Crumlin

Cruimghlinn

Maggi Nic Shíomóin

Crumlin, meaning ‘crooked glen or valley’.

As Gaeilge: Cruimghlinn

Other forms of the name: Cruimlin; Crimlin East by Surveyors Sketch Map and County Cess Collector and the Rev. Michael Heraghty, P.P. Other placenames in or near the townland were Crimlin Village and Crimlin River, which flows into the Doughta River and ultimately into Lough Corrib.

Situation:

Crumlin is in the south side of the parish of Ross, bounded on the north by the townlands of Bohaun, and Drishaghaun; on the west by Crimlin West; on the south by the parish of Cong and on the east by townlands Cong, Tieranee and Cloghbrack Upper, in the County of Galway.

Description:

 O’Donovan’s Field Names Books (1938):

The proprietor of this townland was Sir Valentine Blake, Esq., Minlow near Galway. All the lands were held under lease by Donmick Blake, Esq., Tuam. The agent was Mr. Thomas Joyce, Tullymore. All the lands were sublet to tenants for the bulked rent of £17.10s. yearly. The soil was described as steep mountain about the village, heathy and mixed pasture with some arable and reclaimed mountain at the valley. The crops of oats and potatoes were not good in 1838. The County Cess was 12 ½ pence paid per acre for 59 acres and some straggling houses, a river.

Griffith’s Valuation (1850’s)

The primary valuation was the first full-scale valuation of property in Ireland. It was overseen by Richard Griffith and published between 1847 and 1864. It is one of the most important surviving 19th Century genealogical sources. Crimlin East information is to be found on Ordnance Survey Map 26. The total area of land in Crimlin East was 1,626 acres and 10 perches. The total rateable annual valuation for the land was £64.6s.0d and the value of the buildings was £9.8s. In all there were three plots with a total of twenty-six occupying families.

Plot No 1 was the largest area with 1,098 acres, 1 rood and 12 perches. In all there were eighteen occupying families and the immediate lessor for this entire plot was Edward Browne.

Michael Joyce paid £2.17s for his land and a further £0.8s. for the house.

John Coyne had a lesser holding and paid £1.18s for his land and £0.7s. for his house.

Thomas Coyne had a similar holding and paid £1.18s for his land and £0.7s for the house.

Jane Coyne also paid £1.18s for the land and £0.7s for her house.

Martin Walsh held house, offices and lands to the rateable value of £8.17s and £0.13s for the house.

Patrick Walsh paid £2.17s for the offices and land and £0.8s for the house.

Thomas Coyne, jun. paid £1.8s for the land and offices and £0.7s for his house.

Patrick Thornton held office and land to the rateable value of £2.3s and £0.7s for the house.

John Thornton also had office and land of rateable value £2.3s. and also paid £0.7s for his house.

Thomas Thornton Jun. paid £2.3s. for office and land and £0.7s for his house.

Thomas Thornton paid £3.2s for land and office and a further £0.8s for the house.

John Thornton Jun. paid £4.6s for the lands and £0.10s. for his house.

Patrick Thornton Jun. also paid £4.6s for the land and offices and £0.10s for the house.

Thomas Walsh paid £3.16s for the land and offices and £0.8s for the house.

John Joyce holding merited £1.11s for land and offices and just £0.5s for his house.

James Welsh paid £2.3s for land and offices, and £0.7s for the house.

Michael Joyce paid £2.3s for the offices and land together with £0.7s for his house.

Martin Corcoran paid also £2.3s for land and offices and £0.7s for the house.

 

Plot No. 2 was a clochán encompassing 9 acres, 2 roods and 37 perches. The immediate lessors of this plot were Michael Joyce and Parners

Michael Joyce in plot 2a) paid £0.13s for the land and offices and £0.7s for the house.

Joseph Joyce in plot 2b) paid £0.13s for the land and offices and £0.7s for the house.

Anne Joyce paid to the partnership £0.12s for land only.

 

Plot 3 was also a clochán with five occupiers, comprising 518 acres and 1 perch.

Anthony Coyne paid the sum of £3.10s for the land and offices and £0.10s for his house.

Peter Coyne paid £1.15s for the land and offices and £0.5s for the house.

Richard Lally ‘s annual rateable valuation was £1.15s for land and also £0.5s for the house.

Thomas Coyne paid £3.10s for his land and offices and £0.10s for the house.

Bridget Joyce paid £0.6s for her plot of land and £0.4s for her house.

Cremlin (sic) East 1901 Census. Unless otherwise stated all persons were Roman Catholic and were born in County Galway.

House No. 1

Patt (Peter) Coyne and his wife Bridget resided in this 2nd class house with their four sons: Martin, aged 9, Tom aged 7, Peter aged 5 and the infant John, aged 3 months. The family spoke both Irish and English and only Patt, who was a farmer, could read. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 2

Martain (sic) Coyne was head of this family. He was 63, spoke only Irish and could neither read nor write. He was a farmer. With him resided his son Michael, who was 24 and married. Michael spoke both Irish and English. Jane Coyne was listed as Martains daughter-in-law was aged 40 and spoke only Irish and could not read or write. They had a 2 year old child Patt.   Theirs was a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a stable.

House No. 3

Thomas Coyne headed this family. He was a farmer and could neither read nor write, although he was bilingual. He was 27 years old. His wife, Nappie was 23 years old and could read and write. Their daughter, Bridget was 9 years old – which would mean that Nappie was 14 years old when she gave birth. Theirs was a 3rd class one-roomed house and they had a stable.

House No. 4

Bridget Coyne, a widowed farmer was 60. She could not read or write and spoke only Irish. Her four children resided with her and they were John, aged 28, Martin aged 26, Michael aged 22 and her daughter Catherine aged 18. Both John and Catherine spoke Irish and English and no member of the family could read or write. They had a 3rd class house with 3 rooms, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 5

Daniel Duffey and his wife Mary lived in this 3rd class, two-roomed house with his mother-in-law, Bridget Walsh, listed as Housekeeper.   The household spoke only Irish and could not read or write. They had no out buildings. Daniel was 24 years old, a farmer, Mary was 20 and her mother was 58.

House No. 6

Patrick and Mary Coyne were the heads of this large family of five children, together with his father John, aged 78, a widower and a farmer. Patrick was also a farmer and was 38 years old. His wife Mary was 30. Their children were Martin, aged 9, Bridget aged 8, Patrick aged 6, Mary aged 3 and baby Thomas was four months old. The three older children were scholars and could read and write, as could Mary, their mother. Neither Patrick nor his father John could read. The household spoke both languages. They had a 3rd class house with two rooms, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 7

Patt Coyne (S) aged 80 lived in this house with his wife Mary, aged 65, and their son Thomas aged 30. No family member could read or write and they spoke only Irish. Pat and Mary clearly survived the famine. They had a 3rd class house with two rooms, a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 8

The household of Thomas and Bridget Murphy was 3rd class with two rooms. These they shared with their four children, Catherine, aged 16, Julia aged 13, Thomas aged 6 and James aged 3 years. Thomas was 50, as was his wife. His occupation is that of a farmer and neither he nor Bridget nor their eldest daughter Catherine could read or write. These family members also spoke only Irish. Young Julia could read and write and spoke both Irish and English, as could young Thomas. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 9

The family of Patrick Corcoran, aged 50 and a farmer resided in this 3rd class, two-roomed house. His wife Julia had six children and his own mother resided with the family. Patrick was 50, Julia aged 40, their sons John aged 20 and Michael aged 7. Their four daughters were Mary aged 18, Bridget aged 14, Margaret aged 10 and Julia aged 4. Julia Senior was 80 years old and a widow, a survivor of the famine also.   The only persons in this family who could read and write were the two scholars, Bridget and Margaret and their older sister Mary. Patrick and his mother Julia together with the two youngest children spoke only Irish. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 10

The family of John and Margret (sic) Joyce lived in this 2nd class, three roomed house, together with his mother in law and their four children. John was 40, Margret was aged 38 and their four daughters were Mary aged 12, Julia and Bridget aged 8 and Maggie who was 5 years old. Mary Thornton was 80. No member of this family could read or write and while everyone spoke Irish, it was just the children, who were scholars who spoke English also. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 11

Patt, a farmer and Julia Walsh lived in this 3rd class house with their two children, Mary 2 and John, one month old. Patt’s mother Sarah, aged 73 also lived with them. Patt was 40 and Julia 32 years old. The family also had a stable, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery. None of the adults could read or write and everyone spoke Irish only.

House No. 12

Patt Joyce, a farmer lived here with his wife Catherine. Their ages were 30 and 25 respectively. Their two children Mary, aged 2 and Bridget, aged 6 months comprised the family. Irish was the language of the household and neither parent could read or write. Theirs was a 3rd class house, with 2 rooms and 2 windows to the front. They also had a stable, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery.

House No. 13

This was a 3rd class house, with two rooms, occupied by 8 people. The Thornton family was headed by Patt, a 46 year old farmer and his wife Nappie, aged 30. These parents could neither read nor write and spoke only Irish. Of their 4 children Mary and Bridget were scholars, aged ten and eight years respectively and they could read and write and spoke both languages. The two younger children, John and Julia were four years and two years. They didn’t yet read or write and it is unclear they could speak any language. It is likely that Irish was the language of this household as Patt’s mother Sarah (80) and his brother James (30) lived with them and spoke only Irish. Just imagine that Sarah was born circa 1821 and has survived the famine.   They were unable to read or write also. Sarah, a widow, was listed as the Housekeeper and James, a farm Servant, unmarried. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 14

Martin Kinavey (sic) lived in this 2nd class, 2 roomed house, which had 3 windows to the front. He also had a stable, a cow house and a piggery. There were eight occupants in total. Martin (45) nad Honor (40) were the parents of six children – five girls and one boy. Mary (18) was the eldest, then Bridget (16), Catherine (13), Maria (11), Martin (4) and Honor aged 2. Only Catherine and Maria, the scholars could read and write and spoke both Irish and English.

House No. 15

The home of James (Tom), (40) and Catherine (32) Walsh was a 3rd class, two roomed house which had one window to the front. They had a cow house only. Neither James nor Catherine could read or write, though Catherine was bilingual. Their eldest daughter Mary (10) was a scholar and could read and also spoke both Irish and English, as did Bridget (4). Their youngest daughter Catherine was just one year old. Sarah Walsh, James’ mother lived with them. She is listed as their House Keeper, a widow and aged 76 years old – another survivor of the famine. Sarah spoke only Irish and could not read.

House No. 16

The 3rd class, three roomed house of Martin Joyce (25), a farmer and his wife Honor (also 25) was shared with his widowed mother, Mary Joyce (60). The household spoke only Irish and could not read or write. The Form B.2 – Return of Out-Offices and Farm –Steadings is not available for the rest of the houses in this 1901 Census, and therefore it is not known how many sheds the remainder of the families used.

House No. 17

This 3rd class house was the home of Michael (Tom) Coyne (60) and his wife Bridget (50). They had six children ranging in age from ten years to six months. Mary was ten, Michael eight and Thomas was six. These three children were scholars and could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Michael and Bridget could not read or write and while he spoke both Irish and English, Bridget spoke Irish only. Young Bridget was four and Julia was two years old. Baby Catherine was six months. There were three rooms in the house with two windows on the front.

House No. 18

The 2nd class home of Thomas (Pat) Thornton (50) and his wife, Catherine (24) had three rooms for its eight occupants. Thomas was a farmer. Their four children were Bridget (6), Mary (4), Sarah (2) and Julia aged six months. While Catherine spoke both Irish and English, no other member of the family was bilingual. James (30), the brother of Thomas lived with the family. He was listed as a farm servant. A nephew, Michael Corcoran (18) was in the house on the night of the completion of the census form. He too was a farm labourer.

