Shanadullaun

Sean na d-Tulan

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Translation:  the old land of the hillocks.

The Down Survey:

The Down Survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656 is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world. The Down Survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details being all laid down by admeasurement on maps. The survey sought to define legal property boundaries and measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish in order to facilitate it’s redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

The Down Survey:

The Down Survey name for Shanadullaun was Slewpartry.  In 1641 (pre Cromwell) the owner was Morish Linch a catholic.  In 1670 (post Cromwell) Morish Linch remained the owner. Shanadullaun was in the half barony of Rosse (sic) and in the parish of Rosse.  There were 2768 plantation acres of unprofitable land and 95 plantation acres of profitable land. The profitable land was forfeited.

O Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838 tell us the standard name for the townland was Shanadullaun and the Irish form of the name was Sean na d-Tulan.  O’Donovan provides variant forms of the name; Shanadullaun, Sean na d-Tulan, Shanadulan, Shaundullaun By. Surveyors Map, Shanadullaun, Co. Cess Collector, Shanadullaun, Local, Shannadullaun, Mearsman, and Shanadullane, Tithe Ledger.

Description:

The proprietors of this townland were the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont, Dublin.  Their agent was Mr. James Fair of Fairhill, Ross parish.  All lands were held under lease for a bulked rent of £15.  The soil was all mountainous; the steep part was in the north west of Binleavy (sic), all of it heath and mixed pasture with some arable mountain.  The mountain on the flat had mixed pasture and bog.  Light crops of oats and potatoes were produced. The County Cess of 11¼d was paid per acre for 19 acres.  Shanadullaun was a compact little village with no antiquities.

Situation:

Shanadullaun is a central townland bounded on the north by the townlands of Cloghbrack lower; on the west by Cloghbrack upper and Thonleghee or Townanal, to the south by Thonleghee or Townanal and Coolin, and on the east by Bohaun.  Shanadullaun is in the Barony of Ross and is in County Galway.

Griffiths Valuation 1855:

According to Griffith’s valuation, the land area of the townland of Shanadullaun was 372 acres, 3 roods and 35 perches (Ordnance Survey Sheet 27) and this was held by the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont.  The area was divided between five tenants and they paid rents to the agent appointed by the Earls for their respective portions of property.

Plot 1:comprised of 372 acres, 3 roods and 35 perches and had the following divisions:

1(a): Anthony Coyne had a house, office and land.  He paid £2 and 10 shillings for his portion of land and 5 shillings for the buildings. His total annual valuation of rateable property was £2 and 15 shillings.

1(b): Martin Duddy (sic) had a house and land. He also paid £2 and 10 shillings for his portion of land and 5 shillings for the house.  His total annual valuation of rateable property was £2 and 15 shillings.

1(c): Edmund Finn had a house and land. He paid £2 and 10 shillings for his piece of land and 5 shillings for the house. His total annual valuation of rateable property was also £2 and 15 shillings.

1(d): Thomas Coyne had a house and land. He paid £3 and 15 shillings for his piece of land and he paid 5 shillings for the house.  His total annual valuation of rateable property was £4.

1(e): Thaddeus Halloran had a house and land. He also paid £3 and 15 shillings for his portion of land and he paid 5 shillings for the house.  His total annual valuation of rateable property was £4.

Census 1901 for Shanadalaun (sic):

Constable Patrick McShane was the enumerator and he collected the census return on the 9thof April 1901.  There were seven houses in the village at the time and all were occupied.  Four houses were 2ndclass and three were 3rdclass and all had perishable roofs that were most likely thatch. Farming was their main livelihood.

No 1: Thomas Halloran (55) a farmer was married to Bridget (60).  Their son John (19) was a farmer’s son.  Mary (18), Catherine (16) and Julia (14) were farmer’s daughters.  Julia Joyce (82) a widow was visiting the family.  Thomas, his wife and Julia the visitor could not read while his children could read and write.  His wife and children were bilingual. Thomas and Julia spoke Irish only. The house was 3rdclass and had two windows to the front.  Seven people occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 2: Mary Coyne (57) a farmer was a widow. Her son John (29) was a farmer’s son and he was married to Mary (21).  Mary and her son could not read while her daughter – in – law could read and write.  All the family spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rdclass and had two windows to the front.  The mother and the young couple occupied two rooms.  They had a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 3: Joseph Coyne (60) was a farmer and he was married to Mary (50).  Their daughter Mary (20) was a farmer’s daughter, their sons Michael (15) was a farmer’s son and Stephen (12) was a scholar.  The parents could not read while the children could read and write. The parents and children were bilingual. The house was 2ndclass and had three windows in front.  The family of five shared three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the premises.

No 4: Martin Kavanagh (43) a farmer and his wife Margaret had seven children.  Michael (14) was a farmer’s son.  Margaret (12), Mary (10), Patrick (9) and Martin (8) were scholars.  John was (5) and Ellen (4) years old. Margaret and her two youngest children spoke Irish only, Martin and the other children were bilingual.  The parents could not read while Michael and his school going siblings could read and write.  The house was 2ndclass and had three windows in front and the family of nine occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn on the property.

No 5: Luke Kavanagh (33) was married to Ellen (30) and farming was their occupation.  They had three children; John (5), Mary (4) and James (2) years old. Luke spoke Irish only; his wife and five year old John were bilingual.  None could read.  The house was 2ndclass and had three windows to the front.  The parents and children shared three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 6: Michael Joyce a farmer and his wife Sarah (50) and their five children lived here.  Michael (19) and William (14) were farmer’s sons.  Bridget (17) was a farmer’s daughter and Mary (12) and Catherine (9) were scholars.  Michael and his children could read and write, his wife could not read.  All the family was bilingual.  The house was 3rdclass and had two windows to the front. The parents and their children occupied two rooms.  They had a piggery and a barn on the premises.

No 7: John Joyce (50) was married to Honor (45) and they were farmers.  The couple had five children; Stephen (20) was a farmer’s son, Mary (16) and Margaret (14) were farmer’s daughters and Bridget (10) and John (8) were scholars. The parents and eight year old John could not read.  The other children could read and write.  The family spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2ndclass and had three windows in front.  Seven members occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house and a barn on the holding.

Census 1911 for Shanadalaun:

The census for Shanadalaun (sic) was collected by Constable Patrick Breheny.  The village had seven houses and all were occupied.  Four of the houses were 2ndclass and three were 3rdclass and all had perishable roofs that were most likely thatch. Thirty six people lived there; eighteen males and eighteen females. Ten years on since the last census, the questions were expanded to include ‘completed years the marriage had lasted, children born to the marriage and children still living’.  This gives an indication of a high infant mortality rate for the townland with many families losing a number of children.  Sadly this was common place in Ireland in those times. The majority of the inhabitants could read and write and were bilingual.  Irish was the spoken language of the home as the younger children spoke only Irish even in their early years of attending school.  Farming was the family occupation.

No 1: Joe Coyne (70) a farmer and his wife Mary (70) were married for thirty years and of the nine children born to the couple, only two were still living.  Tom (40) and Stephen (22) were farmer’s sons.  None of the family could read.  The father and sons spoke Irish only; the mother was bilingual.  The house was 3rdclass and had one window to the front.  Four people occupied two rooms.  They had a stable and a cow house on the holding.

No 2: John Coyne (45) was married to Mary (30) for eleven years and they were farmers.  They had five children; Michael (10) was a farmer’s son, Mary (7) and Maria (6) were scholars.  Bridget was (4) and John (2) years old.  Maria Coyne (69) was a boarder in the house.  John and Maria senior could not read; his wife and three oldest children could read and write.  John’s wife and the two older children spoke Irish and English, the other members of the household spoke Irish only.  The house was 2ndclass and had three windows in front and the eight people occupied two rooms.  They had three outbuildings; a stable, a cow house and a calf house.

No 3: Thomas Halloran (65) and his wife Bridget (67) were married for thirty four years and they had four children, two were still living.  Julia (25) was a farmer’s daughter and John (22) a farmer’s son.  Julia was the only one of the family that could read and write, and she was bilingual.  Thomas, his wife and son spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rdclass and had two windows to the front.  The family of four shared two rooms.  They had a stable and a cow house on the property.

No 4: Martin Cavanagh (sic) (56) a farmer and his wife Margaret (56) were married for thirty years.  Eleven children were born to the couple but only three lived.  Martin (18) and John (15) were farmer’s sons and Ellie age (12) was a scholar.  Martin and Margaret could not read; their children could read and write.  Margaret spoke Irish only, her husband and children were bilingual.  The house was 2ndclass with three windows in front.  Five people occupied three rooms.  They had a stable and a cow house on the holding.

No 5: William Joyce (25) a farmer’s son was head of this household.  His sister Catherine (19) was a farmer’s daughter.  William could not read while Catherine could read and write.  Both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2ndclass and had three windows in front. The brother and sister had the use of three rooms.  They had a stable on the premises.

No 6: Nora Joyce (60) was a widow and farming was the family occupation.  She was married for twenty nine years and she had five children; three were still living. Her sons Stephen (28) and John (18) were farmer’s sons and her daughter Bridget (20) was a farmer’s daughter. Nora and her son Stephen could not read and they spoke Irish only.  John and Bridget could read and write and they were bilingual.  The house was 2ndclass and had two windows to the front. The family of four shared two rooms. They had a cow house on the holding.

No 7: Luke Cavanagh (47) and his wife Ellen were farmers.  They were married for eighteen years and they had ten children; seven were still living. John (16) was a farmer’s son and Margaret (14) a farmer’s daughter.  Ellie (10), Bridget (8) and Martin (6) were scholars.  Maggie was (4) and little Luke was (1) year old.  Luke’s wife and five oldest children could read and write.  He and his three young children spoke Irish only; his wife and the other children were bilingual.  The house was 2ndclass with three windows in front.  The parents and seven children occupied three rooms.  They had a stable and a cow house on the property.

 

This page was added on 06/02/2019.

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