Cloghbrack Lower

Cloch Bhreac

Cloghbrack Lower, Cloch Bhreac meaning speckled rock

Names:

According to O Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Cloghbrack Lower and Cloch Bhreac was its official Irish form. The village was also known as Cloughbrack Lower (County Cess Collector, Tithe Ledger) and An Chloch Bhreac Íochtair (Logainm.ie).

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie), Cloghbrack Lower had a population centre called Cloghbrack (An Cloch Bhreac) and two minor features, these two features were Corhoor (An Corrthuar) and Derrynacorra Fort (Doire na Cathrach). There was also a school in this village and the image below gives the basic information of the school. This image can be found on http://www.duchas.ie/en/cbes/4622980/4620116

cloch

Situation:

This townland is a central townland bounded on the North by Cappaghnagoppul, Lough Mask and Cloghbrack Middle, on the West by Cloghbrack middle and Cloghbrack Upper, on the south by Shannadullaun and on the East by Bookaun and Cappaghnagoppul.

Description:

Down Survey: “The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps; ‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will”. (Wikipedia). In the Down Survey, the name given to Cloghbrack Lower was Cloghbrack alias Gortcoyne. The Down survey for this village does not give information about who owned Cloghbrack Lower in 1641 and does not give information about profitable, unprofitable and forfeited land. In 1670 the owners were John Brown who was Protestant and John Browne who was Catholic.

O’ Donovans (1838): In 1838, the proprietors for Cloghbrack Lower were Earl of Leitrim and Charlemont, Dublin. The agent was Mr. James Fair of Fairhil. The townland of Cloghbrack Lower is composed of 642 acres, 0 roods and 28 perches according to O Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838). The townland is located in the parish of Ross, in the Barony of Ross and in the County of Galway. O’ Donovan tells us that the townland was under ‘lease of lives’, with a bulked rent of £71.06s.5d yearly. O Donovan states that the soil was all mountain with some healthy and mixed pasture and some arable mountain with some tillage. According to O Donovan, there was also crops of oat’s that were middling, a small part of potatoes that were middling and some very bad. He also states that in rainy weather the streams from the mountain form a river which runs through the village into Lough Mask. O Donovan further states that near or in this townland there was a village called Curhoor and a fort called Derrynacorra. O Donovan states that children were buried in Derranacorragh fort.   The Co. Cess paid for 11 and a quarter d. per acre.

Griffith’s Valuation(1855): According to Griffith’s Valuation, Cloghbrack Lower had a total acreage of 642 acres, 1 rood and 24 perches but they exempted the school house land so the acreage was 638 acres, 2 roods and 20 perches . The annual valuation for this village was £90.11s.0d. Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont were the immediate lessors. Cloghbrack Lower was divided into 21 plots

Plot 1 was composed of 27 acres, 1 rood and 10 perches. It was divided into 2 sub-plots (a) and (b). Thomas Mannion owned (a) and Martin Mannion owned (b). This plot had a total annual valuation of £3.0s.0d.

Plot 1 (a) Thomas Mannion had a house and land. The land was valued at £1.5s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 1 (b) Martin Mannion had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1.5s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 2 was composed of 58 acres, 3 roods and 38 perches. Plot 2 was divided into 2 sub plots (A) and (B). Plot 2 (A) was further subdivided into two plots (a) and (b). (a) was owned by Micheal Morrin and (b) was owned by Patrick Morrin. Plot 2 (B) was also divided into 2 plots. One of these plots was owned by Micheal Morrin and the other by Patrick Morrin. This plot had a total valuation of £9.0s.0d.

Plot 2 (A) (a) Micheal Morrin had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2.15s.0d and the house at £0.10s.0d.

Plot 2(A) (b) Patrick Morrin had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2.15s.0d and the house at £0.10s.0d.

Plot 2 (B) Michael Morrin had land. The land was valued at £1.5s.0d.

Plot 2 (B) Patrick Morrin had land. The land was valued at £1.5s.0d.

Plot 3 consisted of 13 acres, 0 roods and 24 perches. The total annual valuation for this plot was £2.15s.0d.

Michael Coonan had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.10s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 4 consisted of 33 acres, 2 roods and 10 perches. The total annual valuation for plot 4 was £5.10s.0d.

John Costelloe had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £5.0s.0d. and the house at £0.10s.0d.

Plot 5 was composed of 38 acres,1 rood and 29 perches. This plot was sub divided into 2 sub-plots (a) and (b). Total annual valuation for this plot was £5.0s.0d.

Plot 5 (a) Martin Comer had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.5s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 5 (b) John Burke had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.5s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 6 was a clochán (cluster settlement) and consisted of 31 acres, 3 roods and 37 perches. Plot 6 was divided into 3 sub-plots (a), (b) and (-). Total annual valuation for this plot was £5.4s.0d.

Plot 6 (a) Patrick Moorin had a house and land. The land was valued at £1.12s.0d. and the house at £0.4s.0d.

Plot 6 (b) Hugh Killeen had a house and land. The land was valued at £1.12s.0d. and the house at £0.4s.0d.

Plot 6 (-) Martin Moorin had land which was valued at £1.12s.0d.

Plot 7 was composed of 18 acres, 0 roods and 8 perches. Total valuation for this plot was £2.15s.0d.

John Morrin (Fire) had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2.10s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 8 was composed of 17 acres, 0 roods and 10 perches. Total annual valuation for this plot was £2.15s.0d.

Martin Morrin had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2.9s.0d. and the house at £0.6s.0d.

Plot 9 consisted of 47 acres, 1 rood and 0 perches and was divided into plots (a) and (b). The total annual valuation for this plot was £5.3s.0d.

Plot 9 (a) Thomas Joyce had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.5s.0d. and the house at £0.3s.0d.

Plot 9 (b) John Joyce had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.5s.0d. and the house at £0.10s.0d.

Plot 10 was also a clochán (cluster settlement) and was composed of 26 acres, 3 roods and 15 perches. This plot was sub divided into 4 plots (a), (b), (-) and (c). (c) was also subdivided into 2 plots. Total annual valuation for this plot was £5.0s.0d.

Plot 10 (a) Patrick McDonough had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1.10s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 10 (b) Thos. McDonough had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1.10s.0d and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 10 (-) Patrick Walsh had land valued at £1.10s.0d.

Plot 10 (c ) Micheal Walsh had land valued at £0.2s.0d.

 Plot 10 (c ) Patrick Walsh had land which was valued at £0.2s.0d.

Plot 11 was a clochán (cluster settlement) and consisted of 12 acres, 2 roods and 6 perches. This plot was sub divided into 3 plots. The total valuation for this plot was £4.7s.0d.

Plot 11 Michael Walsh had land, which was valued at £1.5s.0d.

Plot 11 Patrick Walsh had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1.5s.0d and the house value was £0.10s.0d.

Plot 11 Nicholas Walsh had land valued at £1.7s.0d.

Plot 12 was composed of 12 acres, 2 roods and 37 perches. The total valuation for this plot was £4.15.0d.

Micheal Walsh had a house, offices and land. The land was valued at £4.5s.0d and the house at £0.10s.0d.

Plot 13 consisted of 7 acres, 0 roods and 7 perches. Total valuation for plot 13 was £1.12s.0d.

James Comer had a house and land. The land was valued at £1.8s.0d. and the house at £0.4s.0d.

Plot 14 consisted of 12 acres, 2 roods and 24 perches. It was divided into 2 further plots (a) and (b). The total valuation for this complete plot was £5.1s.0d.

Plot 14 (a) John Carney had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.10s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 14 (b) Mark Coyne had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.0s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 15 was composed of 5 acres, 1 rood and 30 perches and had a total valuation of £1.15s.0d.

Anthony McDonough had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1.10s.0d and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 16 consisted of 10 acres, 3 roods and 0 perches with a total valuation of £3.10s.0d.

Nicholas Walsh had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.0s.0d and the house at £0.10s.0d.

Plot 17 was composed of 14 acres, 1 rood and 16 perches. This plot was divided into two sub-plots (a) and (b). Total valuation for this plot was £5.0s.0d.

Plot 17 (a) John Coyne had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £2.5s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 17 (b) Patt Coyne had a house,office and land. The land was valued at £2.5s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 18 was a clochán (cluster settlement) and consisted of 32 acres, 0 roods and 26 perches. This plot was sub divided into 3 plots (-), (a) and (b). The total valuation for plot 18 was £4.14s.0d.

Plot 18 (-) Patrick Walsh had land which was valued at £1.8s.0d.

Plot 18 (a) Anthony Coyne had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1.8s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.4s.0d.

Plot 18 (b) John Coyne had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £1.8s.0d. and the house at £0.6s.0d.

Plot 19 was a clochán (cluster settlement) and was composed of 167 acres, 2 roods and 38 perches of mountain land. This plot was divided into 13 sub-plots. The total valuation for plot 19 was £3.2s.0d.

Plot 19 Patrick McDonough had land which was valued at £0.3s.0d.

Plot 19 Thos. McDonough had land valued at £0.3s.0d.

Plot 19 Patrick Walsh had land valued at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 19 Michael Walsh had land valued at £0.12s.0d.

Plot 19 Nicholas Walsh had land valued at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 19 James Comer had land, which was valued at £0.2s.0d.

Plot 19 John Carney had land valued at £0.5.0d.

Plot 19 Mark Coyne had land valued at £0.4s.0d.

Plot 19 Anth. McDonough had land, which was valued at £0.3s.0d.

Plot 19 John Coyne had land valued at £0.4s.0d.

Plot 19 Patrick Coyne had land valued at £0.4s.0d.

 Plot 19 Anthony Coyne had land valued at £0.3s.0d.

Plot 19 John Coyne had land valued at £0.3s.0d.

Plot 20 was composed of 49 acres, 1 rood and 25 perches. It was sub divided into 2 sub-plots (A) and (B) with a total valuation of £7.10s.0d.

Plot 20 (A) Michael Mulroe had land which was valued at £0.15s.0d.

Plot 20 (B) Micheal Mulroe had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £6.0s.0d. and the house at £0.15s.0d.

Plot 21 consisted of 3 acres, 2 roods and 35 perches. This plot had a total valuation of £3.0s.0d.

John Griffith had a school house and land. The land was valued at £1.10s.0d. and the school house at £1.10s.0d.

Census 1901

The Census of 1901 indicated that there were 26 houses in this village, one of which was a school and unoccupied. The other house was a private dwelling building and unoccupied. Everyone in Cloghbrack Lower was Roman Catholic. Everyone in this village, expect households 2, 6 and 21, were born in Galway. The Enumerator’s abstract (Form N) and Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings Return (Form B2) were incomplete, the Enumerator’s abstract stopped at house 17 and the Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings Return stopped at house 15.

House 1-Thomas and Kate Morrin

Thomas (63) and Kate (50) Morrin lived in house numbered 1 with their two sons Michael (26) and John (25). Thomas was a farmer. The parents could not read or write while their children could. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 2-Patrick and Kate Curran

Patrick (45) and Kate (31) Curran lived in house numbered 2 with their five children, their niece, Bridget Connell (17), and their servant, Mary Mannion (16). Their children were John Jos (7), Michael H. (6), Vincent (3), Patrick (2) and Mary (7 months). Patrick was a National school teacher. John, Michael and Vincent were scholars. Mary was a general domestic servant. Patrick (Snr.), Kate, John, Michael and Bridget could read and write. Mary (16) could not read. Vincent, Patrick (Jnr.) and Mary were too young to read and write. Everyone in this household, except Patrick (Jnr.) and Mary (7 months) who were too young to talk, spoke Irish and English. Patrick (Snr.) and Bridget were born in Kerry, Kate and Mary (7 months) were born in Mayo and the rest of the household was born in Galway. They had a 2nd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house. Their landlord was Lord Ardilaun who did not live in Cloghbrack Lower.

House 3-John and Bridget Curran

John (36) and Bridget (24) Curran lived in house 3 with their three children and their two servants. Their children were Mary (4), Winifred (3) and Bridget (1). Their servants were Julia Halloran (50) and Anne Coyne (18). John was a farmer and Grocer. Anne was a general domestic servant and Julia was a nurse domestic servant. Julia was also a widow. Bridget (Snr.) and Anne were the only people in this household who could read and write, the rest of the family could not read or write. Everyone in this household, except Bridget (Jnr.) and Julia, spoke Irish and English. Bridget (Jnr.) was too young to talk and Julia spoke Irish only. They had a 1st class house with eight rooms. They had a stable, two cow houses, a piggery and a barn.

House 4-Bridget Melia

Bridget Melia (32) lived in house numbered 4 with her sister, Mary Maree (30), and Bridget’s son Thomas Melia (1). Bridget was a farmer. Bridget was married and Mary was a widow. No one in this household could read or write. Bridget and Mary spoke Irish and English and Thomas was too young to talk. They had a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 5-Bridget Maree

Bridget Maree (46) lived in house 5 with her three children, Mary (16), John (14) and Thomas (12). Bridget was a farmer and John and Thomas were scholars. Bridget was also a widow. Bridget could not read but her children could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 6-Michael O Donnell

Michael O Donnell (70) lived in house 6 with Sarah O Donnell (66). The census form did not state what relation she had to Micheal O Donnell. Both of them are married. Michael was a farmer. Both of them could not read or write and they both spoke Irish only. Michael was born in Mayo and Sarah in Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a barn.

House 7-Patrick and Mary Coyne

Patrick (53) and Mary (49) Coyne lived in house 7 with their five children. Their five children were Ellen (20), Thomas (14), Kate (12), William (11) and Margaret (9). Patrick was a farmer. Kate, William and Margaret were scholars. The parents could not read.   All the children, except Margret who could read only, could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They had a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 8-Catherine Coyne  

Catherine Coyne (50) lived in house 8 with her daughter, Bridget (9). Catherine was a farmer. No one in this household could read and write. Catherine and Bridget both spoke Irish only. They lived in a 4th class house with one room. They had no out offices or farm-steadings. The landlord for this household was Patrick Coyne who lives in Cloghbrack Lower in house 7.

House 9-Martin and Mary Walsh

Martin (39) and Mary (30) Walsh resided in house 9 with their daughter, Bridget (4), their servant, Margaret Coyne (18), and Martin’s two brothers, Thomas Walsh(32) and William Walsh (29). Martin was a farmer and blacksmith. Thomas was a National school teacher. William was also a blacksmith. Margaret was a general domestic servant. Thomas and William were the only members of this household who could read and write, the rest of the household could not. Everyone in this household, except Bridget who was too young, spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 1st class house with seven rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a forge.

House 10-Patrick and Catherine Coyne

Patrick (32) and Catherine (26) Coyne lived in house 10 with their three children and Patrick’s mother, Anne Coyne (80). Their three children were Mary (5), Bridget (4) and Anne (2). Patrick was a farmer. No one in this household could read and write. Everyone in this household, except the two Anne’s, spoke Irish and English. Anne (2) was too young to talk and Anne (80) spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had no out offices or farm-steadings.

House 11- Bridget Keaney

Bridget Keaney(57) resided in house 11 with her daughter-in-law Bridget Keaney (22). Bridget (57) was a farmer. Both of them were married. Bridget (57) could not read or write but Bridget (22) could read and write. Both of them spoke Irish and English. They had a 2nd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

House 12-John and Mary Walsh

John (70) and Mary (68) Walsh lived in house 12 with their four children. Their four children were Margret (18), Bridget (16), John (14) and Martin (12). John was a farmer. Margaret and Bridget were the only members of this household who could read and write. Margaret and Bridget spoke Irish and English, the rest of the household spoke Irish only. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had no out offices or farm-steadings.

House 13-Mary Walsh

Mary Walsh (85) resided in house 13 with her son, Patrick (50). Mary was a farmer. Mary was also a widow. No one in this household could read or write. They both spoke Irish only. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had no out offices or farm-steadings.

House 14-Ellin McDonagh

Ellin (called Ellen on Form B1-House and Building Return) McDonagh (51) lived in house 14 with her three children and her ‘relative’ (as listed in the 1901 census) , John Folynn (90). Ellin’s children were Anthony (27), Patt (19) and Bridget (16). Ellin was a farmer. Anthony and Bridget were the only members of this household who could read and write. Anthony and Bridget were also the only members of this household who spoke Irish and English. The rest of the household spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 15-Michael and Bridget McDonagh

Michael (35) and Bridget (40) McDonagh resided in house numbered 15 with their three children, Michael’s mother and a ‘relative’ (as listed in the 1901 census), Michael Mulrow (70). Michael’s mother was Margret McDonagh (75). Their three children were Mary (10), Michael (8) and Bridget (5). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer and Mary was a scholar. Mary could read only, the rest of the household could not read or write. Mary spoke Irish and English, the rest of the household spoke Irish only. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

House 16-Bridget Joyce

Bridget Joyce (70) resided in house 16 with her son, her daughter-in-law and her five grandchildren. Her son was John Joyce (30). Her daughter-in-law was Ellen Joyce (30). Her grandchildren were Bridget (9), Mary (6), Michael (2), Kate (2) and Anne (1 month). Bridget (70) was a farmer. Bridget and Mary were scholars. Bridget (9) was the only member of this household who could read and write. John, Bridget (9) and Mary spoke Irish and English. Bridget, Ellen, Michael and Kate spoke Irish only . Anne was too young to talk. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. (FORM B.2 Return of Out-Offices and Farm- steadings are incomplete for houses 16-24 )

House 17-Patrick and Catherine Morrin

Patrick (33) and Catherine (30) Morrin occupied house numbered 17 with their five children. Their children were Bridget (9), Michael (7), Catherine (5), John (2) and Martin (6 months). Patrick was a farmer. Bridget and Michael were scholars. Catherine (Snr.) and Bridget could read and write. Michael could read only. The rest of the household could not read or write. Catherine (Snr.), Bridget, Michael and Catherine spoke Irish and English. Patrick spoke Irish only. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

House 18-Patt and Mary Morrin

Patt (72) and Mary (60) Morrin lived in house numbered 18. Patt was a farmer. Patt and Mary could not read or write and spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

House 19-Patrick and Margaret Burke

Patrick (41) and Margaret (32) Burke resided in house numbered 19 with their three children. Their children were John (7), Mary (5) and Michael (3 months). Patrick was a farmer and John was a scholar. No one in this household could read or write. Patrick, Margaret and John spoke Irish and English. Mary spoke Irish only and Michael was too young to talk. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

House 20-Martin and Bridget Comer

Martin (78) and Bridget (75) Comer resided in house numbered 20 with their two children , John (40) and Rodger (30). Martin was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write. The parents spoke Irish only and their children spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

House 21-Patrick and Margaret Costelloe

Patrick (70) and Margaret (70) Costelloe lived in house that was numbered 21 with their son , John (40), and their daughter in law , Bridget Costelloe (40). Patrick was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write. Patrick and Margaret spoke Irish and English while the rest of the household spoke Irish only. Patrick was born in Mayo and the rest of the household was born in Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

House 22-James and Winnie Curran

James (60) and Winnie (60) Curran resided in house numbered 22. James was a farmer. Neither of them could read and both of them spoke Irish only. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.

House 23-John and Mary Morrin

John (38) and Mary (34) Morrin lived in house numbered 23 with their five children. Their five children were Pat (12), Catherine (10), Martin (7), Thomas (4) and Mary (2). John was a farmer. Pat, Catherine and Martin were scholars. Mary (Snr.), Pat and Catherine could read and write. The rest of the household could not read or write. John, Mary (Snr.) and Pat spoke Irish and English. Martin spoke English only. Catherine was listed as not speaking any language at all and Thomas and Mary were too young to talk.   They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

House 24-Thomas and Kate Mannion

Thomas (50) and Kate (42) Mannion resided in house numbered 24 with their nine children. Their children were John (18), Martin (16), Thomas (13), James (10), Mary (7), Michael (6), Catherine (4), Bridget (2) and William (10 months). Thomas (Snr.) was a farmer. Thomas, James, Mary and Michael were scholars. John, Martin, Thomas (Jnr.) and James could read and write, the rest of the household could not. Bridget and William were too young to talk. Kate, Michael and Catherine spoke Irish only. The rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.

Census 1911:

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living); if Deaf and Dumb, Dumb only, Blind, Imbecile or Idiot, Lunatic. Everyone in this village in 1911 were Roman Catholic. Houses 2, 7, 10 , 23 had children whose birthplace have not been listed. House numbers differ from those of 1901. In 1911 there were 27 houses. House 17 was inhabited and house 26 was an inhabited National School. Patrick Curran was the landlord for the National school and he lived in the village in house 22 and he was a school teacher . House 17 and the National School had a cow house. House 17 was a 3rd class house with 1 room and Thomas Walsh was the landlord. Thomas Walsh lived in house 23 and he was also a school teacher. There are also inconsistent age gaps between 1901 to 1911 Census. The National school was a 2nd class building. Some of the forms were incomplete in 1901, therefore we were unable to make some comparisons for a few of the households.

House 1-Tom and Kate Mannion

Tom (called Thomas in 1901) (55) and Kate (53) Mannion lived in house 1 (previously numbered house 24) with their six children ; Martin (27), Mary (20), Michael (18), Kate (listed as Catherine in 1901) (15), Bridget (13) and William (11). There was no mention of John, Thomas or James in this 1911 census. Tom and Kate (Snr.) were married for 30 years, had eleven children and six of them had survived by 1911. Tom was a farmer. Bridget and William were scholars. The parents and Martin could not read or write and spoke Irish only, the other children could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Tom was born in Galway WR and everyone else in this household was born in Galway. They still lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable and a cow house. Unable to make comparisons with houses 1-10 of 1911 to 1901 as Form B.2 Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings are incomplete for houses 24-16 in 1901.

House 2-John and Mary Morrin

John (52) and Mary (47) Morrin lived in house 2 (previously numbered house 23) with their twelve children; Pat (24), Catherine (22), Michael (20), John (16), Tom (14), Mary (12), Peter (10), James (8), Annie (4), Sarah (4), Bridget (2) and Julia (1). There was no mention of Martin in this census. John (Snr.) and Mary (Snr.) were married for 25 years, had thirteen children and twelve of them had survived by 1911. John (Snr.) was a farmer. Mary (Jnr.), Peter and James were scholars. John (Snr.) , Annie, Sarah, Bridget and Julia could not read or write, the rest of the family could read and write. John (Snr.), Bridget and Julia spoke Irish only, the rest of the family spoke Irish and English. John (Snr.) was born in Galway WR, everyone else, except possibly Julia, was born in Galway. It is not listed where Julia was born. They still lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable, 2 cow houses, 1 calf house and a barn.

House 3-James and Winnie Curran

James (73) and Winnie (74) Curran resided in house 3 (previously numbered 22). James and Winnie had been married for 52 years and had five children. In the 1911 census question about ‘children still living’ they placed a ‘-’. James was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write. James and Winnie spoke Irish only. They were born in Galway. They still lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house.

House 4-John and Bridget Costellow

John (46) and Bridget (45) Costellow lived in house 4 (previously numbered 21). There was no mention of Patrick or Margaret in this census. John and Bridget were married for 10 years and had no children. John was a farmer. Both of them could not read and they both spoke Irish only. John and Bridget were born in Galway WR. In 1901 they lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms, they did live in 2nd class with with three rooms in 1901. They had a stable and a cow house.

House 5-Roger and Margaret Comer

Roger (50) and Margaret (55) Comer lived in house 5 with their six children. This was a new household. Their children were Mary (8), Bridget (7), Pat (5), John (4), Margaret (2) and Martin (1). Roger and Margaret (Snr.) were married for 9 years, had six children and five of them had survived by 1911. Roger was a farmer. Mary and Bridget were scholars. Margaret (Snr.), Mary and Bridget could read and write, the rest of the family could not read or write. Margaret (Snr.), Mary and Bridget also spoke Irish and English. The rest of the household, except Martin who was too young to talk, spoke Irish only. Roger, Margaret (Snr.) and Mary were born in Galway WR., the rest of the household was born in Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with one room. They had a cow house.

House 6-Martin and Bridget Comer

Martin (89) and Bridget (84) Comer lived in house 6 (previously numbered house 20). There was no mention of John in this census and Rodger in 1911 lived in house 5 with his own family. Martin and Bridget had been married for 61 years, had five children and one of them had survived by 1911. Martin was a farmer. Both of them could not read and they spoke Irish only. Both of them were born in Galway. They still lived in a 3rd class house but had one room,in 1901 they had two rooms in a 3rd class house. They had a cow house.

House 7-Tom and Maggie O Neill

Tom (50) and Maggie (42) O Neill lived in house 7 with their four children. This was a new household   Their children were Mary (15), Michael (9), Maggie (7) and Nora (2). Tom and Maggie (Snr.) were married for 6 years had two children and one of them had survived by 1911. Tom was a farmer. Mary, Michael and Maggie (Jnr.) were scholars. The parents and Nora could not read or write while their other children could read and write. Everyone in this household, except Maggie and Nora who were too young to talk, spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household, except possibly Nora, was born in Galway. It was not listed in the 1911 census where Nora was born.   They resided in a 3rd class house with one room. They had a cow house.

House 8-Pat and Mary Morrin

Pat (called Patrick in the 1901 census)(84) and Mary (73) Morrin lived in house numbered 8 (previously numbered house 18) with their niece, Nora (15). They were married for 49 years and had no children. Pat was a farmer and Nora was a scholar. Nora was the only member of this household who could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. Nora spoke Irish and English. Pat and Mary spoke Irish only. Pat and Mary were born in Galway W.R and Nora was born in America. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms, in 1901 they lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house.

House 9-Pat and Kate Morrin

Pat (called Patrick in the 1901 census) (46) and Kate (called Catherine in the 1901 census) (46) Morrin resided in house numbered 9 (previously numbered house 17) with their eight children ; Bridget (20), Michael (17), Catherine (15), John (13), Martin (10), Patrick (8), Thomas (6) and Mary (4). Pat and Kate had been married for 21 years, had eight children and all of them had survived by 1911. Pat was a farmer. John, Martin, Patrick, and Thomas were scholars. Pat and Mary could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Pat and Mary spoke Irish only and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They still lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

House 10-John and Ellen Joyce

John (50) and Ellen (40) Joyce resided in house 10 (previously numbered house 16) with their eight children; Mary (16), Michael (14), Kate (14), Anne (10), John (8), Stephen (6), Martin (4) and Tom (2). Kate is their daughter but her surname was not listed in this 1911 census, in the 1901 census her surname was listed as ‘Joyce’. There was no mention of the two Bridget’s in this 1911 census. John (Snr.) and Ellen had been married for 20 years, had nine children and eight of them had survived by 1911. John (Snr.) was a farmer. Michael, Kate, Anne, John, Stephen and Martin were scholars. John (Snr.), Ellen, Stephen, Martin and Tom could not read, the rest of the household could read and write. John (Snr.), Ellen , Stephen, Martin and Tom spoke Irish only. Everyone in this house, except possibly Tom, was born in Galway. It was not listed in the 1911 census where Tom was born. The rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house.

House 11-Michael and Bridget McDonagh

Michael (60) and Bridget (55) McDonagh lived in house 11 (previously numbered house 15) with their two children, Michael (17) and Bridget (15),. There was no mention of Margret McDonagh, Mary McDonagh or Michael Mulrow in this 1911 census. Michael (Snr.) and Bridget (Snr.) were married for 23 years, had 3 children and 2 of them had survived by 1911. Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. Bridget (Jnr.) was the only family member who could read and write.. Bridget (Jnr.) spoke Irish and English, the rest of the family spoke Irish only. They still lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They still had a cow house and added a stable by 1911.

House 12-Ellen McDonagh

Ellen (64) McDonagh lived in house 12 (previously numbered house 14) with her five children and their daughter-in-law, Judy McDonagh(28). Their five children were Pat (29), Anthony (40), Pat (4), Michael (3) and Tom (2). There was no mention of Bridget McDonagh or John Flynn in this 1911 census. Ellen was a widow. Pat (29) and Judy had been married for 6 years, had three children and all three of them had survived by 1911. Ellen was a farmer. Pat (29), Judy and Anthony could read and write, the rest of the family could not. Pat (29), Judy and Anthony spoke Irish and English, the rest of the family spoke Irish only. They still lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms. They still had a cow house and added a stable, but no longer had a piggery and a barn.

House 13-Pat Walsh

Pat Walsh (69) (called Patrick in the 1901 census) resided in house 13 (previously numbered house 13). There was no mention of Mary Walsh (85) in this census. Pat was a farmer. Pat could not read and spoke Irish. He still lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. He had a cow house by 1911, in 1901 he had no out-offices or farm -steadings.

House 14-John and Mary Walsh

John (80) and Mary (67) Walsh lived in house 14 (previously numbered house 12) with their son, Martin (20). There was no mention of Margaret, Bridget or John in this 1911 census. John and Mary had been married for 40 years, had 7 children and one of them had survived by 1911. John was a farmer. Martin was the only family member who could read and write. The census form was not filled in correctly and in the section about the Irish language, they stated ‘Galway’. They still lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They added a cow house by 1911, in 1901 he had no out-offices or farm -steadings.

 House 15-Bridget Keaney

Bridget Keaney (70) resided in house 15 (previously numbered house 11). There was no mention of Bridget (Jnr.) in this household in 1911. Bridget was a widow. Bridget was a farmer. Bridget could not read and spoke Irish and English. She lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms in 1911, she did live in a 2nd class house with three rooms in 1901. She still had a cow house and added a stable.

House 16-Martin and Mary Walsh

Martin (50) and Mary (41) Walsh lived in house 16 (previously numbered house 9) with their five children, Martins brother and a boarder. Their children were Bridget (14), Mary (10), Martin (8), John (6) and Nicholas (2). Martin’s brother was William Walsh (41) and their broader was Katie Coyne (70). There was no mention of Thomas Walsh or Margaret Coyne in this household in the 1911 census. Martin and Mary had been married for 19 years, had five children and all five of them had survived by 1911. Martin (Snr.) was a farmer. William was a blacksmith. Bridget, Mary,Martin and John were scholars. Martin (Snr.), William and Katie spoke Irish only. Nicholas was too young to talk and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. Martin left his column for reading and writing (education) blank. Nicholas and Katie could not read and write, everyone else in the household could read and write. Mary was born in Mayo, Nicholas and Kate was born in Galway and everyone else in this household was born in Galway WR.   They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms in 1911, they lived in a 1st class house with seven rooms in 1901. They still had a stable, a cow house and a forge but no longer had a piggery.

House 18-Catherine Coyne

Catherine Coyne (50) resided in house 18 (previously numbered house 10) with her four children; Anne (12), Kate (10), Michael (8) and Pat (5). There was no mention of Patrick, Mary, Bridget or Anne (80) in this 1911 census. Catherine was married for 18 years, had 6 children and 4 of them had survived by 1911. Catherine was a farmer. Anne, Kate and Michael were scholars. Anne, Kate and Michael could read and write, the rest of the family could not read or write. Anne and Kate spoke Irish and English, the rest of the household spoke Irish only. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms in 1911, they did live in a 2nd class house with three rooms in 1901. By 1911 they had a cow house,in 1901 they had no out-offices or farm -steadings.

House 19-Mary Walsh

Mary Walsh (60) lived in house 19 with her stepson, Pat Melia(11). This was a new household. Mary was a farmer. Mary and Pat could not read or write and they both spoke Irish only. Mary was a widow. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a calf house.

House 20-Bridget Marie

Bridget Marie (50) lived in house numbered 20 (was numbered house 4 in 1901) with her two sons, John (23) and Tom (21). There was no mention of Mary in this 1911 census. Bridget was a widow and gave details of her previous marriage, she was married for 26 years, had three children and two of them had survived until 1911. Bridget was a farmer. No one in this family could read or write. Tom spoke Irish and English. The rest of the household spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms, they lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They still had a cow house but no longer had a piggery or barn.

House 21-John and Bridget Curran

John (50) and Bridget (36) Curran resided in house 21 (in 1901 was numbered house 3) with their nine children, their servant and a boarder. Their children were Mary (14), Winifred (13), Bridget (12), Martin (10), Kate (7), Sarah (6), Ellin (5), Barbarah (3) and Patrick (1). Their servant was Bridget Burke (18) and their broader was Kate Cor Conroy (30). There was no mention of Julia Halloren and Anne Coyne in this 1911 census. John and Bridget (36) were married for 15 years, had 11 children and 9 of them had survived by 1911. John was a farmer. Mary, Winifred, Bridget (12), Martin, Kate, Sarah, Ellin and Barbarah were scholars. Bridget was a servant. Kate Cor was a school teacher. John, Ellin, Barbarah, Patrick and Bridget (18) could not read, everyone else in this household could read and write. Patrick and Barbarah were too young to talk. John and Ellin spoke Irish only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms in 1911, in 1901 they lived in a 1st class house with eight rooms. They still had a stable, two cow houses, a piggery, a barn and added a calf house by 1911.

House 22-Patrick and Mary Curran

Patrick (55) and Mary (50) Curran lived in house 22 (previously numbered house 2) with Patrick’s four children; John J. (17), Michael H. (16), Vincent (13) and Patrick (10). There was no mention of Mary Curran , Mary Mannion, Bridget Connell and Kate Curran. Patrick (Snr.) and Mary had been married for 9 years and had no children. Patrick was a school teacher. John J. , Micheal H., Vincent and Patrick were scholars. Everyone in this family could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with four rooms, in 1901 they lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They still had a cow house by 1911.

House 23-Thomas and Mary Walsh

Thomas (43) and Mary (31) Walsh lived in house 23 with their four children. This is a new household. Their children were Patrick (6), Mary (5), James (3) and Bridget (3 months). Thomas was a National school teacher. Patrick, Mary (Jnr.) and James were scholars. Thomas and Mary (Snr.) had been married for 7 years, had five children and and four of them had survived by 1911. The parents could read and write, Patrick could read and the rest of the family could not read or write. Everyone , except Bridget who was too young to talk, spoke English and Irish. The parents were born in Galway but it is not stated where the children were born. They lived in a 1st class house with four rooms. They had a cow house.

House 24-Thomas and Catherine Morrin

Thomas (73) and Catherine (72) Morrin resided in house 24 (previously numbered house 1) with Thomas’ son, John (35), and Thomas’ daughter in law, Judy (50). There was no mention of Michael or Kate in this 1911 census. Thomas and Catherine had been married for 3 years and had no children. John and Judy had been married for 1 year and also had no children. Thomas was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write. The parents and John spoke English and Irish. Judy spoke Irish only. They still lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They still had a cow house and added a piggery and a barn.

House 25-Michael and Anne Morrin

Michael (33) and Anne (29) Morrin lived in house 25 with their five children. This was a new household. Their children were Bridget (7), John (6), Mary (4), Michael (2) and Pat (1). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer and Bridget was a scholar. Michael (Snr.) and Anne had been married for eight years, had five children and all five of them had survived until 1911. The parents and Bridget could read and write, the rest of the family could not. The parents and Bridget also spoke Irish and English while the rest of the family spoke Irish only. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

House 27-Mary Coyne

Mary (66) Coyne resided in house 27 (previously numbered 7) with their three children; Tom (called Thomas in 1901) (24), William (23) and Maggie (called Magaret in 1901) (18). There was no mention of Patrick, Ellen or Kate in this 1911 census. Mary was a widow and did not give details of her previous marriage. Mary was a farmer. Mary could not read but her children could read and write. Mary spoke Irish only and her children spoke Irish and English. They still lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They no longer had a cow house, piggery or barn, they had no out-offices or farm -steadings at all.  

This page was added on 16/02/2017.

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