Dooris

Dubh Ros

Tomás O’Flatharta

Dooris, Dubh Ros, meaning Black point (wood)

Author: Tomás O’Flatharta

Names:

According to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books, 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Dooris and Dubh Ros was its official Irish form. The townland was also spelt as Ieardowry’s, Recte. Dooros (O’ Donovan’s), Duras (Inquis. Temp. Car. I), Dawras (Inquis. Temp. Jac. I), Dooriss (Meresman).

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie) Dooros (sic) had 4 islands, these islands were Knock Islands, Knock Island (Oileán an Chnoic), Illaunglass Islands (An tOileán Glas) and Dead Island (Oileán na nDaoine Marbha). Logainm also states there was a rock in this townland, this rock was Cormorant Rock (Carraig na gCailleach Dubh). It also had 2 minor features; these features are Keelogenabreena (Caológ na Bruíne) and Fionnoileán (Finnillaun). Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (www.logainm.ie) gives information about Dead Island and Finnillaun and how to pronounce them. See image below which was scanned from the records found on www.logainm.ie/en/20667

image001image003

Situation:

The townland was located on the south side of the civil parish of Cong. It was bounded on the north by the townland of Cornamona and Lough Corrib, east by Cloonbrone, south by Lough Corrib and on the west by Lough Corrib and Cornamona (sic).

Description

Down Survey: “The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps; ‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will”. (Wikipedia). The Down survey revealed that in 1641 and 1670, the landlord for Dooros (sic) (Ross Barony) was Earl of Cork and he was a Protestant. The Earl of Cork in 1641 and 1670 was Charles Boyle, 3rd Viscount Dungarven. (Wikipedia)   Dooros had a lot more unprofitable land than profitable land. It has 783 acres of unprofitable land and 173 acres of profitable land.

O’ Donovans (1838): In 1838, the landlord for Dorris (sic.) was Sir Richard O’ Donnel (sic.), Esq. of Newport and the agent was Alexander Clandenning, Esq. of Westport. The townland of Dorris (sic.) is composed of 535 acres, 0 roods and 14 perches according to O Donovan’s Field name Books (1838) The townland is located in the civil parish of Cong, in the Barony of Ross and in the County of Galway. O’ Donovan tells us that the townland was under lease, with a bulked rent of £111. 15s. 4d yearly. O’ Donovan states that the soil was part good clay but the skirting (sic) all round was not good. It was a compact village with 2 detached houses at Cnucknaskehee. He further states that there was a holy well, Tubbernasool, and a children’s burial place called ‘Keelogue-na-brea’. The burial ground was only for children from the islands of Innishvinlush, Finaillaun, Illaunnagorp and Incheeyivell (as per transcribed information of www.galwaylibrary.ie)

Griffith’s Valuation(1855):

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Dooris had a total acreage of 535 acres, 1 roods and 10 perches. The annual valuation for the lands in Dooris was £103.12s.0d. Benjamin L. Guinness was the immediate lessor. Dooris was divided into 12 plots.

Plot 1 was composed of 48 acres, 3 Roods and 28 perches

Rev. Ralph Sadleir rented this land and it was valued at £13.10s.0d.    

Plot 2 had 30 acres, 0 roods and 20 perches. It was divided into two sub-plots:

  • Thomas Discan had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £4.10s.0d.and the house was valued at £0.10s.0d.
  • James Discan had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £4.10s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.10s.0d.

Plot 3 contained 22 acres, 1 rood and 22 perches and was held in two sub-divisions:

  • Mark Rurke had a house and land. The land was valued at £3.5s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.
  • Diana Cassidy had house and land. The land was valued at £3.5s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 4 consisted of 20 acres, 0 rood and 20 perches and was held in two sub-divisions:

  • Anthony Walsh had a house and land. The land was valued at £3.10s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.
  • Richard Walsh, Jun. had land and a house. The land was valued at £3.10s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 5 had a total of 28 acres, 1 rood and 24 perches and was held in two sub-divisions:

  • Richard Walsh had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.17s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.
  • Patrick Walsh had house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.17s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 6 was composed of 30 acres, 3 roods and 28 perches and was also held in two sub-divisions:

  • John Walsh had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.7s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.
  • Patrick Discan had house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.7s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 7 had a total acreage of 20 acres, 1 rood and 10 perches and was held in three sub-divisions:

  • Martin Davern had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.0s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.
  • Thomas Davern had a house and land.   The land was valued at £4.0s.0d and the house at £0.10s.0d.
  • John Discan had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.0s.0d and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 8 was composed of 44 acres, 2 roods and 18 perches and was divided into two sub-plots:

  • & Jas. Varley had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £8.10s.0d. and the house at £0.10s.0d.
  • Patrick Thomas had house, office and land. The land was valued at £4.5s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.

Plot 9 had 51 acres, 3 rood and 0 perches and was held in three sub-divisions:

  • Martin Burke had a house and land. The land was valued at £3.4s.0d. and the house at £0.6s.0d.
  • Patrick Kenavey had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.2s.0d and the house at £0.5s.0d.
  • George Thomas had a house and land. The land was valued at £1.1s.0d and the house at £0.4s.0d.

Plot 10 was composed of 16 acres, 3 rood and 28 perches and was divided into two sub-plots:

  • Patrick Darey had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.15s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.
  • Patrick Laffy had a house and land. The land was valued at £2.15s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.

Plot 11 had a total acreage of 27 acres, 0 rood and 12 perches and was held in 4 sub-divisions:

  • Thomas Kenavey had a house and land. The land was valued at £1.0s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.
  • Denis Kenavey had house and land. The land was valued at £3.0s.0d. and the house at £0.8s.0d.
  • Patrick Malone had a house and land. The land was valued at £1.0s.0d and the house at £0.4s.0d.

(-)Martin Laffey had land. The land was valued as £1.0s.0d.

Plot 12 had 187 acres, 3 roods and 0 perches

Benjamin L. Guinness had this land (bog and commonage). The land was valued at £7.0s.0d.

Census 1901

The Census of 1901 indicated that there were 24 houses in this village, one of which was unoccupied. Everyone in this Census was Roman Catholic and everyone in this village, except Mary Agnes in house 20, was born in Galway. House and Building return (Form B2) is incomplete and stops recording after house 15. Enumerator’s abstract (Form N) is also incomplete and stops recording after house 11.

House 1-John and Mary Walsh

John (51) and Mary (49) Walsh resided in house 1 with their 5 children; Thomas (25), Maggie (22), Mary (20), Bridget (18) and Kate (14). John was a farmer and Kate was a scholar. Everyone in this family could read and write and were bilingual. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a barn.

House 2-John and Honor Walsh

John (40) and Honor (38) Walsh lived in house 2 with their 4 children and John’s mother, Anne Walsh (80). Their 4 children were Mary (5), Michael (4), Patrick (2) and Thomas (4 months). John was a farmer and the only family member who could read and write. His wife, Honor, could read but his children could not read or write. Anne spoke Irish only, while John, Honor and their two eldest children spoke Irish and English. The other children were too young to speak. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a barn.

House 3-Patrick and Norah Diskin

Patrick (40) and Norah (50) Diskin lived in house 3 with their 3 daughters. Their 3 daughters were Mary (18), Bridget (16), and Ellen (9).   Patrick was a farmer and a boatman. Ellen was a scholar. The children could read and write while the parents could not. Everyone in this family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a fowl house.

House 4-Thomas and Mary Walsh

Thomas (40) and Mary (40) Walsh resided in house 4 with their 2 children; Bridget (16) and Pat (14). Thomas was a farmer. Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a turf house.

House 5- Thomas and Bridget Kineavy

Thomas (42) and Bridget (24) Kineavy lived in house 5 with their daughter, Mary (17). Thomas was a farmer. Thomas could not read or write but his wife and daughter could both read and write. Everyone in the family spoke both Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house. There is clearly an error in the transcription of Bridget’s age as she is too young to have a 17 year old daughter. Perhaps Mary was born of a different mother.

House 6- Thomas and Catherine Mullroe

Thomas (34) and Catherine (26) Mullroe lived in house 6. Thomas was a farmer and boatman. Neither Thomas nor Catherine could read or write and they both spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 7- Thomas and Bridget Mullroe

Thomas (56) and Bridget (60) Mullroe lived in house 7 with their daughter, Ellen (20). Thomas was a farmer. Ellen was the only family member who could read and write. The parents spoke Irish only while their daughter spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had no out offices or farm steadings.

House 8- George and Bridget Cassidy

George (28) and Bridget (25) Cassidy lived in house 8 with their 4 children and Georges mother, Letesha (sic) Cassidy (70). Their children were Bridget (5), Patrick (4), Mary (3) and Ned (2 months). George was a farmer. The parents could read and write, while the children could not. Letesha spoke Irish only. George, Bridget (Snr.) and their two eldest children spoke Irish and English. The other children were too young to speak. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house.

House 9-Patrick and Bridget O Rourke

Patrick (58) and Bridget (49) O Rourke lived in house 9 with their 5 children; Patrick (24), Michael (20), Sarah (14), Ellen (15), Maggie (12). Patrick was a farmer. Ellen and Maggie were scholars. Everyone in the family could read and write and spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 10-Patrick and Ellen Diskin

Patrick (70) and Ellen (62) Diskin resided in house 10 with their 2 children; Catherine (27) and Thomas (20). Patrick was a farmer. Everyone in this family could also read and write and spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable and a cow house.

House 11-William and Diana Diskin

William (60) and Diana (57) Diskin lived in house 11 with their 4 children; Ellen (20), Patrick (18), Anne (16) and Maggie (14). William was a farmer and Maggie was a scholar. The parents could not read or write but the children could. Everyone in the family was bilingual. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 12-Michael and Mary Diskin

Michael (45) and Mary (40) Diskin resided in house 12 with their 6 children; Michael (19), Bridget (17), Mary (15), Kate (13), Pat (10) and Ellen (5). Michael was a farmer. Kate, Pat and Ellen were scholars. Michael (Snr.), Mary and Ellen could not read or write, the rest of the family could. Everyone in this household spoke English and Irish. They had a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable, cow house and a piggery.

House 13-Sarah Cassidy

Sarah Cassidy (58) lived in house 13 with her 3 children; John (30), Michael (28) and Mary (27). Sarah was a farmer. Sarah was a widow. Michael was the only member in this family who could read or write. Sarah spoke Irish only while her children spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 14- Myles and Mary Varrilly

Myles (34) and Mary (29) Varrilly resided in house 14 with their 5 children and Myles’ father, William Varrilly (83). Their 5 children were Pat (9), William (7), Tom (5), Bridget (3) and John (1). Myles was a farmer. The three eldest children were scholars. Mary, Patt, William (7) and Tom could read and write. The rest of the family could not. William (83) spoke Irish only. The rest of the household spoke Irish and English, expect John who was too young to speak. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 15- Catherine Burke

Catherine Burke (50) lived in house 15 with their 4 children; Thomas (20), Sarah (18), Michael (16) and Martin (14). Catherine was a farmer and Martin was a scholar. Everyone in this family could read and write, except Catherine. Everyone in this family spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 16- Richard and Bridget Walsh

Richard (76) and Bridget (74) Walsh lived in house numbered 16 with their daughter, Bridget Logan (40). (Bridget was married and her husband’s last name was probably Logan and she took his last name, her husband is not mentioned in this census). Richard was a farmer. The parents could not read or write but Bridget could. The parents also spoke Irish only, while Bridget spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. Out-Offices and Farm Steadings are not recorded for house 16-23.

House 17-Patrick and Mary Walsh

Patrick (50) and Mary (40) Walsh resided in house numbered 17 with their 4 children. Their 4 children were Mary (16), Maggie (14), Nora (9) and Anthony (7). Patrick was an agricultural labourer and all his children were scholars. Everyone in the family could read and write and spoke English and Irish. They had a 3rd class house with one room. Their landlord was Richard Walsh who resided in house numbered 16 in the same village.

House 18- Michael and Bridget Diskin

Michael (46) and Bridget (50) Diskin resided in house 18 with their 2 children; Mary (19) and Myles (17) Deskin (most likely a mistake or another way they spell their surname.). Michael was a farmer. Everyone in this household could read and write. The parents and Myles spoke Irish and English, while Mary spoke English only. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms.

House 19- Mary Murphy

Mary (54) Murphy lived in house numbered 19 with her son, Michael (22). Mary was a farmer. Michael could read and write, while Mary could not. Michael spoke English and Irish while Mary spoke Irish only. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms.

House 20-Anne O Dea

Anne (84) O Dea resided in house numbered 20 with her 2 children and her grandchild, Mary Agnes (9) Gerth. Her 2 children were Catherine (40) Gerth and Thomas (60) O Dea. Anne was a farmer and Mary Agnes was a scholar. Catherine and Mary Agnes could read and write, the rest of the household could not. Anne spoke Irish only. The rest of the household spoke Irish and English. Anne, Catherine and Thomas were born in Galway while Mary Agnes was born in America. They lived in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms.

House 21- Martin Keneavey

Martin Keneavey (sic.) (78) lived in house 21 with his son, Mathias (28), daughter in law, Nora Keneavey (24), and his grandchild, Catherine (2 months). Martin was a farmer. Mathias and Nora could read and write the rest of the household could not. Everyone in the household, expect Catherine who was too young to speak, spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms.

House 22-Patt and Mary Keneavey

Patt (34) and Mary (24) Keneavey resided in house 22 with their daughter Kate (2). Patt was a farmer. Mary was the only family member who could read and write. The parents spoke Irish and English and the child was too young to talk. They lived in a 3rd class house with 1 room.

House 23-John Walsh

John Walsh (60) resided in house 23 with his 4 children; Mary (25), Thomas (20), Martin (17) and Catherine (15). John was a farmer.   John was a widower. Thomas and Martin were Boat-men. Everyone in this household, except Catherine, could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke both English and Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with 1 room.

House 24 was uninhabited but the landlord was Myles Varrilly (of Carrick Middle).

 Census 1911

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living); if Deaf and Dumb, Dumb only, Blind, Imbecile or Idiot, Lunatic. House numbers differ from those of 1901. There are also inconsistent age gaps between 1901 to 1911 Census. Some of the forms were incomplete in 1901, therefore we were unable to make some comparisons for a few of the households. There were two new households in 1911 in Dorris, these were houses 3 and 9. There was also a shop in the village which belonged to Mary Walsh.

House 1- Thomas and Catherine Mullroe

Thomas (42) and Catherine (40) Mullroe lived in house 1 (previously numbered house 6 in the 1901 Census) with their 4 children; John (7), Thomas (5), Mary (3) and Margaret (9 months).   Thomas and Catherine had been married for 10 years, had 7 children and 4 of them were still living by 1911. Thomas was still a farmer in 1911 but no longer a boatman. No one in the family could read or write and they spoke Irish only. They were still living in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and a piggery.

House 2-Thomas and Bridget Mullroe

Thomas (70) and Bridget (73) Mullroe lived in house 2 (previously numbered 7 in the 1901 Census). There is no mention of Ellen in this census. Thomas and Bridget had been married for 50 years, had 5 children and 4 of them were still living by 1911. Thomas was still a farmer. Thomas and Bridget could not read and spoke Irish only. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911; they did live in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms in 1901. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 3-Michael and Julia Cassidy

Michael (65) and Julia (66) Cassidy lived in house 3 with their daughter, Nora (27). This is a new household in Dooros. Michael and Julia had been married for 39 years, had 9 children and 7 had survived by 1911. Michael was a farmer. No one in the family could read or write. Michael spoke English and Irish while his wife and child spoke Irish only. Nora is classified as being an Imbecile in the final section of the census form. They lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house.

House 4-Thomas and Bridget Keneavey

Thomas (55) and Bridget (37) Keneavey resided in house 4 (previously numbered house 5 in the 1901 Census) with their 5 children; John (8), Patrick (7), Bridget (6), Catherine (5) and Sarah (4 months). There is no mention of Mary in this Census. Thomas and Bridget had been married for 10 years, had 7 children and 5 were still living in 1911. Thomas was still a farmer. John was a scholar and the only family member who could read and write, the rest of the family could not.  Thomas and John spoke Irish and English and Bridget (Snr.), Patrick, Bridget and Catherine spoke Irish. Sarah was too young to speak. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and added a piggery.

House 5- George and Bridget Cassidy

George (42) and Bridget (41) Cassidy lived in house 5 (previously numbered house 8 in the 1901 Census) with their 5 children and George’s mother, Lettecha (sic) (87) who was called Letesha in the 1901 Census. Their children were Patrick (15), Edward (10) called Ned in 1901, Nora (8), Michael (6) and Myles (4). There was no mention of a Bridget (Jnr.) or Mary in this census. George and Bridget had been married for 17 years, had 10 children and 7 of them were still living in 1911. George was still a farmer in 1911 and Edward and Nora were scholars. Lettecha spoke Irish only; the rest of the household spoke English and Irish. George, Lettecha, Michael and Myles (as he was too young) could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house and had added a piggery.

House 6- Myles and Mary Varley

Myles (56) and Mary (40) Varley (called Varrilly in 1901) lived in house 6 (previously numbered 14 in the 1901 Census) with their 9 children; Patt (19), William (17), Tom (15), Bridget (13), John (11), Kate (9), James (7), Myles (5) and Micheal (2). There was no mention of William (Snr.) Varilly, in this census. Myles and Mary had been married for 20 years, had 9 children and 9 had survived until 1911. Myles (Snr.) was a farmer. Bridget, John, Kate and James were scholars. Everyone, except Micheal, who was too young to talk, spoke Irish and English. Everyone in the family, except Myles (Snr.), Myles and Micheal, could read and write. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house, a piggery and had added a barn.

House 7- William and Diana Diskin

William (71) and Diana (70) Diskin lived in house 7 (previously numbered 11 in the 1901 Census) with their 2 children; Patrick (31) and Anne (28). Ellen and Maggie were not mentioned in this census. William and Diana had been married for 45 years. William might have filled the form in incorrectly because when asked ‘total children born alive’ he wrote 3 but in the previous census they had at least 4 children. He also wrote 3 children are still living in 1911. William and Patrick were farmers and Diana and Anne were described as ‘domestics’. The parents could not read while the children could read and write. Everyone in family spoke Irish and English. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house, piggery and had added a fowl house.

House 8- Patrick and Ellen Diskin

Patrick (82) and Ellen (75) Diskin resided in house 8 (previously numbered 10 in the 1901 Census) with their son, Thomas (33), and their daughter-in-law Anne Diskin (41). There is no mention of Catherine Diskin in this census. Patrick and Ellen had been married for 52 years, had 4 children and 3 of them were still living in 1911. Thomas and Anne had been married for 1 year and had no children. Patrick was still a farmer. Thomas and Anne could read and write while the rest of the family could not. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911; they did live in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms in 1901. They still had a cow house added a piggery but no longer had a stable.

House 9-Michael and Bridget Diskin

Michael (66) and Bridget (67) Diskin lived in house 9 with their son, Michael (37). This is a new household in Dorris. Michael and Bridget had been married for 45 years, had 9 children and 7 of them were still living in 1911. Michael was a farmer. Everyone in this household could read and write. Everyone also spoke Irish and English. They had a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 10-Catherine Gerth

Catherine Gerth (53) lived in house 10 (previously numbered house 20 in the 1901 Census) with her brother Thomas O Dea (70) and her daughter Mary Agnes (18). There is no mention of Catherine and Thomas’ mother Anne O Dea in this census, she was the head the family in 1901. She was 84 in 1901 therefore, there is a strong possibility she had passed away in the interim. Catherine was a widow and did not fill in details about her marriage. Everyone in this household was a farmer. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. Catherine and Mary Agnes could read and write, the rest of the family could not read or write. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 11-Thomas and Mary Walsh

Thomas (61) and Mary (69) Walsh lived in house 11 (previously numbered 4 in the 1901 Census) with their son, Patrick (23) who was called Pat in 1901 Census. There was no mention of Bridget in this census. Thomas and Mary had been married for 31 years, had 3 children and 2 of them had survived by 1911. Thomas was still a farmer. Everyone in this household was bilingual. The parents could not read while Patrick, the son, could read and write. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911. They still had a cow house added a piggery but no longer had a turf house.

House 12-Patt and Mary Kinneavy

Patt (sic.) (45) and Mary (32) Kinneavy (Keneavey in the 1901 Census) lived in house 12 (previously numbered 22 in the 1901 Census) with their 6 children; Katherine (12) who was called Kate in 1901, Mary (9), John (7), Bridget (5), Maggie (3) and Micheal (2). Patt and Mary had been married for 15 years, had 6 children and 6 of them were still alive by 1911. Patt was a farmer. Katherine, Mary and John were scholars. Everyone in this household spoke English and Irish. Patt, Bridget, Maggie and Micheal could not read, the rest of the household could. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911, they had lived in a 3rd class house with 1 room in 1901. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 13-Mathias and Nora Keneavey

Mathias (40) and Nora (33) Keneavey lived in house 13 (previously numbered 21 in the 1901 Census) with their 4 children; Catherine (10), Mary (7), Margaret (5) and Martin (1). There is no mention of Mathias father, Martin (Snr.) Keneavey, in this census, he was listed in the 1901 Census. Mathias and Nora were married for 11 years, had 5 children and 4 were still living in 1911. Mathias was a farmer. Catherine and Mary were scholars. Everyone in the family, except Martin who was too young to speak, spoke English and Irish. Nora, Catherine, Mary could read and write the rest of the family could not. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house.

House 14-Mary Murphy

Mary Murphy (67) lived in house 14 (previously numbered 19 in the 1901 Census) with her son, Michael (32). Mary was widow and did not fill in details of her previous marriage. Mary was a farmer. Michael spoke Irish and English while Mary spoke Irish only. Mary could not read while Michael could read and write. They still lived in a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 15-John Walsh

John Walsh (49) resided in house numbered 15 (previously numbered 2 in the 1901 Census) with his 4 children; Michael (14), Patrick (13), Thomas (10) and Catherine (8). There is no mention of John’s wife, Honor Walsh, his eldest daughter, Mary Walsh, or his mother, Anne Walsh, in this 1911 Census. Anne was 80 in 1901 therefore she probably died before 1911. John states he is married but does not give details of his marriage and his wife, Honor Walsh, is not mentioned in this census.   John was still a farmer and his 3 eldest children were scholars. Everyone in this household spoke both English and Irish. Michael, Patrick and Thomas could read and write while the rest of the household could not. In 1911 they lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms; they did live in a 2nd class house with 2 rooms in 1901. They still had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 16-Patrick and Mary Walsh

Patrick (67) and Mary (66) Walsh lived in house 16 (previously numbered 17 in the 1901 Census) with their 2 children; Nora (19) and Anthony (17); and Patrick’s mother, Bridget Walsh (85). There was no mention of Maggie in this Census. Patrick and Mary had been married for 38 years, had 8 children and all 8 of them had survived by 1911. Patrick, Mary, Nora and Anthony were farmers in 1911, Patrick was no longer an agricultural labourer and his children were no longer scholars. Everyone in this household, expect Bridget, spoke Irish and English. Bridget spoke only Irish. Everyone in this family, except Bridget, could read and write. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms in 1911; in 1901 they had lived in a 3rd class house with 1 room. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 17- Michael and Mary Diskin

Michael (62) and Mary (52) Diskin lived in house 17 (previously numbered 12 in the 1901 Census) with their 3 children; Michael (30), Kate (25) and Nellie (15) who was called Ellen in 1901 Census. There is no mention of Michael’s other children; Bridget, Mary and Pat, in this 1911 Census. Michael and Mary had been married for 32 years, had 8 children and 6 of them had survived by 1911. Michael was still a farmer and Nellie was still a scholar. Everyone in this family spoke Irish and English. The parents could not read or write but the children could. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

 House 18-Sarah Cassidy

Sarah Cassidy (70) lived in house 18 (previously numbered 13 in the 1901 Census) with her 3 children; John (39), Mary (37) and Michael (35). Sarah was a widow and did not fill in details of her past marriage. Sarah was a farmer. Everyone in the family, except Sarah, spoke Irish and English. Sarah spoke Irish only. Michael was the only family member who could read and write. They lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms; they had lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 19-Catherine Burke

Catherine Burke (69) lived in house 19 (previously numbered 15 in the 1901 Census) with her 2 children; Thomas (34) and Martin (25). There is no mention of Sarah or Michael Burke in this 1911 Census. Catherine was a widow and did not fill in the section about how many years she had been married but did fill in that she had 10 children and 7 of them had survived by 1911. Catherine was still a farmer in 1911. Everyone in this family spoke Irish and English. Catherine could not read or write but her children could. Thomas, in 1911 was classified as being an imbecile, in 1901 this was not stated. They still had a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They also still had a cow house and a piggery.

House 20-Pat and Bridget O’ Rourke

Pat (sic) (called Patrick in 1901) (76) and Bridget (68) O’ Rourke lived in house 20 (previously numbered 9 in the 1901 Census) with their 3 children and 2 grandsons. Their children were Patrick (34), Michael (29) and Maggie (22). Their grandchildren were Michael (10) and Patrick (8) Kenneavy. Pat and Bridget had been married for 37 years, had 6 children and 3 of them had survived by 1911. Patrick was still a farmer in 1911. Maggie was no longer a scholar. Michael and Patrick were scholars. Everyone in this family spoke English and Irish. Everyone in this household could read and write. They still lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a cow house and piggery and added a stable.

House 21-Pat and Norah Diskin

Pat who was called Patrick in 1901 (53) and Norah (67) Diskin resided in house 21 (previously numbered house 3 in the 1901 Census) with their 2 daughters; Mary (28) and Ellen (23). There was no mention of Bridget in this 1911 Census. Pat and Norah had been married for 33 years, had 5 children and 3 of them were still living by 1911. Pat was a farmer. Norah, Mary and Ellen spoke Irish and English. Pat spoke only Irish. The parents could not read while their children in this household could read and write. In 1901 they lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms; they had lived in a 3rd class house with 3 rooms in 1901. They had a cow house added a stable and a piggery and no longer had a fowl house.

House 22-Mary Walsh

Mary Walsh (69) resided in house 22 (previously resided in house numbered 1 in the 1901 Census) with her 3 sons, her daughter-in-law, Maggie Walsh (24) and her grandson, Patrick Joyce (6). Her children were Thomas (Thos.) Walsh (36), Bridget McDarby(26) and Kate (22) Walsh. There is no mention of John, Maggie (Mary’s daughter) and Mary (Jnr.) in this Census. Mary Walsh was a widow and did not fill in every detail about her marriage; she did state she was married for 38 years. Mary was still a farmer and Bridget had become a National school teacher. Everyone in the family, except Patrick, could read and write. Everyone in the family, expect Patrick, spoke English and Irish. Patrick spoke English only. They lived in a 2nd class house with 5 rooms. They had lived in a 2nd class house with 3 rooms. They still had a stable, a cow house and a barn and had added a piggery by 1911.

House 23-John Walsh

John Walsh (72) resided in house 23 (was numbered 23 in the 1901 Census) with his son Martin (24). There was no mention of Mary, Thomas and Catherine in this 1911 Census. John was a widower. John was still a farmer and Martin was no longer a boat-man. They both spoke Irish and English. Martin could read and write while John could not. They had a 3rd class house with 2 rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 24 (numbered 24 in the 1901 Census as well) was uninhabited and belonged to Myles Varley who was called Varrilly in 1901

 

 

 

 

 

This page was added on 05/10/2016.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share this
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Email this to someone