Cappanacreha

Ceapa na Croice

Teresa Philbin

Teresa Philbin

Translation:  Plot of the Gallows

 

Down Survey:   The Down Survey of Ireland is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world.  The survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details all laid down by admeasurements on maps.  It was carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656.   The survey sought to measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish, in order to facilitate its redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

No Down Survey information for this townland.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:  John O’Donovan tells us the name for this townland is Cappanacreha and the name in Irish is Ceapa na Croice.

Other forms of the name:  Cappanacreha, Ceapa na Croice, Cappanacreagh (Boundary Surveyor’s Sketch Map), Cappaghnacregha (County Cess Collector), Cappanacreha (Local), Cappaghanacreagh (Mearsman), Cappanacreghe (Mearsman), Cappanacreghe (Revd. Michael Heraty P.P.), Cappanacreghe (Tithe Ledger).

Description:  John O’Donovan described it as a village situated in the townland of Cappanacrehe.  The neighbouring townlands of Barnahowna, Derry, Dirkbeg, Killateeaun, Lettereeneen and Shanvalleycahil share a border with Cappanacreha.

Census 1901:  Cappanacreha is in the subdistrict of Derrypark, in the barony of Ross and is in the parish of Ballinchalla.  Constable Martin Higgins enumerated the census return on the 1st of April 1901. There were twenty-seven houses: one 1st class, twenty-five 3rd class and one 4th class dwelling; all but the 1st class had perishable roofs that were most likely thatch.  Out – Offices and Farm Steadings Return (Form B2) from no 16 -27 is not documented. Farming and Lacemaking were the main occupations, and all the inhabitants were Roman Catholic.

No 1:   Julia Joyce (50) a widow was a farmer.  She lived here with her daughter Mary (19) a farmer’s daughter, her mother Julia Casey (80) a widow, and her nephew Peter Casey (5).  All were born in Co. Mayo and spoke Irish only; none could read.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 2:  Bridget Conoboy (42) a married woman was a farmer’s wife.  Her sons Pat (16), John (15), Thomas (9), Martin (7), Michael (4) and Timothy (2) were farmer’s sons; Kate (12), Anne (10) and Bridget (5) were farmer’s daughters.  All were born in Co. Mayo; none could read at this time.  Bridget, her three eldest and her two youngest children spoke Irish only; Anne, Thomas and Martin were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of ten occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

No 3:  Pat Conoboy (46) and his wife Mary (48) were born in Co. Mayo, and they were farmers.  The couple could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and they occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house

No 4:  Peter Lydon (30) a widower was a farmer.  His sister Cathrine [sic] (20) does not have an occupation listed, his son Michael (19) was a farmer’s son, and his mother Cathrine [sic](70) was a widow. All were born in Co. Mayo; none could read, Michael was bilingual, the others spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house.

No 5:  John Joyce (40) lived here with his wife Kate (40) and their five daughters.  Farming was their way of life.  Mary (15) was a farmer’s daughter, Anne (13) and Kate (10) were scholars, Sarah was (4) and Bridget (1) year old.  John was born in Co. Galway; Bridget and the children were born in Co. Mayo.  The parents could not read; Mary, Anne and young Kate could read and write. John and the children were bilingual; Kate spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of seven occupied two rooms.  There was a fowl house on the premises.

No 6:  Margaret Joyce (60) a widow born in Co. Mayo, was a farmer.  Margaret could not read, and she spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and she had two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a piggery and a cow house.

No 7:  Michael Lydon (70) and his wife Mary (74) were farmers.  Sarah (32) a farmer’s daughter and Thomas (30) a farm labourer were both single.  Michael’s grandson Pat Lydon (12) was a scholar.  Thomas and Pat could read and write and were bilingual; the others could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the property.

No 8:  Michael Joyce (46) a farmer and his wife Bridget (42) lived here with their daughters: Mary (21) with no occupation listed, Catherine (18) and Margaret (15) were lace makers, Julia (13), Anne (10) and Sarah (7) were scholars.  Sarah could read and the rest of the family could read and write, all spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class and the family of eight occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the property.

No 9:  Julia Joyce (60) a married woman was head of this household, and farming was her livelihood. Her son John (30) a farmer’s son was not married.  Both were born in Co. Mayo; neither could read, Julia spoke Irish only, John was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and mother and son occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 10:  Michael Lydon (52) and his wife Mary (45) were farmers.  Bridget (19), Mary (17) and Sally (15) were farmer’s daughters and Michael (12) a farmer’s son, Catherine (9) a scholar and Honor was (3) years old.  Catherine could read and write and was bilingual, the others could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of eight occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 11:  John Joyce (40) a farmer and his wife Bridget (45) lived here with their daughter Mary (20) a lacemaker, Pat (17) and John (12) who were farmer’s sons and scholars Michael (10) and Martin (6).  Bridget, Mary and John (Jnr) could read and write, Michael could read, and the others could not read.  All were bilingual and were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and seven people occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a piggery and a cow house.

No 12:  John Joyce (60) and his wife Mary (40) farmed for a living.  Bridget (20), Margaret (18) and Catherine (12) were farmer’s daughters; Anne (13) was a lacemaker and Pat (15) was a farmer’s son. Margaret, Anne and Catherine could read and write and were bilingual, the others could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and seven people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

No 13:  Martin Lydon (50) a farmer, his wife Bridget (40) and their four sons lived here.  John (11) and Pat (7) were farmer’s sons, Martin was (4) and William (1) year old.  All were born in Co. Mayo, none could read at this time, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of six occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

No 14:  Bridget Lydon (37) a married woman, was a farmer. John (11) was a farmer’s son, Mary (9) a farmer’s daughter, Bridget was (5) and Martin (1) year old.  None could read at this time; all spoke Irish only and were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and Bridget and her children occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

No 15:  Thomas Joyce (52) and his wife Mary (40) were farmers.  Pat (20) was a farmer’s son, Bridget (18) a farmer’s daughter, Mary (16) and Margaret (14) were lacemakers, Honor (10) and Ellen (8) were scholars, Thomas was (6) and Michael (4) years old.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Thomas, his wife and son Pat could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  The children from age eight to eighteen could read and write, and from age four to eighteen were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class and the family of eleven occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 16:  Honor Lydon (28) a married woman farmed for a living.  She lived here with her two daughters and three sons. Mary (8), Pat (6) and Martin (5) were scholars, Bridget was (3) and John (2) years old.  None could read at this time; all were bilingual and were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the mother and her five children occupied two rooms.

No 17:  Peter Lydon (60) and his wife Kate (52) were farmers.  Mary (18), Sarah (16), Bridget (14) and Julia (5) were farmer’s daughters, Kate (13), Michael (8) and Maria (6) were scholars.  Sarah, Bridget and Kate could read and write and were bilingual, the others could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class and the family of nine occupied two rooms.

No 18:  Matt Casey (70) a farmer and his wife Maria (80) were born in Co. Mayo.  They could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 4th class and the couple occupied one room.

No 19:  Sibby (sic) Lydon (60) a widow was a farmer.  She lived here with Mary (36) a farmer’s daughter, John (32) and Malachy (26) farmer’s sons none were married.  They were born in Co. Mayo.  Sibby and her family could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and four people occupied two rooms.

No 20:  Thomas Lydon (30) his wife Bridget (24) their sons John (2) and infant Pat (2) months old were born in Co. Mayo.  Farming was their occupation. The couple could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of four occupied two rooms.

No 21:  Michael Joyce (50) and his wife Bridget (40) were farmers.  Thomas (20), Pat (17), Michael (15) and Martin (16) were farmer’s sons.  Michael’s grandson John Connor (2) was recorded here.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Michael and his wife were bilingual, their family spoke Irish only, none could read.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and seven people occupied two rooms.

No 22:  Michael Casey (60), his wife Mary (63) and their son Michael (25) were born in Co. Mayo.  Farming was their livelihood. Michael’s niece Bridget Flaherty (11) a scholar, was born in England.  Michael and Mary could not read, and they spoke Irish only; his son and his niece could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and four people occupied two rooms.

No 23:  Pat McGing (60), his wife Bridget (50) and their seven children were the occupants of this house, and farming was their way of life.  John (20) was a farmer’s son, Mary (18) a farmer’s daughter, Pat (13), Ellen (10), Thomas (9) and Kate (8) were scholars and Martin was (6) years old.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  The parents could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  Their children except for young Martin, could read and write and they spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and nine people occupied two rooms.

No 24:  Martin Mara (40) and his wife Anne (35) were farmers.  Philip (7) and John (5) were scholars, Bridget was (3) and Pat (1) year old.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  The family could not read at this time, Martin was bilingual, Anne and the children spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of six occupied two rooms.

No 25:  John Conoboy (28) a farmer, his wife Mary (27) and their (1) year old son John lived in this house.  John Lydon (60) a farm servant was listed here.  None could read, John spoke Irish and English, Mary and John Lydon spoke Irish only, all were born in Co. Mayo.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.

No 26:  Anthony Joyce (73), his wife Margaret (60), their two sons and a daughter were the occupants of this house.  Farming was their occupation. Martin (24) and Pat (19) were farmer’s sons and Maggie (20) did not have an occupation listed.  All were born in Co. Mayo, Maggie could read, the others could not read, Anthony spoke Irish only, his wife and family were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.

No 27:  A Royal Irish Constabulary (R.I.C.) Barrack:  Form H – Return of Military, R. I. C. Constabulary or Metropolitan Police in Barracks.  Form 27 gives details of the following men before enlistment or appointment:

1:  Acting Sergeant R. I. C. Myles Gilhooly (36) a farmer’s son was born in Co. Leitrim

2:  Constable M.K. (25) a farmer’s son was born in Co. Galway; he spoke Irish and English

3:  Constable P.H. (28) a farmer’s son was born in Co. Donegal; he spoke Irish and English

4:  Constable D.H. (23) a draper’s assistant was born in Co. Cavan

5:  Constable T. K. (22) a groom was born in Co. Dublin

6:  Constable T.F. (23) a farmer’s son was born in Co. Cavan

7:  Constable T.D. (23) a farmer’s son was born in Co. Kerry

The Sergeant and Constables were Roman Catholic.  Myles Gilhooly was married; the others were single men.  Only two constables spoke Irish in an area where Irish was the first language of the people.  The R.I.C.  Barrack was a 1st class dwelling with five windows to the front and eleven people occupied four rooms.  Colonel H. T. Clement was the name of the landholder where the building was situated.

 

1911 Census:   Constable John Reilly enumerated the census return between April 3rd and April 5th, 1911.  One hundred and forty-one people lived in the townland of Cappanacrea; all were Roman Catholic.  There were twenty-six dwellings; three were 2nd class, twenty-one were 3rd class and two were vacant. Farming and lacemaking were still the main occupations, and the Irish language was widely spoken.

No 1:  A vacant dwelling.  Patrick Joyce was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 2:  John Joyce (Judy) (44) was married to Catherine (31) for ten years and they had four children: Mary (9) and Bridget (6) were scholars, John was (3) and infant Catherine (6) months old.  John’s father Patrick Joyce (88) a widower was a listed as a lodger.  All were born in Co. Mayo.  Farming was the family occupation.  Nine-year-old Mary was bilingual, the others spoke Irish only, none could read at this time.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and seven people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the premises.

No 3:  Thomas Lydon (Ml) (45) a farmer and his wife Mary (31) were born in Co. Galway.  They were married for eight years, and they had nine children, five were still living:  Six-year-old twins John and Mary (6), Michael (4), Thomas (3) and (1) year old Sarah.  Thomas senior could read and write and was bilingual, Mary and the children could not read at this time, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of seven occupied two rooms.  Two outbuilding contained a piggery and a cow house.

No 4:  Michael Joyce (Pat) (60) a farmer, was married to Bridget (62) for thirty-two years and they had seven children, four were recorded here. Catherine (27) had no occupation listed, Margaret (25) and Julia (22) were lacemakers and Sarah (17) was a scholar.  All were born in Co. Galway.  Michael and his daughters could read and write, Bridget could read only, all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and six people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.

No 5:  John Joyce (Dick) (51) and his wife Catherine (50) were married for twenty-six years and of the ten children born to the couple, seven were still living and three were recorded in this census return.  Bridget (11) and Nora (9) were scholars and Thomas was (7) years old.  John and Catherine were born in Co. Galway, their children were born in Co. Mayo. Farming was their livelihood. Bridget and Nora could read and write, their parents could not read, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 6:  Julia Casey (89) a widow was a retired farmer, and she was head of this household.  She lived here with her daughter Julia Joyce (61) a farmer, who was also a widow, and her daughter Mary Joyce (29) a single girl with no occupation listed. All were born in Co. Galway.  None could read and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and three people occupied two rooms.  Julia Joyce was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 7:  Bridget Conoboy (sic) (60) a farmer’s wife was married for twenty-six years, and she had nine children, eight were still living and five were recorded.  Thomas (20) and Martin (16) were farmer’s sons, Bridget (15) was a lacemaker, Michael (13) and Thady (11) were scholars.  Thady was born in Co. Mayo, the others were born in Co. Galway.  Bridget senior could not read, and she spoke Irish only; her children could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and six people occupied two rooms.  Thady Conoboy was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 8:  Patrick Conoboy (59) a farmer and his wife Mary (64) were born in Co. Galway.  They were married for twenty-nine years, and they had no children.   The couple could not read, Patrick spoke Irish only, Mary was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class and they occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a piggery and a cow house.

No 9:  Margaret Joyce (69) a widow was married for forty-four years, and she had six children; two were recorded; Martin (37) and Patrick (31) were farmer’s sons, and they were single.  Margaret could not read, her sons could read and write, all spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and three people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 10:  Mary Conoboy (43) a farmer born in Co. Galway, was married for twelve years and she had six children that were born in Co. Mayo.  John (11) and Bridget (9) were scholars, Michael was (8), Peter (7), Nora (4) and Mary (1) year old.  John could read and write and was bilingual; Margaret and the other children could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of seven occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.

No 11:  Michael Lydon (68) and his wife Mary (58) were farmers.  They were married for thirty-two years, and they had nine children, six were still living and three were recorded here.  Sarah (24) a farmer’s daughter, Nora (13) and Thomas (5) years old.  Thomas was born in Co. Mayo; the others were born in Co. Galway.  Sarah could read and write and was bilingual, the others could not read, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 12:  Peter Lydon (70) a farmer, was married to Catherine (65) for thirty-four years and they had eleven children, seven were still living.  Bridget (26) was a farmer’s daughter, Catherine (24) and Maria (17) were lacemakers, Michael (20) a farmer’s son and Julia (13) a scholar.  Peter’s granddaughter Mary Lydon (6) was born in Co. Mayo, and she spoke Irish only, the others were born in Co. Galway.  The parents could not read, and they spoke Irish only, their children could read and write, and were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and eight people occupied two rooms.  Three outbuildings contained a stable, a piggery and a cow house.

No 13:  John Joyce (Pat) (68) a farmer was a widower.  He lived here with his six children; Maggie (28) had no occupation listed, Anne (25) and Catherine (20) were lacemakers, Patrick (24) and John (19) were farmer’s sons and Thomas (13) a scholar.  All were born in Co. Galway.  John senior and Patrick could not read, and they spoke Irish only; the rest of the children could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and seven people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.

No 14:  John Lydon (56) and his wife Honor (46) were farmers.  They were married for twenty years, and they had five children; Mary (19) was a lacemaker, Patrick (17) and Martin (15) were farmer’s sons, Bridget (13) and John (12) were scholars.    All were born in Co. Galway.  The parents could not read, John junior could read; the others could read and write, and all the family spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and seven people occupied two rooms.  Three outbuildings contained a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

No 15:  Bridget Lydon (52) a farmer’s wife was married for twenty-two years, and she had five children, four were still living; John (21) and Patrick (17) were farmer’s sons, Martin (15) and William (11) were scholars.  William was born in Co. Mayo; the others were born in Co. Galway.  Bridget and her son John could not read, the others could read and write, all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 16:  Bridget Lydon (60) a farmer, was a widow.  She was married for twenty-four years, and she had four children, three were recorded here.  Mary (19) and Bridget (17) were farmer’s daughters and Martin (12) a scholar.  All were born in Co. Galway. Martin could read, the others could not read, Bridget was bilingual, her children spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and four people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the premises.

No 17:  Thomas Joyce (67) and his wife Mary (65) were farmers.  They were married for thirty-five years, and they had thirteen children, twelve were still living and six were documented:  Maggie (24) was a farmer’s daughter, Norah (18) and Lillie (16) were lacemakers, Thomas (15) a farmer’s son and Michael (12) and Sarah (10) were scholars. The parents could not read; their children could read and write.  The language column had the education details entered and was then crossed out, but I assume the family were Irish speakers, and may have spoken English as well.   Michael and Sarah were born in Co. Mayo, the others were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and eight people occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 18:  A private dwelling, was uninhabited.  John Lydon was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 19:  Sabina Lydon (73) a widow was a retired farmer.  She was married for fifty-two years, and she had five children.  Her son Lackey (38) a farmer’s son and his wife Margaret (34) were married for eight years, and they had five children. Scholars: Thomas (7) and Michael (6), Patrick (4) Bridget (3) and Mary (1), were all born in Co. Mayo.  Sabina, Lackey and Margaret were born in Co. Galway.  The family spoke Irish only and none could read at this time.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and eight people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the premises.  Loughlin Lydon was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 20:  Thomas Lydon (44) a farmer born in Co. Galway, was married to Bridget (36) for thirteen years and they had six children.  John (11), Patrick (10) and Mary (8) were scholars, Bridget was (6), Michael (4) and Catherine (2) years old and they were all born in Co. Mayo.  John and Patrick could read and write and were bilingual; the others could not read at this time, and they spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class and the family of eight occupied two rooms.  Two outbuildings contained a cow house and a piggery.

No 21:  Michael Joyce (Henry) (70) and his wife Bridget (65) were farmers.  They were married for forty-eight years, and they had eight children, five were still living and three were recorded here.  All were born in Co. Galway. Thomas (40), Michael (30) and Martin (27) were farmer’s sons and were single at the time.  The parents and Thomas were bilingual, Michael and Martin spoke Irish only; none could read.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 22:  John Joyce (Jnr) (54) a farmer, was married to Bridget (57) for thirty-three years and they had six children, two were recorded here: Michael (19) a farmer’s son and Martin (16) a scholar.  All were born in Co. Galway.  John and Bridget could not read, Michael could read only, and Martin could read and write, all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms.  Three outbuildings contained a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house.

No 23:  Mary Casey (78) a widow was married for fifty-four years, and she had nine children, eight were still living and one is recorded here.  John (30) a farmer’s son was married to Bridget (30) for five years and they had three children:  Bridget (4), Mary (3) and Martin (1) were born in Co. Mayo.  Mary, her son and his wife were born in Co. Galway.  John and Bridget could read and write and were bilingual, Mary could not read; she and the children spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of six occupied two rooms.  Three outbuildings contained a cow house, a piggery and a potato house.

No 24:  Patrick McGing (75) a farmer and his wife Bridget (65) were married for thirty-nine years, and they had nine children, eight were still living and three were documented.  John (26) and Martin (17) were farmer’s sons and Ellen (21) a lacemaker. They were born in Co. Galway.  Patrick’s granddaughter Bridget Casey (6) a scholar was born in Co. Mayo.  Patrick and his wife could not read, and they spoke Irish only, their children could read and write; Bridget junior could read, all were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and six people occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery and a cow house on the property.

No 25:  Martin Mara (55) a farmer, was married to Anne (60) for nineteen years and they had eight children, five were still living and four were recorded.  Philip (17) a farmer’s son and scholars: John (15), Mary (9) and Anne (7).  Martin and Anne could not read, Philip and John could read and write, and Mary and Anne junior could read.  The parents and Anne spoke Irish only; the others were bilingual.  Mary and young Anne were born in Co. Mayo; the rest of the family were born in Co. Galway.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and six people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 26.1:  Mary Agnes Healy (31) born in Co. Roscommon was married for five years and she had three children.  Mary Josephine (4) and Bridget Angela (3) were also born in Co. Roscommon; (1) month old John Joseph was born in Co. Mayo.  Mary Agnes could read and write.  The house was 2nd class with five windows to the front and four people occupied four rooms.  Four outbuildings consisted of: a potato house, two sheds and a wash house.  Michael Healy signed as the head of family.

Note stating that the head of family is returned on Form H.

Form H:  A return of Military, R. I. Constabulary Police in Barrack who were quartered in the Barrack in Derrypark.  Four men occupied three rooms.

26.2: Acting Sergeant R.I.C. M. H. (Michael Healy) a (39) year old married man was born in Co. Sligo.

26.2:  Constable R.I.C. M. D. (45) a single man was born in Co. Longford.

26.2:  Constable R.I.C. J. R. (John Reilly) (40) a married man was born in Co. Cavan

26.2:  Constable R.I.C. E. C. (23) a single man was born in Co. Longford.

All the above were farmer’s sons and were Roman Catholic.  The Irish language does not seem to have been considered where many of the inhabitants were mainly Irish speakers.

This page was added on 02/07/2022.

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