Cummer

Cumar

Tomas O Flatharta and Teresa Philbin

Names:

The standard name given to the townland was Cummer and Cumar was its official Irish name.  Other names given to this townland was Comer (County Map, Rev. Michl. Heraghty P.P.) and An Comar (Logainm.ie).

 

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie), Cummer had a river called Finny river flowing through the village.

 

Situation:

Cummer is a central townland in the parish of Ross. Cummer is bounded on the north by the townlands of Glanbeg and Maumtransa. Bounded on the west by Dhuletter and Loughnafoey.  Bounded on the south by Kangarrow, Drin and Finny and bounded east by Finny and Glanbeg West.

 

Description:

Down Survey: The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656.  The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps ‘‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will.’ (Wikipedia).  There was no townland information available for Cummer.

 

O Donovan’s (1838): The proprietors for this village were the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont, Rosshil and Dublin.  The agent was Mr. James Fair, Fairhil.  There was no lease on this townland.  The rent was £26.9s.4d. per year. The soil was all mountain with some heathy mixed and pasturable mountain.  There was also some arable mountain and tillage.  The Co. Cess paid 11¼d. per acre for 103 acres for Finny as well.  There was also an antiquity of a burying place for children.

 

Griffiths Valuation

According to Griffith’s Valuation, Cummer had a total acreage of 534 acres, 0 roods and 18 perches.  The total valuation for this townland was £27.6s.0d. This townland was divided into two plots.  The immediate lessors for plot 1 and plot 2 -.- was the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont.  The immediate lessors for plot 2 a and b was Patrick and John Lyden.

 

Plot 1 was comprised of 446 acres, 1 rood and 3 perches.  This plot was divided into six sub-plots labelled a,b,c,d,e and -.  a was owned by Lewis O’Brien, b was owned by Sarah O’Brien, c was owned by Thomas Cumusk (sic.), d was owned by John Joyce, e was owned by Edward Jennings – was owned by John Lyden.  Total valuation for this plot was £21.18s.0d.

 

Plot 1 a Lewis O’Brien had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £6.10s.0d. The buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £7.0s.0d.

Plot 1 b Sarah O’Brien had a house, office and land.  The land was valued at £3.5s.0d. The buildings were valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £3.10s.0d.

Plot 1 c Thomas Cumusk had a house, offices and land. The land was valued at £3.5s.0d. The buildings were valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £3.10s.0d.

Plot 1 d John Joyce had a house and land.  The land was valued at £3.5s.0d. The house was valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £3.10s.0d.

Plot 1 e Edward Jennings had a forge and land. The land was valued at £0.18s.0d. The buildings were valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £1.3s.0d.

Plot 1- John Lyden had land.  The land was valued at £3.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £3.5s.0d.

 

Plot 2 was comprised of 87 acres, 3 roods and 15 perches.  This plot was divided into four sub-plots labelled -.-, a and b. – was owned by Patrick Lyden, – was owned by John Lyden, a was owned by Andrew Lyden and b was owned by Patk. Lyden (Smith).  Total valuation was £5.18s.0d.

 

Plot 2 – Patrick Lyden had land valued at £1.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £1.5s.0d.

Plot 2 – John Lyden had land valued at £1.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £1.5s.0d.

Plot 2 a Andrew Lyden had a house and land. The land was valued at £1.5s.0d. The house was valued at £0.5s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £1.10s.0d.

Plot 2 b Patk. Lyden (Smith) had a house and land.  The land was valued at £1.5s.0d. The house was valued at £0.3s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £1.8s.0d.

 

1901 Census

Constable Martin Higgins enumerated the census return for the townland.  Sixteen houses were occupied, seven were second class and nine were third class dwellings; one had an unperishable roof; the remainder were perishable and were most likely thatch. Farming was the principal occupation, and the families were Roman Catholic.  The return of out-offices and farm steadings (Form B.2.) is uncomplete for this townland and does not include house numbered 16 out offices and farm steadings.

House 1- Mary Walsh

Mary Walsh (50) a widow was a farmer. She lived here with her son John (24) a farm laborer, her daughter-in-law Mary (27) and grandson Pat who was (1 month old).  Mary’s mother-in-law was Bridget Walsh (85) also a widow was recorded here. Everybody in this household was born in Co. Mayo. John and his wife could read and write; Mary and Bridget could not read.  They all spoke Irish and English. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and five people occupied two rooms.  There was a cow house on the property.

 

House 2- Michael and Barbara Joyce

Michael Joyce (65) and his wife Barbara (62) born in Co. Mayo. Michael was a farmer. Michael and Barbara could not read.  Michael spoke Irish only and she was bilingual. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the couple occupied two rooms.  Their outbuildings were a piggery and a cow house.

 

House 3-Pat and Bridget Gibbons

Pat Gibbons (70) lived here with his wife Bridget (67), his son Michael (30), his daughter in law Margaret (25) and his grandchildren; Mary (2) and infant Michael (6 months).  Farming was their way of life. Pat could read and write; the others could not read at this time. Bridget, Margaret and Mary spoke Irish only; Pat and Michael were bilingual. The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of six occupied two rooms.  There was a piggery on the premises.

 

House 4- Pat and Kate Duffy

Pat Duffy (30) a farmer, and his wife Kate (23) were the occupants of this house.  They were born in Co. Mayo. Pat and Kate could read and write, and they spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and they occupied two rooms. There was a cow house on the property.

 

House 5 – Michael O’Brien  

Michael O’Brien (50) and his wife Bridget (52) lived in this household. Michael was a farmer. John (18) was a farmer’s son, and their married daughter Mary Kerrigan (24) had no occupation listed. All were born in Co. Mayo. John and Mary could read and write; their parents could not read. Bridget spoke Irish only; the others were bilingual. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and four people occupied two rooms. Two outbuildings consisted of a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 6- Mary Geenings [sic]

Mary Gennings [sic] (45) a married woman born in England, was a farmer.  She lived here with her sons: Thomas (18) a farmer’s son and John (13) a scholar who were both born in Co. Mayo.  Mary could not read; her sons could read and write; all spoke Irish and English. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and three people occupied two rooms. Three outbuildings contained a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 7- Mary Conroy

Mary Conroy (85) a widow was head of this household.  Farming was the family occupation.  Her son Martin (32) and his wife Maggie (33) lived here with their five children; Pat (9) and Mary (8) were scholars; Martin (4), James (2) and infant Maggie (6 months) also lived there.  They were all born in Ireland but does not say which county they were born in. Martin (32), Maggie (33), Pat and Mary (8) could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write.   Mary spoke Irish only, the rest of the household was bilingual. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of eight occupied two rooms. There was a cow house and a piggery on the premises.

 

House 8- Peter and Bridget Duffey

Peter Duffy (60) a farmer lived here with his wife Bridget (58), Martin (23) a farmer’s son and Bridget (28) a farmer’s daughter. Julia Feerick (26) was a boarder, and her occupation was a teacher. Peter and his wife could not read or write; their children and Julia could read and write; all spoke Irish and English and were born in Co. Mayo. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and five people occupied two rooms. Three outbuildings contained a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

 

House 9- Martin and Mary Duffey

Martin Duffey (50), his wife Mary (47), his sister Anne Duffey (60) and his grandson Martin Butler (no age was entered for this person on the census form) were the occupants of this house. They were born in Co. Mayo. Anne spoke Irish only; the others were bilingual; none could read or write. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and four people occupied two rooms. There was a piggery on the premises.

 

House 10- Patrick and Mary Duffey

Patrick Duffy (64) a shopkeeper and farmer lived here with his wife Mary (62). Their sons William (37) a married man was a Sub Postmaster; Michael (28) and Peter (26) were rural postmen, and they were single. Mary Duffy (20) a married woman does not have an occupation listed. Patrick’s niece Sarah Conroy (14) and his grandson Pat Duffy (11) were scholars; his grandson James Duffy (5) and infant granddaughter Bridget Duffy (1 month) were all recorded here. John Lydon (39) a single man was a lodger and Martin Derrig (15) was a servant. Mary (Snr) and Sarah were born in Co. Galway; the others were born in Co. Mayo. Patrick and Mary could not read, and she spoke Irish only and he spoke English and Irish. His sons, daughter- in -law, grandson Pat, his niece Sarah, and John Lydon could read and write; Martin Derrig could read only. Five-year-old James spoke English, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and twelve people occupied two rooms. A variety of outbuildings consisted of, a cow house, a piggery, a fowl house, a barn and a store.

 

House 11- Margaret Higgins

Margaret Higgins (50) a widow was head of this family and farming was their livelihood. Pat (30) a farmer’s son was not married. Her son in law Martin Keane (24) a farm laborer and her daughter Margaret (21) lived here with their children; Bridget (2) and Michael (9) months old. All were born in Co. Mayo. Margaret (Jnr) could read and write; the others could not read at this time. Pat spoke Irish only; the other adults were bilingual. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and six people occupied two rooms. There was a cow house and a piggery on the property.

 

House 12- William and Mary Lyden

William Lydon (56) was a farmer.  He lived here with his wife Mary (45) and their five children: Pat (20), Michael (18) and Richard (16) were farmer’s sons; Catherine (12) and Mary (9) were listed as farmer’s daughters. All were born in Co. Mayo. None could read at this time; all were bilingual. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of seven occupied two rooms. There was a cow house on the property.

 

House 13-Mary Lydon

Mary Lydon (40) a married woman was a farmer. Catherine (20) was a farmer’s daughter, Michael (18) and Pat (15) were farmer’s sons and John (10) was a scholar. John could read and write; the others could not read. Mary spoke Irish only; her children spoke Irish and English. All were born in Co. Mayo. The house was 3rd class with one window in front and five people occupied one room. There were no out offices.

 

House 14- Martin Lydon

Martin Lydon (60) a widower was a farmer. Martin (24) was a farmer’s son, Mary (22), Bridget (20) and Anne (18) were farmer’s daughters. Martin (Snr) and Mary could not read, Martin, Bridget and Anne could read and write; all were bilingual and were born in Co. Mayo. The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and five people occupied two rooms. There were no outbuildings.

 

House 15- John and Bridget Keane

John Keane (40) and his wife Bridget (50) lived in house numbered 15. John was a farmer. They lived in this house with their four sons Martin (13) and Pat (10) who were farmer’s sons and Thomas (8) and Michael (6) who were scholars. Martin and Thomas could read and write; the parents and Pat could not read at this time. All were bilingual and were born in Co. Mayo. The house was 3rd class with one window in front and six people occupied two rooms. There was a piggery on the premises.

 

House 16- Martin and Nora Keane

Martin Keane (33) a farmer and his wife Nora (40) lived here with their four children; John (8) was a scholar, Mary (6), Martin (3) and infant Pat (3 months). Only John could read and write at this time. Nora and young Martin (3) spoke Irish only, the others spoke Irish and English. All were born in Co. Mayo. The house was 3rd class with one window in front and the family of six occupied one room.  The Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings (Form B.2.) is incomplete for this townland, the out-offices and farm steadings for this household is on the missing forms.

 

1911 Census

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living).  There were 16 houses in this village and all 16 were inhabited.  House numbered 16 was also a warehouse.  There was little information written for the house numbered 7.2 on the 1911 census on the house and building return (Form B.1.).  The landlord for house numbered 14 was Martin Conroy. The landlord for houses numbered 15 and 16 was Patrick Duffey.  There was no mention of households numbered 2 and 9 in the 1901 census . These households were the  Michael and Barbara Joyce household in household numbered 2, and the Martin and Mary Duffey household in household numbered 9.  There was 3 new households in this village. In household numbered 7.1 in the 1911 census was the Madden household.  In household numbered 8 was the Mary Duffy household. In household numbered 16 was the Peter Duffy household.  Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic.  There was 33 out-houses in this village.  There were two stables, a coach house, fifteen cowhouses, eleven piggeries, one barn and three sheds.

 

House 1- John and Bridget Keane

John (59) and Bridget (65) resided in house 1, previously numbered house 15, with their son, Michael (20).  There was no mention of Martin, Pat or Thomas in this 1911 census for this household.  John and Bridget were married for 31 years, had five children all five of them survived. John was a farmer.  Michael could read and write. The rest of the household could not read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a shed.

House 2-Martin and Honor Keane  

Martin (49) and Honor (called Nora in 1901) (49) Keane lived in house 2, previously numbered house 16, with their six children.  Their children were John (18),  Mary (16), Martin (14), Patrick (called Pat in 1901) (10), Anne (8) and Honor (9 months).  Martin (Snr.) and Honor (Snr.) were married for 21 years, had six children and six of them survived.   Martin (Snr.) was a farmer. Mary was a lacemaker and Martin (Jnr.) was a scholar.  John, Mary, Martin and Patrick could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. Honor (Jnr.) was too young to talk, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English.  Martin (Snr.), Honor (Snr.), John, Mary, Martin (Jnr.) were born in Galway, the rest of the household was born in  Mayo.  They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 3- Martin Lydon

Martin Lydon (73) resided in house 3, previously numbered house 14, with his son, daughter in law and four grandchildren. Martins’ son was Andrew (50), his daughter in law was Anne (31) and his grandchildren were Bridget (10), Martin (8), Mary (6) and John (1).  There was no mention of Martin (24), Mary (22), Bridget (20) and Anne (18) in 1911 census for this household.  Martin (Snr.) was a widower.  Andrew and Anne were married for 12 years, had four children and four of them survived.  Martin (Snr.) was a farmer.  Bridget was a scholar. Anne and Bridget could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write.  John was too young to talk. Mary spoke Irish only.   The rest of the household spoke Irish and English.  Martin (Snr.), Andrew and Anne was born in Galway, the rest of the household was born in Mayo.  The rest of the household was born in Mayo.  They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 4- Mary Lydon

Mary Lydon (65) lived in house numbered 5, previously numbered house 13, with her son.  Her son was John (21).  There was no mention of Catherine, Michael or Pat in this 1911 census.  Mary was married for 30 years, had four children and three of them survived.  Mary was a farmer. Both Mary and John could not read or write, and both spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 4th class house with one room.  They had a cow house.

 

House 5-William and Mary Lydon

William (66) and Mary (66) Lydon resided in house numbered house 5, previously numbered house 12, with their two children.  Their children were Michael (30) and Patrick (called Pat in 1901) (27).  There was no mention of Richard, Catherine or Mary in this 1911 census. William and Mary were married for 35 years, had five children and all five of them survived.  William was a farmer.  No one in this household could read or write.  Everyone in this household  spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 6-Margaret Higgins

Margaret Higgins (75) lived in house 6, previously numbered house 11, with her two children and her seven grandchildren. Her children were Patrick (called Pat in 1901) Higgins (40) and Margaret Keane (34).  Margaret’s grandchildren were Bridget Keane (12), Michael Keane (10), Thomas Keane (9), Peter Keane (7), Patrick Keane (5), Mary Keane (4) and Martin Keane (1).  There was no mention of Martin Keane in this household in the 1911 census.  Margaret (75) was a widow. Margaret (34) was married for 13 years, had seven children and seven of them survived.  Margaret (75) was a farmer. Bridget was a scholar.  Bridget and Michael could read and write. Thomas could read only.  The rest of the household could not read or write.  Martin was too young to talk.  Patrick (40) and Mary spoke Irish only. The rest of the household spoke English and Irish.  Margaret (75), Patrick (40), Margaret and Bridget was born in Galway and the rest of the household was born in Mayo.  They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 7- (7.1)- Kathleen Madden

Kathleen Madden (26) lived in house numbered 7 (there is two houses numbered 7, so this house is numbered 7.1), this was a new household in this village.  Kathleen was a national schoolteacher.  Kathleen could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Kathleen was born in Mayo.  There is no indication on the census what kind of house she lived on and her name doesn’t appear on the House and Building Return (Form B.1.). There is also no indication if she owned out buildings or farm-steadings or not.

 

House 7 (7.2)- Peter and Bridget Duffy

Peter (71) and Bridget (73) Duffy lived in house numbered 7 (there are two houses numbered 7, so this house is numbered 7.2), this was previously numbered house 8, with her son, daughter in law and three grandchildren.  Their son was Martin (34), their daughter in law was Bridget (31).  Their grandchildren were Mary (4), Michael (3) and Maggie (9 months).  There was no mention of Julia Feerick for this household in the 1911 census.  Peter and Bridget (73) was married for 49 years, had seven children and six of them survived.  Martin and Bridget was married for 5 years, had four children and four of them survived.  Peter was a farmer.  Martin and Bridget (31) could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write.  Maggie was too young to talk, the rest of the household could speak Irish and English.  Mary, Michael and Maggie were born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2nd class house with two rooms.  They had a stable, cow house, a piggery, a barn and a shed.

 

House 8-Mary Duffey

Mary Duffey (73) resided in house numbered 8, this was a new household in Cummer,.  She was a farmer.  Mary could not read or write. Mary could speak Irish and English. Mary was born in Galway. She lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.  She had a cow house.

 

House 9-Mary Walsh   

Mary Walsh (65) lived in house numbered 9, this was previously numbered house 1 in the 1901 census, with their son, daughter in law and two grandchildren.  Mary’s son  was John (36). Her daughter in law was Mary Walsh (38). Mary’s (65) grandchildren were Michael Walsh  (7) and Mary Walsh (3). There was no mention of Bridget Walsh or Pat in this 1911 census.  Mary (65) was a widow. John and Mary were married for 11 years, had three children and two of them survived.  Mary (65) was a farmer.  John and Mary (38) could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write.  Mary (3) spoke Irish only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. Michael and Mary (3) were born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 10-Patrick and Bridget Gibbons    

