Clonbur

An Fhairche

Teresa Philbin

Clonbur/ An Fhairche

Translation: lawn of the knolls.

The Down Survey: The Down Survey Name for the townland of Clonbur was Derrinacarragh (sic) in Cloghbrack (sic). It is in the half barony of Rosse (sic), in the parish of Rosse in County Galway. The owner(s) in 1641 (pre Cromwell) were Hugh McRory McShoy, (Catholic). In 1670 (post Cromwell) the owner was John Brown, (Protestant). The survey states there were 74 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 55 acres of profitable land. The profitable land was forfeited.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:

The standard name given to the townland was Cloonbur and Cluan Barr was the Irish form of the name, translated as the lawn of the knolls. There were many forms of the name when O’Donovan’s Field Names Books was published in 1838; Cloonbur (O’Donovan’s), Cloonbur (By. Surveyors Sketch Map), Cloonbur (County Cess Collector), Cloonbur (County Map), Clowinb?arr (sic) (Inquis. Temp.Jac 1), Cloonbur (Local), Cloonbur (Mearsman), Cloonbur (Rev.Michael Heraghty, P.P., Cloonbur (Tithe Ledger), the other place names in or near this townland are; Fairhill (village), Pound (pound) and An Fhairche (Logainm.ie).

Situation:

Clonbur is situated in the south east corner of the parish. It is in the Barony of Ross and in County Galway. Clonbur is bounded on the north by the townland of Rosshill, on the west by Kilbeg Lower and Rusheen West, to the south by Rusheen East and on the east by the parish of Cong, County Mayo and Lough Mask.

Griffith’s Valuation (1855):

According to Griffith’s Valuation 1855, the townland of Cloonbur (sic) that can be found on Ordnance sheet 27, had a total acreage of 193 acres 1 roods and 1 perch and was comprised of ten plots. The annual valuation for the rateable property was £145. There was an area of 3 roods and 10 perches exempt from the total acreage and this had an annual valuation of £1. 0. 0. for the land. The buildings were valued at £33. 15. 0. The total annual valuation for the exempted property was £34. 15. 0. Thus the total area exclusive of exemptions was 193 acres 2 roods and 3 perches, with a total rateable annual valuation of £110. 5. 0. The Earl of Leitrim and Charlemont (sic) were the Immediate Lessors of the land and the fees were paid to them unless otherwise stated. They were members of the Clements and Caulfield families and the Earl occupied some of the land himself.

Plot 1 comprised of 87 acres 2 roods 12 perches and was divided into three lots;

  • had acreage of 60 acres 1rood and eight perches, valued at £15. 10. 0.
  • had acreage of 10 acres and 22 perches, valued at £0. 10. 0.
  • had acreage of 17 acres, 2 roods and 22 perches valued at £13. 0. 0.

Anthony Coyne had the lease of this land and the total rateable annual valuation on the property was £29.0.0.

Also within plot 1,a subdivision 1ca, is described as a church in the ownership of Rev. Edward G O’Grady and the building had a total rateable annual valuation of £4.0.0.

Plot 2 consisted of an area of 24 acres 1 rood and 35 perches and had a rateable annual valuation. of £8. 15s. The Earl of Leitrim and Charlemont (sic) held this land in fee.

Plot 3 was occupied by Thomas Cribben (sic) and he had a house, offices and land. The area was 3 acres 1 rood and 20 perches. The rateable annual valuation on the land was £2. 5. 0. The buildings were valued at £0. 10. 0.

Plot 4 Henry McDermott and had an area of 2 acres, 2 roods and 11 perches with a rateable annual valuation of £1. 10. 0.

Plot 5 Rev. Francis Nash had a house, offices and land. The area was 47 acres and 5 perches that had a rateable annual valuation of £18. 0. 0. The buildings were valued at £4. 0. 0. The total annual valuation for the land and buildings was £22. 0. 0.

Plot 6 was a parcel of land with a total of 6 acres, 2 roods and 11 perches and a rateable annual valuation of £5. 0. 0. Michael Coyne had the lease it.

Plot 7 occupied by Thomas Joyce had an area of 5 acres with a rateable annual valuation of £3. 15. 0.

Plot 8 is subdivided into 2 plots with a number of subdivisions.

Plot 8 A was held by Daniel McNamara and John Handburry (sic). Within the plot Daniel McNamara held plot 8A that consisted of a house and land, while John Handburry held land only. Both men held 2 acres, 2 roods and 15 perches in common. Daniel McNamara held half this land that was valued at £1. He had a house that was valued at 5 shillings. John Handburry (sic) paid £1 annually for his portion of land.

Plot 8 B had two tenants on a total of 4 acres, 2 roods and 23 perches. Daniel Mac Namara (sic) had a R.A.V. of £1.15.0. for the use of parcel 1. John Handburry paid £1.15.0 for the land and £0.5.0. for the house on parcel 2.

On plot 8 also, Nappy O’Brien had a house valued at £0.5.0

Plot 9 Nappy O’Brien had a plot of land with and acreage of 1 acre and 15 perches with a rateable annual valuation of £0.15.0.

Plot 10 was subdivided as follows:

  • Anne Hamilton had a house, offices and land. She had an area of 4 acres, 1 rood and 20 perches. The R.A.V. was £2.15.0. for the land and £5.0.0. for the buildings.
  • James Phayre (sic) had a house, offices and land. The area was 1 rood and twenty perches with a R.A.V. of £0.10.0. for the land and £7.10.0. for the buildings.
  • Peter Gaynor had but 13 perches and his tenement was described as a house and garden. The R.A.V. for the land was £0.3.0. and the building, £3.2.0. The rent was paid to Michael Vaughan.
  • Catherine Buchanan had no land and paid £1.5.0. Per annum for a house and yard.
  • Patrick Loftus paid £2.0.0 for his house and yard.
  • Patrick Walsh had a house and yard valued at £2.10.0.
  • Court house and dispensary had an R.A.V. of £9.0.0.
  • Constabulary Force had a police barrack, office and garden on an area of 15 perches leased from James Phayre. The land was valued at £0.5.0., the buildings at £7.15.0.
  • Peter Waldron occupied a house, office and garden. The area was 35 perches and was valued at £0.10.0., the buildings were valued at £4.0.0. with a total R.A.V. of £4.10.0. The monies were paid to James Phayre.
  • A national school house and garden sat on an area of 1 rood and 15 perches. The R.A.V. for the land was £0.10.0. and the building was valued at £2.0.0.
  • Anne Hamilton had a garden with an area of 3 roods and 25 perches leased for an annual sum of £1.0.0.
  • The Roman Catholic Chapel stood on an area of 1 rood and 20 perches and the lessor was Rev. Peter Waldron. The land was valued at £0.5.0. , the building £11.0.0. with a total R.A.V. of £11. 5.0.
  • An area of 2 roods and 20 perches valued at £0.5.0. was described as a plantation. The Earl of Leitrim and Charlemont (sic) was in fee.

The following tenements were exempt from the payment of rates; the courthouse and dispensary, the police barrack, office and garden, the national school house and garden, the Roman Catholic Chapel and yard and the Church of Ireland. An area of 1 acre, 2 roods and 3 perches are described as waste of street for which no monies were payable.

Census 1901:

According to the 1901 Census for Clonbur, there were fifteen premises in the village of Clonbur. Five were private dwellings; three were shops, four were public houses, one was the boy’s national school, one the girl’s national school and one was the courthouse. All were in use. Twenty males and thirty females were resident in Clonbur and they had a variety of occupations; farmer, herd, farm labourer, shopkeeper, shop assistant, publican, teacher, scholar, domestic servant, housekeeper, royal Irish police constable and a catholic clergyman. The majority were born in County Galway, were Roman Catholic, bilingual and most could read and write.  Four were Church of Ireland and four were Church of England and had Paris, Devonshire, London, Kinsale (sic), Leitrim and Sligo as their place of birth.

No 1: was a private dwelling. John Hansbury (sic) (76) was married to Mary (82). He was a farmer and was bilingual. John and Mary could not read. Mary spoke Irish only. Their house was a 3rd class dwelling and had two rooms with one window to the front. They had a cow house on the plot.

No 2: was private dwelling. Bridget Glynn (56) a widowed farmer, was born in Co. Mayo.   Bridget was bilingual, she could not read. The house was 3rd class with two rooms and had two windows in front. Bridget had no out houses on her property.

No 3: was a private dwelling. Thomas Corbett (69) a widower, was head of the family and he worked as a herd. His sons Michael (34), and Martin (32) were herds also. They were not married.   His daughters Mary (30), and Anne (28) were house keepers and they too were single.   His brother Patrick (63) a bachelor, was a labourer who was also in the house. Thomas and his family could all read and write. His brother could read. They were all bilingual. The house was 2nd class with two windows in front. Six persons occupied four rooms. They had two cow houses and one piggery on the property. Lord Ardilaun (sic) was the name of the landholder.

