Toberbiroge

Tobar Biorroige

Tomas O Flatharta

Tomas O Flatharta

Tobar Biorroige meaning Birroge’s well

Names:

According to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Toberbiroge and Tobar Biorroige was its official Irish name.  Other names given to the townland were Tubberbervogue (Boundary Surveyor’s Sketch Map), Tubberbirrogue (Local and Rev. Micheal Waldron), Tubberrouge (Merseman), Tobar Bioróige (Logainm.ie) and Thobar Bioróige (Logainm.ie).

Situation:

Toberbiroge was a central townland, bounded on the North by Cregdothia, Breandrim and the parish of Cong. It was bounded on the West by Carrowbaun and Culleenaleana.  On the East by Clogher and Cloonamorriv. Bounded on the South by Ballinamona and Croaghrim.

Description:

Down Survey:

The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps; ‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will”. (Wikipedia).  The name used by the Down Survey was Kellcapcossan.  In 1641 the owner for this townland was Sir Thomas Blake who was a Protestant.  In 1670, the townland was still owned by Sir Thomas Blake.  There was 118 acres of profitable land in this townland and 118 of those acres were forfeited.

O Donovan’s (1838):

In 1838, the proprietor for this village was Lord Oranmore, Castlemontgaret.  The agent was Laurence Glynn do place or Jared Strickland, Esq. of Loughglynn, Co. Roscommon (as per transcribed from O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books, 1838).  The townland was composed of 178 acres, 0 roods and 29 perches according to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838).  The village was held under lease by Robert Brown, Esqr. Portarlington.  The village was sublet to the tenants.  The rent was 33 shillings per acre.  The Co. Cess paid 12¼ d. per acre.   The soil was light and rocky.  It produced light crops of wheat and potatoes.  There was a well called Tubberbirrogue in this village. There were also farms which were 4¾ acres each.  The O Donovan’s also states there was ‘Der?  (unable to decipher this word) , soil and poor’.

Griffiths Valuation

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Toberbiroge had a total acreage of 178 acres, 1 rood and 25 perches. The total valuation for this plot was £83.0s.0d.  Benjamin L. Guinness was the immediate lesser for this townland.  There were 5 plots in this townland.

 

Plot 1 was composed of 4 acres, 2 roods and 10 perches.  This plot was divided into 2 plots Aa and B.  Both plots belonged to John Ansborough.  Total valuation for this plot was £2.10s.0d.

Plot 1 Aa John Ansborough had land and a house.  The land was valued at £1.15s.0d. and the house at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £2.0s.0d.

Plot 1 B John Ansboroughhad land. The land was valued at £0.10s.0d. Total valuation for this sub-plot was £0.10s.0d.

 

Plot 2 was comprised of 91 acres, 1 rood and 33 perches.  This plot belonged to William Gallagher.  Total valuation for this plot was £31.10s.0d.

Plot 2 William Gallagher had land valued at £31.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £31.10s.0d.

 

Plot 3 was composed of 41 acres, 1 rood and 6 perches.  This plot was divided into a and b. Plot 3 a belonged to John Varley and Plot 3 b belonged to Peter Cowan.  Total valuation for this plot was £27.0s.0d.

Plot 3 a John Varleyhad a house, offices and land.  The land was valued at £25.15s.0d. and the buildings was valued at £0.15s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £26.10s.0d.

Plot 3 b Peter Cowanhad a house and office.  The house and office was valued at £0.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £0.10s.0d.

 

Plot 4 comprised of 18 acres, 0 roods and 36 perches.  This plot belonged to Catherine Walsh.  Total valuation for this plot was £12.0s.0d.

Plot 4 Catherine Walshhad a house, offices and land.  The land was valued at £10.10s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £1.10s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £12.0s.0d.

 

Plot 5 was composed of 22 acres, 3 roods and 20 perches.  This plot belonged to Peter Cowan.  Total valuation for this plot was £10.0s.0d.

Plot 5 Peter Cowanhad land valued at £10.0s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £10.0s.0d.

Census 1901

The Census of 1901 states there were three inhabited houses.  There were eight males and eight females in this village according to the Enumerators Abstract (Form N).  There were 13 out-offices or farm steadings in this village.  There were two stables, three cow houses, four piggeries, one fowl house, one barn and two sheds in this village according to the Return of Out-offices and farm-steadings (Form B2).

 

House 1-Thomas and Catherine Varrily

Thomas (60) and Catherine (54) Varrily resided in house 1 with their five children.  Their children were Patrick (20), Thomas (17), John (16), Bridget (22) and Norah (18). Thomas (Snr.) was a farmer.  John was a tailor.  Norah was a seamstress.  The parents could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway and was Roman Catholic.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with four rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a barn and a shed.

 

House 2- John and Norah Varrily

John(71) and Norah (63) Varrilylived in house 2 with their three children and their grandson.  Their children were Luke(26), Julia(24) and Norah(21).  Their grandson was Martin Gannon(16).  John was a farmer and Norah (Jnr.) was a seamstress.  The parents could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  The parents spoke Irish only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English.  Norah (Snr.) was born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, two piggeries and a shed.

 

House 3- Elizabeth Nelmes

Elizabeth Nelmes (52) occupied house 3 with her daughter, Frances(19), and her son, John (14).  Elizabeth was a laundress.  Everyone in this household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke English only.  Elizabeth was born in England and the rest of the household was born in Mayo.  Everyone in this household was Church of Ireland.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with four rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house. Their landlord was Lord Ardilaun.

Census 1911

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living); if Deaf and Dumb, Dumb only, Blind, Imbecile or Idiot, Lunatic.  There were three inhabited houses.  There were seven males and four females in this village.  Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic.  There was no mention of the Nelmes household in 1901 (numbered household 3 in 1901).  In 1911, there was a new household called the Walsh’s in household numbered 1.   There was 17 out-houses in this village.  There were three stables, three cow houses, two calf houses, three piggeries, two fowl houses, three barns and one shed. There are inconsistent age gaps between the 1901 Census and the 1911 Census.

 

House 1-Penelope Walsh

Penelope Walsh (71)lived in household numbered 1, this was a new household in 1911, with her son, grandson and servant.  Penelope’s son was James(49).  Penelope’s grandson was Michael Coyne(16). Penelope’s servant was John Conroy(28).  Penelope was a widow.  Penelope was a farmer.  Michael was a scholar and John was a farm servant.  John could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Michael spoke English only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with six rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn and a shed.

 

House 2-Tom and Catherine Varley

Tom(called Thomas in 1901) (72) and Catherine(68) Varleyresided in house 2, previously numbered house 1, with their son, Tom (called Thomas in 1901) (26). There was no mention of Patrick, John, Bridget or Norah in this 1911 census.  Tom (Snr.) and Catherine were married for 38 years, had seven children and five of them survived.  Tom (Snr.) was a farmer and Tom (Jnr.) was a farmer.  The parents could not read or write.  Tom (Jnr.) could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English and was born in Galway. They lived in a 2ndclass house with four rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 3- John and Honor Varley

John (86) and Honor (called Norah in 1901)(74) Varley resided in house 3, previously numbered house 2, with their daughter and grandson.  Their daughter was Honor Birmingham (called Norah Varrily in 1901) (34) and their grandson was John Birmingham(5 months). There was no mention of Luke, Julia or Martin in this 1911 census.  John (Snr.) and Honor (Snr.) were married for 50 years, had nine children and six of them survived until 1911.  Honor (Jnr.) was married for two years, had one child which survived until 1911.  John (86) was a farmer.  Honor (Jnr.) could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write.  John (Jnr.) was too young to talk, Honor (Jnr.) spoke Irish and English, the rest of the family spoke Irish only.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway. They lived in  a 2ndclass house with three rooms.  They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house and a barn.

This page was added on 24/09/2018.

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