Cahergal

An Chathair Gheal

Teresa Philbin

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The Down Survey:  The Down Survey of Ireland is the first ever detailed land survey on a national scale anywhere in the world.  The survey is a cadastral survey of Ireland and was so called simply by its topographic details all laid down by admeasurements on maps.  It was carried out by William Petty an English scientist in 1655 and 1656.   The survey sought to measure all the land to be forfeited by the Catholic Irish, in order to facilitate it’s redistribution to merchant adventurers and English officers and soldiers in Oliver Cromwell’s army. It was to repay them and the many English politicians and adventurers who had funded Cromwell’s military campaign in Ireland.

The Down Survey of 1641 reveals the name for Cahergal (sic) was Letterlagach (sic) including Cangarrow (sic).   In 1641 (pre Cromwell) the owner was Murrough O’Flahartye (sic) a catholic. In 1670 (post Cromwell) it was in protestant ownership of Dublin College. The survey states that Cahergal was in the half barony of Rosse (sic) in the parish of Rosse.  There were 885 plantation acres of unprofitable land, 62 acres of profitable land and the profitable land was forfeited.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1838:  The standard name for this townland was Cahergal.  The Irish form of the name was Cathair Gheal that translates as white stone fort, white caher or stone fort.  It lies in the civil parish of Ross.

Other forms of the name:  Cahergal, Cathair Gheal, Cahergal (Boundary Surveyors Sketch Map), Cahergal, (County Cess Collector), Cahergall, (County Map), Cahirgeall (Inquis Temp Car 1), Cahergal ) Local), Cahergal, (Mearsman), Cahergal (Rev. Michael Heraghty P.P.).

Description:  The proprietor of Cahergal was the Earl of Leitrim and Charlemont (sic) of Rosshill and Dublin, the agent was Mr. James Fair of Fairhill, Ross parish.  The land was held under lease by tenants for the rent of £84.4.8d per year.  The soil was all mountainous, being heathy with mixed pasture.  The arable mountain had some tillage, and crops of oats and potatoes were produced.  The crops were middling in some parts but the potatoes were poor in places.  The county cess was 11¼ d per acre paid half yearly for thirty eight acres.  The village was in two clusters, each having stunted trees.  The stream from the mountain had no name.

Situation:  Cahergal is situated in the south east side of the parish.  It is bounded on the north by the townlands of Cappaghnagappul (sic) or Petersburgh and Bookaun, on the west by Bookaun and Coolin and to the south and east by Kilbeg Upper.  Cahergal is in the barony of Ross and is in County Galway.

 

Griffiths Valuation 1855: 

According to Griffith’s valuation, Cahergal had an area of two hundred and fifty ones acres and thirty two perches.  The land value at the time was £52.6.10s. The Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont leased the land to under tenants and all rents of properties were paid to the earls unless otherwise stated.

Plot 1 A (a):  Patrick Madigan leased a house, office and land.  The land measured six acres, one rood and fourteen perches, with an annual valuation of £1 and 17 shillings and the buildings had an annual valuation of 8 shillings.

Plot 1-B:  Patrick Madigan had another parcel of land that contained five acres, two roods and eleven perches that had an annual valuation of 15 shillings.  His total annual rent on both plots and buildings amounted to £3.

Plot 2:  Patrick Flanagan leased this plot that was held in three divisions 2A, 2B and 2C

2A: was comprised of five acres, one rood and thirty five perches of land and had an annual valuation of £1 and 15 shillings.

Plot 2-B:  contained two acres, three roods and eight perches of land and was valued at 10 shillings.

Plot 2-C: contained one acre, two roods and sixteen perches of land and had an annual valuation of 5 shillings.  Patrick’s total annual valuation on the three lots amounted to £2 and 10 shillings.

Plot 3:  Patrick Conway had three parcels of land in plot 3; 3A, 3-B & 3-C

3 A: had land with an area of six acres, three roods and twenty four perches and a house with an annual valuation of £2 and 5 shillings.

Plot 3-B:  consisted of six acres, three roods and fourteen perches with an annual valuation of £1 and 4 shillings.

Plot 3-C: Patrick’s third piece of land measured one rood and twenty one perches and had an annual valuation of 3 shillings.  His total annual valuation of rateable property was £4.

Plot 4:  Catherine Conway leased a house and land.  There were five acres, three roods and twenty five perches of land that had an annual valuation of £2.  The house had an annual valuation of 5 shillings.  Her total annual rent was £2 and 5 shillings.

Plot 5A:  had two tenants 5(a) and 5(b)

5(a):  Stephen Walsh had a house and land.  The land area was five acres, one rood and fifteen perches that had a total annual valuation of £1 and 15 shillings and the house had an annual valuation of 5 shillings. Stephen’s total annual valuation of rateable property was £2.

5 (b):  Catherine Walsh had a house and garden.  The garden measured two roods and twenty perches.  She paid 6 shillings lease for the garden and 4 shillings annually for the house.   Her total annual rent was 10 shillings.

Plot 6:  contained three acres and thirty two perches and it was leased between Catherine Conway and Stephen Walsh.  Each paid an annual sum of 5 shillings for their portion.

Plot 7:  Thomas Flanagan leased a house, office and land.  The land amount was two acres and six perches and it had an annual valuation of £1 and 6 shillings; the buildings were valued at 7 shillings. His total annual valuation was £1 and 13 shillings.

Plot 8:  Edmund Joyce occupied a house and land.  The land area was one acre, three roods and thirty six perches and it had an annual valuation of £1 and 6 shillings. The house had an annual valuation of 6 shillings.  His total annual valuation of rateable property was £1 and 12 shillings.

Plot 9:  was comprised of three acres, three roods and thirty six perches of land and this was divided between Thomas Flanagan and Edmund Joyce.  Each paid an annual rent of 7 shillings.

Plot 10 A: contained five acres and one rood and it was leased by two tenants, 10 (a) and 10 (b) and 10 – (b) was also held by them.

10 (a):  Thomas Comer leased a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £2 and 2 shillings and the house was valued at 8 shillings.  His total annual valuation of rateable property was £2 and 10 shillings.

 10 (b):  Michael Walsh had a house and land.  The piece of land had an annual valuation of 14 shillings and the house had an annual valuation of 6 shillings.

Plot 10- B:  comprised of four acres and twenty five perches of land that was divided between Thomas Comer and Michael Walsh.  Thomas’s portion had an annual valuation of 8 shillings and Michael’s portion had an annual valuation of 2 shillings. Michael Walsh’s total annual valuation on property 10 (b) & 10-B was £1 and 2 shillings.

Plot 11 A was leased by John Joyce and was divided into 11A and 11-B.  He had a house and office on plot 12 (ab)

11 A: comprised of four acres, one rood and seventeen perches and had an annual rateable valuation of £2.

Plot 11-B: comprised of three acres and twenty perches and this had an annual valuation of 8 shillings.

Plot 12 (a b):   John Joyce had a house and office on this plot that had an annual valuation of 6 shillings.  John’s total annual valuation of rateable property was £2 and 14 shillings.

Plot 12 Patrick Malia (sic) held this plot that had two divisions, 12A and 12B

(a):  Patrick Malia leased a house and land.  The land amount was six acres, three roods and twenty six perches.  The annual valuation for the land was £1 and 15 shillings and the house had an annual valuation of 6 shillings.

12- B:  Patrick Malia had another five acres, one rood and nineteen perches of land with an annual valuation of 15 shillings.    His total annual rent on both properties was £3.

Plot 13 had two divisions A and B.

13 A:  Patrick Malia (Andrew) had a house, office and land.  The portion of land measured three roods and thirteen perches and was valued at 6 shillings; the house had an annual valuation of 6 shillings.

13 -B:  Patrick Malia (Andrew) had another portion of land that comprised of two acres, three roods and twenty perches that had an annual valuation of 10 shillings. His total annual rent for both properties was £1 and 2 shillings.

Plot 14:  contained five acres, two roods and thirty seven perches that was divided between Pat Malia (Andrew) and Patrick Malia (John).  Each portion of land had an annual valuation of 5 shillings.

Plot 15:  Thomas Forde had a house, office and land.  The land area was nine acres, three roods and thirty eight perches that had an annual valuation of £2 and 3 shillings and the buildings had an annual valuation of 12 shillings. Thomas’s total annual valuation of rateable property was £2 and15 shillings.

Plot 16:  comprised of twelve acres, two roods and twenty nine perches which was divided in two lots (a) and (b)

16 (a):  John Mulroe (sic) had a house, office and land. The land had an annual valuation of £1 and the buildings were valued at 8 shillings. John’s total valuation of rateable property was £1 and 8 shillings.

16 (b):  Patrick Mulroe had a house and land.  The land had an annual valuation of £1 and the house was valued at 8 shillings.  His total annual valuation of rateable property was £1and 8 shillings.

Plot 17A:  There was one rood of land and that was divided between William Comer and Francis Comer and each paid an annual sum of 2 shillings for their portion of land.

Plot 17- B:  comprised of twelve acres, one rood and twenty two perches and was held in two lots (a) and (b)

(a):  William Comer had a house and land.  He paid an annual sum of £1 and 5 shillings for his piece of land and he paid an annual sum of 8 shillings for the house.  His total annual valuation of rateable property was £1 and 13 shillings.

(b):  Francis Comer had a house and land.  He also paid an annual sum of £1 and 5 shillings for his piece of land and he paid and an annual sum of 8 shillings for the house.  His total annual valuation for house and land was also £1 and 13 shillings.

Plot 18A:   comprised of three acres, three roods and thirty five perches and was held in two lots (a) and (b)

(a):  Martin Walsh had a house and land.  He paid £1 for his portion of land and 8 shillings for the house.

(b):  Andrew Malia had a house and land.  He also paid £1 for his portion of land and 8 shillings for the house.

Plot 18-B:  measured nine acres, three roods and thirty five perches and was divided between Martin Walsh and Andrew Malia.  Each paid an annual sum of 17 shillings for their portion of land.

Plot 19:  was comprised of three acres, three roods and eighteen perches of land and was held between Patrick Kenny and Peter Kenny.  Each paid 2 shillings annually for his portion of land.

Plot 20: contained eighty seven acres, two roods and twenty six perches of mountainous land that was subdivided between the following twenty two tenants; each paid an annual sum according to their portion size:

Patrick Malia (Andrew) and Thomas Ford paid an annual sum of 3 shillings,

Patrick Madigan, Patrick Flanagan, Patrick Canavy (sic), Thomas Flanagan, Edmund Joyce, Thomas Comer, John Joyce, Patrick Malia, Francis Comer, William Comer and Patrick Kenny paid an annual sum of 2 shillings,

Catherine Canavy (sic), Stephen Walsh, Michael Walsh, Andrew Malia, Patrick Malia (John), John Mulroe (sic), Patrick Mulroe, Martin Walsh and Peter Kenny paid an annual sum of 1 shilling.

Plot 21:  measured four acres and twenty perches.  Rev. Edward O’Grady paid an annual sum of £3 and 5 shillings to Charles J. Lynch for the lease of the land.

Plot 22 A & B:  Charles J. Lynch had three acres, one rood and ten perches of land, and  five acres, three roods and fourteen perches that was under water.  He paid the Earls of Leitrim and Charlemont an annual rent of £2 for the land.  (There was no charge for the area under water that was presumably a small lake).

 

1901 Census: 

Constable Hugh Daly collected the census for Cahergal on 8th April 1901. Nineteen houses were inhabited at this; one had a slate roof; the remainder had perishable roofs that were most likely made of thatch.  Three houses were 2nd class, fifteen were 3rd class and one was 4th class. One woman was born in Co. Mayo; the others were born in Co. Galway and all were Roman Catholic.  On Form B 2 – Returns of Out Offices and Farm Steadings only fifteen properties were recorded.  Farming was the main occupation though a few were employed in general domestic service. The vast majority spoke Irish; many were bilingual and could read and write. There were nine widows and one widower in this small community.

No 1:  William Madigan (46) a farmer was married to Honor (sic) (40).  Their son Patrick (23) was a farmer’s son.  Their granddaughter Kate Munroe (sic) was (4) years old.  The family were bilingual but could not read.  The house was 3rd class and had one window to the front and the family of four occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

No 2:  Mary Burke (60) was a widow and farming was the family occupation.  Her son John (19) was a farmer’s son.  Martin (16) had no occupation listed.  Mary (14), Bridget (10), Peter (8) and Kate (6) were scholars and Nora was (2) years old.  Mary’s mother – in – law Margaret Burke was the great age of (100) years and she too was a widow. Mary and Margaret could not read while Peter and the school going children could read and write.  Mary and her children were bilingual and Margaret spoke Irish only.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of nine occupied two rooms.  They had a barn on the property.

No 3:  Mary Kinneavy (sic) (70) a farmer was a widow.  Her son Thomas (45) a farmer’s son was married to Catherine (40) who was a housekeeper.  They had eight children at this time.  Their son Stephen (16) was a general assistant domestic servant.  Mary (14), Catherine (12), Martin (10), and Mark (8) were scholars.  Julia was (6), Maria (4) and the infant John was 1 year old.  Mary, her son and his wife could not read and Mary spoke Irish only.  Thomas, his wife and older children were bilingual. Julia who was six years old spoke English only and this may suggest that English was the language used by her parents and siblings in the home.  The house was 3rd class and had one window to the front.  Eleven members of the family occupied two rooms.  They had a piggery and a barn on the property.

No 4:  William Walsh (60) was married to Catherine (50) and they were farmers.  He spoke only Irish while his wife and daughter were bilingual.  Their daughter Catherine (18) was an assistant domestic servant and she could read and write. The house was 3rd class and had two windows in front.  The family of three shared two rooms.  They had a cow house on the holding.

No 5:  Catherine Walsh (60) a farmer was head of the household and she was a widow.  Her daughter Bridget (31) was a general domestic servant.  Her other daughter Mary Moran (30) and Mary’s husband Patrick Moran (32) and their children; Bridget (4), Michael (2) and (9) month old baby Thomas were also in the house.  Mary and Patrick were general farm and domestic servants.  Catherine and her son – in – law could not read while her daughters could read and write.  The family were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of seven occupied two rooms. They had a cow house and a barn on the premises.

No 6:  William Flanagan (40) a farmer was a single man.  He spoke Irish and English but could not read.  The house was 4th class and William had one room.  There were no outbuildings on the property.

No 7:  Bridget Melia (sic) (40) was a married woman.  She had three sons; John (20) was a farmer’s son, Andrew (14) a farm servant and Peter (11) was a scholar.  Mary and her son John could not read while Andrew and Peter could read and write and all were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class and it had two windows in front.  Four family members occupied two rooms.  They had a barn on the holding.

No 8:  Thomas Joyce (60) and his wife Bridget (50) farmed for a living.  Their daughter Catherine (15) was a general domestic servant.  Stephen Kinneavy (sic), a visitor, did not have his age or occupation listed.  Thomas, his wife and Stephen could not read; Catherine could read and write and all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of three occupied two rooms.  They had a piggery and a barn on the property.

No 9:  James Comer (55), a farmer, was married to Mary (52).  Their daughter Kate (17) did not have an occupation documented.  James and Mary could not read; Kate could read and write and all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class and had two windows to the front.  Three family members shared three rooms.  They had a barn on the holding.

No 10:  Patrick Walsh (47) and his wife Mary (46) were farmers.  Their son Martin (19) was a farm servant, Patrick (18) had no occupation listed and their daughter Bridget (13) was a scholar and the only member of the household that could read and write. Mary and her eldest son Martin spoke Irish while Patrick senior and his youngest son and his daughter were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class and had one window to the front and the family of five occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house on the property.

No 11:  Bridget Mulroe (sic) (50) a farmer was a widow and she was born in Co. Mayo.  Her children; John (23), Mary (21), Pat (20), Thomas (18) and Mark (16) were farm servants.  Annie (13) and Ellen (12) were scholars.  Bridget and her family could read and write.  Bridget filled and signed her census form.  The family spoke English and Irish.  (She put English first which may indicate it was the spoken language of the home).  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and the family of eight occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 12:  Margaret Comer (60), a widow, was a farmer.  She could not read and she spoke Irish only.  The house was 3rd class; it had two windows in front and Margaret had the use of two rooms.  There were no out buildings on the premises.

No 13:  Honor (sic) Comer (30) was a widow and farming was her occupation.  She had three children; Patrick (10), Thomas (7) and Anne (4) years old.  Thomas was a scholar and he could read and write. Patrick was not documented as a scholar and like his mother he could not read.  All the family were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the mother and her children shared two rooms.  They had no outbuildings on the property.

No 14:  Catherine Duffy was (52) and her daughter Catherine (21) and neither had an occupation recorded.  Catherine could read only; her daughter could read and write and both spoke Irish and English. The house was 3rd class; it had two windows in front and Catherine and her daughter shared two rooms.  They had a piggery on the holding.

No 15:  Michael Ford (53) a farmer was a single man.  His sister Agnes (45) was a general domestic servant and she too was single.  Michael and Agnes could read and write and they were bilingual. Michael filled and signed their census form.  The house was 2nd class with a slate roof and it had three windows in front.  They had a cow house and a barn on the property.

No 16:  Patrick Delaney (62) was a Royal Irish Constabulary (R.I.C.) pensioner who was born in Co. Tipperary.  His wife Mary (54) was born in Co. Kilkenny and they were Roman Catholic. They had two sons; Martin (24), a post boy, and Andrew (17) had no occupation listed.  Patrick and his family could read and write and his sons were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class and had two windows in front and the parents and their sons occupied two rooms.  Mary O’Brien was the name of the landholder where the house was situated.

No 17:  Bridget Melia (50) was a widow and farming was her occupation.  She had three children; Honor (16), Patrick (15) and John (10).  Honor did not have an occupation documented; Patrick was a farm servant and John a scholar.  Bridget could not read; her children could read and write and all spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class and had two windows in front.  The family of four shared two rooms.

No 18:  Bridget Melia (50) a farmer was a widow and she could not read. Her daughter Kate (22) had no occupation listed.  Kate could read and write and mother and daughter were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front.  The mother and her daughter occupied two rooms.

No 19:  James Gibbons (63) was a widower and he had no occupation recorded.  James was bilingual but he could not read.  The house was 3rd class and James had the use of two rooms.

 

Census 1911:   

The Census was collected by Constable Thomas Walsh on April 11th 1911.    There were eighteen houses in the village at this time and seventeen of these had perishable roofs that were most likely thatch.  Seventy three people resided in Cahergal; thirty three males and forty females; all Roman Catholic.  There was one widower and nine widows; eight of the widows were head of their household.  Although the 1911 Census was expanded to include ‘Particulars as to Marriage’ the completed years the marriage lasted, total children born alive and the number still living. The details for the nine widows and one widower of this townland were omitted.  Farming was the predominant way of life and sixteen out of eighteen holdings had a piggery.  General domestic and agricultural labour accounted for other means of livelihood.

No 1:  Patrick Walsh (71) and his wife Mary (69) were farmers .The couple were married for forty years and had four children; two were still living.  Their son Patrick (24) was a farmer’s son and he was single.  Patrick and Mary could not read while their son could read and write. The family were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class and it had three windows in front and three people shared three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 2:  Mary Burke (71) was a widow and farming was her livelihood.  Her daughters Bridget (25) and Mary (24) were general domestic servants.  Her daughter Annie (18) was a scholar.  All the girls could read and write while their mother could not read; the family spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and mother and daughters shared two rooms.  They had a piggery on the holding.

No 3:  Bridget Mulroe (sic) (68) was a widow and farming was her occupation.  Her son Thomas (27) was a farmer’s son and he was single.  Her daughter Ellen (22) was single and did not have an occupation listed.  Bridget and her children could read and write and Bridget completed her census form. The family were bilingual.  The house was 2nd class with three windows in front and three family members occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house and a barn on the property.

No 4:  Honor Comber (sic) (50) was a widow and farming was her way of life.  Her son Thomas (18) was a farmer’s son and her daughter Annie (15) a scholar.  Honor could not read; her children could read and write and all spoke Irish and English. The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and three people occupied three rooms. They had a piggery on the property.

No 5:  Catherine Duffy (74) a widow was a farmer and a wool spinner.  Her daughter Catherine (30) a single girl was a general domestic servant and she could read.  Catherine senior could not read; both were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and mother and daughter shared two rooms.  They had a piggery on the premises.

No 6:  Michael Forde (76) a farmer was a single man.  (A Michael Forde was listed as (53) in the 1901 census)  His niece Maggie Jennings (20) was in the house but did not have an occupation listed for her.  Michael and his niece could read and write and they spoke Irish and English.  Michael completed his census form.  The house was 2nd class and had a slate roof and two windows to the front.  They had a cow house, a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 7:  Mary Delaney (70) a widow was a farmer.  Her son Martin (37) was an agricultural servant and he was single.   Both could read and write and were bilingual.  Mary filled and signed her census form.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front.  Mother and son occupied two rooms.  They had a piggery on property.

No 8:  Bridget Melia (sic) (73) a widow farmed for a living.  Her daughter Katie (26) was a farmer’s daughter and she could read and write, Bridget could not read; both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and mother and daughter occupied two rooms.  They had a piggery on the holding.

No 9:  Andrew Melia (69) a farmer was a married man.  Andrew could not read.  His son Peter (22) a farmer’s son, could read and both were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class and had two windows to the front and father and son occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the holding.

No 10:  Bridget Joyce (69) a widow was a farmer.  Bridget spoke only Irish and she could not read.  Her daughter Catherine (25) was married for five years and she had four children.  Catherine’s husband Andrew Delaney (29) was an agricultural labourer.  Their children were; Mary (4), Martin (2), Bridget (1) and baby Thomas (1) month old.  Bridget’s grandson Stephen Kinneavy (sic) (16) a scholar was also in the house.  Catherine, her husband and Stephen could read and write and were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of eight occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the property.

No 11:  James Comber (sic) (72) a farmer was a widower and he could not read. His daughter Catherine (28) was single and she had no occupation listed for her. She could read and write; and both spoke Irish and English.  The house was 3rd class and it had two windows in front.  Father and daughter occupied two rooms.  They had a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 12:  William Flanagan (70) was an agricultural labourer and he was single.  James could not read but was bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window in front and William had one room.  There were no outbuildings on the premises.

No 13:  Patrick Moran (48) was married to Mary (45) for sixteen years and they were farmers.  They had five children; Bridget (15), Michael (12) and Thomas (10) were scholars.  John was (7) and Patrick (3) years old.  Patrick’s sister – in – law Bridget Walsh (56) was also in the house.  She was a general domestic servant and she could read and write.  Mary Moran and her school going children could all read and write while her husband could not read.  Theirs was a bilingual household.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and eight family members occupied three rooms.  They had a piggery and a barn on the property.

No 14:  John Canny (49) and his wife Catherine (35) were farmers and they were married for nine years.  The couple had seven children; five were still living.  Nora was (5) Patrick (3), twin daughters Kate and Bridget were (2) years, and baby son Stephen (6) months old.  John could not read while his wife could read and write.  The parents and five year old Nora were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows in front and the family of seven occupied two rooms. They had a piggery and a barn on the holding.

No 15:  Thomas Kinneavy (sic) (60) and Catherine (50) were married for twenty nine years and they were farmers.  They had eleven children; ten were still living and seven of these were recorded on this census.  Martin (21) was a forester and Mark (18) was an agricultural labourer.  Julia (15) had no occupation listed, Maria (14), John (12), and Bridget (9) were scholars and Maggie was 5 years old.  Thomas and his wife could not read while their children could read and write, all the family spoke Irish and English.  The house was 2nd class with three windows to the front and the family of nine occupied three rooms.  They had a stable and a piggery on the property.

No 16:  Mary Burke (62) was a widow and farming was her occupation.  Her sons, Martin (26) and Peter (18) were farmer’s sons.  Her daughter Bridget (19) was a dress maker, Katie (16) and Norah (13) were scholars.  Bridget Higgings (sic) (79), a widow born in Co. Mayo, was listed as a lodger and a visitor. She was a general domestic servant and she could not read or write.  Mary and her children could read and write; all in this household were bilingual. The house was 2nd class and had three windows in front and seven people occupied three rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the premises.

No 17:  Patrick Madigan (38) a farmer was married to Margaret (36) for six years and they had three children; Patrick (5), Margaret (4) and Martin (1) year old.  Patrick could not read while his wife could read and write; the parents and five year old Patrick were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with two windows to the front and the family of five occupied two rooms.  They had a cow house and a piggery on the premises.

No 18:  James Gibbons (75), an agricultural labourer, was married to Mary (55), who was born in Co. Mayo, for ten years.  Their one son James (8) was a scholar and he could read and write.  The parents could not read; the family were bilingual.  The house was 3rd class with one window to the front.  The parents and son occupied two rooms.  They had a piggery on the holding.  Patrick Madigan was the name of the landholder where the house was built.

This page was added on 25/07/2020.

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