cow house and added a piggery but no longer had a barn. Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.

Michael John O Maille (41) resided in house numbered 11, formerly house numbered 14, with his servant Bridget Duffy (72). They also had a visitor the day this census was taken place, this visitor was Margaret Kelly (15). There was no mention of Sarah O Malley or Mary Laffey in the 1911 census. Michael John wasa National School teacher , he also added that he was an under-graduate of R.U.I (Royal University of Ireland). Bridget Duffywas a domestic servant. Everyone in this household, except Bridget Duffy, couldread and write. Bridget spoke Irish only and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English.   They still lived in a 2nd class house but have added two rooms to their house to make it 7 rooms. They added a turf house to their out-buildings. Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.

This page was added on 16/02/2017.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *