Moneenmore

Móinín Mór

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Móinín Mór, meaning little bog (big)

Names:

According to O’Donovan’s field name books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Moneenmore and Móinín Mór was its official Irish form.  The other forms of the name were Mooneenmore (Boundary Surveyors Sketch, Local, Rev. Michael Waldron, P.P, Tithe Ledgar) and Monymore in poch de Conga (Inquis. Temp. Jac. 2).

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie), Ardnageeha had a hill called Knocknagussy (Cnoc an Mháma) and a minor feature called Lugacurry (Log an Choire).

Situation:

The townland is located on the west side of the parish.  It is bounded on the north and west by the parish of Ross, on the south by the townlands of Tiernakill north and Tiernakill south and Lough Corrib and on the east by Carhoogariv (sic).

Description:

Down Survey:

There is no information about the townland of Moneenmore in the Down Survey.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838

O’Donovan tells us that the townland was held under different leases, and was sublet to the tenants for a bulked rent of £42.19s .8d yearly.  The Co. Cess paid 1 1¼ d. for each of 30½ acres, hotel, bridge and bog (as per transcribed from O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books).  Pictures of the hotel and bridge are shown above.  The proprietors were the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont, the agent was Mr James Fair, Fairhill house.  The soil was steep mountain with very bad and rough arable mountain from foot of the steep towards Lough Corrib and Moneenmore village and also tillage at the south and foot of the steep public road running close to the village.  The crops of oats and potatoes were not good.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855

According to Griffith’s Valuation,  Moonenmore had a total acreage of 658 acres, 0 roods and 39 perches.  The total valuation for this village was £60.10s.0d. The Petty Sessions Court house and the Police barracks and garden were exempted from this valuation.  Pictures of the Petty Sessions court house is shown above.  In total 2 acres, 1 rood and 33 perches were exempted from area total and £7.0s.0d. was exempted from final valuation total.  This townland was divided into 3 plots.  The immediate lessor for plot 1a was Rev. P.B Ellis.  The immediate lessor for Plot 1-b and  Plot  -c was John King.  The Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont were the immediate lessors for plot 2 and plot 3a. The immediate lessor for plot 3b was Michael Higgins.

Plot 1 was composed of 206 acres, 2 roods and 25 perches.  This plot was divided into 3 plots labelled a, -b and -c. a was occupied by John King, -b was vacant and -c was a petty Sessions Court house, which John King paid half annual rent on. Total valuation for this plot was £38.0s.0d. The Petty Sessions court house was exempt from valuation, therefore the total valuation for this plot was £37.0s.0d.

Plot 1a John King had a house, offices and land.  The land was valued at £13.10s.0d and the buildings were valued at £22.0s.0d. Total valuation for this sub-plot was £35.10s.0d.

Plot 1 b Vacant.  This plot was vacant and had a house valued at £1.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £1.10s.0d.

Plot 1 c Petty Sessionshad a house valued at £1.0s.0d.  Total valuation for this plot was £1.0s.0d.  John Kingpaid half annual rent of £2.10s.0d.

Plot 2 was comprised of 2 acres, 1 rood and 33 perches.  This plot was occupied by the Constabulary Forces.  The Earls of Leitrim paid half annual rent.  Total valuation for this plot was £6.0s.0d.  The Constabulary Forces Police barracks and garden were exempt for valuation therefore this plot had no valuation.

Plot 2 Constabulary Forceshad Police-barracks and a garden.  The land was valued at £1.0s.0d and the buildings were valued at £5.0s.0d.  Total annual valuation for this plot £6.0s.0d. The Earls of Leitrim and Charlemontpaid half annual rent of £8.0s.0d.

Plot 3 was composed of 451acres, 2 roods and 13 perches.  This plot was divided into two plots labelled a and b. a was owned by Michael Higgins and b was owned by Mary Coyne.  Total valuation for this plot was £23.10s.0d.

Plot 3a Michael Higginshad a house and land.  The land was valued at £20.0s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.10s.0d.  Total valuation for this sub-plot was £20.10s.0d.

Plot 3b Mary Coynehad a house and land. The land was valued at £2.10s.0d. and the house was valued at £0.10s.0d.   Total valuation for this sub-plot was £3.0s.0d.

 

1901 Census

In 1901 there were five houses. There were three inhabited and there were two uninhabited. The first dwelling was a hotel and it was a 2ndclass residence. The second dwelling was a public house, but it was uninhabited. The third house was a 2ndclass residence, as was the fourth house, and lastly the fifth house was the Courthouse which was uninhabited.  There were seven males and eight females in this village.  There were eleven out-offices in this village. There were three stables, one coach house, one harness room, three cow houses, one calf house and two piggeries in this village.  John Wallace was the landowner of the hotel and public house.  Col. J.H Clements was the landowner of the court house.

Barbra Louisa Wallace (50) resided in House No 1, which was a hotel and she was head of the family.  Her occupation was a Hotel Manageress.  She could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  She had one son and a daughter.  Her son was Michael BernardWallace (25) and he was a Hotel Manager.  He could read and write and he spoke Irish and English.  Her daughter was Alice AnstaceWallace (17) and she was a Assistant Manageress.  She could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Also in the house at the time of the 1901 census was a Mary Kerrigan (18) whose occupation was a Domestic servant. She could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Catherine O’Malley(90) was a visitor on the night.  She could not read and spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was Roman Catholic and born in Galway.  This was a second class house with ten rooms. They had two stables, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery. The name of the landlord was John Wallace.

Andrew Crawford (46)resided in House No 3.  His occupation was a Land Steward.  He could read and write and spoke English only. He was Church of Ireland. He was born in Co Meath.  Patrick Thornton  (15) was living in the same house. His occupation was a Farmer Servant. He could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  He was born in Galway and he was a Roman Catholic.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with five rooms. They had a stable, a coach house, a harness room and a cow house. The landlord for this house was Colonel Clements.

John Coyne (60) resided in House No 4.He was head of the family.  His occupation was a Shepherd.  He could not read or write and he spoke only Irish.  He was married to Barbra Coyne (50), she could not read or write and she spoke only Irish.  They had three sons and three daughters.  Their children were Peter(20), Kate(18), Michael(15), Norah (13), Barbra(11) and Andrew (9). Peter Coyne’s occupation was a Shepherd’s son.  He could read and spoke Irish and English. He was single. Kate was a Shepherd’s daughter. She could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Michael was a Shepherd’s son, he could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Norah was a Scholar, and could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Barbra was a scholar and she could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Andrew was a scholar, he could read and write and spoke Irish and English. Everyone in this household was born in Galway and were Roman Catholic.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery.  The landlord for this house was Patrick D. Conroy.

 

1911 Census

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage, and children still living).     In 1911 there were five houses.  The first two houses were private dwellings. They were 2ndclass houses. House numbered 3 was the Petty Sessions Courthouse, the hotel was the fourth residence in 1911, it was a 2ndclass residence, and House numbered 5 was a not inhabited private dwelling.  The landlord for this house was Barbara Wallace   There were fourteen out-offices or farm-steadings in this village.  There were two stables, two coach houses, one harness room, three cow houses, two calf houses, one piggery and three fowl houses.

John Coyne(66) resided in House No 1 with his wife, his four children, daughter in law and seven grandchildren.  John was married to Barbara (72). Their children were John(42), Michael (25),Barbara (21), and Andrew (20).  Their daughter-in-law was Mary Coyne (42).  Their grandchildren were Mary(15), Patrick(13),John(11), Michael(9), Bridget(7), Anne(5) and Martin(1).  John (66) and Barbara (Snr.) were married for 44 years, had ten children and ten of them survived until 1911.  John(42) and Mary (42) were married for sixteen years, had eight children and seven of them survived until 1911.  John (66) was a shepherd.  John (42) was a shepherd.  Michael was a agricultural labourer.  Andrew was a lead miner.  Mary (Jnr.), Patrick, John (11), Michael (Jnr.), Bridget and Anne were scholars. John (66), Barbara (Snr.), John (42), Michael (25), Michael, Bridget, Anne and Martin could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write.  Martin was too young to talk.  John (66) spoke Irish only.  The rest of the household spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway and was Roman Catholic.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with two rooms. They had a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a fowl house.  Their landlord was Patrick Conny, Rosmuck.

Andrew Crawford (56) resided in House No 2. He was head of the family and married. His occupation was a Land Steward. He could read and write and spoke English only. He was a Protestant  Episcopalian as were the rest of the household.  He was born in Meath. Mary Crawford(27) was his wife.  She could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Mary and her children were born in Galway.  They were married six years, had four children and three of them survived until 1911.  They had one son and two daughters. Henry Andrew (5) (sic.) could not read or write and spoke English only.  Florence Mary (3) could not read or write and spoke English only and Olive Crawford(2) could not read or write and spoke English only.  On the night of the census there was a female visitor; her name was Gladys Emelie Williams (10) she was also a Protestant Episcopalian and a Scholar, she was born in Boston, America. She could read and write and spoke English only.  They had a 2ndclass house with eight rooms.  They had a stable, a coach house, a harness room, a cow house and a fowl house.  Their landlord was H.J Clements, Co. Kildare.

Margaret F. Wallace (28) resided in House No 4, she was head of the family.  She could read and write and spoke Irish and English.  Her sister was called Alice Wallace (25).  She could read and write and spoke Irish and English.   They also had a farm servant living with them, his name was Peter Conneely (sic.)(19) he could not read or write and he spoke Irish and English.  Everyone in this household was born in Galway and was Roman Catholic.  They lived in a 2ndclass house with nine rooms.  They had a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a calf house and a fowl house.  Their landlord was Barbara Wallace.

This page was added on 02/10/2018.

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