Bunnaviskaun

Bun a’Mhioscáin

Teresa Philbin

Teresa Philbin

Translation:  Foot of the Heap

 

Down Survey 1670:  The Down Survey of Ireland is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world.  The survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details all laid down by admeasurements on maps.  It was carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656.   The survey sought to measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish, in order to facilitate its redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

The Down Survey name for the townland was Bonnaveskan.  In 1641 it was owned by Teige O’Flaharty catholic.  In 1670 it was in protestant ownership of College of Dublin.  It is in the half barony of Rosse (sic) in the parish of Rosse in County Galway.  There was 741 plantation acres of unprofitable land; 39 plantation acres of profitable land, and this amount was forfeited.

O’ Donovans Field Name Books 1838:  John O’ Donovan lists many variations of the name of the townland.  Bunnaviskaun. Bun a’Mhioscáin, Bunnaviskaun (Boundary Surveyors Sketch Map), Bunnaviskaun (County Cess Collector) Bunavuskaun (County Map), Bunnaviskaun (Local), Bunnaviskaun (Mearsman), Glangleiss (Rev. Michael Heraghty P.P.), Bunnaviskane (Tithe Ledger).

Description:  The proprietor was Thomas Martin Esq., Ballynahinch or London.  It does not state who his agent was.  The soil consisted of steep heath and rough pasture, with some coarse mixed pasture and arable mountain at the valley.  The rent was £92 per year.  The County Cess of 11¼ d was paid per year for 28 acres.  Bunaviskaun mountain, Aill Bun a Mhiosgáin a precipice on the mountain, Glanglosh river, and a herd’s house are situated in the townland.  There are no antiquities.

Situation:  It is situated in the west side of the parish of Ballinakill, south by the townland of Gowlaunlee, and on the east by Lee.  It is in the barony of Ross in County Galway.

Griffith’s Vauation 1849:  According to Griffith’s Valuation (Ordnance Sheet 21 & 25) Bunaviskaun had an area of 1,592 acres, 30 perches.  The land value at the time was £84.6.9.  The Directors of the Law Life Assurance Company owned 1,592 acres, 3 roods and 18 perches of land contained in one plot.  The occupiers all bore the Joyce surname; (1a), (1b), (1-), (1-).  Each paid rent according to the size and quality of their holding.

(1a):  Patrick Joyce had a herd’s house and land.  The land had a rateable annual valuation of £33 and the herd’s house was valued at 10 shillings.  Patrick’s total annual rent was £33 and 10 shillings.

(1b):  Thomas Joyce also had a herd’s house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £33 and the house was valued at 5 shillings. His total annual rent was £33 and 5 shillings.

(1-):  John Joyce and (1-) Tobias Joyce each had a piece of land with an annual valuation of £16 and 10 shillings.  All rents were payable to the Directors of the Law Life Assurance Company.

Glencraff – Gleann Cneamh (valley of wild garlic), Gabhlán Lighe, Lettershanbally (Leitir a’Seanbhaile (hillside of the old town and Lugatarrif – Log a’tarbh (bulls hollow) all share a border with this townland.

1901 Census:  Bunnaviskane is in the electoral division of Letterbrickane, in the sub – district of Leenane.  Constable Thomas Parkinson enumerated the census return. Twenty-two people were resident here in 1901:  twelve males and ten females.  Shepherding was their way of life.  All were born in County Galway and were Roman Catholic. The dwellings were 3rd class with perishable roofs that were most likely thatch.

No 1:  John Coyne (32) a herd, and his wife Mary (32) lived here with their four children. Mary was (4), Pat (3), John (2) and Michael (8) months old.  John could not read; Mary could read and write, and both were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of six occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the holding.  Tobias Joyce was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 2:  Pat Joyce (30), his wife Bridget (30) and their six children were the occupants of this house.  Bridget was (8), John (7), Mary (6), Thomas (4), Michael (3) and infant Catherine was (6) months old.  Pat worked as a herd.  None of the family could read at this time.  The parents and children from age four upwards spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of eight occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.  Thomas F. Joyce was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 3:   Pat Malia (60) a herd, his wife Barbara (60) and their son Pat (14) also a herd lived in this house.  Their daughter Margaret Callaghan (24) a farm labourers’ wife and her son James Callaghan (1) were recorded here.  Pat senior could read; the others could not read, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.  Arthur Joyce was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 4:  John Joyce (30), his wife Sarah (27) and their (2) year old daughter Mary live here.  John was a herd.  Sarah could read and write; John could not read; they spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the couple and their child occupied two rooms.  Thomas E. Joyce was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

1911 Census:  Constable Joseph Carlos enumerated the census return for Bunnaviskane on 14th of April 1911.  Eleven people were recorded on this census return: half the number of the previous return.   All were born in County Galway and were Roman Catholic.

No 1:  Pat Joyce (49) a shepherd, and his wife Bridget (42) were married for twenty years, and they had ten children; nine were still living and seven were documented.  Bridget (18) had no occupation listed; Martin (17) and John (16) were shepherds, Pat (12) and Anne (10) were scholars, Tom was (8) and Michael (4) years old.  Pat senior, Bridget and the two youngest children could not read at this time.  All but the two youngest were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and nine people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property. Thomas F. Joyce was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 2:  Barbara Malley (73) a widow was married for forty-two years, and she had nine children; six were still living and one was recorded here.  Her son Pat (24) a single man was a shepherd.  Barbara spoke Irish only; Pat was bilingual; neither could read.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front, and mother and son occupied two rooms.  Arthur Joyce was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

This page was added on 19/04/2022.

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