Maum East

An Mám Thoir

Tomas O Flatharta

Maum East/Mám meaning an elevated pass
Tomas O Flatharta

Maum East/Mám meaning an elevated pass

Names:

According to O’ Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838, the standard name given to the townland was Maum East and Mám was its official Irish name. Other names given to this village was Maume (Map of Property 1760, Map of Property 1815), Maam East (Tithe Ledger) and Maum (Leases 1837). There is also an incorrect spelling of Ma’am by O’ Rourke’s Hotel.

According to Coimisiúin na Logainmneacha (logainm.ie), Maum East has a mountain or mountain range called Lugnabrick (Log na Brice).

Situation

Maum East was described as a central townland. It was bounded on the north by Baunreevagh and Cammanagh. Bounded west by Maum West. Bounded south by Tiernakill North and Moneenmore and bounded east by Crimlin West.

Description:

Down Survey: The Down Survey was a cadastral survey of Ireland carried out by William Petty, English scientist in 1655 and 1656. The survey was apparently called the “Down Survey” by Petty because the results were set down in maps ‘‘admeasurement down’ was used; it is referred to by that name in Petty’s will.’ (Wikipedia). The name used by the Down Survey for this village was Mamtrasna. In 1641 the owner for Maum East was Murragh a Na Dow o Flahartye who was a Catholic. In 1671 the owner was Sir James Cuffe (Protestant).

O Donovan’s (1838): The proprietor for this village was the Earl of Leitrim and Charlemont Rosshil or Dublin. The agent was Mr. James Fair of Fairhil. This village was all held under lease for a rent of £40.0s.0d. per year. The soil was all mountain with some steep and mixed pasture with some arable mountain at the foot. Crops of oats were middling. A small share of potatoes. Other parts were not good. The Co. Cess paid 11¼ d. per acre for 366 acres. There was a stream and a bridge between this village and Maum West. This village held Fairs on Maum Bridge on the 2nd September, 10th July, 12th March and 1st December.

Griffiths Valuation:

According to Griffiths Valuation, Maum East had 481 acres, 2 roods and 37 perches. Total valuation for this village was £38.0s.0d. The immediate lessors for this townland were the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont for plot 1 and Michael Holloran for plot – g. This village was divided into two plots labelled plot 1 and plot – g.

Plot 1 was composed of 481 acres, 2 roods and 37 perches. This plot was divided into seven plots labelled a,-, b, c, d, e and f. a was owned by Edmund Fitzhenry, – was owned by Michael Joyce, b was owned by Michael Holloran, c was owned by Michl Holloran. jun., d was owned by James Holloran, e was owned by Richard Walsh and f was owned by Patrick Spellman. Total valuation for this plot was £37.0s.0d.

Plot 1 a Edmund Fitzhenry had a house and land. The land was valued at £4.5s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d. Total valuation for this sub-plot was £4.15s.0d.

Plot 1 – Michael Joyce had land valued at £4.5s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £4.5s.0d.

Plot 1 b Michael Holloran had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £8.10s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £9.0s.0d.

Plot 1 c Michl. Holloran. jun. had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £4.5s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £4.15.0d.

Plot 1 d James Holloran had a house and land. The land was valued at £4.5s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £4.15s.0d.

Plot 1 e Richard Walsh had a house, office and land. The land was valued at £4.5s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £4.15s.0d.

Plot 1 f Patrick Spellman had a house and land. The land was £4.5s.0d. and the buildings were valued at £0.10s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £4.15s.0d.

Plot – g was comprised of one plot. This plot was occupied by Michael Muns. Total valuation for this plot was £1.0s.0d.

Plot g Michael Muns had a house valued at £1.0s.0d. Total valuation for this plot was £1.0s.0d.

 

1901 Census

The Census of 1901 states there was 11 houses in this village and 10 of them were inhabited. House numbered 3 was not inhabited and was a shop. House numbered 3 was owned by Peter O’ Malley. House numbered 5 was also a shop. There were 28 males and 22 females in this village and everyone in this village was Roman Catholic. There was 21 out-houses or farm steadings in this household. There were three stables, one coach house, eight cow houses, two calf houses, six piggeries and a forge according to the Return of Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings Return (Form B2). Everyone in this village, except households numbered 2 and 5, were born in Galway. Thomas Glynn and John Ryan from household 2 were born in Mayo. John Holleran from household 5 was born in Mayo.

House 1- Patrick Lally

Patrick Lally (64) resided in house 1 with his two children. His children were Bridget (27) and Joseph (23). Patrick was a farmer. Patrick could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 2- Thomas and Julia Glynn

Thomas (29) and Julia (27) Glynn lived in the house with their three children and Thomas’s nephew. Their children were Michael (3), Liggie (sic.) (2) and Mary (2 months). Thomas’s nephew was John Ryan (12). Thomas was a blacksmith and John was a scholar. Thomas and John could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. Liggie and Mary were too young to talk, Michael spoke English only, the rest of the household spoke English and Irish. Thomas and John were born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a forge. The landlord for this household was Peter O Malley.

House numbered 3 was an uninhabited shop.

House 4-Mary Walsh

Mary Walsh (82) resided in house 4 with her son, Michl. (47). Mary was a housekeeper. Michl. could read and write. Mary could not read or write. Both Mary and Michl. spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house.

House 5-Thos. and Kate O Malley

Thos. (45) and Kate (32) O Malley lived in house 5 with their three servants. They also had a visitor on the night of the census. In the Household Return (Form A) for this household, both Thos and Kate are referred to as heads of the family. Their servants were John Holleran (45), John Kyne (26) and Mary Kyne (18). Their visitor was M.H. (sic.) Kyne (23). Thos. was an assistant Co. Surveyor. M.H. was a shop assistant. John (45) and Mary were domestic servants. John was a farm servant. Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. John (45) was born in Mayo, the rest of the household was born in Galway. They lived in a 1st class house with nine rooms. This house was also a shop. They had a stable, a coach house, a cow house and a calf house.

House 6-Bridget Walsh

Bridget Walsh (60) resided in house 6 with her two children, her mother and a relative. Her children were Thomas (28) and Michael (19). Bridget’s mother was Catherine Coyne (88). Bridget’s relative was Ellen Halloran (65). Ellen was a barracks servant. Thomas and Michael could read or write. The rest of the household could not read or write. Everyone in this household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery.

House 7-John and Bridget Halloran

John (45) and Bridget (33) Halloran occupied house 7 with their six children and John’s mother. Their children were James (12), Mary (10), John (8), Kate (5), Michael (3), and Patrick (9 months). John’s mother was Mary Halloran (63). John (Snr.) was a farmer. Bridget was a housekeeper. James, Mary (10) and John were scholars. Kate, Michael and Patrick could not read or write, Mary (63) and John (Jnr.) could read only, the rest of the household could read and write. Patrick was too young to talk, Mary (10), John (Jnr.), Kate and Michael spoke English only, the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a calf house and a piggery.

House 8-Thady Coyne

Thady Coyne (45) lived in house 8 with his daughter, Julia (20). Thady was a farmer. Julia could read and write, Thady could not read or write. Both Thady and Julia spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 9- John and Bridget Coyne

John (74) and Bridget (59) Coyne resided in house 9 with their three children and their daughter-in-law. Their children were Thomas (25), Michael (1) and Bridget (3 months). Their daughter in law was Mary (28). John was a farmer. John, Thomas and Mary could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. Michael and Bridget spoke English only or were too young to talk, Bridget spoke Irish only and the rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 10-Michael Cassidy

Michael Cassidy (70) lived in house 10 with their son, Michael (30). Michael (Snr.) was a farmer. No one in this household could read or write. Michael (Snr.) spoke Irish only, Michael spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with one room. They had no out-offices or farm steadings.

House 11-William and Bridget Fitzhenry

William (45) and Bridget (35) Fitzhenry lived in house 11 with their seven children. Their children were Mary (15), Bridget (11), Martin (9), Thomas (7), Stephen (5), Sabina (3) and John (10 months). William was a tenant farmer. Bridget (Jnr.), Martin, Thomas, Stephen and Sabina were scholars. Sabina and John were too young to read or write. Bridget (Snr.) could not read or write. The rest of the household could read and write. John was too young to talk. Martin, Thomas, Stephen and Sabina spoke English only. The rest of the household spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

 

Census 1911

Ten years later the census questions were expanded to include the following: Particulars as to Marriage (which included – completed years the present marriage has lasted, children born alive to present marriage, total children born alive to this marriage and children still living). There were nine houses in this village; eight of them were inhabited in 1911. The house that was not inhabited was numbered house 9 and was owned by Thomas Coyne of Maum West. Household numbered 8 was a shop. In 1911 there was one shop in this village instead of two. Household numbered 8 was a new household in this village. There was no mention of households numbered 2, 4 and 9 in 1901. These households were the Glynn household, the Mary Walsh household and the John and Bridget Coyne household. Everyone in this village was Roman Catholic. Everyone in this village was born in Galway, except household numbered 6,. There were 25 out-offices or farm steadings in this village. There were four stables, one coach house, one harness room, six cow houses, two calf houses, six piggeries, two fowl houses, one turf house, one potato house and one store.

