Croaghrim

Cruach Dhruim

Tomas O Flatharta

Tomas O Flatharta

Names: According to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to this townland was Croaghrim and Cruach Dhruim was its official Irish form.  Other names this townland has been known as are Creaughim (Meresman) and Cruachroim (Logainm.ie).

Situation:  This townland was a central townland. This townland was bounded north by Tubberrogue, bounded west by Tubberrogue and Ballinamona, bounded south by Ballinamona, Ardnageeha and Cappaghorkogue and bounded east by Cappaghorkogue (sic.) and Clogher.

Description:

Down Survey: The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.  The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps ‘‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will.’ (Wikipedia).  There was no townland information available for Croaghrim.

O Donovan’s (1838): The proprietor for this village was Lord Oranmore, Castlemontgaret (sic.), Co. Mayo.  The agent for this townland was Jerrard Strickland Esq., Loughglynn, Co. Roscommon. According to O’ Donovans Field Name Books, this townland was composed of 32 acres, 0 roods and 35 perches.  The farms ranged from one to three acres.  The village was held under lease by Robert Browne, Esq., Portarlington who sublet it to Richard Walsh of Kulleenalena (sic.) and who further sublet it to the tenants of Croaghrim.  The rent was from 3 to 34 shillings per acre.  The Co. Cess paid 13½ d. per acre half yearly.  The soil was middling and the village produced middling crops of potatoes and oats.  There were no antiquities in this village.

Griffiths Valuation  

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Croaghrim had a total acreage of 32 acres, 2 roods and 27 perches.  The total valuation for this village was £18.5s.0d.  The immediate lessor for this townland was Benjamin L. Guinness.  This townland was divided into 2 plots.

Plot 1 was composed of 25 acres, 2 roods and 31 perches.  This plot belonged to Thomas Walsh.  Total valuation for this plot was £14.0s.0d.

Plot 1 Thomas Walsh had a house and land.  The land was valued at £13.10s.0d.and the buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £14.0s.0d.

Plot 2 was comprised of 6 acres, 3 roods and 36 perches.  This plot belonged to Edward Jennings.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.5s.0d.

Plot 2 Edward Jennings had a house and land.  The land was valued at £4.0s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £4.5s.0d.

 

Census 1901

There were four houses in this village and all of them were inhabited.  There were eight males and eight females in this village according to the Enumerator’s Abstract (Form N).  The landlord for houses numbered 1, 3 and 4 was Lord Ardilaun (sic.). House numbered 1 was stated as the Steward’s house and house numbered 4 was the shepherd’s house.  There were eight out-offices or farm steadings in this village.  There were two cow houses, two piggeries, a fowl house, a barn and two sheds in this village in 1901 according to Return of Out-offices and Farm- steadings (Form B.2.).

 

House 1-George and Louisa Bell

George (52) and Louisa (48) Bell resided in house 1 with their two children, Eveline (17) and Marion (12).  George was a land steward.  Everyone in this household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke English only.  The parents were born in Westmeath and their children were born in Co. Galway.  Everyone in this household was part of the Irish Church.  They lived in a 2nd class house with five rooms.  They had a fowl house.  Their landlord was Lord Ardilaun (sic.).

 

House 2-Michael and Bridget Walsh

Michael (40) and Bridget (30) Walsh lived in house 2 with their two children, Michael’s mother and Michael’s nephew.  Michael and Bridget’s children were Mary (3) and John (1 month).  Michael’s mother was Catherine Walsh (75) and Michael’s nephew was Michael Lewscon (sic.) (12).  Bridget and Michael (12) could read and write.  Michael and Catherine could read only.  Mary and John could not read or write.  The parents with Catherine and Michael spoke Irish and English.  Mary spoke English only.  John was too young to talk.  Bridget was born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.  They lived in a 3rd class house with four rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a shed.

 

House 3-Mary Burke

Mary Burke (50) resided in house numbered 3.  Mary was a laundress.  Mary could not read or write.  She spoke Irish and English.  Mary was born in Co. Galway.  She was a Roman Catholic.  She lived in a 4th class house with one room.  She had a piggery.  The landlord for this household was Lord Ardilaun

 

House 4-Michael and Mary Birmingham

Michael (59) and Mary (40) Birmingham lived in house 4 with their three sons.  Their sons were Francis (24), Michael (14) and John (12).  Michael (Snr.), Francis and Michael were shepherds.   John was a scholar.  The parents could read only.  Francis could not read or write.  The rest of the household could read and write.  Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.  They lived in a 2nd class house with six rooms.  They had a cow house and a shed.  The landlord for this household was Lord Ardilaun.

 

Census 1911

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living).   There were four houses in this village and three of them were inhabited.  The house that was  not inhabited was numbered 4 and its landlord was Lord Ardillaun.  There was no mention of the Birmingham household, house numbered 4 in 1901, in this census.  There were seven out-offices or farm-steadings in this village in 1911.  There was a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, three fowl houses and a shed.

 

House 1-Michael and Bridget Walsh

Michael (50) and Bridget (39) Walsh resided in house 1, previously numbered house 2, with their three children.  Their children were Mary (13), John (10) and Martin (5).  There was no mention of Catherine Walsh or Michael Lewscon (sic.) in this 1911 census.  Michael and Bridget were married for 15 years, had five children and three of them survived.  Michael was a farmer.  Mary and John were scholars.  Martin could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  John and Martin spoke English only, the rest of the household spoke English and Irish. Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.  Everyone in this household was born in Co. Galway.  They lived in a 3rd class house with four rooms.  They had a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house and a shed.

 

House 2-Mary Burke

Mary Burke (67) lived in house 2, previously numbered house 3.  Mary was a widow and a general domestic servant.  Mary spoke Irish and English and could read and write.  Mary was Roman Catholic and was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.  They had a fowl house.  The landlord for this household was Lord Ardillaun (sic.).

 

House 3-George and Louisa Bell

George (63) and Louisa (59) Bell resided in house 3, previously numbered house 1, with their daughter, Marion (22).  There was no mention of Eveline in this 1911 census. She was mentioned in the 1901 census to be in this household.  George and Louisa were married for 28 years, had two children and two of them survived until 1911.  George was a land steward.  Everyone in this household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke English only.  Everyone in this household was Church of Ireland.  The parents were born in Co. Westmeath and Marion was born in Co. Galway.  They lived in a 2nd class house with six rooms.  They had a fowl house.  The landlord for this household was Lord Ardillaun.

This page was added on 18/05/2022.

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