House No. 19

James Thornton (30) lived in this house with his wife Kate (24) and their three children and his mother, Bridget (60). Their two sons were, Michael (5) and Thomas (3). Their infant daughter, Bridget was one year old. The family spoke only Irish and no one could read or write. James was a farmer and his mother, a widow, was the house keeper. The house was 3rd class with two rooms and one window in front.

House No. 20

This was the house of Martin Walsh (70) and his wife Ann (60). Their children, John (27), Michael (22), Annie (19) and Maggie (16) resided with them. The parents could not read or write, and spoke only Irish. All the children could read and write and were bilingual. Theirs was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front and with three rooms.

House No. 21

The residence of Michael Coyne (45) and his wife Mary (40) was a 3rd class house with two rooms. They lived with their six children: Mary (17), Michael (15), John (13) James (10), Bridget (7) and Sarah (5). The parents spoke Irish only and could not read or write. All but the two youngest children could read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Bridget and Sarah could read however.

House No. 22

Martin Coyne (40) and his wife Nappie (40) lived in this 3rd class house with two rooms with their two children – Bridget aged 7 and Mary aged 6. The family were Irish speakers and could not read or write.

House No. 23

Martin Joyce (53) and his wife Sarah (45) lived in this two-roomed, 3rd class house alone. They spoke both Irish and English and Sarah could read.

House No. 24

The family of James (50) and Mary (40) Coyne lived in this 3rd class, two-roomed house together with their daughter and four sons. These were Mary (21), James (18), Thomas (13), Michael (10) and Patrick (8). All family members spoke both Irish and English and none of them could read or write.

House No. 25

The widow, Bridget Joyce (60), a housekeeper lived with her daughter, also Bridget and also widowed (40). Her daughter Julia (30) and son John (22) a farmer also lived with her, as did her grandson Michael Murphy, aged 10. Michael was not attending school yet. The family spoke Irish only and could not read or write. Theirs was a 3rd class, two-roomed house.

House No. 26

James Walsh (64) and his wife Bridget (60), lived in this 3rd class two-roomed house with their two sons Michael (22) and Patrick (18). James was a farmer. The family spoke Irish only and none could read or write.

 

 Census 1911:

 

Form N. – Enumerator’s Abstract for a Townland or Street tells us that there were a total of 161 persons living in this townland, of which 91 were female and 70 were male. There were a total of 62 outhouses and steadings.

House No. 1

Patrick Coyne, an eighty year old farmer was head of this household. He spoke only Irish. With him lived Thomas (45) and Mary Coyne (30), his son and daughter-in-law together with their four children: James, aged 8, Bridget, aged 7, Michael (3) and Patrick (2). Mary and James spoke both Irish and English and the remaining children spoke Irish only. No member of this family could read. During their nine year marriage, four children were born to Thomas and Mary, and all survived. Theirs was a 2nd class house with three windows to the front, and three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House No. 2

Michael Coyne (68) and his wife Mary, (61) lived in this two-roomed 3rd class house, with five of their children: Michael (Junior) and his brother John were both 24, James was 20, Bridget was 18 and Sarah was 16. During their thirty-one year marriage, nine children were born and eight were still living. Only Michael (Jnr), Bridget and Sarah could read and spoke both Irish and English. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 3

James Coyne (68) and his wife Mary (60) lived in this 3rd class house with two rooms. Their daughter Mary Duffy (33), was a widow and lived with her parents and her own three children, Mary (7), Michael (6) and William (3). James and Mary’s two sons, Michael (22) and Pat (20) Coyne also lived with the family They had been married thirty-six years and of the seven children born to them, five were still living. They had a cow house and a piggery. No member of this large family could read, and all except the jather James, spoke Irish only.

House No. 4

Martin Joyce, a widowed farmer lived in this 3rd class, two-roomed house. He spoke Irish

only and could not read. He did have a cow house.

