Rusheen East

 An Roisín Thoir

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Irish form of the name: Ruisín which translates as a small point.

Down Survey:

The Down Survey of 1641 reveals the name for Rusheen (sic) East was Rosshine (sic). In 1641 (Pre Cromwell), the owner(s) were Shoy , Moyler McTibbet McEdmund who were catholic. In 1670 (post Cromwell) the owner was John Brown, a protestant. The Survey states that Rusheen East was in the half barony of Rosse (sic), in the parish of Rosse, in County Galway. There was 29 plantation acres of profitable land and the same amount of land was forfeited.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books (1838):

According to O’Donovan’s Field Name Books the standard name for the townland was Rusheen (sic) East. O’Donovan records many forms of the name; Rusheen, Ruisín, Rusheen East By. Surveyors Sketch Map, Rusheen East, County Cess Collector, Rusheen, County Map, Rusheen East (Local), Rusheen East, Mearsman, Rusheen East, Rev. Michl Heraty, P.P. (also spelled Heraghty).

Description:

The proprietor of the townland was the Earl of Leitrim and Charlemont (sic). The agent was James Fair, Fairhill, Ross parish. The land was all held by tenants for a bulked rent of £10.2.6. The entire farm being about eight acres and three roods was held under lease by two persons. The farms amounted to four and a half acres and one and a half roods per person. The soil was light and rocky, producing light crops of wheat and potatoes. The County Assessment of 12½ was paid per acre for eight acres. The village was very small and had no antiquities.

Situation:

Rusheen East is situated in the south east corner of the parish, bounded on the north by the parish of Cong, County Mayo and the townland of Clonbur. On the west side it is bounded by Rusheen West, south by the parish of Cong, Galway and Cong, County Mayo. It lies in the barony of Ross and in County Galway.

Griffith’s Valuation (1855):

Rusheen East can be found on ordnance sheet 27. It had an area of 202 acres, 2 roods and 27 perches. The Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont (sic) held a portion of land in fee. The other immediate lessors were Alexander Lambert and Patrick Ryan. The land comprised of four plots with a number of subdivisions.

Plot 1: (a) Anthony Coyne had a house, office and land. The area was 83 acres and 8 roods. The land had a rateable annual valuation of £42. for the land and £4. for the buildings.

Plot 1: (b) The Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont (sic) were in fee for a plantation on 20 roods with a valuation of £0.2.0. per annum.

Plot 2: Myles Joyce had a house, office and land. The area was 3 acres, 2 roods and 18 perches. The land had a rateable annual valuation of £2.6.0., the buildings £0.6.0.

Plot 3: comprised an area of 55 acres and 19 perches. The immediate lessor was Alexander Lambert and the plot was divided between:

3(a) James Halloran who had a house, offices and land with an rateable annual valuation of £3.5 shillings for the land and 10 shillings for the buildings.

3 (b) Thomas Halloran who had a house offices land valued at £6.10 shillings.

3 (b) Michael Discan (sic) had land with a rateable annual valuation of £9.15 shillings.

 

Plot 4: comprised an area of 60 acres, 3 roods and 2 perches. Patrick Ryan leased the land that was divided between:

John Fox who held land valued at £7.5shillings.

Stephen Lyden (sic) held land valued at £2.15shillings.

Thomas Somerville held land valued at £3.5 shillings.

Thomas Ganly (sic) held land valued at £2.5 shillings.

George Langley held land valued at £1.

Anne Duffy held land valued at £1.

Sarah Connolly held land valued at £2.5 shillings.

William Cowan held land valued at £2.5 shillings.

Plot 4:

(a) John Morrin (sic) had a house and land. The land value was £1. The house value was 4 shillings with a total rateable annual valuation of £1.4 shillings.

Census 1901:

The Census for Rusheen East was collected on the 6th April 1901, by Constable Hugh Daly enumerator. There were five inhabited dwellings, four of these were 3rd class and one was 2nd class. Thirty seven people lived in this townland; seventeen were male and twenty were female.

No 1: Thomas Joyce (50) a farmer was married to Nappy (50) and they had a son Myles (20). It does not list an occupation for Myles. Thomas and Nappy could not read while their son could read and write. Thomas and Myles were bilingual, Nappy spoke only Irish. The house was 3rd class and had two windows in front. Three people shared two rooms. They had a stable and a piggery on the holding.

No 2: Mary Varley (sic) (78) was a widow. Her daughter Mary (34) was a housekeeper, daughter Anne (32) was a general domestic servant and both girls were single. The family were bilingual though they could not read or write. The house was 3rd class and had one window to the front. Three people occupied two rooms. They had no out buildings on the property.

No 3: Patrick Scahill (sic) (60) a farmer was married to Mary (50) who was a Bk? servant. They could not read or write. Their son John (23) had no occupation listed. Patrick (17) was a coachman. James (14), Bridget (20) and Catherine (18) did not have any occupation documented. The children could read and write and all the family spoke both Irish and English. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front. The family of seven shared four rooms. They had three out offices; a stable, a piggery and a shed.

No 4: Thomas Halloran (50) was a farmer. He was married to Mary (45) and they had ten children living with them. Thomas was (20); Mary (19) and Nora (17) had no occupations listed for them. John (16) was a post boy. Sarah (13), Michael (11) and James (10) were scholars. Margaret was (8), Winifred (5) and Kate (2). Thomas senior and the older children could read and write. His wife and the three youngest children could not read. The house was 3rd class and had two windows to the front. The family of twelve occupied three rooms. They had a stable, a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 5: Michael Halloran (50) a farmer, his wife Mary (40) and their ten children lived in this house. Their son Michael (18) was a post boy. Margaret (17) and Catherine (15) had no occupation listed. Martin (14), Patrick (13), Nora (12), Anne (10), Julia (9) and Thomas (7) were scholars. William was (2) years old. Michael and his children could read and write. His wife could not read. All in this household were able to speak both Irish and English. The house was 3rd class and had two windows in front. Twelve members of the family occupied three rooms. They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

Census 1911:

Constable Thomas Walsh collected the census for Rusheen East on the 4th April 1911. There were five inhabited dwellings; four were 2nd class and one was 3rd class. Thirty people lived in Rusheen East; thirteen were male and seventeen were female.

No 1: Michael Halloran (65) was a farmer. He was married to Mary (55) for thirty five years and they had twelve children, eleven were still living.   Pat was (22), Norah (20), Julia (18), Thomas (16) and William (13). The older children were documented as farmer’s sons and daughters while William was a scholar. Michael’s grandchildren were also in the home. Terence Kennedy was (4), Mary Kennedy (3) and Annie Kennedy was (1) year old. They were all born in the United States of America. The Halloran family were bilingual and they could all read and write. (the 1901 census states wife Mary could not read). The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front. The family of ten occupied three rooms. They had a stable, a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 2: Mary Halloran (56) was a widow and farming was the family occupation. Her daughter Norah (24) was a dressmaker and Sarah (21) a farmer’s daughter. John (23), Michael (19) and James (17) were farmer’s sons. Maggie (15), Winifred (13) and Catherine (11) were scholars. All the children could read and write while their mother could not. They all spoke both Irish and English. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front. Nine people shared three rooms. They had four out offices; a cow house, a stable, a piggery and a barn.

No 3: Patrick Schahill (sic) (73) was a farmer and a car man. (perhaps he provided a car hire service). He was married to Mary (68) for forty six years and they had nine children, eight were still living. Their son John (40) a farmer’s son was single as was their daughter Bridget (30). Bridget could read and write while her parents and brother could not. The family were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and had three windows to the front. Four people occupied four rooms. They had a stable, a cow house, a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 4: Mary Varley (sic) (65) and her sister Anne (64) were born in County Mayo. They were both general domestic servants and they were single. They could not read, they spoke both Irish and English. The house was 3rd class with one window to the front, the sisters occupied one room.   There were no out buildings on the property.

No 5: Thomas Joyce (64) a farmer was married to Nappy (70) for thirty nine years and they had two children. One was still living. Their son Myles (30) was married to Bridget (29) for two years and they had an infant son Thomas F who was nine months old. Thomas and his wife could not read or write. His son and wife could read and write and the family were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front. The family of five shared three rooms. There were four out offices on the holding; a stable, a piggery, a fowl house and a shed.

 

 

 

 

This page was added on 19/02/2018.

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