Patrick (called Pat in 1901) (80) and Bridget (73) Gibbons resided in house 10, previously numbered house 3, with their son, daughter in law, five grandchildren and a boarder.  Their son was Michael (44), their daughter in law was Margaret (44). Their grandchildren were Mary (13), Michael (11),  Bridget (9), Margaret (6), Thomas (3). The boarder was Margaret Joyce (73).  Patrick and Bridget (73) were married for 55 years, had nine children and eight of them survived.  Michael and Margaret (44) were married for 14 years, had six children and five of them survived. Patrick was a farmer. Mary was a scholar.  Patrick, Bridget (73), Margaret (44), Margaret (6), Thomas and Margaret could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Bridget, Margaret (44) Thomas and Margaret (73) spoke Irish only.  The rest of the household spoke Irish and English. Michael, Bridget (9), Margaret and Thomas were born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms.  They had a cow house.

 

House 11-Patrick and Catherine Duffy

Patrick (48) and Catherine (called Kate in 1901 census) (36) Duffy resided in house 11, previously numbered house 4, with their five children.  Their children were James (10), Patrick (8), Michael (6), Martin (5) and William (3).  Patrick and Catherine were married for 11 years, had five children and five of them survived until 1911.  Patrick (Snr.) was a farmer.  James was a scholar. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  James could read and write; the rest of the household could not read or write. Patrick (Snr.) and Catherine was born in Galway. The rest of the household was born in Mayo.  They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 12-Michael and Bridget O Brien

Michael (68) and Bridget (70) O Brien lived in house 12, previously numbered house 5, with son and granddaughter.  Their son was John (28). Their granddaughter was Bridget Kerrigan (8). There was no mention of Mary Kerrigan in this household in the 1911 census.  Michael and Bridget were married for 35 years, had five children and five of them survived.  Michael was a farmer.  The section titled ‘Education’ was not filled in on this form for this household.  This section stated if the people in the household could ‘read and write’, ‘read only’ and ‘cannot read’. Everyone in this household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 13-Mary Jenning (called Gennings in 1901)

Mary Jenning (60) resided in house 13, previously numbered house 6, with her father (also stated as a boarder). Her father was John Duddy (82).  There was no mention of Thomas Gennings or John Gennings in this 1901 census for this household.  Mary was a widow and John was a widower.  Mary was a farmer and John was a farm labourer.  Both Mary and John could not read or write. They both spoke Irish and English.  Both of them were born in Galway. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

House 14-Margaret Conroy

Margaret (called Maggie in 1901 census) Conroy (46) lived in house 14, previously numbered house 7, with her nine children.  Her children were Patrick (called Pat in 1901 census) (20), Mary (19), Martin (17), James (13), Maggie (10), Bridget (9), Julia (8), Andrew (6) and Michael John (2).  There was no mention of Mary or Martin in this 1911 census.  Margaret was married for 22 years, had ten children and nine of them survived.  Margaret was a farmer.  James was a scholar.  Andrew, Michael John and Margaret could not read and write.  The rest of the household could read and write.  Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English.  Maggie, Bridget, Julia, Andrew and Michael John were born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a shed.

 

House 15-Patrick and Mary Duffy

Patrick (78) and Mary (74) Duffy resided in house 15, previously numbered house 10, with their son, daughter in law and seven grandchildren.  Their son was William (49).  Their daughter in law was Mary Duffey (29).  Their grandchildren were Michael (18), James (12), Bridget (10), Mary (8), Kate (5), Patrick (4) and Julia (2).  There was no mention of Michael Duffey (25), Peter Duffey, Pat Duffey, Sarah Conroy, Martin Derrig or John Lydon in this 1911 census for this household.  Patrick (78) and Mary (74) were married for 52 years, had eleven children and eight of them survived. William and Mary (29) were married for eleven years, had six children and five of them survived.  Patrick (78) was a farmer. William was a shopkeeper and rural postmaster.  Michael was an agricultural labourer.  James, Bridget and Mary (8) were scholars.   Patrick (78), Mary (74), Kate, Patrick (4) and Julia could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Mary (74) spoke Irish only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. Mary (8), Kate, Patrick (4) and Julia was born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway.  They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms.  They had a stable and a cow house.

 

House 16-Peter Duffey

Peter Duffey (31) lived in house 16, this was a new household in Cummer in 1911.  Peter was a postman.  Peter could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  He was born in Galway. The building he lived in was stated as a warehouse. It was a first class building with seven rooms.  He had a coach house.

This page was added on 04/08/2022.

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