No 4: was a shop. Annie Malone (17) was a shop keeper.  William Gavin (35) a national school teacher, was a boarder in the house. He was born in County Mayo and was a single man.  Annie and William were bilingual and they could read and write. Cecilia Malone was the name of the landholder and Annie was her daughter. The building was 2nd class and had three windows in front. Two people occupied five rooms. There were four out offices on the premises; a cow houses, a piggery, a turf house and a store

No 5: was a public house. Edward Jennings (49) was married to Catherine (38) and they had four children.   Delia was (19), Annie (18), Edward (16) and P Wolf Tone was (2) years and four months old. Anne Flanagan (42) was a visitor in the household. Rev. James Geoffrey (sic) C.C. a Catholic clergyman was born in Co. Mayo and he was a boarder with the family. Everyone in this household could read and write and they were all bilingual. Edward senior filled and signed the census form. The building was 1st class and had six windows in front. Eight persons occupied nine rooms. There were three stables on the holding. Lord Ardilaun (sic) was the name of the landholder.

No 6: was a private dwelling. Samuel R Kingston (42) was born in Co. Cork, he was married to Mary E (28) and she was born in Co. Donegal. They had two daughters, Violet (6) a scholar was born in Co. Dublin and Mabel (3) was born in Co. Leitrim. Samuel was a District Inspector for the Royal Irish Constabulary. The family were Church of Ireland. Mary E Callaghan (17) was born in Co. Sligo and she was a catholic. She was a domestic servant to the household. Samuel filled and signed the census form. The house was 1st class and had six windows in front. Five people shared ten rooms. The outbuildings consisted of a stable, a coach house and a turf house. Lord Ardilaun (sic) was the land holder.

No 7: was a shop. Bridget McNally (67) was a widow and she was a retired national school teacher. Her daughters Mary Anne (36), and Delia (28) lived her. They were both national school teachers and were not married. The family were bilingual. The building was 1st class and had four windows in front. The family of three shared six rooms. They had a turf house on the plot. Lord Ardilaun (sic) was the name of the landholder.

No 8: was a public house. Patrick Loftus (50) was a farmer and a publican. He was married to Bridget (48), and they lived with their six daughters and three sons. Kate (25) and Mary (20) were shop assistants. Bridget was (18) and it doesn’t state her occupation. Annie was (13); Lena (7) and Letitia (4) were scholars. Patrick (23) and ‘a farmer’s son’, while John (16) has no occupation listed. Thady (sic) (10) was a scholar. The family could all read and write and were bilingual. Patrick signed the census form. The building was 1st class and had six windows to the front. The family of eleven occupied nine rooms. They had four out offices; a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

No 9: was a shop. Mary Hayes (70) a widow, was a shop keeper. Ellen Loftus (17) was a shop assistant and a boarder in the house. They were bilingual and they could read and write. The building was 3rd class and had only one window in front. Two people shared three rooms. There were no out buildings. Patrick Kyne (sic) was the name of the landholder.

No 10: was recorded as a public house on Form B 1, House and Buildings Return. Patrick Kearney (48) a widower, was listed as a shopkeeper, not a publican. His daughter Bridget (24) was not married and no occupation was listed for her. Patrick and his daughter could read and write and they spoke Irish and English. The building was 2nd class and had three windows to the front. Two people occupied six rooms. They had three stables on the premises.

No 11b: was a public house. Patrick Kyne (sic) (75) was married to Bridget (60). He was a publican and a shop keeper.   His son Joseph (19) and his daughter Lizzie (24) were shop assistants. Anne Davern (sic) (16) and Martin Disken (sic) (22) were general domestic servants. Everyone is this household could read and write and they were bilingual. The building was 1st class and had nine windows in front. Six persons occupied nine rooms. They had nine out offices; two stables, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house and a store.

No 12: was a private dwelling. Noel Allix (sic) (54) a retired colonel who was born in Paris, lived here. His wife Gertrude (31) was born in Devonshire. Their daughters Vera (6) and Helene (5) were born in London. Nora Griffin (16) was born in Kinsale County Cork and she was a cook and general domestic servant. William Hamilton (19) was born in Clonbur Co. Galway and he was a house boy and a general domestic servant also. All in this household could read and write with the exception of five year old Helene who could read only. William Hamilton was bilingual. The house was 2nd class and had five windows to the front. Six persons occupied six rooms. There were no out buildings on the property. John Joyce was the name of the landholder.

No 13: was the male national school.

No 14: was the female national school.

No 15: was the court house.

Census 1911:

Clonbur village had an estimated area of four acres according to the 1911 census, taken by Constable Thomas Walsh enumerator and collected between the 15th and the 18th of April 1911. The Census for Clonbur and Rusheen (sic) West were documented on the one Census form, though in previous census they were treated separately. Buildings numbered 1 – 7, and numbers 19 – 28 belong to Clonbur village.