House No. 5

Martin Coyne (50) and his wife Jane lived in this 2nd class three-roomed house, with their two daughters, Bridget (19) and Mary (14). They had been married for twenty years and the two daughters were the only issue of the marriage. The parents could not read and spoke only Irish. Bridget could not read and spoke both Irish and English. Mary, a scholar, could read and write. The family had a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 6

Michael Coyne (60), a farmer and his wife Bridget (50) lived in this 2nd class, three roomed house with their six children. These were Michael (Jnr) aged 20, and his brother Thomas, aged 18. Their four daughters were Bridget (14), Julia (12), Catherine (10) and Margaret aged 8. Their marriage had endured twenty-six years and of the ten children born to the couple, six had survived. The parents spoke only Irish and could not read, neither could their son Michael, although he spoke both Irish and English. The remaining children could read and write and were bilingual. Their holding had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 7

John Walsh (38) was a farmer, single and headed this household. His nephew Martin Morrin (18) resided with him. They could both read and write and spoke both Irish and English. Their 2nd class, three roomed house also boasted a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 8

James Thornton (50) and his wife Bridget, also 50 resided in this two-roomed third class house with his mother Kate Thornton (73). James and Bridget had been married for 20 years and had three children, Michael (14), Thomas (13) and Bridget (12). The children were bilingual and only Thomas could read and write. They had a stable, a cow house and a barn.

House No. 9

Thomas Thornton (50), a widower was both a farmer and a grocer. He could not read and spoke only Irish. His four daughters, Bridget (17), Mary (15), Sarah (12) and Julia (10) lived with him as did his brother James (45). James could not read either and also spoke only Irish. The girls could read and write and were bilingual. His 2nd class house boasted five windows and five rooms. The roof was either slate, iron or tiled. They also had a stable, a cowhouse, a piggery and a barn.

House No. 10

Martin Joyce (40) and his wife Honor (50) lived in this 2nd class, three roomed house with their six children, five daughters and an infant son. The girls were Ellen and Mary, both 10 years old, Margaret (9) and another set of twins Bridget and Anne both aged seven. The infant was John, aged 9 months. The family spoke only Irish and could not read or write. Martin’s mother Mary Joyce, aged 87 also resided with the family and she was a widow. The marriage had lasted eleven years and all six of the children born of the marriage were alive. They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House No. 11

James (50) and Catherine (45) Walsh lived in this 2nd class, three roomed house with his mother Sarah Walsh (90), a widow. Their marriage had lasted 23 years and of the eight children born to them, seven were still living. Their children were Mary (21), Bridget (14), Catherine (12) Thomas (10), John (8), Honor (6) and Michael (3). The parents and grandmother could not read or write and Sarah also spoke only Irish. The four older children could read and write and the family was bilingual. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 12

Martin (50), a farmer and Honor (51) Kineavey lived in this 2nd class, three roomed house with their four children. These were Maria (19), Martin (15), Anne (12) and Julia (9). They had been married for thirty years and all seven children born of the union were still living. The whole family was bilingual but only Martin Jnr. and Anne could read and write. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 13

Patrick (62) and his wife Nappy (45) Thornton lived in this 2nd class, three roomed house with his brother James (45) and their seven children. The marriage had lasted 21 years and of the eleven children born, only seven had survived. The children were Mary (20), Bridget (19), John (13), Julia (11), Michael (10), Nappy (8) and Anne (2). The five older children could read and write and were bilingual. The adults of this household could not read or write and spoke Irish only, as did the two younger children. They had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house.

House No. 14

Patrick (54) and Catherine Joyce (40) lived in this 3rd class two roomed house with their five children. These were Mary (12), Bridget (10), Catherine (9), Margaret (8) and Martin (6). The two older children could read and write, as could their mother. Catherine Senior was born in County Mayo. The marriage had lasted twelve years and of the six children born to them, five were still living. Patrick spoke only Irish and the other family members were bilingual. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 15

This 3rd class two roomed house was the residence of John (60) and Maggie Joyce (59) who lived with their four children and Maggie’s mother, Mary Thornton (80). The children were Mary (19), Brigid (18) Julia (18) and Maggie (15). The adults could not read or write and spoke only Irish. The daughters spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. John was a farmer. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 16