House 1-Bridget Lally

Bridget Lally (27) resided in house 1, previously numbered house 1, with her brother and a boarder. Bridget’s brother was Michael (25). Bridget’s boarder was Ellen Halloran (76). There was no mention of Patrick or Joseph in this 1911 census. Ellen was a widow. Michael was a farmer. Michael could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. Bridget and Ellen spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 3rd class house with two rooms. They had a stable.

House 2-Thady Coyne

Thady Coyne (68) lived in house 2, previously numbered house 8, with his daughter, Julia Coyne (35). Thady was a widower. Thady was a farmer. Julia could read and write, Thady could not read or write. Both Thady and Julia spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 3-Michael Cassidy

Michael Cassidy (45) lived in house 3, previously numbered house 10,. There was no mention of Michael Cassidy (70) in this 1911 census. Michael was a farmer. Michael could read and write and spoke Irish and English. He lived in a 4th class house with one room. He had no out-buildings or farm steadings.

House 4-John and Bridget Halloran

John (53) and Bridget (46) Halloran lived in house 3, previously numbered house 7, with their five children. Their children were Mary (19), John (18), Kate (15), Michael (12) and Patrick (11). There was no mention of James or Mary in this 1911 census. John and Bridget were married for 23 years, had seven children and six of them survived until 1911. John was a farmer. Kate, Michael and Patrick were scholars. Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery, a fowl house and a potato house.

House 5- Thomas and Mary Walsh

Thomas (42) and Mary (29) Walsh resided in house 5, previously numbered house 6, with their two children. Their children were Bridget (7) and Kate (2). There was no mention of Bridget Walsh (60), Michael Walsh, Catherine Coyne or Ellen Halloran in this household in 1911. Thomas and Mary were married for 8 years, had five children and two of them survived until 1911. Thomas was a farmer and Bridget was a scholar. The parents could read and write, the rest of the household could not read or write. The parents spoke Irish and English, their children spoke English only or were too young to talk. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house, a piggery and a fowl house.

House 6- Thos. and Kate O’ Malley

Thos. (55) and Kate (45) O’ Malley (called O Malley in 1901) lived in house 6, previously numbered house 5, with their assistant and servant. Their assistant was Annie Curran (20) and their servant was John Holleran (52). There was no mention of M.H. Kyne, John Kyne or Mary Kyne in this 1911 census for this household. Thos. and Kate were married for 19 years and had no children. Thos. was an assistant Co. Surveyor, farmer and sub post master. Annie was a post office assistant. John was a general servant. Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. John was born in Mayo and the rest of the household was born in Galway. They lived in a 1st class house with nine rooms. They had a stable, a harness room, a cow house, a piggery and a turf house. There were strong indications that this building was the post office for Maum East.

House 7-William and Bridget Fitzhenry

William (65) and Bridget (50) Fitzhenry lived in house 7, previously numbered house 11, with their six children. Their children were Martin (19), Stephen (14), Sabina (13), Edward (10), William (8) and Myles (4). There was no mention of Mary, Bridget (11), Thomas or John in this household in 1911. William (Snr.) and Bridget were married for 26 years, had twelve children and nine of them survived until 1911. William (Snr.) was a farmer. Stephen, Sabina, Edward, William and Myles were scholars. Bridget, William (Jnr.) and Myles could not read or write, the rest of the household could read and write. Myles spoke English only; the rest of the household spoke English and Irish. They lived in a 2nd class house with three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery.

House 8- Peter Joseph and Kate O Malley

Peter Joseph (35) and Kate (33) O Malley resided in house 8, this was a new household in this village in 1911, with their daughter, brother and servant. Their daughter was Maura (4), their brother was Patrick D. O Malley (31) and their servant was Maggie Clogherty (17). Peter Joseph and Kate were married for five years, had two children and one of them survived until 1911. Peter Joseph was a farmer and merchant. Patrick D. was a county returning officer. Maggie was a domestic servant. Everyone in this household could read and write and spoke Irish and English. They lived in a 1st class house with six rooms. They had a stable, a coach house, a cow house, a calf house, a piggery and a store. This building was also a shop.

This page was added on 26/10/2019.

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