Cloonbrone

Cluan Bron

Tomas O Flatharta

Tomas O Flatharta
Tomas O Flatharta
Tomas O Flatharta
Tomas O Flatharta

 Cloonbrone, Cluan Bron meaning lawn of the quern

Names:

According to O Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Cloonbrone and Cluan Bron was its official Irish name.  The village was also known as Clonebrone (O Donovan’s), Clonebroone (O Donovan’s) and Clonbroane (Inquis. Temp. Gul. 3).

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie), Cloonbrone had five islands or archipelagos, five rocks and three minor features.  These five islands (or archipelagos) were Cleenillaun (Claonoileán), Illaunanarrow (Oileán an Arbhair), Varley’s Island (Oileán an Bhearshúiligh), Illaunnamang (Oileán na mBan) and Needle Island (Snáthadán).  The five rocks were Cloonbrone Rock (Carraig Chluain Brón), Derry Rock South (Carraig Dhoire Theas), Derry Rock (Carraig Dhoire), Illaunnamang Rock (Carraig Oileán na mBan) and Feliban Rocks (Carraigeacgha Philbin). The three minor features were Bertragh (Beirtreach), Roeillaun (Na Rua-oileáin) and Roeillaun East (Rua-oileán Thoir).

Situation:

This townland is located on the South side of the parish. Cloonbrone is bounded on the North, East and South by Lough Corrib and on the West by Dooris.

Description:

Down Survey: The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps ‘‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will.’ (Wikipedia).  There was no information available for Cloonbrone on the Down Survey.

O’ Donovan’s (1838):

In 1838, the property belonged to Lord Kilman, Neil near Ballinrobe or Galltown, Co. Westmeath.  The agent for Cloonbrone was Charles Cromie, Esq. of Annefield near Hollymount, Co. Mayo. The rent was bulked at £94.11s.0d. per year.  Co. Cess paid 11¼ per acre for 30½ acres.  Cloonbrone was held under lease.  The soil had some good clay.  Some parts were not good due to some bog in the East.  It produces middling crops of potatoes, oats, flax with some wheat. There was two villages Skeghadtherreon and Knocknaskehee.  Skeghadtherreon had a burying place for children.  Cloonbrone also had four houses and islands according to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838).

Additional Information:

‘A Most Un-peninsular People, Cloonbrone town-land from the Great Famine to the Great War’ (1999-2000): This article was written by Bernard O Sullivan from NUI Maynooth. He states, from Ordnance Survey maps, that ‘the topography of Cloonbrone is that of hills of mineral soil divided by low lying peat, which leaves the soil divided about half and half between mineral and bog. As the bog was scattered all over the town-land, this meant that each holding had some bog.’ According to O Sullivan’s article the majority of farmers in Cloonbrone were not well off, due to the subdivision of their land which took place in the 19th century, and this was shown by the houses they occupied in 1901.

They are also differing accounts from scanned records found on logainm.ie of how Varley’s island got its name, one account states locally it is not known as Varley’s Island, it doesn’t have a name at all. Another account was it was the name of an old woman who used to live in ‘gCor na Móna’. The final account was that a man called Varley used to live on that island but people there called the island ‘Jane’s Island’ as Varley did not own the island. See image below which was scanned from the records found on http://www.logainm.ie/en/1399088 .

There is also folklore material about Cloonbrone which is found in ‘The Schools Collection (1937-1939)’ in the section of Cluain an Bhrúnaigh which was the school in Cloonbrone.  This can be found on the website https://www.duchas.ie/en/plc/20664.  The images below shows the school and school gate in Cloonbrone.

Griffiths Valuation

According to Griffith’s valuation, Clonbrone had a total acreage of 280 acres, 1 rood and 32 perches.  The total valuation for this village was £54.12s.0d.  Lord Kilmaine was the immediate lessor for this village. Cloonbrone was divided into 7 plots.

Plot 1 was composed of 47 acres, 0 roods and 10 perches.  This plot belonged to Thomas Joyce.  Total valuation for this plot was £6.15s.0d.

Plot 1 Thomas Joycehad a house, office and land.  The land was valued at £6.0s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.15s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £6.15s.0d.

Plot 2 was composed of 2 acres, 0 roods and 18 perches.  This plot belonged to Mary Butler.  Total valuation for this plot was £1.5s.0d.

Plot 2 Mary Butlerhad a house and land.  The land was valued at £1.0s.0d and the buildings valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £1.5s.0d.

Plot 3 consisted of 22 acres, 3 roods and 24 perches.  This plot belonged to John Joyce (carpenter).  Total valuation for this plot was £3.10s.0d.

Plot 3 John Joyce (carpenter) had a house and land.  The land was valued at £3.0s.0d. and the buildings valued at £0.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £3.10s.0d.

Plot 4 was composed of 52 acres, 1 rood and 14 perches.  This plot was divided into 3 sub-plots labelled A, Band C.  All three plots belonged to Catherine Sullivan.  Total valuation for this plot was £9.0s.0d.

Plot 4 A Catherine Sullivanhad land valued at £0.15s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £0.15s.0d.

Plot 4 B Catherine Sullivanhad a house, office, and land.  The land was valued at £6.5s.0d. and the buildings at £0.15s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £7.0s.0d.

Plot 4 C Catherine Sullivanhad land valued at £1.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £1.5s.0d.

Plot 5 was composed of 31 acres, 3 roods and 16 perches.  This plot was divided into 3 sub-plots a, band c. a was owned by Richard Joyce, b was owned by Thomas Conway and c was owned by John Joyce (Ned.). Total valuation for this plot was £11.2s.0d.

Plot 5 A Richard Joycehad a house, office and land.  The land was valued at £3.7s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.8s.0d.  The total valuation for this sub-plot was £3.15s.0d.

Plot 5 B Thomas Conwayhad a house, office and land. The land was valued at £3.7s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.8s.0d.  The total valuation for this sub-plot was £3.15s.0d.

Plot 5 C John Joyce(Ned.) had a house and land.  The land was valued at £3.7s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation of this sub-plot was £3.12s.0d.

 Plot 6 was composed of 41 acres, 3 roods and 18 perches.  This plot was divided into two plots.  The first plot was owned by Richard Joyce and thesecond plot was owned by Thomas Conway.  Total valuation of this plot was £5.0s.0d.

Plot 6 Richard Joyce had land valued at £2.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £2.10s.0d.

Plot 6 Thomas Conwayhad land valued at £2.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £2.10s.0d.

Plot 7 consisted of 82 acres, 1 rood and 12 perches.  This plot was divided into two sub-plots labelled a and b. a was owned by Thomas Sullivan and b was owned by John Sullivan.  Total valuation of this plot was £18.0s.0d.

Plot 7 A Thomas Sullivan had a house, office and land.  The land was valued at £8.10s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d. Total valuation for this sub-plot was £9.0s.0d.

Plot 7 B John Sullivanhad a house, office and land.  The land was valued at £8.10s.0d. and the buildings valued at £0.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £9.0s.0d.

Census 1901:

The census of 1901 indicated that there were 14 houses in this village, one of which was a national school and was unoccupied. According to O Sullivan by 1901 all the residents, bar one, of Cloonbrone had purchased their lands under the Ashbourne Act which made Cloonbrone residents ‘some of the earliest tenant farmers in the country to become owners of their own property’.  Of the 57 residents in this village there were 11 families with 34 males and 23 females.  All the residents were Roman Catholics according to the Form N- Enumerators Abstract for a townland.  Form B- Return of Out-Offices and Farm Steadings indicates that there were eleven cow houses, one calf house, nine piggeries, two fowl houses, three barns and one turf house in this village.

House 1-Peter Sullivan

Peter Sullivan(59) and his two children, Mary (16) and Patrick (11) occupied house numbered 1. Peter was a widower and farmer. Peter, Mary and Patrick were able to read and write.  Peter spoke English and Irish. Mary and Patrick spoke English only. They were all born in County Galway.  Their house was a 3rdclass house with two rooms. They had a cow house.

House 2- John and Mary Coyne

John(70) and Mary Coyne(60) lived in house 2 with their four children. Their children were Michael (18),Honor (13), William (10) and John (9).  John (Snr.) was a herd and cooper (as per transcribed from 1901 census). Michael was an agricultural labourer.  Honor, William and John were scholars.  John (Snr.) and Mary could not read or write.  The rest of the household could read and write. John (Snr.) spoke Irish only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English.  They were all born in County Galway.  Their house was a 3rdclass house with two rooms. They had no sheds or outhouses.  John and Mary’s landlord was Jane O’Sullivan who also resided in Cloonbrone in house 12.

House 3- Bernard O’ Sullivan

Bernard O’ Sullivan(61) lived in house 3 with his six children.  His children were Elizabeth (26), Mary(23), Patrick (21),Catherine (17), John(15) and Bernard (15).  Bernard (Snr.) was a widower and farmer.  Everyone in the household could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  They were all born in County Galway.  Their house was a 2ndclass house with four rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

House 4- Thomas and Bridget O Sullivan

Thomas(56) and Bridget(46) O Sullivan occupied house 4 with their five children.  Their children were Patrick(23), Eliza(17), Michael(14), Mary Jane(13) and Thomas Francis(11).  Thomas was a farmer.  Mary Jane and Thomas Francis were scholars.  Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  They were all born in County Galway.  Their house was a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 5-Patrick O’ Sullivan

Patrick O’ Sullivan (52) was the sole occupant of house numbered 5.  He was an unmarried farmer.  Patrick could read and write and spoke English and Irish. He was born in County Galway. His house was a 3rdclass house with one room. He also had a turf house.

House 6 –John and Bridget Sullivan

John(51) and Bridget(48) Sullivan lived in house 6 with their two children, Mary (24) and Thomas(20). John was a farmer.  John, Mary and Thomas could read and write.  Bridget could read only.  Everyone in the household spoke English and Irish. They were all born in County Galway. Their house was a 2ndclass house with two rooms.  They had a stable and a cow house.

House 7-Micheal and Bridget Sullivan

Micheal(60) and Bridget (45) Sullivan lived in house 7 with their seven children. Their children were Micheal (22),Mary(19), Sarah(16), Martin(13),John(9), Patrick (6) and Bridget(3).  Micheal was a farmer.  Martin, John and Patrick were scholars.  Micheal (Snr.), Bridget, Mary and Bridget (Jnr.) could not read or write.  Micheal (Jnr.), Sarah, Martin, John and Patrick could read and write.  Both parents and three of their children, Micheal, Mary and Sarah spoke both Irish and English. Martin, John, Patrick and Bridget spoke English only. They were all born in County Galway.  They had a 3rdclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 8-Patrick and Rose Sullivan

Patrick(50) and Rose(46) Sullivan occupied house 8 with their five children.  Their children were Thomas(20), Patrick (18), Sarah(16), Michael(9) and Martin(7).  Patrick (Snr.) was a farmer.  Patrick (Jnr.), Sarah, Michael and Martin were scholars.  Rose could not read.  Patrick (Snr.) could read.  Thomas, Sarah, Patrick (Junior), Michael and Martin could read and write.  Everyone in the household spoke English and Irish. They were all born in County Galway. The house was a 2nd class house with three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 9-Mary Joyce

Mary Joyce(65), her two sons:  Thomas(34) and Martin(21), and her niece Catherine (12) were the occupants of house 9.  Mary Joyce was a farmer.  Catherine was a scholar.  Everyone in the household could read and write and they spoke Irish and English. They were all born in County Galway. Their house was a 3rdclass house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 10- John Joyce

John Joyce(84) and his three children lived in house numbered 10.  Their children were Joseph (46), Mary(36) and Thomas(33).  John was a widower and farmer.  Neither John nor Joseph could read or write.  Mary and Thomas could read and write.  John spoke Irish.  Joseph, Mary and Thomas spoke Irish and English. They were all born in County Galway. This family’s house was a 3rdclass house with two rooms.  They had a cow house and piggery.

House 11- Richard and Margaret Joyce

Richard(60) and Margaret (45) Joyceand their three children:  Thomas(20), Ellen(15) and Maggie(13) were the occupants of house 11.  Richard was a farmer.  Ellen and Maggie were scholars.  Richard, Thomas, Ellen and Maggie could read and write.  Margaret could not read.  Richard, Thomas, Ellen and Maggie spoke English and Irish.  Margaret spoke Irish.  They were all born in County Galway.  Their house was a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.House 12-Jane O’ Sullivan

House 12-Jane O’ Sullivan

Jane O’ Sullivan(50) lived in house 12 with her three sons, her granddaughter and her servant. Her three sons were Redmond(27),Peter(23) and John(18). Her granddaughter was Helena Lowery(4) and her domestic servant was Mary Mullkerrins(25).  Jane O Sullivan was a Farmeress.  Helena (sic.) was a Scholar.  Jane, Redmond, Peter and John could read and write. Helena, and the servant, Mary, could not read or write.  All occupants in this house spoke Irish and English except Helena who spoke only English. They were all born in County Galway. This house was a 2nd class house with six rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.  Jane O’ Sullivan was a landlord for one of the family’s in Cloonbroone, the Coyne’s in house numbered 2.

House 13-William and Honor Joyce

William(50) and Honor (45) Joyce and their five children:  Bridget (21), Thomas (19),John(17), Patrick(9) and Honor(7) occupied house 13.  William was a farmer.  Patrick and Honor (Junior) were Scholars. William and Honour could not read or write.  All of their children could read and write.  Everyone in the household spoke Irish and English.  They were all born in County Galway.  They had a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

Census 1911:

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living); if Deaf and Dumb, Dumb only, Blind, Imbecile or Idiot, Lunatic.  In the previous census they were thirteen occupied houses and in this census twelve houses are listed. All those enumerated here were Roman Catholic.   There is no mention of three households from the 1901 census, the John and Mary Coyne household, the Patrick O’Sullivanhousehold and the Mary Joyce household, in this 1911 census.  There were two new households in Cloonbrone in 1911 with household numbered 2 and household numbered 4.  House numbers differ from those of 1901.  There are also inconsistent age gaps between 1901 to 1911 census.

House 1-Jane O’ Sullivan

Jane(70)O’ Sullivan lived in house numbered 1 (previously numbered house 12) with her two sons.  Her sons were Peter(34) and John(29).  Jane also had two visitors; they were Eliza Margaret(18)Lowryand Helenah(sic) (13) Lowry. Redmond O Sullivan had moved out and in 1911 lived in Cloonbrone, house 2.  Helena and Eliza could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Jane had been married for 41 years and all six children born in the marriage were still living in 1911. Helenah was a scholar in 1911. Everyone in this household was born in born in Galway.  They still lived in a 2ndclass house with six rooms.  They still had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn but they no longer had a calf house.

House 2- Redmond and Mary Sullivan

Redmond (40) and Mary(30) Sullivan and their one daughter, Mary Jane(11 months) were a new household in 1911 and occupied house numbered 2.  They also had a visitor of James Lowry(11).  Redmond was a farmer. Redmond, Mary and James could read and write and everyone in the household spoke Irish and English.  Redmond and Mary had been married for 1 year with one child born in the marriage and still living in 1911.  It was not stated on the 1911 census where Mary Jane was born, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  Their house was a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 3- Thomas and Bridget O Sullivan

Thomas(70) and Bridget(62) O Sullivanlived in house 3 (previously numbered house 4) with their three children.  Their children were Patrick(33), Eliza V.(26) and Mary Jane(23).  There was no mention of Michael or Thomas Francis in this 1911 census. Thomas was a farmer.  Patrick was a fishery Inspector.  Thomas and Bridget had been married for 35 years, had seven children of whom six were living in 1911.  Everyone in this household could read and write.  Eliza and Mary Jane spoke English only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  Their house was now recorded as a first class house with ten to twelve rooms (exact number not given in census).  A shed and a fowl house had been added to their outbuildings which consisted of a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House 4-Thomas and Bridget Sullivan

Thomas(32) and Bridget(38) Sullivanwere the occupants of house numbered 4. This household was a new household in Cloonbrone.  Thomas was a farmer. Thomas and Bridget had been married for four years and had no children. They could both read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Patrick was born in Galway but it is not stated where Bridget was born.  Their house was a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 5-Bernard O’ Sullivan

Bernard (25) O’Sullivanlived in house numbered 5 (previously numbered house 3) with his two sisters.  His sisters wereMary(28) and Kathleen(26) (named Catherine in previous census).  There was no mention of Bernard (61), Elizabeth, Patrick or John in this 1911 census. Bernard was a farmer; Mary was a Manageress and Kathleen was a Dairy Instructress.  This household was all born in Co. Galway. They could all read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Their house was a 2ndclass house with four rooms and they had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house.

House 6-Richard and Margaret Joyce

Richard(77) and Margaret(71) Joycelived in house numbered 6 (house 11 in 1901 census) with their two children Thomas(31) and Margaret(25) (named Maggie in the 1901 census).  There was no mention of Ellen in this 1911 census.  Richard and Margaret had been married for 32 years with four children who were still living.  Richard Joyce was still a farmer.  Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke English and Irish. Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  Their house was still a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  In 1911 they still had a cow house and a piggery but had added a fowl house.  They no longer had a stable.

House 7-Bridget Sullivan

Bridget Sullivan(76) and her two children Mary(31) and Thomas(30) occupied house 7 (previously numbered house 6).  Bridget Sullivan was a widow.  Bridget was a farmer.  Bridget claimed in the 1901 census she could read, but in the 1911 census she ‘could not read’.  Mary and Thomas could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They still lived in a 2ndclass house but they added a room so in 1911 they had three rooms.  They still had a stable and a cow house but they also had added a piggery and a barn.

House 8-Joseph Joyce

Joseph Joyce(50) was the sole occupant of house 8 (previously numbered house 10).  There was no mention of John, Mary or Thomas in this 1911 census.  John was a farmer. He could not read and spoke Irish and English.  Joseph was born in Galway.  He had a 3rdclass house with two rooms and owned a cow house.

House 9-Michael and Bridget O Sullivan

Michael(78) and Bridget (60) O Sullivanlived in house 9 (previously numbered house 7) with their two children, Michael(33) and Bridget(13).  There was no mention of Mary, Sarah, Martin, John and Patrick in this 1911 census.  Michael (78) and Bridget (60) had been married for 40 years, had ten children and seven of them were still living at the time of the 1911 census.  Michael (Senior) was still a farmer and his son Michael (Junior) became a farmer’s assistant.  Bridget was a scholar in 1911.  Michael (Jnr.) and Bridget could read and write, the rest of the household could not.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They now lived in a 2ndclass house with five rooms and they have added a fowl house with their cow house and piggery.

House 10-Patrick and Rose Sullivan

Patrick(69) and Rose(65) Sullivan’s household was numbered 10 in 1911 (numbered house 8 in 1901 census).  They lived with three of their children:  Sarah(25), Patrick(30) and Martin (19).No mention of Michael or Thomas Sullivan in this census.  Patrick (Snr.) and Rose Sullivan were married 38 years had nine children, seven of whom were still living in 1911.  Patrick (Senior) was a Farm Cultivator and his son Patrick (Junior) was a farm servant. Martin was a scholar.  Patrick (Snr.) could read only, Rose could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. The birthplace of only Patrick (Snr.) was given, which was Galway. They still lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They still had a cow house, a piggery and had added a stable.

House 11-William and Honor Joyce

William(70) and Honor(67) Joycelived in house 11 (previously numbered house 13). They lived with their five children. Their children were Bridget(28),John(26), Patrick (24), Catherine(22) and Honor(20). No mention of Thomas in this 1911 census.  William and Honor had been married for 38 years had ten children, nine of whom were still living. William was still a farmer.  The parents could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with four rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery and had added a stable and a barn.

House 12-Peter Sullivan

Peter Sullivan(73) occupied house numbered 12 (previously numbered house 1) and was living with his son, Patrick(22).  This was no mention of Mary in this 1911 census.  Peter was a widower.  No one in this household could read or write and they both spoke Irish and English.  Peter was still a farmer.  Peter and Patrick were both born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rdclass house with two rooms.  They had a cow house and had added a piggery since 1901.

This page was added on 21/10/2016.

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