This 3rd class, two roomed house was occupied by Patrick (45) and Julia (42) Walsh, together with his mother, Sarah Walsh (82) and their five children. These were Mary (13), John (9), Patrick (7), Catherine (3) and Michael (1). The parents had been married fourteen years and of the six children born alive to the marriage, five were still living. The only family member who could read and write was Mary and both she and her mother spoke both Irish and English. All other family members spoke Irish only. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 17

This 3rd class two roomed house was occupied by Patrick (53) and Julia (51) Corcoran, together with their four children. Patrick was a farmer. The children still living were Mary (21), Margaret (18), Michael (16) and Julia (14) who was the only scholar in the family. Margaret, Michael and Julia could read and write and spoke both irish and English. The other family members spoke Irish only. The marriage had lasted 22 years and, of the five children born alive, four were still living. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 18

The 2nd class, three roomed house of Thomas (67) and Bridget (70) Murphy had a cow house and a piggery. Thomas was a farmer. Four of their children resided with their parents – John (21), Julia (20), Thomas (19) and James (13). The marriage had lasted 45 years and of the nine children born to the parents, eight were still living. There is a substantial age gap between James and his mother, Bridget. James was listed as a “Scholar” and both he and Thomas could read and write. These younger three children also spoke both Irish and English. The rest of the family resident in the house spoke Irish only.

House No. 19

Nappy (35) Coyne, a widow and her daughter Bridget (11), a scholar lived in this 3rd class, two roomed house. Nappy spoke Irish only and could not read. Bridget spoke both Irish and English and could read and write. They had a cow house.

House No. 20

Michael (35) Coyne, a farmer and his wife Jane (40) lived in this 3rd class, two roomed house with their daughter Mary (11). Michael and Mary spoke both Irish and English. Jane spoke Irish only and Mary, a scholar, could read and write. They had been married for twelve years and of the two children born alive to the marriage, only Mary survived. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 21

Patrick (40) and Margaret (35) Coyne lived in this 2nd class three roomed house with their four daughters – Bridget (4), Mary (3), Catherine (2) and Margaret (1). No member could read or write and Irish was the language of the home. They had been married for seven years and their four children were still living. Their holding included a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 22

John Coyne (74), a widower and a farmer was listed as head of this household. His son Patrick (50) and wife Mary (46) lived with him, together with their six children – Patrick (19), John (18), Mary (15), Anne (10), Kate (6) and Peter (2). The three older members of the family could not read or write and neither could the three younger members. John himself, spoke only Irish, but all other family members were bilingual. Theirs was a 2nd class house with three rooms and the holding also included a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House No. 23

Bridget (74) Joyce, a farmer and a widow was listed as head of this family. She lived with her daughter Bridget Murphy (46) and her grandson, Michael (19) Murphy. Bridget’s son John Joyce (34) also resided at the house. Bridget Murphy had been married for 21 years and had one live and surviving birth. The family could not read and spoke only Irish. Their 3rd class two roomed holding included a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 24

James (75) and Bridget (70) Walsh lived in this house with their son, Patrick (27). They had been married for 51 years and, of the ten children born alive, four were still living. Patrick was deaf and dumb. No one could read or write and Irish was the spoken language. Their house was 3rd class two roomed dwelling. They also had a cow house and a piggery.

House No. 25

Patrick (54) and Bridget (49) Coyne lived with their seven children – Martin (20), Thomas (18), Peter (15), John (11), Mary (9), Sarah (8) and Patrick (5). The parents could read only and all of the children bar the youngest could read and write. Theirs was a bilingual household. Patrick and Bridget had been married for 21 years and of the eight children born alive, seven were still living. Theirs was a 2nd class three roomed house with a cow house, a piggery and a barn.

House No. 26

Daniel (40) and Mary (32) Duffy lived with their four children and Mary’s mother Bridget Walsh (72) in this 3rd class two roomed house. Their children were Patrick (10), James (8), Bridget (6) and Mary (4). Young Patrick and his mother could read and write. Daniel, Mary, Patrick and James spoke both Irish and English – the other family members spoke Irish only and could not read or write. They had been married for eleven years and the four children born alive were still living. They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

 

 

 

 

This page was added on 09/12/2016.

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