No 1: was a public house. Patrick Kyne (sic) (89) a widower was a retired grocer and farmer. His sons Michael (33) and Thomas Joseph (31) were shop assistants. Patrick’s daughter – in – law Josie (19) was also a shop assistant. (Both sons were married, but as Catherine’s name followed Thomas Joseph’s I assume he was her husband). Catherine Costello (20) was a general domestic servant and John Curran (26) a farm servant. All in this household were bilingual, and with the exception of John Curran they could all read and write. The building was 1st class and had nine windows in front. Six persons occupied twelve rooms. They had a large number of out buildings that consisted of; a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a turf house, a potato house, and two stores.

No 2: was a public house. Bridget Kearney (28) a single lady was head of this establishment. She was a publican and a farmer. Bridget Summerville (16) was a domestic servant. They could read and write and they were bilingual. The building was 2nd class and had three windows to the front. Two people shared six rooms. Bridget had a stable and a barn on the premises.

No 3: was a public house. Patrick Loftus (61) was a publican and a farmer. He was married to Bridget (59) for thirty seven years and they had nine children. Eight were still living. His daughter Catherine (36) was married and her children, Helena (4), Margaret (3) and Alexander (2) were in the household. His other daughters were Mary (29); Annie (21), Helena (17) and Lettia (sic) (15). His son John was (24) years old. Occupations were not listed for the Patrick’s family. Everyone in this family was bilingual and the adults could all read and write. The building was 1st class and had seven windows to the front. Eleven family members occupied nine rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery on the property.

No 4: was a private dwelling. Bridget McNally (73) was head of this household. Bridget was a widow and in receipt of a national school teacher’s pension. Her daughter Mary Anne (47) was single and her daughter Delia O’Connor (38) was married for nine years and had three children. Like their mother Bridget, both of these women were national school teachers. Delia’s daughters Mary (8) and Kathleen (5) were scholars. She also had a (1) year old daughter who was named Delia. In this household too was Bridget Joyce who at (13) year old was listed as a servant and a scholar. All members were bilingual and could read and write. Bridget McNally filled and signed the census form. The house was 1st class and had six windows in front. Seven persons occupied nine rooms. There was a stable, a coach house and a cow house on the holding.

No 5: was a public house. Edward Lynch (34) was a single man. He was a grocer and a publican. His sister Margaret (26) was single and had no occupation documented. Winifred Burke (16) was a general domestic servant. All spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. The building was 1st class and had six windows in front. Three persons occupied eight rooms. There was a stable and a piggery on the property.

No 6: was a shop. James Joseph Malone (38) a single man was born in County Mayo. James was a shop keeper. His niece Lena Finn (19) was born in County Clare and his nephew Walter Finn (12) who was a scholar was born in Queen’s County. The family were bilingual and could read and write. The building was 2nd class and had three windows to the front. Three persons occupied five rooms. There was a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a turf house on the premises.

No 7: was a private dwelling. Thomas Corbett (82) a widower was a herd. His brother Patrick (70) remained single and he was a farm servant. His son Martin (45) was a herd and farm servant. Martin was married to Catherine (37) for seven years and they had four children. Three were still living. Michael was (4), Catherine (2) and Martin was (1) year old. In the household also were Thomas’s unmarried daughters Mary (46) and Anne (43) who were general domestic servants. The family spoke Irish and English and they could read and write. The house was 2nd class and had four windows to the front. Nine persons occupied four rooms. The out offices consisted of; a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. The land holder was Lord Ardilaun (sic) of Ashford.

 

No 19: A hotel that was uninhabited. Godfrey Allen of Carrick was the name of the landholder where the hotel was situated.

No 20: An uninhabited private dwelling, there were six out offices on the premises.

No 21: An uninhabited private dwelling, there were two buildings on the premises.

No 22: A court house, there was a stable and a coach house on the premises.

No 23:   A Roman Catholic Chapel.

No 24: A male national school.

No 25: A female national school.

No 26: A Church of Ireland.

No 27: An uninhabited private dwelling.

No 28: a private dwelling that was uninhabited.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This page was added on 15/11/2017.

Comments about this page

  • How wonderful to find a description of my great aunt Bridget Lowry Loftus’ residence in your census narrative. I only which there was a way to connect the dwelling number with a building that might still be standing in Clonbur. I found their final resting place in the nearby Rosshill Cemetery but can’t seem to locate there they lived. Thanks also for the Ballydoolaugh census narrative listing my great-grandfather’s tenant farm.

    By Paul Lowry (03/06/2018)

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share this
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone