Cloghbrack Middle

Cloch Bhreac

Tomas O Flatharta

Cloghbrack Upper
Ceantar Dhúiche Sheoigheach
Cloghbrack Middle
Ceantar Dhúiche Sheoigheach
This record gives the different names Cloughbrack Upper, Middle and Lower
www.Logainm.ie

Cloghbrack Middle, Cloch Bhreac meaning speckled rock

Names:

According to O Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Cloghbrack Middle and Cloch Bhreac was it’s official Irish form. The village was also known as Cloghybrack Middle (County Cess Collector) and An Chloch Bhreac Láir (www.Logainm.ie).

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (www.Logainm.ie), Cloghbrack Middle had an island, Illaunatee More (Oileán an Tí Mhóir). It also stated that the townland also had a hill which was called Knockaunnabausty Infants Burial Ground (Cnocán na bPáistí). The townland also had 3 rocks , these rocks were Illaunatee More Rocks (Carraigeacha Oileán an Tí Mhóír), Carrigeenlewee (Carraigín Leamhaigh) and Carrigeen (An Carraigín). This townland also had a minor feature which was called America (Baile Mheiriceá). There is also a scanned record on www.Logainm.ie this record gives the different names Cloughbrack Upper, Middle and Lower had. This record is below which can be found on http://www.logainm.ie/en/20634

Situation:

This townland is a central townland bounded on the North by Lough Mask, on the West by Cloghbrack Upper and on the South and East it is bounded by Cloghbrack Lower.

Description:

Down Survey: “The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps; ‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will”. (Wikipedia). In the Down Survey, the name given to Cloghbrack Middle was Cloghbrack alias Gortcoyne and does not give information about who owned Cloghbrack middle in 1641 and does not give information about profitable, unprofitable or forfeited land. The information it does give is that in 1670 the owners were John Brown who was Protestant and John Browne who was Catholic.

O’Donovans (1838):

In 1838, the proprietors for Cloghbrack were the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont and the agent was Mr. James Fair of Fairhil. The townland of Cloghbrack middle is composed of 0 acres, 0 roods and 15 perches according to O Donovan’s Field name Books (1838) this information might be incorrect as 15 perches would be a small amount of land and the Griffith’s Valuation also claim the village was 110 acres, 0 roods and 15 perches. The townland is located in the parish of Ross, in the Barony of Ross and in the County of Galway. O’ Donovan tells us that the townland was under ‘lease of lives’, with a bulked rent of £28. 01s. 9d. yearly. O’ Donovan states that the soil was ‘mostly light soil being reclaimed mountain and is all light poor soil with some pasture towards Lough Mask’ There was also a village called America. He further states that there was a children’s burial place called ‘Cnuckaun. Trigl. Station, Illauna-dtheewore’.(as per transcribed information of www.galwaylibrary.ie). The Co. Cess paid for 304 acres for Cloghbrack Lower, Middle and Upper.

Griffith’s Valuation(1855):

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Cloghbrack Middle had a total acreage of 110 acres, 0 roods and 15 perches. The annual valuation for the lands in Cloghbrack Middle was £28.18s.0d. Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont were the immediate lessors. Cloughbrack Middle was divided into 12 plots.

Plot 1 was composed of 10 acres, 1 roods and 7 perches. It was divided into 2 sub-plots A and B and were both held by Daniel Carey. Daniel Carey paid an annual rate of £3.0s.0d. for this plot.

Plot 1 (A) Daniel Carey had land which consisted of 5 acres, 0 roods and 31 perches and was valued at £1.0s.0d.

Plot 1 (B) Daniel Carey had a house, office and land. The land consisted of 5 acres, 0 roods and 16 perches and was valued at £1.13s.0d and the house was valued at £0.7s.0d.

 

Plot 2 was composed of 11 acres, 3 roods and 25 acres. This plot was divided into 2 subplots A and B and were held by Michael Duddy. Michael Duddy paid an annual rate of £4.0s.0d for plot 2.

Plot 2 (A)Michael Duddy had land which consisted of 5 acres, 2 roods and 31 perches and was valued at £1.8s.0d.

b (B) Micheal Duddy had a house, office and land. The land consisted of 6 acres, 0 roods and 35 perches and was valued at £2.2s.0d. and the house at £0.10s.0d.

 

Plot 3 had 12 acres, 2 roods and 25 perches and was divided into 2 subplots A and B that were held by Thomas Higgins. Thomas Higgins paid an annual rate of £2.10s.0d. for this plot.

Plot 3 (A) Thomas Higgins had land which consisted of 6 acres, 0 roods and 13 perches. This land was valued at £1.8s.0d.

Plot 3 (B) Thomas Higgins had house,office and land. The land consisted of 5 acres,3 roods and 12 perches which was valued at £0.15s.0d. The house was valued at £0.7s.0d.

 

Plot 4 had 10 acres, 3 roods and 20 perches and was divided into 3 subplots A, B and b.John Flynn owned plots A and B and Martin Flynn owned plot b. John Flynn paid £2.8s.0d.

Plot 4 (A) John Flynn had a house and land. The land was composed of 4 acres, 3 roods and 6 perches and was valued at £1.2s.0d. The house was valued at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 4 (B) John Flynn had land. The land had 6 acres , 0 roods and 14 perches and was valued at £0.18s.0d.

Plot 4 b (b) Martin Flynn had a house and was valued at £0.5s.0d.

 

Plot 5 had 7 acres, 2 roods and 32 perches and was divided into A and B and was owned by Margaret Duffy. She paid an annual rate of £1.10s.0d for this plot.

Plot 5 b (A) Margret Duffy had a house, office and land. The land consisted of 3 acres, 0 roods and 17 perches which was valued at £0.15s.0d. The house was valued at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 5 (B) Margaret Duffy had land. The land consisted of 4 acres, 2 perches and 15 roods and was valued at £0.10s.0d.

 

Plot 6 had 13 acres, 0 roods and 19 perches and sub divided into 3 subplots A, B and C all owned by John Kenny. John Kenny paid an annual rate of £3.10s.0d. for plot 6.

Plot 6 (A) John Kenny had land. The land consisted of 4 acres, 0 roods and 6 perches which was valued at £1.0s.0d.

Plot 6 b (B) John Kenny had a house, office and land. The land was composed of 2 acres, 0 roods and 5 perches and was valued at £0.14s.0d and the house at £3.10s.0d.

Plot 6 (C) John Kenny had land. The land was composed of 7 acres, 0 roods and 8 perches and valued at £1.8s.0d.

 

Plot 7 had 13 acres, 0 roods and 36 perches and sub divided into 2 subplots A and B which was owned by Thomas Flynn. Thomas paid an annual rate of £3.10s.0d. for this plot.

Plot 7 (A) Thomas Flynn had a house, office and land. The land consisted of 0 acres, 2 roods and 30 perches and was valued at £1.10s.0d. The house was valued at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 7 (B) Thomas Flynn had land. The land consisted of 6 acres, 2 roods and 6 perches and valued at £1.12s.0d.Plot 8 had 3 acres, 3 roods and 9 perches and was divided into 2 plots, a and -. a belonged to Michael Coyne and – belonged to Martin Flynn. Total Annual Valuation for this plot was £1.0s.0s for Michael’s subplot and £0.15s.0d. for Martin’s subplot. £1.15s.0d. for the complete plot.

 

Plot 8 (a) Micheal Coyne had a house and land. Micheal’s land was valued at £0.15s.0d. and £0.5s.0d for his house and his total valuation was £1.0s.0d.

Plot 8 (-) Martin Flynn had land which was valued at £0.15s.0d. with his total valuation at £0.15s.0d.

 

Plot 9 consisted of 7 acres, 3 roods and 23 perches.

Denis Conroy had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.0s.0d and the house at £0.10s.0d. Plot 9 had a Total Annual Valuation of Rateable Property at £3.10s.0d.

 

Plot 10 was a clachán (cluster settlement) and was divided into 3 subplots.Denis Conroy occupied the first sub plot, Michael Coyne occupied the second subplot and the last subplot belonged to Martin Flynn. This plot consisted of 13 acres, 1 rood and 4 perches with a total valuation of £2.4s.0d.

Plot 10 Denis Conroy had land that was valued at £1.10s.0d.

Plot 10 Michael Coyne had land that was valued at £0.7s.0d.

Plot 10 Martin Flynn had land that was valued at £0.7s.0d.

 

Plot 11 consisted of 1 acre, 2 roods and 7 perches

John McMahon had a house and land. The land was valued at £0.11s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d. This plot had a total valuation of rateable property at £0.16s.0d.

 

Plot 12 composed of 4 acres, 2 roods and 7 perches

Thomas Higgins and others had land (cut away bog). This land had no Rateable Annual Valuation placed on it.

Census 1901

The 1901 census indicates there were 9 houses in this village, one of which was a RIC (Royal Irish Constabulary) Hut which housed 4 officers. Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic and was born in Galway, except the RIC officers who were born in different parts of Ireland. According to the Form N. (Enumerator’s abstract for a Townland or Street) there were 32 males and 25 females in this village. Form B2 (Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings) indicates there were 9 cow houses, 8 piggeries, 7 Barns and a stable. For the RIC Hut I got the information from the Barrack Return (Form H).

House 1-John and Mary Flynn

John (42) and Mary (40) Flynn lived in house 1 with their seven children. Their seven children were John (18), Mary (15), Thomas (11), Bridget (9), Ellin (6), Anthony (4) and Michael (8 months). John (Snr.) was a farmer. Thomas, Bridget and Ellin were scholars. John (Jnr.), Mary (Jnr.) and Thomas could read and write. Bridget could read and the rest of the family could not read or write. Everyone in the family, except Anthony and Michael , spoke Irish and English. Anthony spoke Irish only and Michael was too young to talk. They had a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They also had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 2-Mary Kenny

Mary Kenny (50) lived in house 2 with their six children. Her children were Patrick (25), Daniel (19), Anne (17), John (15), Ellen (12) and Michael (8). Mary was a farmer. Daniel was listed as a ‘rural postman’. John, Ellen and Michael were scholars. Mary could read only, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They had a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable, two cow houses, a piggery and a barn.

House 3-Mark and Anne Flynn

Mark (60) and Anne (50) Flynn resided in house numbered 3 with their four children. Their 4 children were Kate (17), Patrick (15) Anne (12) and Thomas (8). Mark was a farmer. Anne (Jnr.) and Thomas were scholars. Mark and Thomas could not read, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 4-Martin and Mary Coyne

Martin (55) and Mary (50) Coyne lived in house numbered 4 with their two children, their four grandchildren and their daughter-in-law, Mary Coyne (28). Their children were Michael (28) and Bridget (15). Their grandchildren were Patrick (6), Mary (4), John (2) and Honor (6 months). Martin was a wool weaver, Michael was a farmer and Patrick and Mary (Jnr.) were scholars. Bridget was the only person in this household who could read and write. The parents and John spoke Irish only, Honor was too young to talk and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 5-Mary Conroy

Mary Conroy (55) resided in house numbered 5 with their five children. Their children were Patrick (32), Michael (28), Martin (26), Thady (20) and Julia (18). Mary was a farmer. Mary could not read or write while her children could. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 6-Thomas and Mary Flynn

Thomas (55) and Mary (45) Flynn lived in house numbered 6 with their six children. Their children were John (19), Ellen (18) , Martin (14), Thomas (10), Michael (8) and Kate(8). Thomas (Snr.) was a farmer and Thomas (Jnr.), Michael and Kate were scholars. The parents could not read, Micheal and Kate could read only and the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in the family, except Mary, spoke English and Irish. Mary spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 7-Patt and Mary Duffy

Patt (was called Patrick in the House and Building Return) (63) and Mary (55) Duffy resided in house numbered 7 with their two children. Their two children were John (22) and Sarah (12). Patt was a farmer. The parents could not read or write while their children could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 8- Thomas and Mary Joyce

Thomas (50) and Mary (60) Joyce lived in house numbered 8 with their daughter. They also had a visitor on the night of the census, this was Mary Joyce (54). Their daughter was Bridget (20). Thomas was a farmer. The parents could not read , Mary (54) could read only and Bridget could read and write. Everyone in this house spoke Irish and English. They resided in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 9 -Royal Irish Constabulary Hut (RIC)

The RIC hut housed three Constables and a Sergeant. Only the first letter of their forename and surname are given in the Barrack Returns (Form H) but through Household Returns (Form A) and House and Building Return (Form B1) two names were given. The Constables were T.C. (31), R.H. (21) and Patrick McShane (30). The Sergeant was Patrick Caughlan. (47). R.H. was a shoemaker before he become a Constable. Everyone in this RIC Hut could read and write. T.C and Patrick (30) spoke Irish and English, it is not stated what language R.H. and Patrick (47) spoke. Patrick (47) was born in Tipperary, T.C was born in Mayo, R.H was born in Cork and Patrick (30) was born in Donegal. They RIC Hut was a 2nd class house with 4 rooms. They had no out-offices or farm-steadings. Mary Keeny was the landlord for this hut, she also lived in Cloughbrack Middle in house numbered 2 in 1901.

Census 1911:

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living); if Deaf and Dumb, Dumb only, Blind, Imbecile or Lunatic. In the previous census they were 13 occupied houses and in this census 12 houses are listed. All those enumerated here were Roman Catholic ,expect for W.D, the acting sergeant who was Irish Church,. Everyone in this village , except for household numbered 2 and the people in RIC hut,were born in Galway. With house 7, the from is not filled in completely so unsure of birthplaces of the people from that household. There is no mention of 3 households from the 1901 census, the John and Mary Coyne household, the Patrick Sullivan household and the Mary Joyce household, in the 1911 census. House numbers differ from those of 1901. There are also inconsistent age gaps between 1901 to 1911 census. For the RIC Hut, I got information from the Barrack Return (Form H).

House 1- John and Mary Flynn

John (53) and Mary (55) Flynn lived in house 1 (same numbered house as in 1901) with their five children. Their five children were Tom (23), Bridget (19), Ellin (called Ellen in 1901) (17), Anthony (15) and Michael (12). There was no mention of John (Jnr.) or Mary (Jnr.) in this census. John and Mary had been married for 30 years, had 7 children and 5 of them had survived by 1911. John was a farmer and Anthony and Michael were scholars. The parents could not read but their children could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms, in 1901 they lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They still had a cow house and added a stable and a calf house by 1911 but no longer had a barn or piggery.

House 2-Martin and Sarah Higgins

Martin (31) and Sarah (29) Higgins resided in house 2, this was a new household in Cloghbrack Middle, with their three children, Martins brother, Peter Higgins (18), and their niece , Mary Mannion (12). Their children were Mary (3), Michael (3) and Tom (1). They were married for 3 years, had 3 children and three of them had survived by 1911. Martin was a farmer and Mary (12) was a scholar. Martin, Sarah, Peter and Mary (12) could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. Mary (3) , Micheal and Tom were too young to talk, the rest of this household spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household, except Mary Mannion who was born in America, was born in Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a calf house.

House 3- Pat and Mary Kenny

Pat (called Patrick in the 1911 census) (38) and Mary (28) Kenny lived in house 3, (previously resided in house numbered 2) with their two children and Pat’s three brothers. Their children were Mary (2) and Bridget (1). Pat’s brothers were John Kenny (20), Michael Kenny (18) and Dan Kenny (30). There was no mention of Pat’s mother Mary or his sisters Anne or Ellen in this 1911 census. Pat and Mary (Snr.) were married for 4 years, had 2 children and both of them had survived by 1911. Pat was a farmer, John was a farm servant and Michael and Dan were farm labourer’s. Mary (Jnr.) and Bridget could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household, expect Mary and Bridget who were too young to talk, spoke Irish and English. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a stable, one of their cow houses and barn and added a calf house by 1911 but no longer had a piggery or their second cow house.

House 4-Mark and Anne Flynn

Mark (69) and Anne (64) Flynn resided in house 4, previously numbered house 3 in 1901, with their three children. Their children were Pat (called Patrick in 1911) (27), Tom (called Thomas in 1911) (16) and Sarah (30). There was no mention of Anne (Jnr.) or Kate in this 1911 census. Mark and Anne had been married for 35 years, had 3 children and all 3 of them had survived by 1911. Mark was a farmer. Mark was the only person in this household who could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms, (they used to live in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms in 1911). They still had a cow house, a piggery but no longer a barn.

House 5- Martin and Mary Coyne

Martin (71) and Mary (67) Coyne lived in house numbered 5 , in 1911 it was numbered house 4, with their son, their daughter-in-law and their six grandchildren. Their son was Michael (40), their daughter-in-law was Mary Coyne (50). Their grandchildren were Pat (17), Mary (16), John (13), Nora (11),Martin (9) and Tom (6). There was no mention of Bridget in the 1911 census. Martin (Snr.) and Mary (67) had been married for 40 years , had 2 children and 1 of them had survived by 1911. Michael and Mary (50) had been married for 19 years, had 7 children and 6 of them had survived by 1911. Martin (Snr.) was a farmer, Pat was a farm servant, Mary (16) was a domestic servant. John, Nora , Martin (Jnr.), Tom were scholars. Martin (Snr.), Mary (67), Michael and Mary (50) could not read or write, Tom could read only and the rest of the children could read and write. Martin (Snr.), Mary (67), Martin and Tom spoke Irish only, the rest of the household spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms ( they used to live in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms). They still had a cow house and added a calf house but no longer had a piggery or barn.

House 6-Mary Conroy

Mary (69) Conroy lived in house 6 (was numbered house 5) with her two sons, her daughter in law , Maggie Conroy (29), and her granddaughter ,Mary Conroy (1). Her two sons were Michael (36) and Thady (32). There was no mention of Patrick, Martin or Julia in this census. Mary (Snr.) was a widow and did not give details of her previous marriage. Michael and Maggie had been married for 2 years, had 1 child who survived until 1911. Mary (Snr.) was a farmer. Micheal and Thady could read and write, the rest of the family could not read or write. Mary (Snr.) spoke Irish only. The rest of the family, except Mary (Jnr.) who was too young, spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911, they did live in a 2nd class house with 4 rooms in 1901. They still had a cow house, a piggery and added a stable but no longer had a barn in 1911.

House 7-Mary Duffy

Mary Duffy (72) lived in house 7 (was also numbered house 7 in 1901) with her son, John (35) and daughter-in-law, Sarah Duffy (40). There was no mention of Patrick in this census. Mary was a widow and not give details of her previous marriage. John and Sarah had been married for 11 years and had no children. Mary was a farmer. John and Sarah could read and write while Mary could not. No information was given about their birthplace or their Irish language ability. These columns were not filled in. It was also not signed by head of household or enumerator. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms by 1911, they did live in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms in 1901. They still had a cow house and added a calf house but no longer had a piggery by 1911.

House 8- Tom and Mary Joyce

Tom (72) and Mary (77) Joyce lived in house 8 (also numbered house 8 in 1901). There was no mention of Bridget or Mary in this 1911 census. Tom and Mary had been married for 43 years, had 8 children and 5 of them had survived by 1911. Tom was a farmer. Tom and Mary could not read or write. Tom and Mary spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911, in 1901 they lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and a barn but no longer had a piggery.

House 9- Thos and Mary Flynn

Thos (called Thomas in the 1911 census) (70) and Mary (65) Flynn lived in house 9 (numbered house 6 in 1901) with their 3 children and their grandchild. Their children were John (29), Michael (17) and Kate (17). Their grandchild was Martin (6), but his last name was left blank in the 1901 census Household return. There was no mention of Ellen, Martin or Thomas in this 1911 census. Thos and Mary had been married for 36 years, had 12 children and 8 of them had survived by 1911.Thomas was a farmer and Martin was a scholar. The parents spoke Irish only while the children spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911, in 1901 they did live in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They still had a cow house and added a calf house but no longer had a piggery or barn.

House 10- Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) Hut

The Royal Irish Constabulary(RIC) Hut housed 3 constables and an acting Sergeant. These Constables and Sergeant are different in 1911 than in 1901. The Constables and Sergeant’s names were only written by their initials in the Barrack Returns but through Household Returns (Form A) and House and Building Return (Form B1) two names were given. The Constables were J. McD (29), Y.R (27) and Patk II Breheny (as per transcribed from the 1911 census Form A) (23) and the Sergeant was William Dowey (28). In 1901 the sergeant was Patrick Caughlan and the constables were T.C., R.H. and Patrick McShane. Y.R was married. The Sergeant and Constables could read and write. They did not fill in the ‘Irish Language’ part of the form. Willaim and Patk was born in Sligo, J.McD was born in Queen’s County (modern day Laois) and Y.R was born in Westmeath. The RIC Hut was a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911, in 1901 the hut was a 2nd class house with 4 rooms.They had no out-offices or farm-steadings. The landlord for this hut was Pat Kenny, who also lived in this village in house 3 in 1911.

This page was added on 21/12/2016.

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